13:52
TED2015

Latif Nasser: The amazing story of the man who gave us modern pain relief

ラティフ・ナサー: 現代の「痛み」治療を生んだ男

Filmed:

患者にとって最も根本的で一番の悩みである「痛み」、医師たちはこれを、非常に長い間ほとんど無視してきました。ラティフ・ナサーは、詩情と知識あふれる語り口で、プロレスラーであり医師であったジョン・J・ボニカの驚くべき物語を語ります。ボニカは、痛みに真剣に向き合うよう医師たちを説得し、何百万もの人々の人生を変えた男なのです。

- Radio researcher
Latif Nasser is the director of research at Radiolab, where he has reported on such disparate topics as culture-bound illnesses, snowflake photography, sinking islands and 16th-century automata. Full bio

A few years ago,
数年前のことです
00:12
my mom developed rheumatoid arthritis.
母が 関節リウマチを患いました
00:14
Her wrists, knees and toes swelled up,
causing crippling, chronic pain.
手首も 膝も つま先も腫れ上がり
慢性的なひどい痛みが伴いました
00:18
She had to file for disability.
身体障害者の申請が必要になり
00:26
She stopped attending our local mosque.
モスクに通うことさえ止めました
00:28
Some mornings it was too painful
for her to brush her teeth.
朝 痛みが激しくて
歯も磨けないこともありました
00:31
I wanted to help.
何とかしてあげたかった
00:36
But I didn't know how.
でも どうしたらいいのか・・・
00:38
I'm not a doctor.
私は医者ではありません
00:40
So, what I am is a historian of medicine.
医学史が専門です
00:43
So I started to research
the history of chronic pain.
だから慢性的な痛みの歴史を
調べ始めたのです
00:47
Turns out, UCLA has an entire
history of pain collection
その過程で UCLAの書庫に
痛みの歴史に関する蔵書が
00:51
in their archives.
揃っていることを知りました
00:56
And I found a story --
a fantastic story --
そこで私は ある男に関する
途方も無い話を見つけました
00:58
of a man who saved -- rescued --
millions of people from pain;
その男は 私の母のように
痛みに苦しむ何百万の人々を
01:02
people like my mom.
救ったのです
01:07
Yet, I had never heard of him.
でも 私はその人をまったく知らず
01:10
There were no biographies
of him, no Hollywood movies.
伝記も ハリウッド映画も
ありませんでした
01:12
His name was John J. Bonica.
男の名前は ジョン・J・ボニカ
01:16
But when our story begins,
ただ この物語の初めの頃は
01:21
he was better known as
Johnny "Bull" Walker.
ジョニー・ブル・ウォーカーという
名で通っていました
01:22
It was a summer day in 1941.
時は1941年 ある夏の日のこと
01:28
The circus had just arrived
in the tiny town of Brookfield, New York.
NY州の小さな町ブルックフィールドに
サーカスがやって来ました
01:31
Spectators flocked to see
the wire-walkers, the tramp clowns --
大勢の観客が
綱渡りや ピエロを見ようと集まりました
01:37
if they were lucky, the human cannonball.
運が良ければ人間大砲も見られました
01:41
They also came to see the strongman,
Johnny "Bull" Walker,
観客のお目当てのひとつが
怪力男ジョニー・ブル・ウォーカーでした
01:44
a brawny bully who'd pin you for a dollar.
筋骨隆々の乱暴者で
1ドル出せば 技をかけてくれました
01:48
You know, on that particular day,
a voice rang out
ある日 サーカスのスピーカーから
01:52
over the circus P.A. system.
大声が鳴り響きました
01:55
They needed a doctor urgently,
in the live animal tent.
猛獣のテントで
至急 医者が必要だというのです
01:57
Something had gone wrong
with the lion tamer.
ライオン使いに
何かあったようでした
02:01
The climax of his act had gone wrong,
ショーのクライマックスで
事故が起こり
02:03
and his head was stuck
inside the lion's mouth.
ライオンの口の中に
頭がはまってしまったのです
02:06
He was running out of air;
彼は窒息寸前でした
02:11
the crowd watched in horror
彼がもがき苦しみ 気を失っていくのを
02:13
as he struggled and then passed out.
観客は 恐れおののきながら見ていました
02:15
When the lion finally did relax its jaws,
ライオンがやっと噛む力を緩めると
02:18
the lion tamer just slumped
to the ground, motionless.
ライオン使いは地面に崩れ落ち
ピクリとも動きません
02:22
When he came to a few minutes later,
数分後 彼が目を覚ますと
02:27
he saw a familiar figure hunched over him.
見慣れた人影が
自分を覗きこんでいました
02:30
It was Bull Walker.
ブル・ウォーカーでした
02:33
The strongman had given the lion tamer
mouth-to-mouth, and saved his life.
怪力男の彼が ライオン使いに
人工呼吸をして命を救ったのです
02:35
Now, the strongman hadn't told anyone,
この怪力男には秘密がありました
02:42
but he was actually
a third-year medical student.
実は医学部の3年生だったのです
02:44
He toured with the circus
during summers to pay tuition,
夏の間 サーカスで巡業して
授業料を稼いでいましたが
02:48
but kept it a secret
to protect his persona.
自分のイメージを保つために
秘密にしていたのです
02:52
He was supposed to be
a brute, a villain --
彼は 凶暴な悪党役だったので
02:55
not a nerdy do-gooder.
真面目な善人であっては
いけませんでした
02:59
His medical colleagues didn't
know his secret, either.
医大にも秘密は
知られていませんでした
03:02
As he put it, "If you were
an athlete, you were a dumb dodo."
彼の言葉です
「スポーツマンなら 馬鹿でなくては」
03:05
So he didn't tell them about the circus,
だから医大では サーカスのことや
03:09
or about how he wrestled professionally
on evenings and weekends.
夕方や週末にプロレスをしていることは
口にしませんでした
03:12
He used a pseudonym like Bull Walker,
ブル・ウォーカーや
後に マスクド・マーベルといった
03:18
or later, the Masked Marvel.
リングネームを名乗りました
03:20
He even kept it a secret that same year,
その年に ライトウェイト級
03:23
when he was crowned
the Light Heavyweight Champion
世界チャンピオンになった時さえ
03:27
of the world.
秘密にしていたほどです
03:30
Over the years, John J. Bonica
lived these parallel lives.
ジョン・J・ボニカは
長年 二重生活を続けていました
03:33
He was a wrestler;
プロレスラーの彼と
03:38
he was a doctor.
医者の彼
03:40
He was a heel;
悪党の彼と
03:41
he was a hero.
ヒーローの彼
03:43
He inflicted pain,
片方は 痛みを与え
03:45
and he treated it.
もう片方は 治療しました
03:46
And he didn’t know it at the time,
but over the next five decades,
そして 当時は気づいていませんでしたが
その後 50年以上に渡って
03:49
he'd draw on these dueling identities
彼は 対立する2つの人格を利用して
03:52
to forge a whole new way
to think about pain.
まったく新しい 痛みの捉え方を
生み出すことになりました
03:55
It'd change modern medicine
so much so, that decades later,
この捉え方は現代の医学を大きく変え
03:59
Time magazine would call him
pain relief's founding father.
数十年後にタイム誌は 彼を
「鎮痛法の父」と呼ぶことになります
04:03
But that all happened later.
でも それは まだ先のこと
04:09
In 1942, Bonica graduated
medical school and married Emma,
ボニカは1942年に医学部を卒業し
恋人のエマと結婚しました
04:12
his sweetheart, whom he had met
at one of his matches years before.
数年前 試合で出会ったのです
04:17
He still wrestled in secret -- he had to.
彼は密かにプロレスを続けていました
そうするしかなかったのです
04:22
His internship at New York's
St. Vincent's Hospital paid nothing.
NYのセントビンセント病院で
研修医をしていましたが 無給だったのです
04:25
With his championship belt,
he wrestled in big-ticket venues,
チャンピオンベルトを着けていれば
マジソン・スクエアガーデンのような
04:31
like Madison Square Garden,
入場料の高い場所で
04:34
against big-time opponents,
一流の相手 例えば
04:36
like Everett "The Blonde Bear" Marshall,
ブロンドの熊 エベレット・マーシャルや
04:38
or three-time world champion,
Angelo Savoldi.
3度 世界チャンピオンに輝いた
アンジェロ・サボルディと試合ができました
04:41
The matches took a toll on his body;
試合では 体に大きな負担がかかりました
04:46
he tore hip joints, fractured ribs.
股関節は裂け 肋骨に ひびが入りました
04:48
One night, The Terrible Turk's big toe
scratched a scar like Capone's
ある晩には 恐怖のトルコ人
テリブル・タークの足の親指で 彼の頬には
04:52
down the side of his face.
アル・カポネばりの傷が付きました
04:57
The next morning at work,
he had to wear a surgical mask to hide it.
翌朝 仕事場では 傷を隠すため
手術用マスクをつけるはめになりました
04:59
Twice Bonica showed up to the O.R.
with one eye so bruised,
ひどいアザで片目が見えないまま
手術室に来たことも
05:04
he couldn't see out of it.
2度ありました
05:09
But worst of all were
his mangled cauliflower ears.
一番ひどかったのは
潰れて変形した耳でした
05:11
He said they felt like two baseballs
on the sides of his head.
頭の両側に野球ボールが
付いているようだと 彼は言いました
05:16
Pain just kept accumulating in his life.
彼の人生に 痛みが
どんどん蓄積していました
05:21
Next, he watched his wife go
into labor at his hospital.
その後 彼は自分の病院で
妻の出産に立ち会いました
05:25
She heaved and pushed, clearly in anguish.
妻は いきみながら
明らかに苦しんでいました
05:29
Her obstetrician called
out to the intern on duty
産科医が当直の研修医を呼び出して
05:33
to give her a few drops of ether
to ease her pain.
苦痛を和らげるために
エーテルを与えるよう指示しました
05:36
But the intern was a young guy,
just three weeks on the job --
ところが この研修医は まだ若手で
勤務してわずか3週間 ―
05:39
he was jittery, and in applying the ether,
手は震え エーテルを投与する時に
05:42
irritated Emma's throat.
エマの喉を刺激しました
05:45
She vomited and choked,
and started to turn blue.
エマは嘔吐して喉がつまり
青ざめてきました
05:48
Bonica, who was watching all this,
pushed the intern out of the way,
ずっと見ていたボニカは
研修医を押しのけ
05:52
cleared her airway,
妻の気道を確保し
05:58
and saved his wife
and his unborn daughter.
彼女と 生まれてくる娘の命を救いました
05:59
At that moment, he decided
to devote his life to anesthesiology.
この瞬間 彼は麻酔学に
人生を捧げる決意をしたのです
06:04
Later, he'd even go on to help develop
the epidural, for delivering mothers.
後に分娩中の母親に使う
硬膜外麻酔の開発にも手を貸しました
06:09
But before he could focus on obstetrics,
ただ 産科に取り組む前に
06:14
Bonica had to report for basic training.
研修を終えなければなりませんでした
06:17
Right around D-Day,
ちょうどDデイの頃
06:22
Bonica showed up
to Madigan Army Medical Center,
ボニカは タコマ近郊の
マディガン陸軍医療センターに
06:23
near Tacoma.
やって来ました
06:27
At 7,700 beds, it was one of the largest
army hospitals in America.
7,700床を備える
全米最大の陸軍病院の一つでした
06:28
Bonica was in charge
of all pain control there.
彼は そこで疼痛管理を
すべて任されました
06:34
He was only 27.
まだ27歳でした
06:37
Treating so many patients,
Bonica started noticing cases
大勢の患者を治療する中で
ボニカが気付いたのは
06:40
that contradicted everything
he had learned.
学んできたことと矛盾する
症例の存在でした
06:43
Pain was supposed to be
a kind of alarm bell -- in a good way --
痛みは いい意味での「警報」と
考えられていました
06:46
a body's way of signaling an injury,
like a broken arm.
身体が 骨折などのケガを
知らせているというのです
06:51
But in some cases,
ところが 患者が
06:56
like after a patient had a leg amputated,
足を切断した後のような場合には
06:58
that patient might still complain
of pain in that nonexistent leg.
患者が 存在しない足に痛みを
訴えることがあったのです
07:01
But if the injury had been treated, why
would the alarm bell keep ringing?
でも治療が済んでいるのに
なぜ警報が鳴り続けるのか?
07:06
There were other cases in which there
was no evidence of an injury whatsoever,
他にも ケガをした形跡は
まったくないのに
07:10
and yet, still the patient hurt.
患者が痛みを感じる例もありました
07:15
Bonica tracked down all the specialists
at his hospital -- surgeons,
ボニカは病院にいる専門家 全員に
たずね回りました
07:18
neurologists, psychiatrists, others.
外科医や神経科医 精神科医などです
07:22
And he tried to get
their opinions on his patients.
彼の患者について
意見を求めようとしたのです
07:25
It took too long, so he started organizing
group meetings over lunch.
でも それでは時間がかかり過ぎるので
昼食をとりながら会議することにしました
07:29
It would be like a tag team of specialists
going up against the patient's pain.
それは さながら患者の痛みに立ち向かう
専門家のタッグチームのようでした
07:35
No one had ever focused on pain
this way before.
その時まで そんな風に
痛みに注目した人はいませんでした
07:39
After that, he hit the books.
次に 彼は本に当たりました
07:44
He read every medical textbook
he could get his hands on,
手に入る あらゆる医学書を読み
07:47
carefully noting every mention
of the word "pain."
「痛み」という言葉があれば
注意深く書き留めました
07:50
Out of the 14,000 pages he read,
14,000ページを読破して
「痛み」という言葉が載っていたのは
07:54
the word "pain" was
on 17 and a half of them.
17ページ半でした
07:58
Seventeen and a half.
たった17ページ半です
08:02
For the most basic, most common,
most frustrating part of being a patient.
患者にとって根本的な 最も一般的で
一番の悩みなのに・・・
08:04
Bonica was shocked -- I'm quoting him,
ボニカは驚きました
08:10
he said, "What the hell kind of conclusion
can you come to there?
彼の言葉です
「いったい何で こんな結論に至ったんだ?
08:13
The most important thing
from the patient's perspective,
患者にとって一番重要なことについて
08:17
they don't talk about."
書いてないじゃないか」
08:20
So over the next eight years,
Bonica would talk about it.
それから8年間
ボニカは「痛み」について語り
08:23
He'd write about it; he'd write
those missing pages.
「痛み」について書き
空白のページを埋めていきました
08:27
He wrote what would later be known
as the Bible of Pain.
彼の著書は 後に「痛みのバイブル」と
呼ばれるようになりました
08:30
In it he proposed new strategies,
この本の中で 彼は
神経ブロック注射を用いた
08:34
new treatments using
nerve-block injections.
新しい治療方針と 治療法を提案し
08:38
He proposed a new institution,
the Pain Clinic,
昼食会議での議論を元に
新しい施設 ―
08:41
based on those lunchtime meetings.
「ペインクリニック」を提案しました
08:44
But the most important thing
about his book
ただ 彼の著書の本当の重要性とは
08:47
was that it was kind of an emotional
alarm bell for medicine.
それが感情から出た
医学への警告だったという点です
08:49
A desperate plea to doctors
to take pain seriously
患者が生きる中で感じる
痛みを真剣に捉えて欲しいと
08:54
in patients' lives.
医師たちに 必死に訴えたのです
09:00
He recast the very purpose of medicine.
彼は医学の目的の核心を問い直しました
09:03
The goal wasn't to make patients better;
医学のゴールは
患者を治すというより むしろ
09:07
it was to make patients feel better.
患者を楽にすることだと考えたのです
09:11
He pushed his pain agenda for decades,
彼は何十年にも渡って計画を進め
09:16
before it finally took hold
in the mid-'70s.
やっと定着したのが
70年代の中頃でした
09:19
Hundreds of pain clinics sprung up
all over the world.
数百のペインクリニックが
世界中で誕生したのです
09:22
But as they did -- a tragic twist.
ところが同じ頃 予想しなかった
悲劇が訪れました
09:27
Bonica's years of wrestling
caught up to him.
長年に渡るプロレスの影響が
ボニカの体に表れはじめたのです
09:31
He had been out of the ring
for over 20 years,
すでに 20年以上も
リングから遠ざかっていましたが
09:36
but those 1,500 professional bouts
had left a mark on his body.
1,500回に上る試合は
身体中に傷跡を残していました
09:38
Still in his mid-50s, he suffered
severe osteoarthritis.
50歳半ばにして
重度の変形性関節症を患いました
09:43
Over the next 20 years
he'd have 22 surgeries,
その後 20年以上に渡り
22回の手術を受けることになりました
09:48
including four spine operations,
脊椎を4回 手術し
09:52
and hip replacement after hip replacement.
繰り返し人工股関節置換術を受けました
09:54
He could barely raise
his arm, turn his neck.
ほとんど 腕は上がらず
首も回せませんでした
09:58
He needed aluminum crutches to walk.
歩くにもアルミ製の松葉杖がいりました
10:02
His friends and former students
became his doctors.
友人や かつての教え子が
彼を診察しました
10:05
One recalled that he probably
had more nerve-block injections
その一人が こう回想しています
「彼は おそらく地球上で一番
10:09
than anyone else on the planet.
神経ブロック注射を受けた男だろう」
10:14
Already a workaholic,
he worked even more --
ボニカは元々 仕事人間でしたが
さらに働くようになりました
10:18
15- to 18-hour days.
1日に15~18時間もです
10:21
Healing others became more
than just his job,
彼にとって 誰かの病をいやすのは
単なる仕事ではなく
10:23
it was his own most effective
form of relief.
自分の苦痛を和らげる行為でした
10:26
"If I wasn't as busy as I am,"
he told a reporter at the time,
当時 記者に こう語っています
「もし これほど忙しくなかったら
10:30
"I would be a completely disabled guy."
今頃は すっかり
身障者になっていたでしょう」
10:34
On a business trip to Florida
in the early 1980s,
1980年代初頭 ボニカが
フロリダに出張した時
10:39
Bonica got a former student to drive
him to the Hyde Park area in Tampa.
かつての教え子に運転させて
タンパのハイド・パーク地区へ出かけました
10:42
They drove past palm trees
and pulled up to an old mansion,
ヤシ並木を通り
一軒の古い豪邸に車を寄せました
10:49
with giant silver howitzer cannons
hidden in the garage.
ガレージには 銀色の
巨大な大砲がしまってありました
10:53
The house belonged to the Zacchini family,
この邸宅を所有するのは
ザッキーニ家
10:58
who were something like
American circus royalty.
アメリカのサーカス界では
王族のような存在です
11:01
Decades earlier, Bonica had watched them,
ボニカは 何十年も前に
彼らを見たことがありました
11:06
clad in silver jumpsuits and goggles,
銀のジャンプスーツに
ゴーグルをつけ
11:08
doing the act they pioneered --
the Human Cannonball.
彼らが開発したショー
人間大砲を披露していました
11:11
But now they were like him: retired.
でも その頃はボニカと同様
引退した身でした
11:16
That generation is all dead
now, including Bonica,
ボニカを含めて
この世代の人は もう亡くなっているので
11:21
so there's no way to know exactly
what they said that day.
その日 どんな会話があったのか
知るすべはありません
11:24
But still, I love imagining it.
でも 私は想像するのです
11:28
The strongman and the human
cannonballs reunited,
再会した怪力男と人間大砲が
当時の古傷や
11:31
showing off old scars, and new ones.
新しい傷を見せ合うところを・・・
11:34
Maybe Bonica gave them medical advice.
ボニカは 医師として
アドバイスをしたかも知れません
11:37
Maybe he told them what he later
said in an oral history,
あるいは 後年 回想として語った話を
彼らにも話したかも知れません
11:40
which is that his time in the circus
and wrestling deeply molded his life.
サーカスとプロレスの時代が
自分の人生を形作ったことを
11:45
Bonica saw pain close up.
ボニカは「痛み」を間近で見ていました
11:53
He felt it. He lived it.
痛みを感じ 痛みの中で生きました
11:57
And it made it impossible
for him to ignore in others.
だから他人の痛みも
見過ごせませんでした
12:00
Out of that empathy, he spun
a whole new field,
そんな他者への共感を元に
まったく新しい分野を開拓し
12:05
played a major role in getting
medicine to acknowledge pain
医学が「痛み」自体を
きちんと理解するようになる上で
12:08
in and of itself.
重要な役割を果たしたのです
12:11
In that same oral history,
ボニカは 先ほど触れた回想の中で
12:14
Bonica claimed that pain
こう語っています
12:16
is the most complex human experience.
痛みは 人間の経験の中でも
最も複雑なものであり
12:19
That it involves your past life,
your current life,
そこには これまでの人生や
現在の暮らしや
12:24
your interactions, your family.
人との交流や
家族が含まれている と
12:28
That was definitely true for Bonica.
ボニカにとって
まさにその通りだったのです
12:31
But it was also true for my mom.
私の母にとっても そうでした
12:34
It's easy for doctors to see my mom
母は 医者の立場から見れば
12:40
as a kind of professional patient,
毎日 病院の待合室で過ごすだけの
12:43
a woman who just spends her days
in waiting rooms.
いわば「プロ患者」のように
見えるかもしれません
12:46
Sometimes I get stuck seeing her
that same way.
時には 私ですら
そう思ってしまいます
12:51
But as I saw Bonica's pain --
でも ボニカの「痛み」 が
12:57
a testament to his fully lived life --
充実した人生の証だと
気づいてからは
12:59
I started to remember all the things
that my mom's pain holds.
母の痛みの中にある すべてが
頭をよぎるようになりました
13:03
Before they got swollen and arthritic,
関節炎にかかって 腫れ上がる前
13:10
my mom's fingers clacked away
母の指は 勤務していた病院の
人事部でタイプライターを
13:14
in the hospital H.R. department
where she worked.
打ち続けていました
13:17
They folded samosas for our entire mosque.
その指で モスクに来る
全員分のサモサを包んでいました
13:21
When I was a kid, they cut my hair,
その指が 子どもだった私の髪を切り
13:26
wiped my nose,
私の鼻を拭き
13:30
tied my shoes.
靴ひもを縛ってくれたのです
13:32
Thank you.
ありがとう
13:41
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:43
Translated by Kazunori Akashi
Reviewed by Tomoyuki Suzuki

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Latif Nasser - Radio researcher
Latif Nasser is the director of research at Radiolab, where he has reported on such disparate topics as culture-bound illnesses, snowflake photography, sinking islands and 16th-century automata.

Why you should listen

The history of science is "brimming with tales stranger than fiction," says Latif Nasser, who wrote his PhD dissertation on the Tanganyika Laughter Epidemic of 1962. A writer and researcher, Nasser is now the research director at Radiolab, a job that allows him to dive into archives, talk to interesting people and tell stories as a way to think about science and society.

More profile about the speaker
Latif Nasser | Speaker | TED.com