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TED2015

Clint Smith: How to raise a black son in America

クリント・スミス: アメリカで黒人の息子を育てる方法

March 10, 2015

子供のとき、両親や先生から奇妙に思えるアドバイスや、混乱させられるような助言を受けたことが誰しもあるでしょう。幼いクリント・スミスにとっては、この経験はある晩の出来事に集約されています。彼が暗い駐車場で、白人の友達と一緒に水鉄砲で遊んでいたときのことです。この心に深く訴えるトークで、詩人であるクリント・スミスは、彼の父親が見せた怒りと恐れに満ちた反応について描写します。

Clint Smith - Poet, educator
Clint Smith's work blends art and activism. Full bio

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Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Growing up, I didn't always understand
子供の頃 私は両親がなぜ
00:12
why my parents made me
follow the rules that they did.
ルールに従うように言うのか
よく分かりませんでした
00:15
Like, why did I really
have to mow the lawn?
例えば なぜ芝刈りをしないと
いけないの?
00:17
Why was homework really that important?
なぜ宿題がそんなに大事なの?
00:20
Why couldn't I put jelly beans
in my oatmeal?
なぜジェリービーンズを
オートミールに入れて食べたらダメなの?
00:23
My childhood was abound
with questions like this.
子供時代は そんな疑問で溢れていました
00:27
Normal things about being a kid
and realizing that sometimes,
子供である以上 当然のことですし
時には―
00:29
it was best to listen to my parents
even when I didn't exactly understand why.
意味がわからなくても
言うことを聞くのが一番だと考えていました
00:34
And it's not that they didn't want
me to think critically.
両親は私に批判的思考を
してほしくなかったわけではありません
00:38
Their parenting always sought
to reconcile the tension
私の両親は常に 私たち兄弟に
00:41
between having my siblings and I
understand the realities of the world,
世界の現状を理解させながらも
00:43
while ensuring that we never accepted
the status quo as inevitable.
その現実が必然であると思わないように
育ててくれました
00:47
I came to realize that this,
in and of itself,
私はこの考え方自体が
00:51
was a very purposeful form of education.
強い目的を持った教育だと
理解するようになりました
00:54
One of my favorite educators,
Brazilian author and scholar Paulo Freire,
私の好きな教育者 ブラジル人作家で
学者のパウロ・フレイレ氏は
00:57
speaks quite explicitly
about the need for education
教育は批判的な考えを呼び起こし
01:01
to be used as a tool for critical
awakening and shared humanity.
人間性を共有するためのツールで
なければならないと明言しています
01:05
In his most famous book,
"Pedagogy of the Oppressed,"
彼の最も有名な著書
『被抑圧者の教育学』で
01:09
he states, "No one can be
authentically human
「人は他者を人間として
見なすことができなければ
01:12
while he prevents others from being so."
真の人間にはなりえない」と述べています
01:16
I've been thinking a lot about this
lately, this idea of humanity,
私はこの人間性について
最近よく考えています
01:19
and specifically, who in this world
is afforded the privilege
特に この世界で「完全なる人間」という
01:23
of being perceived as fully human.
特権を与えられているのは
誰なのだろうということについてです
01:27
Over the course of
the past several months,
この数ヶ月の間で
01:30
the world has watched
as unarmed black men, and women,
世界では 武器を持たない
黒人の男性や女性が
01:32
have had their lives taken
at the hands of police and vigilante.
警察や自警団に命を奪われる事件が
次々と起こりました
01:35
These events and all that
has transpired after them
このような事件や
その後の出来事によって
01:39
have brought me back to my own childhood
私は自分の子供時代を思い起こし
01:42
and the decisions that my parents made
about raising a black boy in America
両親が「アメリカで黒人の男の子を
育てる」際に下した決断が
01:44
that growing up, I didn't always
understand in the way that I do now.
昔は分かりませんでしたが
今はきちんと理解できるのです
01:48
I think of how hard it must have been,
how profoundly unfair it must have felt
私がちゃんと毎晩
家に帰って来られるように
01:53
for them to feel like they had
to strip away parts of my childhood
私から子供時代を奪うのが
両親にとってどれほど辛く
01:58
just so that I could come home at night.
どれほど不公平に感じられたことでしょう
02:02
For example, I think of how one night,
例えば ある夜
02:05
when I was around 12 years old, on an
overnight field trip to another city,
12歳ぐらいの時
別の街に旅行したときのことです
02:07
my friends and I bought Super Soakers
友達と一緒に水鉄砲を買い
02:11
and turned the hotel parking lot
into our own water-filled battle zone.
ホテルの駐車場を戦場に見立てて
水鉄砲遊びをしていました
02:13
We hid behind cars,
車の陰に隠れながら
02:17
running through the darkness that
lay between the streetlights,
街灯のあいだの暗闇を走り回って
02:19
boundless laughter ubiquitous
across the pavement.
私たちの笑い声は
歩道に響き渡りました
02:22
But within 10 minutes,
しかし10分も経たないうちに
02:26
my father came outside,
grabbed me by my forearm
私の父がやってきて 私の腕を掴むと
02:28
and led me into our room
with an unfamiliar grip.
これまでにないような強い力で
部屋に引っ張って行きました
02:31
Before I could say anything,
私が何かを言う前に―
02:34
tell him how foolish he had
made me look in front of my friends,
友達の前で恥ずかしい思いをさせられたと
父に言う前に
02:36
he derided me for being so naive.
父は私が世間知らずであることを
あざ笑いました
02:39
Looked me in the eye,
fear consuming his face,
私の目をじっと見て
恐怖に溢れた面持ちで
02:42
and said, "Son, I'm sorry,
父はこう言ったのです
「クリント 悪いが―
02:47
but you can't act the same
as your white friends.
お前は白人の友達と
同じような行動はできないんだよ
02:49
You can't pretend to shoot guns.
銃を撃つまねをしたり
02:52
You can't run around in the dark.
暗闇で走り回ったりしてはいけない
02:55
You can't hide behind anything
other than your own teeth."
自分の歯以外の物陰に
身を隠してはいけないんだ」
02:56
I know now how scared he must have been,
私はその時 父が感じた恐怖を
今になって理解できます
02:59
how easily I could have fallen
into the empty of the night,
私が夜の闇に飲まれて
03:02
that some man would mistake this water
誰かが水を実弾と勘違いし
03:06
for a good reason to wash
all of this away.
最悪の事態になることもあったでしょう
03:09
These are the sorts of messages I've been
inundated with my entire life:
私の人生はこのようなメッセージで
溢れていました
03:12
Always keep your hands where they
can see them, don't move too quickly,
手はいつも見えるようにしろ
手を速く動かすな
03:16
take off your hood when the sun goes down.
日が沈んだら
パーカーのフードは被るな
03:19
My parents raised me and my siblings
in an armor of advice,
私の両親は私たち兄弟に
「助言」という鎧を着せて育てました
03:21
an ocean of alarm bells so someone
wouldn't steal the breath from our lungs,
誰かに息の根を止められないよう
肌の色を記憶されないよう
03:25
so that they wouldn't make
a memory of this skin.
多くのことに
気を付けなければなりませんでした
03:28
So that we could be kids,
not casket or concrete.
私たちが棺やコンクリートではなく
子供でいられるように
03:30
And it's not because they thought it
would make us better than anyone else
そして これは他の子供より
良い子にするためではなく
03:33
it's simply because they wanted
to keep us alive.
ただ生きてほしかっただけなのです
03:36
All of my black friends were raised
with the same message,
黒人の友達は皆
同じようなメッセージを受けて育ち
03:39
the talk, given to us
when we became old enough
出る杭は打たれるような年齢に達したり
03:42
to be mistaken for a nail ready
to be hammered to the ground,
肌のメラニン色素が
何か恐ろしいものであるように
03:44
when people made our melanin
synonymous with something to be feared.
思われるたびに忠告を受けました
03:47
But what does it do to a child
でも考えてみてください
03:51
to grow up knowing that you
cannot simply be a child?
「ただの子供ではいられない」
と感じながら育つ子供のことを
03:54
That the whims of adolescence
are too dangerous for your breath,
思春期の気まぐれが
命取りになってしまうことや
03:57
that you cannot simply be curious,
純粋に好奇心を感じることができず
04:01
that you are not afforded the luxury
of making a mistake,
ほんの失敗が許されない状況を
04:02
that someone's implicit bias
誰かの間違った偏見のせいで
04:05
might be the reason you don't
wake up in the morning.
翌朝目覚めることがないかもしれないことを
04:07
But this cannot be what defines us.
しかし 私たちは
これに定義されはしません
04:09
Because we have parents
who raised us to understand
両親は私たちに教えてくれました
04:11
that our bodies weren't meant
for the backside of a bullet,
私たちの体は銃弾の標的になるためでなく
04:14
but for flying kites and jumping rope,
and laughing until our stomachs burst.
凧を上げたり 縄跳びをしたり
お腹を抱えて笑うためにあるのだと
04:17
We had teachers who taught us
how to raise our hands in class,
学校の先生は 降参の意味ではない
授業中の手の挙げ方を
04:20
and not just to signal surrender,
教えてくれました
04:23
and that the only thing we should give up
自分に生きる価値がないという考えこそが
04:25
is the idea that we
aren't worthy of this world.
捨て去るべき唯一のものだと
04:27
So when we say that black lives matter,
it's not because others don't,
「黒人の命は大事だ」というのは
他の命が大事ではないと言うのではなく
04:29
it's simply because we must affirm that we
are worthy of existing without fear,
いくら否定されたとしても
私たちには恐怖を感じることなく
04:32
when so many things tell us we are not.
この世に存在する価値があると
主張したいのです
04:36
I want to live in a world where my son
私は自分の息子が
04:38
will not be presumed guilty
the moment he is born,
生まれた瞬間に
悪さをしていると疑われ
04:40
where a toy in his hand isn't mistaken
for anything other than a toy.
手にしているものが玩具以外の何かに
見間違われることのない世界に生きたいです
04:43
And I refuse to accept that we can't
build this world into something new,
新しい世界を構築することはできない
という考えは受け付けません
04:46
some place where a child's name
子供の名前が
04:50
doesn't have to be written
on a t-shirt, or a tombstone,
抗議デモのTシャツや
墓石に刻まれることがない世界―
04:51
where the value of someone's life
ある人の命の価値が
04:54
isn't determined by anything other
than the fact that they had lungs,
息をしていること以外の何かで
決められることのない世界―
04:56
a place where every single
one of us can breathe.
みんなが同じように
生きられる世界は作れるのです
05:00
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
05:04
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:05
Translator:Aki Morioka
Reviewer:Hanako Fujisawa

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Clint Smith - Poet, educator
Clint Smith's work blends art and activism.

Why you should listen

Clint Smith is a writer, teacher and doctoral candidate at Harvard University studying education, incarceration and inequality. Previously, he taught high school English in Prince George’s County, Maryland where, in 2013, he was named the Christine D. Sarbanes Teacher of the Year by the Maryland Humanities Council.

Clint is a 2014 National Poetry Slam champion, an Individual World Poetry Slam Finalist, and author of the poetry collection Counting Descent. He has received fellowships from the National Science Foundation, Cave Canem and the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop. His writing has appeared in The New Yorker, The Guardian, Boston Review, American Poetry Review, Harvard Educational Review and elsewhere. He was born and raised in New Orleans, LA.

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