07:25
TEDGlobal 2014

Boniface Mwangi: The day I stood up alone

ボニファス・ムワンギ: 私が1人で立ち上がった日

Filmed:

写真家のボニファス・ムワンギは祖国ケニアでの汚職に抗議したいと願っていました。そこで計画を立てます: 人々が多く集まる公の場で、友人と共に立ち上がり、野次を飛ばそうと。しかし、その時が来ると自分一人しかいませんでした。彼は語ります。そこで起きたことによって、真の自分の存在意義が見出せたのだと。彼は「人生には最も重要な日が2度ある。生まれた日と、生まれた理由を見出す日なのだ」と言います。写真も紹介します。

-
Boniface Mwangi is an award-winning Kenyan photographer, artist and activist. He is a TED Fellow. Full bio

People back home call me a heckler,
自分は祖国では野次馬野郎
00:13
a troublemaker, an irritant,
問題児、鬱陶しいやつ
00:16
a rebel, an activist,
反抗者、活動家
00:19
the voice of the people.
人々の声を代弁する者と
呼ばれています
00:21
But that wasn't always me.
でも 最初からそうであった訳では
ありません
00:23
Growing up, I had a nickname.
子どもの頃 あだ名がありました
00:26
They used to call me Softy,
かつては「ソフティ」って呼ばれていました
00:28
meaning the soft, harmless boy.
ソフトで害のない奴だったのです
00:30
Like every other human being,
I avoided trouble.
他の人達と同じく
私はトラブルを避けていました
00:33
In my childhood, they taught me silence.
子供の頃 黙っているべしと
教わりました
00:36
Don't argue, do as you're told.
議論などせず 言われた通りにしろと
00:38
In Sunday school, they taught me
don't confront, don't argue,
日曜学校では
人と対峙するな 議論するな
00:40
even if you're right,
turn the other cheek.
自分が正しいと思っても
侮辱を甘んじておきなさいと教わりました
00:44
This was reinforced
by the political climate of the time.
当時の政情は
このことを さらに後押ししました
00:47
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:52
Kenya is a country
where you are guilty
ケニアは 金持ちになるまでは
00:55
until proven rich.
だれもが罪深いとされる
そんな国です
00:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:00
Kenya's poor are five times more likely
ケニアでは銃によって殺された貧者の数は
01:02
to be shot dead by the police
who are meant to protect them
犯罪者によるものより
人々を守るべき立場である
01:05
than by criminals.
警察によるものが 5倍に上ります
01:08
This was reinforced
by the political climate of the day.
当時の政治的環境から
このような状況になりました
01:10
We had a president,
Moi, who was a dictator.
モイという名の大統領がいました
彼は独裁者でした
01:12
He ruled the country with an iron fist,
彼は鉄拳を振りかざし
国を支配しました
01:15
and anyone who dared
question his authority
彼の権力に盾突くものは
01:18
was arrested, tortured,
jailed or even killed.
誰もが逮捕され、拷問を受け、投獄され
時には殺されました
01:20
That meant that people were taught
to be smart cowards, stay out of trouble.
だから トラブルに巻き込まれないように
賢明な臆病者たるべきと言われたのです
01:25
Being a coward was not an insult.
臆病という言葉は 侮辱にはなりません
01:29
Being a coward was a compliment.
臆病は褒め言葉でした
01:31
We used to be told that a coward
goes home to his mother.
臆病者は母さんのいる所に帰れるのだと
言われ続けてきました
01:33
What that meant: that if you stayed
out of trouble you're going to stay alive.
トラブルに巻き込まれなければ
生きていられるという意味です
01:36
I used to question this advice,
この言葉にいつも疑問を抱いていました
01:40
and eight years ago
we had an election in Kenya,
そして8年前のことです
ケニアで選挙がありました
01:42
and the results were violently disputed.
その結果は 激しい抗争を生みました
01:45
What followed that election
was terrible violence, rape,
選挙の後に ひどい暴力、レイプが起き
01:47
and the killing of over 1,000 people.
さらには千人以上が殺害されました
01:52
My work was to document the violence.
私の仕事は暴力行為を
記録に残すことでした
01:56
As a photographer,
I took thousands of images,
写真家として数千枚の写真を撮りました
01:59
and after two months,
2か月後には
02:02
the two politicians came together,
had a cup of tea,
対立する両者は歩み寄り
お茶を飲み そして
02:04
signed a peace agreement,
and the country moved on.
平和協定書に署名しました
こうしてこの国は先へと進んでいきました
02:09
I was a very disturbed man
because I saw the violence firsthand.
暴力を目の当たりにしていた私は
精神的にとても滅入っていました
02:12
I saw the killings.
I saw the displacement.
殺人を目にし
強制退去を目にしました
02:16
I met women who had been raped,
and it disturbed me,
レイプされた女性を目撃し
私は動揺しました
02:19
but the country never spoke about it.
しかし 国内では
誰もそれを語りませんでした
02:22
We pretended. We all became smart cowards.
みんな 見ぬふりをして
賢明な臆病者になっていたのです
02:24
We decided to stay out of trouble
and not talk about it.
トラブルを避け 口外しないと
決め込んでいたのです
02:27
Ten months later, I quit my job.
I said I could not stand it anymore.
10か月後 私は仕事を辞めました
これ以上耐えられないと思ったのです
02:30
After quitting my job,
I decided to organize my friends
仕事をやめた後
友人達を巻き込んで
02:34
to speak about
the violence in the country,
この国の暴力について語ろう
02:36
to speak about the state of the nation,
国情について語ろうと決意しました
02:38
and June 1, 2009 was the day
that we were meant to go to the stadium
2009年6月1日のことです
スタディアムに行って
02:40
and try and get the president's attention.
大統領の注意を引こうと
計画しました
02:44
It's a national holiday,
その日は国民の祝日です
02:46
it's broadcast across the country,
その様子は国中に放映されます
02:48
and I showed up at the stadium.
私はスタディアムに行きましたが
02:49
My friends did not show up.
友人は姿を現しませんでした
02:53
I found myself alone,
自分一人になり
02:56
and I didn't know what to do.
どうしたらよいか 分りません
02:59
I was scared,
私はびくびくしました
03:02
but I knew very well
that that particular day,
でも その日 決断すべきだということを
03:03
I had to make a decision.
よく理解していました
03:05
Was I able to live as a coward,
like everyone else,
皆と同じように臆病者として生きるのか
03:07
or was I going to make a stand?
それとも立ち上がるのか?
03:09
And when the president stood up to speak,
大統領が演説のために登壇した時
03:11
I found myself on my feet
shouting at the president,
私は立ち上がり
大統領に向かって叫びました
03:13
telling him to remember
the post-election violence victims,
「選挙後の犠牲者たちのことを覚えていますか」
03:17
to stop the corruption.
「汚職をやめるべきです」
と言ったのです
03:21
And suddenly, out of nowhere,
突然どこからともなく
03:23
the police pounced on me
like hungry lions.
腹を空かせたライオンのように
警官が私に飛びかかりました
03:25
They held my mouth
私の口を押え
03:28
and dragged me out of the stadium,
スタディアムから引きずり出し
03:30
where they thoroughly beat me up
and locked me up in jail.
徹底的に私をたたきのめし
刑務所に収監しました
03:32
I spent that night in
a cold cement floor in the jail,
冷たいセメントの床で
一夜を過ごした時
03:37
and that got me thinking.
思いに耽りました
03:43
What was making me feel this way?
なぜ私はこんなことを
する気になったのだろう?
03:46
My friends and family thought
I was crazy because of what I did,
友人や家族は 私の気が触れて
こんな行動をとったのだと思っているだろうとか
03:48
and the images that I took
were disturbing my life.
自分が撮った写真が
いかに私の人生を揺るがしているか
03:51
The images that I took
were just a number to many Kenyans.
それは多くのケニア人にとって 数多ある
紙切れに過ぎませんでした
03:56
Most Kenyans did not see the violence.
殆どのケニア人は暴力を目にしていません
03:59
It was a story to them.
それはただの物語に過ぎないのです
04:01
And so I decided to actually
start a street exhibition
そこで路上の展覧会を開くことを
決心しました
04:03
to show the images of the violence
across the country
暴力を写した写真を全国で見せて
04:05
and get people talking about it.
それについて人々に語らせるのです
04:08
We traveled the country
and showed the images,
国中を旅し 写真を見せていきました
04:10
and this was a journey that has started me
to the activist path,
これが私の活動家としての
旅の始まりです
04:13
where I decided to become silent no more,
もう口を閉じて黙ることなく
04:16
to talk about those things.
語っていくのだと 決心したのです
04:19
We traveled, and our general site
from our street exhibit
旅していくと 街頭展覧会に使った
普通の場所が
04:21
became for political graffiti
about the situation in the country,
汚職や誤ったリーダーシップなど
国情を映し出す
04:25
talking about corruption, bad leadership.
政治的な落書きがなされる
場になっていきました
04:30
We have even done symbolic burials.
抽象的な埋葬も行いました
04:33
We have delivered live pigs
to Kenya's parliament
政治家の貪欲さのシンボルとして
ケニアの国会に
04:36
as a symbol of our politicians' greed.
生きたブタを届けたりしました
04:40
It has been done in Uganda
and other countries,
これはウガンダなど他の国でも
行なわれていたことです
04:42
and what is most powerful is that
the images have been picked by the media
その影響力はめざましく
映像がメディアに取り上げられ
04:45
and amplified across the country,
across the continent.
国中に そしてアフリカ大陸全体に
波及していきました
04:48
Where I used to stand up alone
seven years ago,
7年前には私一人で立ち上がりましたが
04:51
now I belong to a community
of many people who stand up with me.
今や 一緒に行動する多数の人からなる
コミュニティに属しています
04:54
I am no longer alone when I stand up
to speak about these things.
物事を語るのに もはや
私は1人ではありません
04:57
I belong to a group of young people
who are passionate about the country,
情熱をもって
国を変えていきたいと願っている
05:02
who want to bring about change,
若者達のグループと一緒にいます
05:06
and they're no longer afraid,
and they're no longer smart cowards.
彼らはもう恐れてはいません
抜け目ない臆病者ではありません
05:08
So that was my story.
これが私のストーリーです
05:13
That day in the stadium,
あの日のスタディアムで
05:18
I stood up as a smart coward.
抜け目ない臆病者だった私が
立ち上がりました
05:20
By that one action, I said goodbye
to the 24 years living as a coward.
たった一つの行動が
24年間臆病者だった自分に別れを告げました
05:23
There are two most powerful
days in your life:
人生には重要な日が2度訪れます
05:28
the day you're born,
and the day you discover why.
生まれた日 そして
なぜ自分が生まれたかを悟る日です
05:31
That day standing up in that stadium
shouting at the President,
スタディアムで立ち上がり
大統領に向かって叫んだ日
05:36
I discovered why I was truly born,
その日が自分が生まれた理由 つまり
05:40
that I would no longer be silent
in the face of injustice.
沈黙せず不正に立ち向かうことなのだと
発見した日でした
05:43
Do you know why you were born?
皆さんは自分が生まれた理由を
知っていますか?
05:47
Thank you.
有難うございました
05:51
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:53
Tom Rielly: It's an amazing story.
トム・ライリー: 素晴らしいお話でした
06:00
I just want to ask you
a couple quick questions.
いくつか質問させてください
06:03
So PAWA254:
PAWA254について
06:05
you've created a studio, a place
where young people can go
あなたは こういった行動を起こすために
若者が訪れていって
06:07
and harness the power of digital media
デジタルメディアの力を利用するための
06:12
to do some of this action.
スタジオを開かれました
06:14
What's happening now with PAWA?
PAWAは今 どうなっていますか?
06:16
Boniface Mwangi: So we have
this community of filmmakers,
ムワンギ: このコミュニティは
映画の制作者
06:18
graffiti artists, musicians,
and when there's an issue in the country,
漫画家、音楽家の集まりで
国内で何か問題が起きると
06:21
we come together, we brainstorm,
and take up on that issue.
一緒に集まり ブレーンストーミングをして
問題を取り上げていきます
06:24
So our most powerful tool is art,
もっとも効果があるのがアートです
06:27
because we live in a very busy world
where people are so busy in their life,
なぜなら 日常が忙しい そんな
とてもせわしい世の中にあって
06:29
and they don't have time to read.
人々は文字を読む時間がありません
06:33
So we package our activism
and we package our message in art.
ですから 我々は行動指針や
メッセージをアートにして伝えます
06:35
So from the music, the graffiti,
the art, that's what we do.
音楽、グラフィティ、芸術
そんなことをやっています
06:39
Can I say one more thing?
もう一言 言っていいですか?
06:45
TR: Yeah, of course. (Applause)
勿論です (拍手)
06:47
BM: In spite of being arrested,
beaten up, threatened,
逮捕され、打ちのめされ
脅迫されましたが
06:49
the moment I discovered my voice,
その時 自分の心の声が聞こえたのです
06:52
that I could actually stand up
for what I really believed in,
自分が真に信ずることのために
立ち上がれと
06:53
I'm no longer afraid.
もう恐れてはいません
06:56
I used to be called softy,
but I'm no longer softy,
ソフティと呼ばれたことがありましたが
もう違います
06:57
because I discovered who I really am,
as in, that's what I want to do,
なぜなら自分の役割を見出し
行動しているからです
07:00
and there's such beauty in doing that.
そこには美というものがあります
07:03
There's nothing as powerful as that,
knowing that I'm meant to do this,
自分が何をすべきかを知っていることほど
大切なことはありません
07:06
because you don't get scared,
you just continue living your life.
恐れなければ 自分の人生を
生きていくことが出来るからです
07:10
Thank you.
有難うございました
07:13
(Applause)
(拍手)
07:15
Translated by Tomoyuki Suzuki
Reviewed by Yuko Yoshida

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Boniface Mwangi -
Boniface Mwangi is an award-winning Kenyan photographer, artist and activist. He is a TED Fellow.

Why you should listen
For four years Boniface Mwangi held a staff photography position at The Standard, the second largest Kenyan newspaper, taking on various assignments of increasing responsibility in a number of countries. Mwangi became the eye of Kenyans during the 2007 post-election violence and showed courage and compassion to capture thousands of images, some so gory that they could not be published.

Following the political resolution to the election crisis, Boniface started to see himself as a visual artist, using photography as the vehicle for social change in Kenya. His focus was the fight against the impunity of politicians in the face of over 1000 dead and half a million people displaced as a result of the violence they caused.

"Boniface’s images are crucial for the healing of our nation; his ability to stay focused and inject a sense of artistry into his work is a testimony to the spirit of professional journalism," wrote Jackson Biko after Boniface was voted Kenya Photojournalist of the Year in 2008 by readers of Adam, a men’s magazine in the country.

Since then, Boniface has continued to work as a freelance photographer for Bloomberg, the AFP, Reuters, the Boston Globe, and other media outlets while building a movement for social change in Kenya through “Picha Mtaani” (Swahili for street exhibition). The photo exhibit aims to heal the scars of Kenyans and draw their attention to the dynamics of the violence to prevent a repeat during the upcoming elections of 2013.

Boniface founded Pawa254 as a collaborative hub where journalists, artists and activists could meet to find innovative ways of achieving social change. The hub has already had many functions, but two campaigns stand out. “Heal the Nation” is a very successful initiative to show a half-hour documentary about post-election violence to as many Kenyans as possible and facilitate discussions around the film. The campaign is accompanied by a more shadowy graffiti campaign that has evoked strong reactions and fired up the youth of Kenya and the world, as images of the clever graffiti grace the pages of the world’s newspapers.

In 2009 United States Secretary of State Hillary Clinton wrote a letter commending Boniface for his work during the post-election violence. She stated, "Your photography is absolutely stunning and tells an important and powerful story for the world to hear."
More profile about the speaker
Boniface Mwangi | Speaker | TED.com