19:28
TED2015

Anand Giridharadas: A tale of two Americas. And the mini-mart where they collided

アナンド・ギリダラダス: 2つのアメリカの物語と、衝突の現場になったコンビニ

Filmed:

同時多発テロの10日後にテキサスのコンビニで起きた衝撃的な襲撃事件は、被害者と加害者である2人の男の人生を狂わせました。『The True American』の著者アナンド・ギリダラダスが、この驚くべき話を通してその後の展開を語ります。これはアメリカで生きる上でたどり得る、2つの道に関する寓話です。そして2つの道が和解して1つになることを強く求めています。

- Writer
Anand Giridharadas writes about people and cultures caught amid the great forces of our time. Full bio

"Where are you from?"
said the pale, tattooed man.
「どこの国の出身だ?」と
刺青を入れた青白い男が聞きました
00:12
"Where are you from?"
「どこの国の出身だ?」
00:19
It's September 21, 2001,
2001年9月21日
00:24
10 days after the worst attack
on America since World War II.
第二次大戦以来 最悪の
アメリカ本土への攻撃から10日後
00:28
Everyone wonders about the next plane.
誰もが 次の飛行機を
心配しています
00:34
People are looking for scapegoats.
人々は罪を着せる相手を探しています
00:38
The president,
the night before, pledges to
その前夜 大統領は
固い誓いを述べました
00:42
"bring our enemies to justice
or bring justice to our enemies."
「我々は 敵を裁きの場に立たせるか
敵に正義の報いをもたらす」
00:46
And in the Dallas mini-mart,
一方 ダラスでは
タイヤ店とストリップ劇場に囲まれた
00:52
a Dallas mini-part surrounded
by tire shops and strip joints
小さな地区のコンビニエンスストアで
00:58
a Bangladeshi immigrant
works the register.
1人のバングラデシュ移民が
レジを打っています
01:04
Back home, Raisuddin Bhuiyan
was a big man, an Air Force officer.
レイスデン・ブーヤンは 祖国では
空軍将校という地位にありましたが
01:08
But he dreamed of a
fresh start in America.
アメリカでの新生活を夢見ていました
01:15
If he had to work briefly in a mini-mart
to save up for I.T. classes
ITの授業と 2か月後に控える
結婚の資金を稼ぐには
01:18
and his wedding in two months, so be it.
コンビニでのバイトも仕方ありません
01:24
Then, on September 21,
that tattooed man enters the mart.
そして 9月21日
店に刺青の男が入ってきます
01:27
He holds a shotgun.
男はショットガンを抱えています
01:32
Raisuddin knows the drill:
レイスデンは対処法を知っています
01:36
puts cash on the counter.
お金をカウンターに置くのです
01:38
This time, the man doesn't
touch the money.
ところが この時
男はお金に触ろうともしません
01:42
"Where are you from?" he asks.
「どこの国の出身だ?」と尋ねます
01:46
"Excuse me?" Raisuddin answers.
「なんですか?」と
レイスデンが応じます
01:50
His accent betrays him.
訛りで出身が分かります
01:56
The tattooed man, a self-styled
true American vigilante,
アメリカの真の正義を自称する
刺青の男は
02:00
shoots Raisuddin in revenge for 9/11.
同時多発テロの報復として
レイスデンを撃ちました
02:05
Raisuddin feels millions of bees
stinging his face.
レイスデンは 顔面を数百万匹の蜂に
刺されたような痛みを感じます
02:10
In fact, dozens of scalding,
birdshot pellets puncture his head.
でも実際には 大量の熱い
散弾銃のペレットが頭に穴を開けます
02:15
Behind the counter, he lays in blood.
彼はカウンターの後ろに
血まみれで倒れ
02:22
He cups a hand over his forehead
to keep in the brains
脳が出ないように額を手で押さえます
02:25
on which he'd gambled everything.
自分の頭に すべてを賭けてきたからです
02:30
He recites verses from the Koran,
begging his God to live.
コーランを唱え
神に生きたいと願いました
02:34
He senses he is dying.
自分が死んでいくのを感じましたが
02:40
He didn't die.
彼は死にませんでした
02:45
His right eye left him.
右目を失い
02:47
His fiancée left him.
婚約者も失いました
02:51
His landlord, the mini-mart owner,
kicked him out.
家主であるコンビニのオーナーも
彼を追い出しました
02:54
Soon he was homeless and
60,000 dollars in medical debt,
すぐに彼はホームレスとなり
救急車への電話代も含めて
02:58
including a fee for dialing
for an ambulance.
6万ドルの治療費が借金として残りました
03:04
But Raisuddin lived.
それでも レイスデンは生きていました
03:09
And years later, he would ask
what he could do to repay his God
数年経ち 彼は自問していました
神の恩に報いるため そして
03:12
and become worthy of this second chance.
新たな人生に値する人間になるために
何ができるか・・・
03:18
He would come to believe, in fact,
実際 彼はこう信じるようになりました
03:21
that this chance called for him
to give a second chance
「これは 誰もがチャンスに
値しないと思う人間に訪れた ―
03:23
to a man we might think
deserved no chance at all.
第2のチャンスなんだ」と
03:29
Twelve years ago, I was a fresh graduate
seeking my way in the world.
12年前 大学を出たての私は
社会で進むべき道を模索していました
03:35
Born in Ohio to Indian immigrants,
オハイオ生まれで
インド系移民の子の私は
03:41
I settled on the ultimate rebellion
against my parents,
両親に対する
極めつけの反抗をすることに決めました
03:44
moving to the country they had worked
so damn hard to get out of.
彼らが苦労して飛び出した
インドに移住することにしたのです
03:47
What I thought might be a six-month stint
in Mumbai stretched to six years.
私はムンバイで半年過ごそうと
思っていましたが 6年になりました
03:52
I became a writer and found myself
amid a magical story:
私は作家になり 自分が魅力的な物語の
まっただ中にいることに気づきました
03:58
the awakening of hope across much
of the so-called Third World.
いわゆる「第三世界」の至る所で
希望が芽生えつつあったのです
04:02
Six years ago, I returned to America
and realized something:
6年前 アメリカに戻って
あることに気づきました
04:07
The American Dream was thriving,
アメリカン・ドリームは健在でしたが
04:12
but only in India.
それはインドだけの話でした
04:15
In America, not so much.
アメリカでは それほどではありませんでした
04:18
In fact, I observed that
America was fracturing
実際にはアメリカは2つの別々の社会
04:22
into two distinct societies:
すなわち ―
04:26
a republic of dreams
and a republic of fears.
夢の社会と恐怖の社会とに
断絶していると感じました
04:28
And then, I stumbled onto this
incredible tale of two lives
その後 驚くべき2人の人生の物語 ―
04:32
and of these two Americas that brutally
collided in that Dallas mini-mart.
ダラスのコンビニで激しくぶつかった
2つのアメリカの物語を 偶然知りました
04:36
I knew at once I wanted to learn more,
すぐに私はもっと詳しく知りたいと思い
04:43
and eventually that I would write
a book about them,
最終的には彼らの本を
書くことになりました
04:46
for their story was the story
of America's fracturing
彼らの話は
断絶したアメリカの物語であり
04:48
and of how it might be put back together.
それをどうやって
修復するかという物語でした
04:52
After he was shot, Raisuddin's life
grew no easier.
撃たれた後も レイスデンの人生は
決して楽にはなりませんでした
04:58
The day after admitting him,
the hospital discharged him.
入院した翌日
病院から退院させられました
05:02
His right eye couldn't see.
右目は視力を失い
05:06
He couldn't speak.
話すこともできません
05:08
Metal peppered his face.
顔中に金属片が刺さっていました
05:10
But he had no insurance,
so they bounced him.
でも健康保険に入っていなかったので
病院から追い出されたのです
05:13
His family in Bangladesh
begged him, "Come home."
バングラディッシュの家族は
「帰っておいで」と言いましたが
05:17
But he told them he had
a dream to see about.
彼は こう応えました
「思うところがある」
05:23
He found telemarketing work,
彼はテレマーケティングの仕事を見つけ
05:27
then he became an Olive Garden waiter,
後に オリーブ・ガーデンの
ウエーターになりました
05:29
because where better to get over his fear
of white people than the Olive Garden?
イタリア料理店ほど 白人恐怖を
克服しやすい場所があるでしょうか?
05:32
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:37
Now, as a devout Muslim,
he refused alcohol,
敬虔なイスラム教徒として
アルコールを飲まず
05:40
didn't touch the stuff.
触れることすらありませんでした
05:44
Then he learned that not selling it
would slash his pay.
ただ アルコールを売らないと
給料に響くことも知りました
05:47
So he reasoned, like a budding
American pragmatist,
彼はアメリカ的現実主義者の卵らしく
論理的に考えました
05:52
"Well, God wouldn't want me
to starve, would he?"
「神だって私を飢えさせようとは
お思いにならないはずだ」
05:56
And before long, in some months,
Raisuddin was that Olive Garden's
数か月間で
レイスデンはオリーブ・ガーデンの
06:00
highest grossing alcohol pusher.
アルコール販売で一番の売り上げを
誇るようになりました
06:03
He found a man who taught him
database administration.
彼は自分にデータペース管理を
教えた男性を見つけ
06:07
He got part-time I.T. gigs.
パートタイムのITの仕事を得ました
06:11
Eventually, he landed a six-figure job
at a blue chip tech company in Dallas.
最終的にダラスの一流IT企業に落ち着き
年収数十万ドルの職を得たのです
06:13
But as America began
to work for Raisuddin,
アメリカがレイスデンに
味方するようになってからも
06:20
he avoided the classic
error of the fortunate:
彼はツイている人間にありがちな
思い込み すなわち ―
06:24
assuming you're the rule,
not the exception.
「これが当たり前で 特別ではない」などと
思わないようにしました
06:28
In fact, he observed that many with
the fortune of being born American
そして彼はこう考えました
幸運にもアメリカに生まれたのに
06:32
were nonetheless trapped in lives that
made second chances like his impossible.
自分が得たような第2のチャンスを
手に入れられない人がたくさんいると
06:38
He saw it at the Olive Garden itself,
彼はオリーブ・ガーデンで
それを目の当たりにしました
06:45
where so many of his colleagues had
childhood horror stories
彼の同僚の多くは
子どもの頃 恐ろしい体験をしていました
06:48
of family dysfunction, chaos,
addiction, crime.
家庭崩壊や無秩序
薬物中毒や犯罪などです
06:52
He'd heard a similar tale about
the man who shot him
裁判の時 自分を撃った男にも
同じような経験があったと
06:56
back when he attended his trial.
聞いていました
07:01
The closer Raisuddin got to the America
he had coveted from afar,
高嶺の花だったアメリカに
手が届くようになるにつれて
07:04
the more he realized there was
another, equally real, America
レイスデンは
第2のチャンスなど ほとんどない ―
07:09
that was stingier with second chances.
もう一つのアメリカの現実も
次第に理解するようになりました
07:13
The man who shot Raisuddin grew up
in that stingier America.
レイスデンを撃った男は
アメリカの貧しい地域で育ちました
07:19
From a distance, Mark Stroman
was always the spark of parties,
遠目にはマーク・ストロマンは
いつもパーティでは目立ち
07:25
always making girls feel pretty.
女の子をおだてるのが
上手に見えました
07:30
Always working, no matter what
drugs or fights he'd had the night before.
前の晩に どんなにドラッグや
喧嘩をしても 必ず出勤しました
07:34
But he'd always wrestled with demons.
でも 彼はいつも悪魔と戦っていたのです
07:39
He entered the world through
the three gateways
彼もまた アメリカの若者たちの
希望を打ち砕く
07:43
that doom so many young American men:
3つの関門を経て社会に出ました
07:45
bad parents, bad schools, bad prisons.
悪い両親 悪い学校 悪い刑務所です
07:48
His mother told him, regretfully, as a boy
彼が子どもの頃
母親は悔しそうに言いました
07:53
that she'd been just 50 dollars
short of aborting him.
「お前を中絶するのに
50ドル足りなかった」
07:56
Sometimes, that little boy
would be at school,
彼は時々学校に行っては
08:02
he'd suddenly pull a knife
on his fellow classmates.
同級生に いきなりナイフを
突きつけました
08:08
Sometimes that same little boy
would be at his grandparents',
その彼が 時々祖父母の所へ行き
08:12
tenderly feeding horses.
馬に優しくエサをやっていました
08:16
He was getting arrested before he shaved,
髭が生える前に逮捕され
08:18
first juvenile, then prison.
少年院や刑務所に送られました
08:21
He became a casual white supremacist
彼は にわか白人至上主義者で
08:23
and, like so many around him,
a drug-addled and absent father.
近所の多くの子どもと同様
父親は麻薬漬けで 不在がちでした
08:26
And then, before long,
he found himself on death row,
やがて 彼は死刑囚監房に入れられました
08:32
for in his 2001 counter-jihad,
he had shot not one mini-mart clerk,
2011年に起こした「反ジハード」で
彼が撃った店員は1人ではなく
08:37
but three.
3人だったからです
08:43
Only Raisuddin survived.
生き延びたのはレイスデンだけでした
08:45
Strangely, death row was
the first institution
不思議なことに
初めてストロマンが更生した施設が
08:48
that left Stroman better.
死刑囚監房でした
08:53
His old influences quit him.
昔の悪影響は消え去りました
08:57
The people entering his life
were virtuous and caring:
彼の人生に関わった人々には
人徳と思いやりがありました
08:59
pastors, journalists, European pen-pals.
牧師やジャーナリスト
ヨーロッパのペンパルなどです
09:03
They listened to him, prayed with him,
helped him question himself.
彼らは話を聞いてくれ 一緒に祈り
彼が自問自答するのを手伝ってくれました
09:07
And sent him on a journey
of introspection and betterment.
彼は内省を通して向上し
09:14
He finally faced the hatred
that had defined his life.
ついに自分の人生を決定づけた
憎悪と向き合ったのです
09:19
He read Viktor Frankl,
the Holocaust survivor
ホロコーストの生存者
ヴィクトール・フランクルの本を読み
09:24
and regretted his swastika tattoos.
自分のかぎ十字の刺青を悔やみました
09:27
He found God.
彼は神を見出したのです
09:30
Then one day in 2011,
10 years after his crimes,
犯罪を起こしてから10年目の
2011年のある日
09:32
Stroman received news.
あるニュースがストロマンの耳に入りました
09:37
One of the men he'd shot, the survivor,
was fighting to save his life.
銃撃の唯一の生存者が
自分の命を救うために戦っているというのです
09:39
You see, late in 2009,
eight years after that shooting,
銃撃事件から8年後
2009年の後半に
09:47
Raisuddin had gone on his own journey,
a pilgrimage to Mecca.
レイスデンはメッカ巡礼に行きました
09:53
Amid its crowds,
he felt immense gratitude,
群衆の中で
彼は湧き起る感謝とともに
09:59
but also duty.
義務も感じたのです
10:03
He recalled promising God,
as he lay dying in 2001,
2001年 死に瀕していたあの時
もし助かったら
10:05
that if he lived, he would serve
humanity all his days.
生涯をかけて人類に尽くすと
神に約束したことを思い出したのです
10:09
Then, he'd gotten busy
relaying the bricks of a life.
その後は自分の人生を
再び築くので精一杯でした
10:14
Now it was time to pay his debts.
やっと恩に報いる時が来たのです
10:19
And he decided, upon reflection,
that his method of payment
彼はよくよく考えた上で
報恩の方法として
10:23
would be an intervention
in the cycle of vengeance
イスラム世界と西洋世界の間の
報復の連鎖を断つ
10:27
between the Muslim and Western worlds.
手助けをする決意をしました
10:31
And how would he intervene?
どうやって手助けするか?
10:33
By forgiving Stroman publicly
in the name of Islam
イスラムと慈悲の教義の名の下に
10:36
and its doctrine of mercy.
公にストロマンを許すことにしたのです
10:40
And then suing the state of Texas
and its governor Rick Perry
そして死刑執行の中止を求めて
テキサス州とリック・ペリー州知事を
10:42
to prevent them from executing Stroman,
相手取って訴訟を起こしました
10:49
exactly like most people
shot in the face do.
まさに顔を撃たれた人間がすることです
10:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:56
Yet Raisuddin's mercy was inspired
not only by faith.
ただレイスデンの慈悲は信仰だけで
生じたものではありませんでした
10:58
A newly minted American citizen,
he had come to believe that Stroman
新たなアメリカ市民である彼が
確信するようになったのは
11:05
was the product of a hurting America that
couldn't just be lethally injected away.
ストロマンは「傷ついたアメリカ」の落とし子で
薬殺すれば済む問題ではないということです
11:11
That insight is what moved me
to write my book "The True American."
私はその考え方に感動し
『The True American』という本を書きました
11:18
This immigrant begging America
to be as merciful to a native son
全米に向けてレイスデンは訴えました
自分は 言わばアメリカの養子だが
11:23
as it had been to an adopted one.
自分が受けた慈悲を アメリカ生まれの
ストロマンにも与えて欲しいと
11:27
In the mini-mart, all those years earlier,
あの時 コンビニで
11:32
not just two men,
but two Americas collided.
2人の男ではなく
2つのアメリカが衝突したのです
11:35
An America that still dreams,
still strives,
一方は今でも夢を持って努力し
11:40
still imagines that tomorrow
can build on today,
明日は今日の上に築かれると信じています
11:42
and an America that has resigned to fate,
もう一方は 運命のなすがままに
11:47
buckled under stress and chaos,
lowered expectations,
ストレスと混乱と絶望に屈し
11:50
an ducked into the oldest of refuges:
昔からある逃げ場 すなわち
11:53
the tribal fellowship of one's
own narrow kind.
偏狭な同胞意識に逃げ込んだのです
11:56
And it was Raisuddin, despite
being a newcomer,
そしてレイスデンこそが
移民にもかかわらず
12:00
despite being attacked,
襲撃されたにもかかわらず
12:02
despite being homeless and traumatized,
ホームレスになり
トラウマを抱えたにもかかわらず
12:04
who belonged to that republic of dreams
夢の社会の住民だったのです
12:07
and Stroman who belonged to that
other wounded country,
一方 ストロマンはアメリカ生まれの
白人という特権を持ちながら
12:10
despite being born with the privilege
of a native white man.
対極にある
傷ついた社会の住民でした
12:15
I realized these men's stories formed
an urgent parable about America.
私はこの2人の男の物語は
アメリカの寓話だと気付きました
12:20
The country I am so proud to call my own
私が誇りをもって
「祖国」と呼ぶこの国は
12:26
wasn't living through a
generalized decline
すべてにおいて
衰退しているわけではありません
12:30
as seen in Spain or Greece,
where prospects were dimming for everyone.
スペインやギリシャのように
全員の将来が暗いわけではありません
12:34
America is simultaneously the most
and the least successful country
アメリカは先進国の中で
最も成功した国であると同時に
12:41
in the industrialized world.
最も失敗した国でもあります
12:46
Launching the world's best companies,
世界最高の会社を次々と起業する一方で
12:49
even as record numbers
of children go hungry.
飢えている子どもは
記録的な数にのぼります
12:51
Seeing life-expectancy drop
for large groups,
大多数の平均余命が短くなる一方で
12:54
even as it polishes
the world's best hospitals.
世界でも最高の病院を築いています
12:59
America today is a sprightly young body,
現代のアメリカは まるで
元気で若々しい肉体が
13:02
hit by one of those strokes
that sucks the life from one side,
脳卒中に襲われたような状態です
半身からは 生気が奪われ
13:07
while leaving the other
worryingly perfect.
残りの半身だけが
心配になるほど健康なのです
13:12
On July 20, 2011, right after
a sobbing Raisuddin
2011年7月20日
涙ながらにレイスデンが
13:17
testified in defense of Stroman's life,
ストロマンの死刑中止を
求めて証言した直後に
13:24
Stroman was killed by lethal injection
by the state he so loved.
ストロマンは 自分が愛した祖国の手で
薬殺刑に処せられました
13:26
Hours earlier, when Raisuddin still
thought he could still save Stroman,
その数時間前 まだレイスデンが
ストロマンを救えると思っていた時
13:32
the two men got to speak
for the second time ever.
2人の男は 事件以来
2度目の言葉を交わしました
13:37
Here is an excerpt from their phone call.
これは電話の抜粋です
13:40
Raisuddin: "Mark, you should know
that I am praying for God,
レイスデン「マーク 私が
最も哀れみ深く 慈悲深い神に
13:43
the most compassionate and gracious.
祈っていることを知ってほしい
13:49
I forgive you and I do not hate you.
私はあなたを許すし 憎んでもいない
13:52
I never hated you."
憎んだことなどなかった」
13:54
Stroman: "You are a remarkable person.
ストロマン「あなたは素晴らしい人だ
13:57
Thank you from my heart.
心から感謝するよ
14:02
I love you, bro."
ありがとう 兄弟」
14:04
Even more amazingly, after the execution,
さらに驚くべきことに 処刑後
14:07
Raisuddin reached out to Stroman's
eldest daughter, Amber,
レイスデンはストロマンの長女
アンバーに手を差し伸べたのです
14:11
an ex-convinct and an addict.
前科があり薬物依存の彼女に
14:15
and offered his help.
支援を申し出たのです
14:18
"You may have lost a father,"
he told her,
「君は父親を失ったかもしれないが
14:20
"but you've gained an uncle."
おじさんを得たんだよ」と
彼女に言いました
14:23
He wanted her, too, to have
a second chance.
彼女にも第2のチャンスを
つかんで欲しかったからです
14:26
If human history were a parade,
人類の歴史をパレードに例えるなら
14:32
America's float would be
a neon shrine to second chances.
アメリカの山車は ネオンに彩られた
「第2のチャンス」の祭壇でしょう
14:37
But America, generous with second chances
to the children of other lands,
ところがアメリカは 移民の子どもには
気前よく第2のチャンスを与えるのに
14:44
today grows miserly with first chances
to the children of its own.
アメリカ生まれの子どもには
最初のチャンスすら与えなくなりました
14:50
America still dazzles at allowing
anybody to become an American.
アメリカは 誰でもアメリカ人として
受け入れる 光り輝く存在です
14:56
But it is losing its luster at allowing
every American to become a somebody.
でも すべてのアメリカ人が
成功できるわけではありません
15:01
Over the last decade, seven million
foreigners gained American citizenship.
過去10年で700万人の外国人が
アメリカ国籍を取得しました
15:07
Remarkable.
素晴らしいことです
15:12
In the meanwhile, how many Americans
gained a place in the middle class?
一方 どのくらいのアメリカ人が
中流階級の地位を手に入れたでしょうか?
15:14
Actually, the net influx was negative.
実は 人数は減少しているのです
15:19
Go back further,
and it's even more striking:
時を遡ると
事態は もっとはっきりします
15:23
Since the 60s, the middle class
has shrunk by 20 percent,
60年代以降 中流階級は
20%減少していますが
15:25
mainly because of the people
tumbling out of it.
主な原因は 人々が中流から
転落していったためです
15:31
And my reporting around the country
tells me the problem is grimmer
私が全米を調査した結果
この問題は単なる不平等ではなく
15:34
than simple inequality.
はるかに深刻なものです
15:38
What I observe is a pair of secessions
from the unifying center of American life.
1つだったアメリカの生活が
中央から2つに分裂したのです
15:40
An affluent secession of up, up and away,
裕福な層は どんどん上昇して
15:46
into elite enclaves of the educated
and into a global matrix
教養のある一部のエリート集団や
15:50
of work, money and connections,
仕事やお金 人脈の発信源へと
流入しています
15:53
and an impoverished secession
of down and out
一方 貧困層は どんどん下にこぼれ落ち
15:56
into disconnected, dead-end lives
幸運な人々は ほとんど経験しない
16:00
that the fortunate scarcely see.
つながりもなく
行き詰まった生活へと転落しています
16:03
And don't console yourself
that you are the 99 percent.
自分は99%の1人だと
安心しないでください
16:07
If you live near a Whole Foods,
もし近所に高級スーパーがあるなら
16:13
if no one in your family serves
in the military,
軍隊で務めた家族がいないなら
16:18
if you're paid by the year,
not the hour,
時給ではなく 年俸をもらっているなら
16:22
if most people you know finished college,
知り合いが ほとんど大卒なら
16:27
if no one you know uses meth,
覚せい剤を使っている
知り合いがいないなら
16:30
if you married once and remain married,
離婚歴がないなら
16:33
if you're not one of 65 million Americans
with a criminal record --
あなたが犯罪歴のあるアメリカ人
6,500万人の1人では ないなら・・・
16:35
if any or all of these things
describe you,
あなたがこのすべて
もしくは一部に当てはまるとしたら
16:39
then accept the possibility that actually,
自分が今 起きている問題に
気づいておらず
16:43
you may not know what's going on
問題の一端を担っている
16:46
and you may be part of the problem.
可能性を認めるべきです
16:48
Other generations had to build
a fresh society after slavery,
前の世代の人々は
奴隷を解放し 不況を乗り越え
16:54
pull through a depression,
defeat fascism,
ファシズムを倒し
ミシシッピのフリーダム・ライドを経て
17:00
freedom-ride in Mississippi.
新しい社会を築かねばなりませんでした
17:04
The moral challenge of
my generation, I believe,
私の世代の道徳的な課題は
17:07
is to reacquaint these two Americas,
この2つのアメリカを
再び結びつけ
17:10
to choose union over secession once again.
分裂するのではなく もう一度
1つになることを目指すことです
17:13
This ins't a problem we can tax
or tax-cut away.
これは課税や減税の問題ではありません
17:18
It won't be solved by tweeting harder,
building slicker apps,
もっとツイートしようと
もっとすごいアプリを作ろうと
17:22
or starting one more
artisanal coffee roasting service.
プロのコーヒー焙煎サービスを始めようと
解決できる問題ではありません
17:26
It is a moral challenge that begs
each of us in the flourishing America
繁栄するアメリカに暮らす
私たち一人ひとりが レイスデンと同じように
17:30
to take on the wilting America as our own,
疲弊したアメリカを
自分の問題として引き受けるという
17:37
as Raisuddin tried to do.
道徳的な課題なのです
17:41
Like him, we can make pilgrimages.
私たちも彼のように巡礼できるはずです
17:44
And there, in Baltimore and Oregon
and Appalachia,
ボルチモアで オレゴンで
アパラチア地方で
17:46
find new purpose, as he did.
彼のように新しい目的を見つけるのです
17:50
We can immerse ourselves
in that other country,
他の地域の実態を知り
17:52
bear witness to its hopes and sorrows,
希望や悲しみを証言することで
17:56
and, like Raisuddin, ask what we can do.
レイスデンのように
自分たちに何ができるか問いましょう
17:59
What can you do?
あなたには何ができますか?
18:06
What can you do?
あなたには何が?
18:09
What can we do?
私たちには何ができるでしょう?
18:11
How might we build
a more merciful country?
より慈悲に満ちた国にするには
どうしたらいいのでしょうか?
18:13
We, the greatest inventors in the world,
私たちは世界で最も
発明に長けているのですから
18:18
can invent solutions to the problems
of that America, not only our own.
自分たちのアメリカだけでなく
もう一つのアメリカの問題も解決できるはずです
18:22
We, the writers and the journalists,
can cover that America's stories,
私たち作家やジャーナリストは
そちら側のアメリカで
18:27
instead of shutting down
bureaus in its midst.
事務所を閉鎖するのではなく
記事を書くことができるはずです
18:31
We can finance that America's ideas,
NYやサンフランシスコ発の
アイデアに代わって
18:34
instead of ideas from New York
and San Francisco.
そちら側のアメリカのアイデアに
資金を援助できるはずです
18:38
We can put our stethoscopes to its backs,
そちらのアメリカの背に聴診器を当て
18:41
teach there, go to court there,
make there, live there, pray there.
そこで教え そこで裁判所に行き
物づくりをし 祈ることができるはずです
18:44
This, I believe, is the calling
of a generation.
これは時代の要請だと思います
18:50
An America whose two halves learn again
2分されたアメリカは もう一度
18:55
to stride, to plow, to forge,
to dare together.
共に歩み 共に耕し
関係を築き 挑むことを学ぶのです
18:58
A republic of chances, rewoven, renewed,
再び組み立てられ 新しくなった
「チャンスの社会」を
19:06
begins with us.
私たちが始めるのです
19:12
Thank you.
ありがとう
19:15
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:17
Translated by Masako Kigami
Reviewed by Kazunori Akashi

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Anand Giridharadas - Writer
Anand Giridharadas writes about people and cultures caught amid the great forces of our time.

Why you should listen

Anand Giridharadas is a writer. He is a New York Times columnist, writing the biweekly "Letter from America." He is the author, most recently, of The True American: Murder and Mercy in Texas, about a Muslim immigrant’s campaign to spare from Death Row the white supremacist who tried to kill him. In 2011 he published India Calling: An Intimate Portrait of a Nation's Remaking, about returning to the India his parents left.

Giridharadas's datelines include ItalyIndiaChinaDubaiNorway, Japan, HaitiBrazilColombiaNigeriaUruguay and the United States. He is an on-air contributor for NBC News and appears regularly on "Morning Joe." He has given talks on the main stage of TED and at Harvard, Stanford, Columbia, Yale, Princeton, the University of Michigan, the Aspen Institute, Summit at Sea, the Sydney Opera House, the United Nations, the Asia Society, PopTech and Google. He is a Henry Crown fellow  of the Aspen Institute. 

Giridharadas lives in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife, Priya Parker, and their son, Orion.

More profile about the speaker
Anand Giridharadas | Speaker | TED.com