sponsored links
TED2015

Martine Rothblatt: My daughter, my wife, our robot, and the quest for immortality

マーティーン・ロスブラット: 我が娘、妻、ロボット、そして永遠の生の追求

March 18, 2015

サイラス XM衛星ラジオの創設者マーティーン・ロスブラットは現在では稀な病気から生涯命を救う薬(自分自身の娘の命を救ったある薬を含む)を作る製薬会社を指揮しています。同時に彼女はデジタルファイルの中に愛する女性の意識を保存して、コンパニオンロボット作りに取り組んでいます。TEDのクリス・アンダーソンとの檀上での会話の中で、ロスブラットは愛、アイデンティティ、創造性そして限りない可能性について、力強い話をしています。

Martine Rothblatt - Transhumanist
Whether she’s inventing satellite radio, developing life-saving drugs or digitizing the human mind, Martine Rothblatt has a knack for turning visionary ideas into commonplace technology. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Chris Anderson: So I guess
what we're going to do is
(クリス・アンダーソン) これから
00:12
we're going to talk about your life,
お持ち頂いた写真を使って
00:14
and using some pictures
that you shared with me.
あなたの人生について
語って頂きたいと思います
00:17
And I think we should start
right here with this one.
こちらから始めたいと思います
00:20
Okay, now who is this?
さて これはどなたでしょうか?
00:23
Martine Rothblatt: This is me
with our oldest son Eli.
(マーティーン・ロスブラット) 一番上の
息子イーライと私です
00:26
He was about age five.
5歳ぐらいだったでしょうか
00:31
This is taken in Nigeria
ナイジェリアで撮ったもので
00:33
right after having taken
the Washington, D.C. bar exam.
ワシントンDCで
司法試験を受けた直後の写真です
00:35
CA: Okay. But this doesn't
really look like a Martine.
(クリス) でもマーティーンには
あまり見えませんね
00:39
MR: Right. That was myself as a male,
the way I was brought up.
(マ―ティーン) これは生まれ育った
元の性の男性の私です
00:43
Before I transitioned from male
to female and Martin to Martine.
男性から女性へ マーティンから
マ―ティーンへと変わる前です
00:51
CA: You were brought up Martin Rothblatt.
マーティン・ロスブラットとして
育った訳ですね
00:55
MR: Correct.
その通りです
00:57
CA: And about a year after this picture,
you married a beautiful woman.
この写真を撮った約一年後
素敵な女性と結婚しましたね
00:58
Was this love at first sight?
What happened there?
一目惚れだったのですか?
何があったのですか?
01:03
MR: It was love at the first sight.
一目惚れでした
01:05
I saw Bina at a discotheque
in Los Angeles,
ロスのディスコでビーナと出会い
01:07
and we later began living together,
その後 一緒に暮らし始めました
01:11
but the moment I saw her,
I saw just an aura of energy around her.
一目見てすぐ 彼女にオーラと
エネルギーを感じたのです
01:15
I asked her to dance.
それでダンスを申し込んだのです
01:19
She said she saw an aura
of energy around me.
彼女も私に同じものを感じたと
言っていました
01:20
I was a single male parent.
She was a single female parent.
私はシングルファーザーで
彼女はシングルマザーでした
01:23
We showed each other
our kids' pictures,
二人は互いに子供の写真を
見せ合いました
01:27
and we've been happily married
for a third of a century now.
そして今 無事
結婚して30数年になります
01:30
(Applause)
(拍手)
01:34
CA: And at the time, you were
kind of this hotshot entrepreneur,
当時 あなたは衛星の仕事に従事する
01:38
working with satellites.
有能な起業家でしたね
01:41
I think you had two successful companies,
あなたは 成功を収めた
2つの会社をお持ちで
01:43
and then you started
addressing this problem
その後 衛星を使ってラジオに
01:45
of how could you use satellites
to revolutionize radio.
如何に改革を起こすか
ということに着手し始めました
01:47
Tell us about that.
その事についてお聞かせください
01:51
MR: Right. I always
loved space technology,
ええ 私はずっと
宇宙工学に夢中でした
01:53
and satellites, to me, are sort of
like the canoes that our ancestors
衛星とは私にとって
先祖が初めて水をかき分けた
01:55
first pushed out into the water.
カヌーのようなものなのです
01:59
So it was exciting for me
to be part of the navigation
私にとって空という海原を航海するのは
02:01
of the oceans of the sky,
本当にわくわくするものでした
02:05
and as I developed different types
of satellite communication systems,
違った形の衛星通信システムを開発した時
02:07
the main thing I did was to launch
bigger and more powerful satellites,
私は主として より大きくより力強い
衛星を打ち上げました
02:12
the consequence of which
was that the receiving antennas
その結果 受信するアンテナは
02:17
could be smaller and smaller,
より小さなものにする事が出来ました
02:21
and after going through
direct television broadcasting,
直接テレビ放送の衛星が出来てから
私はこう思いました
02:23
I had the idea that if we could make
a more powerful satellite,
より強力な衛星が作れたら
パラボラアンテナは
02:26
the receiving dish could be so small
かなり小さく出来るので
02:30
that it would just be a section
of a parabolic dish,
単に一つのパーツに過ぎなくなり
02:33
a flat little plate embedded
into the roof of an automobile,
それを車の屋根に
埋め込む事が出来れば
02:36
and it would be possible to have
nationwide satellite radio,
全国規模の衛星ラジオが聴けるのだと
02:40
and that's Sirius XM today.
それが今日のシリウス XM なのです
02:44
CA: Wow. So who here has used Sirius?
おお 皆さんの中でシリウスに
ご加入の方は?
02:46
(Applause)
(拍手)
02:48
MR: Thank you for
your monthly subscriptions.
月額のお支払い 有難うございます
02:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:53
CA: So that succeeded despite
all predictions at the time.
当時のすべての予測を裏切って
成功を収めていますね
02:56
It was a huge commercial success,
商業的には大いに成功でした
03:00
but soon after this, in the early 1990s,
しかし このすぐ後1990年代初頭に
03:02
there was this big transition in your life
and you became Martine.
人生における大きな変化があり
あなたはマーティーンになりました
03:07
MR: Correct.
CA: So tell me, how did that happen?
(マーティーン) その通りです
(クリス) どうやってそうなったのですか?
03:11
MR: It happened in consultation with Bina
and our four beautiful children,
ビーナと私たちの4人の素晴らしい
子供たちに相談し
03:16
and I discussed with each of them
そしてその一人一人と
話し合いを持ちました
03:23
that I felt my soul was always female,
and as a woman,
私の魂は常に女性であると
感じてましたが
03:28
but I was afraid people would
laugh at me if I expressed it,
私がそれを言えば
皆から笑われるだろうと思いました
03:34
so I always kept it bottled up
それで私は常に自分の気持ちを押し殺し
03:39
and just showed my male side.
自分の男性の部分だけを見せていました
03:41
And each of them
had a different take on this.
家族の皆はこの事について
異なる反応をしました
03:44
Bina said, "I love your soul,
ビーナはこう言いました
「あなたの魂を愛しているの
03:47
and whether the outside
is Martin and Martine,
外見がマーティンだろうと
マーティーンだろうと私には大した事ではないわ
03:52
it doesn't it matter to me,
I love your soul."
私はあなたの魂を愛しているのだから」
03:55
My son said, "If you become a woman,
will you still be my father?"
息子は言いました 「女になっても僕の
お父さんでいてくれる?」
03:58
And I said, "Yes,
I'll always be your father,"
私は言いました「ああ
いつでも君のお父さんだよ」
04:05
and I'm still his father today.
そして今でも 私は彼の父親です
04:09
My youngest daughter did an absolutely
brilliant five-year-old thing.
末娘は全く明るい5歳児らしい反応でした
04:12
She told people, "I love my dad
and she loves me."
娘は皆に「私はパパが大好きだし
彼女も私が大好きよ」と言っていました
04:17
So she had no problem
with a gender blending whatsoever.
性別が入り混じっても
娘には何の問題もありませんでした
04:23
CA: And a couple years after this,
you published this book:
その2,3年後 あなたは
『性のアパルトヘイト』という
04:28
"The Apartheid of Sex."
この本を出版されましたね
04:31
What was your thesis in this book?
この本の中での
あなたのテーマは何でしたか
04:33
MR: My thesis in this book is that there
are seven billion people in the world,
この本の私のテーマは
世界には70億人の人々がいて
04:35
and actually, seven billion unique ways
to express one's gender.
実際70億通りの独自の
性の表現方法があるという事です
04:39
And while people may have
the genitals of a male or a female,
人は男性又は女性の生殖器を
持っているかもしれませんが
04:44
the genitals don't determine your gender
生殖器は性別や性のアイデンティティを
04:51
or even really your sexual identity.
決めるものではないのです
04:54
That's just a matter of anatomy
それは体の構造の問題でしかなく
04:57
and reproductive tracts,
単に生殖の器官なのです
04:58
and people could choose
whatever gender they want
南アフリカが国民に黒人か白人の
区別を強いていたように
05:00
if they weren't forced by society
into categories of either male or female
私たちが社会から男女どちらか一方の
区別を強いられる事がないならば
05:03
the way South Africa used to force people
into categories of black or white.
自分の望む性を選ぶことが出来るでしょう
05:09
We know from anthropological science
that race is fiction,
私たちは人種は虚構だと
人類学から知りました
05:13
even though racism is very, very real,
人種差別がまったくの現実だとしてもです
05:17
and we now know from cultural studies
又私たちは文化研究から
これを今学んでいます
05:20
that separate male or female genders
is a constructed fiction.
男女のジェンダーの区別は
積み上げられた虚構だと
05:23
The reality is a gender fluidity
現実にジェンダーには流動性があるのです
05:27
that crosses the entire continuum
from male to female.
男性から女性への全体の感覚の変化が
交差しているのです
05:30
CA: You yourself don't always
feel 100 percent female.
あなたご自身は常に100%女性だと
感じている訳ではないのですね
05:34
MR: Correct. I would say in some ways
そうです ある意味ではそう言えます
05:37
I change my gender about as often
as I change my hairstyle.
ヘアースタイルを変えるのと同じ頻度で
自分の性も変えていますよ
05:39
CA: (Laughs) Okay, now, this is
your gorgeous daughter, Jenesis.
(笑) 分かりました さてこちらがあなたの
美しいお嬢さんジェネシスですね
05:43
And I guess she was about this age
when something pretty terrible happened.
この頃とても大変な事が起きたようですね
05:50
MR: Yes, she was finding herself
unable to walk up the stairs
ええ 彼女は家の階段を
寝室まで 歩いて
05:55
in our house to her bedroom,
上れなくなってしまったのです
06:00
and after several months of doctors,
病院に行って数か月後
06:02
she was diagnosed to have a rare,
almost invariably fatal disease
彼女は肺高血圧症という稀で
ほぼ治る見込みのない
06:04
called pulmonary arterial hypertension.
致命的な病気だと診断されました
06:09
CA: So how did you respond to that?
それで どのように対応しましたか?
06:13
MR: Well, we first tried to get her
to the best doctors we could.
はい 私たちは最初出来るだけ
優秀な医師に診てもらおうとしました
06:15
We ended up at Children's National
Medical Center in Washington, D.C.
結局ワシントンDCの国立小児
メディカルセンターにたどり着きました
06:19
The head of pediatric cardiology
小児循環器科長は私たちにこう言いました
06:23
told us that he was going to refer her
to get a lung transplant,
彼女に肺移植を行うよう
専門医に紹介しますが
06:25
but not to hold out any hope,
一切期待はしないでくださいね
06:29
because there are
very few lungs available,
特に子供のものとなると
移植用の肺は
06:31
especially for children.
数が非常に少なくなるからです
06:33
He said that all people
with this illness died,
この病気の罹患者は
死に至ると医師は言いました
06:35
and if any of you have seen
the film "Lorenzo's Oil,"
映画 『ロレンツォのオイル』を
観た方はご存じでしょうが
06:40
there's a scene when the protagonist
主人公が階段を転げまわって
06:44
kind of rolls down the stairway
crying and bemoaning the fate of his son,
泣きながら息子の運命を嘆き悲しむのです
06:46
and that's exactly
how we felt about Jenesis.
それは私たちがジェネシスに対して
持っていた感情と全く同じものでした
06:52
CA: But you didn't accept that
as the limit of what you could do.
しかしあなたはそれを
限界として受け入れず
06:56
You started trying to research
and see if you could find a cure somehow.
どうにかして治療法を見つけられるか
調べようとし始めましたね
06:59
MR: Correct. She was in the intensive
care ward for weeks at a time,
その通りです 彼女は集中治療病棟に
数週間入院しました
07:04
and Bina and I would tag team
to stay at the hospital
ビーナと私はチームを組み
どちらかが病院に泊まり込む時は
07:08
while the other watched
the rest of the kids,
もう片方が他の子供たちの面倒を見たり
07:12
and when I was in the hospital
and she was sleeping,
私が病院にいる時 ビーナは寝ていました
07:14
I went to the hospital library.
私は病院の図書館に行き
07:17
I read every article that I could find
on pulmonary hypertension.
その病気に関して見つけられ得る
あらゆる記事を読みました
07:19
I had not taken any biology,
even in college,
大学でも生物学は一切
履修していなかったので
07:24
so I had to go from a biology textbook
to a college-level textbook
生物のテキストから大学レベルの
生物学のテキストまで読まなければならず
07:27
and then medical textbook
and the journal articles, back and forth,
その後医学書や専門誌の記事を
あちこち読み漁りました
07:33
and eventually I knew enough to think
that it might be possible
そして遂に誰かが治療法を見つける事が
可能かもしれない
07:37
that somebody could find a cure.
という所まで分かったのです
07:41
So we started a nonprofit foundation.
そこで私たちは非営利財団を設立し
07:43
I wrote a description
asking people to submit grants
医学研究のための助成金を提供し
07:47
and we would pay for medical research.
公募しました
07:51
I became an expert on the condition --
doctors said to me, Martine,
私はもうこの病状に関する専門家
になりました 医師はこう言いました
07:54
we really appreciate all the funding
you've provided us,
「マーティーン
私たちに提供してくれた資金は
07:57
but we are not going to be able
to find a cure in time
本当に有難いのですが
娘さんを助ける為の治療を発見するには
08:01
to save your daughter.
もう時間がありません
08:05
However, there is a medicine
しかし薬ならあります
08:07
that was developed at the
Burroughs Wellcome Company
バローズウェルカム社で
開発されたもので
08:09
that could halt the progression
of the disease,
この病気の進行を止める事が
出来るかもしれません
08:14
but Burroughs Wellcome has just
been acquired by Glaxo Wellcome.
しかしバローズウェルカム社は丁度
グラクソウェルカム社に
08:17
They made a decision not to develop
買収されたばかりで 会社は
08:22
any medicines for rare
and orphan diseases,
珍しい薬や希少疾患の薬は
作らないと決めたのです
08:24
and maybe you could use your expertise
in satellite communications
衛星通信の専門知識を利用して
08:27
to develop this cure
for pulmonary hypertension.
肺高血圧症の治療薬を
開発できるかもしれません」
08:32
CA: So how on earth did you get
access to this drug?
では一体どうやって
この薬を入手したのですか?
08:37
MR: I went to Glaxo Wellcome
私はグラクソウェルカム社に出向きました
08:40
and after three times being rejected
and having the door slammed in my face
3度拒絶され
目の前でドアを閉ざされた後の事です
08:42
because they weren't going
to out-license the drug
会社は衛星通信の専門家にも 誰にも
08:47
to a satellite communications expert,
薬を手放すつもりはありませんでした
08:51
they weren't going to send the drug
out to anybody at all,
薬を手放すつもりはありませんでした
08:54
and they thought
I didn't have the expertise,
私に専門知識があるとも
思っていませんでした
09:00
finally I was able to persuade
a small team of people to work with me
結局 会社の小さなチームをくどき落として
09:03
and develop enough credibility.
なんとか信頼を獲得したのです
09:10
I wore down their resistance,
彼等の抵抗を弱めましたが
09:12
and they had no hope this drug
would even work, by the way,
因みに彼らはこの薬が機能する見込みは
まるでないと思っており
09:14
and they tried to tell me,
"You're just wasting your time.
私にこう言おうとしてました
「時間の無駄をしただけですね
09:17
We're sorry about your daughter."
娘さんの事はお気の毒です」
09:20
But finally, for 25,000 dollars
しかし最終的には2万5千ドルを支払い
09:22
and agreement to pay 10 percent
of any revenues we might ever get,
収益の10%を支払うという協定を結んで
この薬の世界中の権利を
09:25
they agreed to give me
worldwide rights to this drug.
譲渡する事に同意してくれたのです
09:29
CA: And so you put this drug on the market
in a really brilliant way,
あなたは本当に素晴らしいやり方で
この薬を市場に出しましたね
09:34
by basically charging what it would take
to make the economics work.
経済を機能させる為にかかるものを
基本的に先に支払う事で
09:40
MR: Oh yes, Chris, but this really wasn't
a drug that I ended up --
ええそうなんですクリス でも実はこれが
薬になった訳ではありませんでした
09:45
after I wrote the check for 25,000,
2万5千ドルの小切手を書いた後
09:49
and I said, "Okay, where's
the medicine for Jenesis?"
私は言いました 
「ジェネシスの薬はどこにあるの?」
09:52
they said, "Oh, Martine,
there's no medicine for Jenesis.
彼らは言いました 「マーティーン
ジェネシスの薬はないよ これは
09:54
This is just something we tried in rats."
ラットで実験をしたものに過ぎないんだ」
09:57
And they gave me, like,
a little plastic Ziploc bag
彼らは中にごく少量の粉が入った
小さなプラスティックのジップロックの
10:00
of a small amount of powder.
袋のようなものをくれました
10:03
They said, "Don't give it to any human,"
「人に飲ませないようにね」と彼らは言い
10:05
and they gave me a piece of paper
which said it was a patent,
特許と書かれた一枚の
紙切れをくれました
10:08
and from that, we had to figure out
a way to make this medicine.
そこから私たちはこの薬の作り方を
理解しなければなりませんでした
10:12
A hundred chemists in the U.S.
at the top universities
アメリカでトップの大学の名だたる化学者は
10:15
all swore that little patent
could never be turned into a medicine.
その特許品は
薬には決して出来ないと断言しました
10:18
If it was turned into a medicine,
it could never be delivered
もしそれが薬になったとしても
病巣へ届ける事は決して出来ない
10:23
because it had a half-life
of only 45 minutes.
何故なら半減期が
わずか45分しかないのですから
10:26
CA: And yet, a year or two later,
you were there with a medicine
しかし1,2年後ジェネシスに効いた
薬をもって来られましたね
10:30
that worked for Jenesis.
しかし1,2年後ジェネシスに効いた
薬をもって来られましたね
10:34
MR: Chris, the astonishing thing
is that this absolutely worthless
クリス 驚く事に
ジェネシスに希望を垣間見せただけで
10:38
piece of powder
クリス 驚く事に
ジェネシスに希望を垣間見せただけで
10:43
that had the sparkle of a promise
of hope for Jenesis
全く無価値と思われたわずかな粉は
10:45
is not only keeping Jenesis
and other people alive today,
今日 ジェネシスや
他の人々を生かし続けるだけでなく
10:49
but produces almost a billion
and a half dollars a year in revenue.
およそ年間15億ドルの収益を
生み出しているのです
10:54
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:58
CA: So here you go.
やりましたね
11:02
So you took this company public, right?
それでその会社を上場したのですよね?
11:05
And made an absolute fortune.
そして莫大な財を成しました
11:08
And how much have you paid Glaxo,
by the way, after that 25,000?
ところでグラクソには2万5千ドルの他
いくら支払ったのですか?
11:11
MR: Yeah, well, every year we pay them
10 percent of 1.5 billion,
そうですね毎年15億ドルの10%の
1億5千万ドルを支払っています
11:15
150 million dollars,
last year 100 million dollars.
昨年は1億ドル払いました
11:19
It's the best return on investment
they ever received. (Laughter)
これは今までで最高の利益でした (笑)
11:22
CA: And the best news of all, I guess,
そして一番良いニュースは
11:25
is this.
これだと思います
11:28
MR: Yes. Jenesis is an absolutely
brilliant young lady.
そうです ジェネシスは実に明るく
若々しい女性です
11:29
She's alive, healthy today at 30.
活発で健康的で今年30歳になりました
11:34
You see me, Bina and Jenesis there.
ビーナもジェネシスも来ていますよ
11:36
The most amazing thing about Jenesis
ジェネシスで最も驚くべきことは
11:39
is that while she could do
anything with her life,
彼女が活気に満ちて
どんな事も出来るという事です
11:42
and believe me, if you grew up
your whole life with people
本当です 致命的な病気にかかっていると
皆に面と向かって
11:45
in your face saying
that you've got a fatal disease,
言われながら育ってきたら おそらく
11:48
I would probably run to Tahiti and just
not want to run into anybody again.
私ならタヒチに逃げて
もう二度と誰にも会いたくないと思うでしょう
11:51
But instead she chooses to work
in United Therapeutics.
しかしそうではなく彼女は私のユナイテッド
セラピューティクスで働く事を選びました
11:56
She says she wants to do all she can
to help other people
彼女は他の人たちを助ける為
希少疾患に薬を提供するなど
11:59
with orphan diseases get medicines,
自分に出来る全ての事をやりたいと
言いました
12:03
and today, she's our project leader
for all telepresence activities,
そして今日彼女は私たちのテレプレゼンス活動の
プロジェクトリーダーになって
12:05
where she helps digitally unite
the entire company to work together
そこで彼女は肺高血圧症の
治療法を見つける為に
12:10
to find cures for pulmonary hypertension.
会社全体をデジタルで繋ぎ
共に働いています
12:13
CA: But not everyone who has this disease
has been so fortunate.
しかしこの病気の全ての人が
そんなに幸運だとは限りませんよね
12:16
There are still many people dying,
and you are tackling that too. How?
未だに死に直面している人々もいて
それに対しあなたはどのように対処しているのですか?
12:19
MR: Exactly, Chris. There's some 3,000
people a year in the United States alone,
その通りです クリス アメリカだけでも
年間3千人あまりの人々が死に瀕しています
12:24
perhaps 10 times that number worldwide,
おそらく世界規模だとその
10倍の数の人たちが
12:28
who continue to die of this illness
この病気が原因で亡くなり続けています
12:31
because the medicines
slow down the progression
薬が進行を遅らせてはいますが それを
12:33
but they don't halt it.
止めるまでには至っていません
12:36
The only cure for pulmonary hypertension,
pulmonary fibrosis,
肺高血圧症 肺腺維症
12:38
cystic fibrosis, emphysema,
のう胞腺維 肺気腫
12:42
COPD, what Leonard Nimoy just died of,
レナード・二モイの死因である
COPDの唯一の治療法は
12:45
is a lung transplant,
肺移植なのです
12:48
but sadly, there are only enough
available lungs for 2,000 people
しかし悲しい事にアメリカで1年に肺移植に
使える肺はわずか2千しかありません
12:50
in the U.S. a year
to get a lung transplant,
しかし悲しい事にアメリカで1年に肺移植に
使える肺はわずか2千しかありません
12:55
whereas nearly a half
million people a year
一方1年に50万人近くの人々が
12:58
die of end-stage lung failure.
末期の肺不全で亡くなっています
13:01
CA: So how can you address that?
それにどのように対処する事が
出来るでしょうか?
13:03
MR: So I conceptualize the possibility
ビルのパーツや機械のパーツが
13:06
that just like we keep cars and planes
大量に供給されることで
車や飛行機や建物が
13:09
and buildings going forever
ずっと状態を維持出来るのと同じように
13:12
with an unlimited supply
of building parts and machine parts,
私は可能性を具体的に追及しています
13:14
why can't we create an unlimited supply
of transplantable organs
人々を無期限に生かし続ける為に
特に肺の病気の人たちに対し
13:19
to keep people living indefinitely,
移植可能な臓器の大量の供給が
13:22
and especially people with lung disease.
なぜ出来ないのでしょうか
13:25
So we've teamed up with the decoder
of the human genome, Craig Venter,
それで私たちはヒトゲノム解析者
クレイグ・ベンターと
13:27
and the company he founded
彼が創設した会社や
13:33
with Peter Diamandis,
the founder of the X Prize,
X プライズの創設者
ピーター・ディアマンディスとチームを組み
13:35
to genetically modify
豚の臓器が人間の体に
13:38
the pig genome
豚の臓器が人間の体に
13:40
so that the pig's organs will not
be rejected by the human body
拒否反応を示さないように
豚ゲノムを遺伝学的に修正しました
13:42
and thereby to create an unlimited supply
その結果移植可能な臓器の大量供給が
13:47
of transplantable organs.
可能になりました
13:50
We do this through our company,
United Therapeutics.
私たちの会社ユナイテッドセラピューティクス
を通してこれを行っています
13:52
CA: So you really believe that within,
what, a decade,
10年以内に 移植可能な肺の不足は
13:55
that this shortage of transplantable lungs
maybe be cured, through these guys?
おそらくこの人たちによって
本当に解決されると信じているのですね?
13:58
MR: Absolutely, Chris.
絶対です クリス
14:03
I'm as certain of that as I was
of the success that we've had
シリウス XMのテレビ放送の成功と
14:04
with direct television
broadcasting, Sirius XM.
同じくらい確実だと思っていますよ
14:08
It's actually not rocket science.
実際これはロケット科学ではありません
14:11
It's straightforward engineering away
one gene after another.
これは遺伝子を次々と追っていく
分かりやすい工学なのです
14:13
We're so lucky to be born in the time
that sequencing genomes
私たちはこのような時代に生まれて
とても幸運でした
14:17
is a routine activity,
順番に並んだゲノムが所定の活動をして
14:21
and the brilliant folks
at Synthetic Genomics
シンセティックジェノミクスの優秀な職員が
14:24
are able to zero in on the pig genome,
豚のゲノムに専念する事が出来
14:26
find exactly the genes
that are problematic, and fix them.
問題のある遺伝子を見つけ出し
修正するのですから
14:28
CA: But it's not just bodies that --
though that is amazing.
驚くべき事に体だけに限ったものでは
ないのですね
14:32
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:35
It's not just long-lasting bodies
that are of interest to you now.
現在皆さんが興味をお持ちの
不変の身体のみならず
14:38
It's long-lasting minds.
不変の精神に関する事でもあるのです
14:42
And I think this graph for you
says something quite profound.
このグラフには 大変重要な事が
示されていると思うのですが
14:44
What does this mean?
どういう意味でしょうか?
14:50
MR: What this graph means,
and it comes from Ray Kurzweil,
このグラフと レイ・カーツウェルによると
コンピューター処理、
14:51
is that the rate of development
in computer processing
ハードウエア、ファームウェアやソフトウェア
における発達の割合は
14:55
hardware, firmware and software,
今日 ここまでのプレゼンで見たように
15:00
has been advancing along a curve
この上向きのカーブに沿って進歩し続け
15:03
such that by the 2020s, as we saw
in earlier presentations today,
情報と私たちを取り巻く世界を
15:06
there will be information technology
人間の心と同じ速度で処理する
情報工学が
15:10
that processes information
and the world around us
2020年代には
現れるだろうという事です
15:13
at the same rate as a human mind.
2020年代には
現れるだろうという事です
15:16
CA: And so that being so, you're actually
getting ready for this world
ある事が実現可能だと信じることによって
15:20
by believing that we will soon
be able to, what,
あなたは実際にそんな世界に対する
準備をしているのですね
15:23
actually take the contents of our brains
and somehow preserve them forever?
実際我々の脳の情報内容を取り出し
どうにかしてそれらを永久に保存するとか?
15:27
How do you describe that?
どんなものか教えてもらえますか?
15:34
MR: Well, Chris, what we're working on
is creating a situation
そうですね クリス 私たちが取り組んで
いるのは人々がマインドファイル―
15:36
where people can create a mind file,
その人の特徴、個性、記憶、感情、信条、
15:40
and a mind file is the collection
of their mannerisms, personality,
態度、価値観等の集積や今日グーグル、
アマゾン、フェイスブックに
15:43
recollection, feelings,
押し寄せる全ての情報を入れたもの―
を作りだし
15:47
beliefs, attitudes and values,
押し寄せる全ての情報を入れたもの―
を作りだし
15:48
everything that we've poured today
into Google, into Amazon, into Facebook,
そこに蓄えられた全ての情報を基に
数十年のうちには
15:50
and all of this information stored there
will be able, in the next couple decades,
ソフトウェアが意識さえ創り出して
マインドファイルの中に
15:56
once software is able
to recapitulate consciousness,
マインドファイルの中に
溢れかえった情報から
16:02
be able to revive the consciousness
which is imminent in our mind file.
意識を甦らせられるような
状況にしたいのです
16:07
CA: Now you're not just
messing around with this.
気まぐれにちょっと
やっている訳ではないのですね
16:12
You're serious. I mean, who is this?
真剣な取り組みですね  
これは誰ですか?
16:14
MR: This is a robot version of
my beloved spouse, Bina.
私の愛する伴侶ビーナのロボットです
16:17
And we call her Bina 48.
ビーナ48と呼んでいます
16:22
She was programmed
by Hanson Robotics out of Texas.
テキサスのハンセン・ロボテック社で
プログラムされました
16:24
There's the centerfold
from National Geographic magazine
彼女のヘルパーの一人と
ナショナルジオグラフィックマガジンの
16:28
with one of her caregivers,
中央見開きページに出ています
16:31
and she roams the web
ウェブをあちこち見て
16:34
and has hundreds of hours
of Bina's mannerisms, personalities.
何百時間もかけてビーナの
特徴や個性を捉えています
16:36
She's kind of like a two-year-old kid,
彼女は2歳児のような所がありますが
16:41
but she says things
that blow people away,
皆を驚かせるような事も言います
それは
16:43
best expressed by perhaps
ニューヨークタイムズ
ピューリッアー賞受賞者の
16:46
a New York Times Pulitzer Prize-winning
journalist Amy Harmon
記者エミィ・ハーモンによる
最高の表現のようです
16:49
who says her answers
are often frustrating,
エミィの答えには
しばしば失望させられますが
16:53
but other times as compelling as those
of any flesh person she's interviewed.
時として彼女はインタビューされる側の
意見と同じくらい人を惹きつける事があります
16:55
CA: And is your thinking here,
part of your hope here, is that
あなたがここで考え望んでいることは
17:02
this version of Bina can in a sense
live on forever, or some future upgrade
このビーナのクローンはある意味で
永遠に生き続けることが出来る又は
17:06
to this version can live on forever?
将来改良したクローンは
そうなるという事ですね?
17:12
MR: Yes. Not just Bina, but everybody.
そうです ビーナだけでなく
誰でもそうなります
17:15
You know, it costs us virtually nothing
to store our mind files
フェイスブック、インスタグラム等々に
私たちのマインドファイルを
17:17
on Facebook, Instagram, what-have-you.
保存するには事実上
一切費用は掛かりません
17:21
Social media is I think one of the most
extraordinary inventions of our time,
ソーシャルメディアは我々の時代の
最も驚くべき発明の一つだと思います
17:24
and as apps become available
that will allow us
アプリが利用できるになるにつれ
私たちはスマホに物を尋ねる事も
17:28
to out-Siri Siri, better and better,
出来るし どんどん賢くなっています
17:32
and develop consciousness
operating systems,
又意識オペレーティングシステムを向上させ
17:35
everybody in the world,
billions of people,
世界中の何十億万人の人々が皆
ウェブ上の
17:38
will be able to develop
mind clones of themselves
自分自身の人生を持つ
自分自身のマインドクローンを
17:41
that will have their own life on the web.
進歩させることが出来るでしょう
17:45
CA: So the thing is, Martine,
マーティーン それでは 要は
17:47
that in any normal conversation,
this would sound stark-staring mad,
どんな普通の会話の中でも
これは荒唐無稽に聞こえるかもしれませんが
17:49
but in the context of your life,
what you've done,
あなたが人生の背景で やってきた事
17:53
some of the things we've heard this week,
今週私たちが聞いた いくつかの事柄
17:56
the constructed realities
that our minds give,
私たちの心が組み立てる事実は
17:58
I mean, you wouldn't bet against it.
確かではないという事ですね
18:00
MR: Well, I think it's really nothing
coming from me.
さて 私から出て来るものは
本当に何もないと思います
18:04
If anything, I'm perhaps a bit
of a communicator of activities
もしあるとしたら おそらく私は
中国、日本、アメリカ、ヨーロッパの
18:07
that are being undertaken
by the greatest companies
大企業によって引き受けられている
ちょっとした
18:14
in China, Japan, India, the U.S., Europe.
活動の伝達者なのかもしれません
18:17
There are tens of millions of people
working on writing code
何千万人もの人々が
人間の意識のより多くの面を表す
18:20
that expresses more and more aspects
of our human consciousness,
コードを書く事に取り組んでいます
18:25
and you don't have to be a genius
to see that all these threads
全てのこれらの共通理念を一つにして
18:29
are going to come together
and ultimately create human consciousness,
究極的に人間の意識を作り出すには
天才である必要はないのです
18:34
and it's something we'll value.
この活動は私たちが尊重することなのです
18:38
There are so many things
to do in this life,
この人生に於いて 色々すべき事があります
18:40
and if we could have a simulacrum,
a digital doppelgänger of ourselves
自分の似姿―自身のデジタル分身―を
持つことが出来
18:43
that helps us process books, do shopping,
本を読んでくれたり 買い物をしたり
18:47
be our best friends,
親友になれるのであれば
18:50
I believe our mind clones,
these digital versions of ourselves,
私は自分たちのマインドクローン
自分たちのデジタルバージョンとは
18:52
will ultimately be our best friends,
最終的には親友になれると信じています
18:55
and for me personally and Bina personally,
私にとって個人的に それはビーナです
18:58
we love each other like crazy.
私たちは互いに夢中です
19:00
Each day, we are always saying, like,
毎日いつもこんなことを言っています
19:02
"Wow, I love you even more
than 30 years ago.
「30年前より今の方がずっと好きだよ」
19:03
And so for us, the prospect of mind clones
だから私たちにとって
マインドクローンの可能性と
19:06
and regenerated bodies
再生された身体のお陰で
19:09
is that our love affair, Chris,
can go on forever.
二人の恋愛関係は永遠に続くんです
クリス
19:11
And we never get bored of each other.
I'm sure we never will.
私たちは互いに飽きる事は決してないし
これからもそうだと信じています
19:14
CA: I think Bina's here, right?
MR: She is, yeah.
(クリス) ビーナはここにいますよね?
(マーティーン) ええ 来ていますよ
19:17
CA: Would it be too much, I don't know,
do we have a handheld mic?
登場頂くのはどうでしょう―マイクある?
19:20
Bina, could we invite you to the stage?
I just have to ask you one question.
ビーナ ステージに上がっていただけますか?
一つ質問したい事がありますし
19:23
Besides, we need to see you.
皆さんもあなたにお会いしたいでしょう
19:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:28
Thank you, thank you.
ありがとうございます
19:35
Come and join Martine here.
マーティーンとこちらにどうぞ
19:36
I mean, look, when you got married,
お二人が結婚された時
19:39
if someone had told you that,
in a few years time,
誰かがあなたにこう言ったなら
19:44
the man you were marrying
would become a woman,
数年後に あなたの結婚相手は女性になり
19:47
and a few years after that,
you would become a robot --
その数年後に あなたはロボット
になるだろうと
19:49
(Laughter) --
(笑) --
19:52
how has this gone? How has it been?
どんな経緯だったのですか?
如何お感じですか?
19:55
Bina Rothblatt: It's been really
an exciting journey,
(ビーナ・ロスブラット)本当にワクワク
する冒険でした
19:59
and I would have never
thought that at the time,
当時はそんな事考えたこともなかったけど
20:01
but we started making goals
and setting those goals
目標を作り始めてその目標を設定して
20:03
and accomplishing things,
それをやり遂げました
20:07
and before you knew it,
we just keep going up and up
皆が知る前に私たちはどんどん
上昇し続けて
20:09
and we're still not stopping,
so it's great.
未だに止まらず上り続けています
素晴らしいわ
20:11
CA: Martine told me something
really beautiful,
マーティーンがこの前スカイプで本当に
素晴らしい事を伝えてくれました
20:14
just actually on Skype before this,
マーティーンがこの前スカイプで本当に
素晴らしい事を伝えてくれました
20:17
which was that he wanted
to live for hundreds of years
それはマインドファイルとして何百年も
生き続けたいという事でした
20:19
as a mind file,
それはマインドファイルとして何百年も
生き続けたいという事でした
20:25
but not if it wasn't with you.
それはお二人ご一緒にという事でしょう
20:28
BR: That's right,
we want to do it together.
その通りです 私たちは一緒に
生き続けたいのです
20:31
We're cryonicists as well,
and we want to wake up together.
私たちは人体冷蔵をし
一緒に目を覚ましたいと思っています
20:33
CA: So just so as you know,
from my point of view,
お分かりのように 私が考える限り
20:36
this isn't only one of the most
astonishing lives I have heard,
これは今まで聞いた中で最も驚くべき生命
の一つであるだけでなく
20:39
it's one of the most astonishing
love stories I've ever heard.
最も驚くべき愛の物語の一つです
20:42
It's just a delight to have you
both here at TED.
ご一緒にTEDに登壇して頂けて光栄です
20:45
Thank you so much.
どうもありがとうございました
20:48
MR: Thank you.
ありがとうございました
20:49
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:51
Translator:Shoko Takaki
Reviewer:Eriko T.

sponsored links

Martine Rothblatt - Transhumanist
Whether she’s inventing satellite radio, developing life-saving drugs or digitizing the human mind, Martine Rothblatt has a knack for turning visionary ideas into commonplace technology.

Why you should listen

After creating satellite radio with a startup that went on to become Sirius XM, Martine Rothblatt was on the verge of retirement. But her daughter’s rare lung disease inspired her to start United Therapeutics and develop an oral medication that changed the lives of thousands of patients. Now with the Terasem Foundation, she’s researching the digital preservation of personality as a means to enable the contents of our minds to outlast our bodies.

Rothblatt’s books include The Apartheid of Sex, which (inspired by her experiences as a transgendered woman) takes on conventional wisdom surrounding gender. Her latest book, Virtually Human, explores human rights for the digital lifeforms just over the horizon.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.