sponsored links
TED1990

Frank Gehry: My days as a young rebel

フランク・ゲーリー: 若き反抗の日々

March 3, 1990

今では伝説的な奇才として知られる建築家フランク・ゲーリーが、カリフォルニア・ベニスビーチの自邸から現在建設中(講演当時)でその進行状況が気にかかるパリのアメリカン・センターまで、初期の作品の数々について簡略に紹介します。

Frank Gehry - Architect
A living legend, Frank Gehry has forged his own language of architecture, creating astonishing buildings all over the world, such as the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the Walt Disney Concert Hall in LA, and Manhattan's new IAC building. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
早速スライドを
一緒に見ていきましょう
00:12
I'm going to go right into the slides.
本日のプレゼンから分かることは
00:14
And all I'm going to try and prove to you with these slides
私の作品はみな
とても率直だということです
00:16
is that I do just very straight stuff.
00:21
And my ideas are --
私のアイデアは
00:25
in my head, anyway -- they're very logical
極めて論理的に出来ていて
00:27
and relate to what's going on and problem solving for clients.
世の中で進行中の事柄と
クライアントの問題解決に関係しています
00:33
I either convince clients at the end that I solve their problems,
私は問題が解決したと
クライアントに納得させるか
00:40
or I really do solve their problems,
実際に問題を解決します
00:42
because usually they seem to like it.
最終的には 皆さん気に入ってくれる
ケースがほとんどです
00:45
Let me go right into the slides.
では 早速スライドを見ていきましょう
照明を落とせますか
00:49
Can you turn off the light? Down.
暗いほうが好きなんです
00:54
I like to be in the dark.
00:56
I don't want you to see what I'm doing up here.
壇上で何をしてるか
見えないほうがうれしい
00:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:00
Anyway, I did this house in Santa Monica,
これは 私が設計した
サンタモニカの住宅です
01:03
and it got a lot of notoriety.
たくさんの悪評を受けました
ポルノ系のコミック本に載ったくらいです
01:06
In fact, it appeared in a porno comic book,
01:09
which is the slide on the right.
スライドの右側がそれです
01:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:20
This is in Venice.
カリフォルニア州ベニスの住宅です
01:23
I just show it because I want you to know
このプロジェクトをお見せした理由は
私は周辺環境を
意識して設計するからです
01:26
I'm concerned about context.
左側を見てください
01:28
On the left-hand side,
小さな住居が集まった環境です
01:30
I had the context of those little houses,
この環境となじむデザインを心掛けました
01:33
and I tried to build a building that fit into that context.
01:36
When people take pictures of these buildings out of that context
周辺の雰囲気をフレームに
入れずビルの写真だけ撮ると
01:40
they look really weird,
とても変てこなビルに
見えてしまいます
01:42
and my premise is that they make a lot more sense
私のデザインの前提条件は
01:45
when they're photographed or seen in that space.
その空間に置かれたり 写真に収められて
しっくりする事です
01:50
And then, once I deal with the context,
そして 周辺環境との関係をとりなしたら
01:54
I then try to make a place that's comfortable and private and fairly serene,
快適でプライベートな静かな
空間となるよう工夫します
02:01
as I hope you'll find that slide on the right.
そんな雰囲気を右側の写真から
感じ取ってもらえると嬉しいです
02:06
And then I did a law school for Loyola in downtown L.A.
これはロス市内の
ロヨラ大学法学部です
02:12
I was concerned about making a place for the study of law.
法を学ぶ空間の創造を意識しました
02:18
And we continue to work with this client.
クライアントと一緒になって
取り組んでいるプロジェクトです
02:22
The building on the right at the top is now under construction.
右手に見えるビルの最上階は
現在工事中です
02:27
The garage on the right -- the gray structure -- will be torn down,
右側のガレージ グレーの構造物は
解体される予定です
最終的には 複数の小さな教室が
02:33
finally, and several small classrooms will be placed
キャンパス内の中に作った
道路沿いに並びます
02:37
along this avenue that we've created, this campus.
02:41
And it all related to the clients and the students
そして 大学側と学生さんに意見を聞くと
02:47
from the very first meeting saying they felt denied a place.
一回目の会合から
「その場を拒絶された感がある」との意見で
「空間を意識できる場所」を
求めていました
02:52
They wanted a sense of place.
そこで 課題となったのが
いかにしてそのような空間を
02:54
And so the whole idea here was to create that kind of space
02:58
in downtown, in a neighborhood that was difficult to fit into.
融通の利かない都心に
織り込むかでした
03:05
And it was my theory, or my point of view,
私の理屈又は観点は
03:09
that one didn't upstage the neighborhood --
周囲を見下すような建物でなければ
03:14
one made accommodations.
全体との調和を生み出すと考えました
03:16
I tried to be inclusive, to include the buildings in the neighborhood,
よって 周辺の環境を
受け入れるよう努めました
03:20
whether they were buildings I liked or not.
私の好き嫌いは
二の次にしてです
03:25
In the '60s I started working with paper furniture
60年代には
紙で家具作りを始めました
03:28
and made a bunch of stuff that was very successful in Bloomingdale's.
ブルーミングデールで売れまくった
ヒット作も中にはあります
03:33
We even made flooring, walls and everything, out of cardboard.
段ボールでフローリングから壁まで
なんでも作りました
03:38
And the success of it threw me for a loop.
そして この成功に
むしろ当惑しました
家具での成功を
うまく受け止められなかった
03:42
I couldn't deal with the success of furniture --
建築家として
まだ十分な自信がなかった
03:44
I wasn't secure enough as an architect --
03:46
and so I closed it all up and made furniture that nobody would like.
それで全部引き上げて
誰も好まない家具を作りました
03:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:59
So, nobody would like this.
これをいいと思う人はいないでしょう
04:01
And it was in this, preliminary to these pieces of furniture,
これらの作品の前作となったのが
リッキーと取り組んだ
スライスの家具です
04:05
that Ricky and I worked on furniture by the slice.
04:09
And after we failed, I just kept failing.
失敗に終わって
それからも失敗の連続でした
04:13
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:21
The piece on the left --
左側の作品は
04:23
and that ultimately led to the piece on the right --
最終的に
右側の作品を生み出しました
04:26
happened when the kid that was working on this
若手のスタッフが作業していた時です
04:29
took one of those long strings of stuff and folded it up
長い段ボールを折り畳んで
04:32
to put it in the wastebasket.
ゴミ箱に入れていました
04:34
And I put a piece of tape around it,
それを私が
周りをテープで止めただけです
04:37
as you see there, and realized you could sit on it,
ご覧のとおり
座れる事に気付きました
04:40
and it had a lot of resilience and strength and so on.
また 弾力性と強度もありました
思いがけない発見でした
04:43
So, it was an accidental discovery.
04:53
I got into fish.
それから 魚に目覚めました
04:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:03
I mean, the story I tell is that I got mad at postmodernism -- at po-mo --
これにはちゃんとした主張があり 
ポストモダニズムに怒りを覚え
魚は人類より5億年も前に
既に存在したと聞き
05:09
and said that fish were 500 million years earlier than man,
過去に遡るのであれば 
起源まで戻ってやろうと思ったんです
05:15
and if you're going to go back, we might as well go back to the beginning.
これが変わったモノを
作り始めた発端です
05:18
And so I started making these funny things.
作品達は自分の命が宿ると
どんどん大きくなりました
05:24
And they started to have a life of their own and got bigger --
ウォーカー・アート・センターの
ガラス作品が それです
05:30
as the one glass at the Walker.
05:32
And then, I sliced off the head and the tail and everything
それで 頭から尾と
全部そぎ落としてみました
05:36
and tried to translate what I was learning
魚のフォルムと動きに関する考察を
作品で表現しようとしました
05:39
about the form of the fish and the movement.
この取り組みが後に建築のアイデアの
元になりました
05:43
And a lot of my architectural ideas that came from it --
05:46
accidental, again --
またもや
思いがけない発見でした
05:48
it was an intuitive kind of thing, and I just kept going with it,
直観の赴くまま
それに従うのみです
そしてあるビルの草案を出しました
草案だけなんですが
05:53
and made this proposal for a building, which was only a proposal.
05:59
I did this building in Japan.
これは日本にあるビルです
小さなレストランと
契約を結んだ日でした
06:04
I was taken out to dinner after the contract
06:07
for this little restaurant was signed.
ディナーに招待されました
06:10
And I love sake and Kobe and all that stuff.
日本酒、神戸と
あの文化 全部が大好きです
06:14
And after I got -- I was really drunk --
その日 すっかり酔っぱらいました
06:20
I was asked to do some sketches on napkins.
そんな状態で
紙ナプキンにスケッチを頼まれました
06:24
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:28
And I made some sketches on napkins --
素直にスケッチしましたよ
当時よく描いてた
小さな箱やモランディ調のものをね
06:32
little boxes and Morandi-like things that I used to do.
06:35
And the client said, "Why no fish?"
それを見てクライアントが
「魚は居ないの?」って
それで魚のスケッチを描いて
日本を後にしました
06:39
And so I made a drawing with a fish, and I left Japan.
それから図面一式が届いたのが
3週間後でした
06:43
Three weeks later, I received a complete set of drawings
06:46
saying we'd won the competition.
正式に受注先に選ばれたとの事
06:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:58
Now, it's hard to do. It's hard to translate a fish form,
魚のフォルムを表現するのは
とてつもなく難しい事です
07:03
because they're so beautiful -- perfect --
あまりにも美しく完璧だからです
07:05
into a building or object like this.
ビルやオブジェで表現するとなると
特に難しい
時々一緒に仕事をする
オルデンバーグには
07:10
And Oldenburg, who I work with a little once in a while,
07:14
told me I couldn't do it, and so that made it even more exciting.
「絶対あなたじゃ無理だ」と言われ
余計に燃えました
07:22
But he was right -- I couldn't do the tail.
でも彼は正しかった
尾をどうしても克服できなかった
頭はなんとか形を帯びてきたものの
尾がどうにもならなかった
07:25
I started to get the head OK, but the tail I couldn't do.
07:29
It was pretty hard.
かなりタフでしたね
右手は蛇の形状をしてます 
「ジッグラト」と呼びます
07:31
The thing on the right is a snake form, a ziggurat.
07:34
And I put them together, and you walk between them.
この二つを合わせて
間を歩けるようにしました
07:37
It was a dialog with the context again.
先程話した
周辺環境との関係に戻りますが
07:40
Now, if you saw a picture of this
もしこの写真を見たら
07:43
as it was published in Architectural Record --
『Architectural Record』誌で
紹介されたのですが
07:46
they didn't show the context, so you would think,
周りの様子が写っていないんです
すると
「なんて自己主張の激しい奴なんだ」
となるでしょう
07:49
"God, what a pushy guy this is."
07:52
But a friend of mine spent four hours wandering around here
実は友人がこのレストランを探して
07:54
looking for this restaurant.
4時間も辺りをさまよいました
それでも探せなかったんです
07:56
Couldn't find it.
だから...
07:58
So ...
(笑)
07:59
(Laughter)
08:08
As for craft and technology and all those things
皆さんが語ってこられた
工芸や技術といった全ての事に
08:12
that you've all been talking about, I was thrown for a complete loop.
完全に困惑しました
これは6か月で建ちました
08:17
This was built in six months.
08:19
The way we sent drawings to Japan:
日本に図面をどう送ったかというと
彫刻模型を作成してくれるミシガンにある
「魔法のコンピューター」を使いました
08:23
we used the magic computer in Michigan that does carved models,
08:28
and we used to make foam models, which that thing scanned.
それがスキャンした
フォーム材の模型もよく作りました
08:32
We made the drawings of the fish and the scales.
そして 魚と鱗の図面を作成しました
08:35
And when I got there, everything was perfect --
日本に到着した頃には
全てが完璧でした
08:38
except the tail.
尾を除いてね
08:42
So, I decided to cut off the head and the tail.
それで
頭と尾を切り落とす事にしました
08:47
And I made the object on the left for my show at the Walker.
左はウォーカー・アート・センターでの
個展用に製作したものです
私の作品の中で
特にうまく出来たものの一つです
08:51
And it's one of the nicest pieces I've ever made, I think.
08:54
And then Jay Chiat, a friend and client,
友達でありクライアントでもある
ジェイ・チアトからの依頼で
08:57
asked me to do his headquarters building in L.A.
ロスの本社ビルの設計を
請け負いました
09:01
For reasons we don't want to talk about, it got delayed.
理由はここでは割愛しますが
進行が遅れました
09:07
Toxic waste, I guess, is the key clue to that one.
確か有害廃棄物が
主な原因でした
それで 仮のビルをとりあえず建てました
「間に合わせ」作業は得意分野ですから
09:12
And so we built a temporary building -- I'm getting good at temporary --
そこで会議室を
魚の中に入れてしまいました
09:18
and we put a conference room in that's a fish.
09:23
And, finally, Jay dragged me to my hometown, Toronto, Canada.
最後にはジェイに私の故郷
カナダのトロントまで連れて行かれました
そこで こんなエピソードがあります
祖母にまつわる実話です
09:28
And there is a story -- it's a real story -- about my grandmother
09:32
buying a carp on Thursday, bringing it home,
子供の頃 祖母は決まって
木曜に鯉を買ってきて
09:34
putting it in the bathtub when I was a kid.
バスタブに放しておきました
09:36
I played with it in the evening.
夜になると私はその鯉と遊びました
09:38
When I went to sleep, the next day it wasn't there.
でも寝て翌朝起きると
鯉はバスタブに居ない
09:41
And the next night, we had gefilte fish.
翌日の夕飯には
鯉料理を堪能しました
09:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:45
And so I set up this interior for Jay's offices
それを思い出して
ジェイのオフィスのインテリアに
彫刻を飾れるよう台座を作りました
09:51
and I made a pedestal for a sculpture.
09:53
And he didn't buy a sculpture, so I made one.
でもジェイが彫刻を買わないので
私が作ってあげました
09:57
I went around Toronto and found a bathtub like my grandmother's,
トロント中探し回って
祖母のとそっくりなバスタブを見つけて
10:00
and I put the fish in.
そこに鯉を入れました
10:02
It was a joke.
冗談のつもりでね
10:05
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:11
I play with funny people like [Claes] Oldenburg.
オルデンバーグみたいな冗談の通じる人とは
ユーモアのあるアイデアで遊びます
10:15
We've been friends for a long time.
彼とは長い付き合いです
彼とコラボした作品が
幾つかあります
10:18
And we've started to work on things.
数年前 ヴェネツィアで
パフォーマンスアートを一緒に手掛けました
10:23
A few years ago, we did a performance piece in Venice, Italy,
10:27
called "Il Corso del Coltello" -- the Swiss Army knife.
『Il Corso del Coltello』と言って
訳すと「スイス・アーミーナイフ」という意味です
10:34
And most of the imagery is --
大半のイメージは—
10:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
彼のアイデアです
両側は私の息子たちですが
10:40
Claes', but those two little boys are my sons,
10:43
and they were Claes' assistants in the play.
実際の公演では息子たちが
助手を務めました
10:47
He was the Swiss Army knife.
そして彼がスイス・アーミーナイフ
10:50
He was a souvenir salesman who always wanted to be a painter,
彼は画家を志す
土産屋の店員役です
10:54
and I was Frankie P. Toronto.
私は「フランキー・P・トロント」という役です
10:56
P for Palladio.
パラーディオの頭文字「P」を借りて
10:58
Dressed up like the AT&T building by Claes --
AT&Tのビルみたいな衣装を着てます
11:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:05
with a fish hat.
勿論「魚」の帽子です
11:09
The highlight of the performance was at the end.
舞台の目玉はフィナーレでした
11:13
This beautiful object, the Swiss Army knife,
なんとも美しいオブジェ
「スイス・アーミーナイフ」の登場です
11:16
which I get credit for participating in.
一応 私も一役買った事に
なっていますが
11:19
And I can tell you -- it's totally an Oldenburg.
まるで オルデンバーグの
独り舞台でした
11:22
I had nothing to do with it.
私は何もしてない
11:23
The only thing I did was, I made it possible for them
唯一したことと言えば
運河をうまく航行できるよう
刃の向きを変えられるようにしたくらいです
11:26
to turn those blades so you could sail this thing in the canal,
11:29
because I love sailing.
趣味はセイリングですから
11:31
(Laughter)
(笑)
セイリングボートに造り上げました
11:33
We made it into a sailing craft.
私は金網フェンスを使った作品で
知られていますが
11:36
I've been known to mess with things like chain link fencing.
11:39
I do it because it's a curious thing in the culture,
金網は「文化」という観点で考察すると
とても興味深いからです
11:43
when things are made in such great quantities,
あるものが大量に生産されて
11:46
absorbed in such great quantities,
いたるところに使われると
11:48
and there's so much denial about them.
強い「拒否」を生み出すようになる
11:50
People hate it.
嫌われものになります
11:52
And I'm fascinated with that, which, like the paper furniture --
でも 私は紙で作った家具も同じで
そういう素材に惹かれます
金網フェンスも然り
11:56
it's one of those materials.
何故かいつも
心を惹かれてしまう
11:58
And I'm always drawn to that.
それで 金網を使って
いろんな悪さをしてみました
12:00
And so I did a lot of dirty things with chain link,
12:03
which nobody will forgive me for.
誰も許してくれないような
使い方も試しました
12:05
But Claes made homage to it in the Loyola Law School.
オルデンバーグのお陰で
ロヨラ大学法学部で価値を認められました
ここに使った金網は
非常に高価です
12:09
And that chain link is really expensive.
空間的にも
全てにおいて見事です
12:11
It's in perspective and everything.
12:16
And then we did a camp together for children with cancer.
がんと闘う子供のキャンプ施設も
一緒に手掛けました
12:20
And you can see, we started making a building together.
一緒に一つの建物の設計に
取り掛かりました
12:24
Of course, the milk can is his.
勿論ミルク缶が彼の作品です
12:27
But we were trying to collide our ideas,
お互いのアイデアが衝突しながら
12:29
to put objects next to each other.
隣り合わせに配置されている
12:31
Like a Morandi -- like the little bottles -- composing them like a still life.
モランディの描く小瓶達が
一枚の静物画に共存するみたいにです
12:36
And it seemed to work as a way to put he and I together.
これが彼と私の作品を
融合する方法だったようです
12:45
Then Jay Chiat asked me to do this building
それから ジェイ・チアトから
このビルのデザインを依頼されました
12:49
on this funny lot in Venice, and I started with this three-piece thing,
ベニスの変な形の敷地で
3棟に分かれた構成で着手しました
12:55
and you entered in the middle.
入口は中央のビルです
12:57
And Jay asked me what I was going to do with the piece in the middle.
ジェイに中央の建物を
どうする予定か聞かれました
13:00
And he pushed that.
しつこく聞かれました
そんなある日
「いい案があるぞ」とひらめいて
13:02
And one day I had a -- oh, well, the other way.
13:05
I had the binoculars from Claes, and I put them there,
持っていたオルデンバーグ作の
双眼鏡を そこに置いてみました
13:08
and I could never get rid of them after that.
それ以来そのまま居座っています
13:14
Oldenburg made the binoculars incredible
オルデンバーグが
原案から初模型を製作して
13:17
when he sent me the first model of the real proposal.
それはすばらしい双眼鏡を
送ってきました
私の建物が
「病んで」見えます
13:22
It made my building look sick.
彼とのやり取りは
13:24
And it was this interaction between
お互いこれでもか これでもかと
刺激し合う面白みがあります
13:26
that kind of, up-the-ante stuff that became pretty interesting.
その刺激を受けたのが
左側の建物です
13:31
It led to the building on the left.
13:33
And I still think the Time magazine picture will be of the binoculars, you know,
『タイム』誌に載る写真は
多分この双眼鏡だと思います
13:37
leaving out the -- what the hell.
両隣の建物は無視でしょう
仕方ないですね
13:47
I use a lot of metal in my work,
私の作品では
金属をたくさん使います
13:49
and I have a hard time connecting with the craft.
金属で「技」を出すのに苦戦します
13:53
The whole thing about my house,
自宅の設計も然り
大工仕事といい全ての作業で
13:56
the whole use of rough carpentry and everything,
出せる「技」には限りがあり
悔しい思いをしました
13:59
was the frustration with the crafts available.
14:02
I said, "If I can't get the craft that I want,
そしてこう言いました
「私のイメージする『技』が出ないなら
14:06
I'll use the craft I can get."
手に入る『技』で勝負するしかない」と
14:08
There were plenty of models for that,
お手本は沢山ありました
14:10
in Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, and many artists
ラウシェンバーグやジャスパー・ジョーンズ他
多くのアーティストが
14:13
who were making beautiful art and sculpture with junk materials.
クズ同然の素材で
美しい芸術作品や彫刻を制作していました
金属に入れ込んだ理由は
14:20
I went into the metal because it was a way of building a building
ビルをビルにしてくれるのは
彫刻だからです
14:23
that was a sculpture.
14:27
And it was all of one material,
また金属は全てに使用されます
14:29
and the metal could go on the roof as well as the walls.
屋根にも壁にも使われます
14:32
The metalworkers, for the most part,
金属で仕事をする人は大抵
14:35
do ducts behind the ceilings and stuff.
天井裏の配管等もやります
14:38
I was given an opportunity to design an exhibit
展示会の
デザインをする機会に恵まれました
14:41
for the metalworkers' unions of America and Canada in Washington,
米国とカナダの板金工組合の
展示会がワシントンでありました
その時一つ条件を付けました
14:48
and I did it on the condition that they become my partners
以後私の金属建築物や作品の製作に
パートナーとして協力して欲しいと
14:50
in the future and help me with all future metal buildings, etc. etc.
それから順調に進行してます
14:56
And it's working very well
職人の彼らはこういった作業に
非常に関心が強いです
14:58
to have these people, these craftsmen, interested in it.
15:01
I just tell the stories.
新しい企画の話をするだけでいいのです
15:03
It's a way of connecting, at least, with some of those people
それはこういう人たちと繋がる方法で
15:08
that are so important to the realization of architecture.
建築のアイデアを
可能にしてくれる大切な人達です
15:17
The metal continued into a building -- Herman Miller, in Sacramento.
続けて金属を使ったビルで
サクラメントにあるハーマンミラー社です
15:23
And it's just a complex of factory buildings.
工場施設の集合体です
15:27
And Herman Miller has this philosophy of having a place --
ハーマンミラーには哲学があり
「ヒトのための場」を
提供するというものです
15:32
a people place.
15:34
I mean, it's kind of a trite thing to say,
特に新しい発想ではないですが
施設の中心になんとしても
集まる場所を置きたかった
15:37
but it is real that they wanted to have a central place
15:41
where the cafeteria would be, where the people would come
食堂や人の集まるところ
15:45
and where the people working would interact.
中で働く人々が交流できる場所です
15:50
So it's out in the middle of nowhere, and you approach it.
人里離れた土地に こう設計しました
15:55
It's copper and galvanize.
銅と亜鉛メッキで出来ています
15:58
I used the galvanize and copper
使用した亜鉛メッキと銅は
16:01
in a very light gauge, so it would buckle.
極薄の厚みにして
曲線を描くようにしてます
16:05
I spent a lot of time undoing Richard Meier's aesthetic.
リチャード・マイヤーの美学と反対で
「崩す」作業に長い時間費やしました
皆が 如何にパネルを完璧に仕上げるか
追求する一方で
16:12
Everybody's trying to get the panels perfect,
16:14
and I always try to get them sloppy and fuzzy.
私は ぐちゃっとした はっきりしないものを
常に追求してきました
16:18
And they end up looking like stone.
最終的には岩のように仕上がりました
16:21
This is the central area.
中央部の様子です
16:23
There's a ramp.
これが傾斜の付いた連絡路です
16:25
And that little dome in there is a building by Stanley Tigerman.
この小さなドームは
スタンリー・タイガーマンの設計です
このプロジェクトを受注できたのは
彼のお陰です
16:28
Stanley was instrumental in my getting this job.
16:31
And when I was awarded the contract I, at the very beginning,
受注が正式に決まって まず初めに
クライアントに スタンリーと私に
小さなものを作らせてほしいと頼みました
16:35
asked the client if they would let Stanley do a cameo piece with me.
16:40
Because these were ideas that we were talking about,
彼と話し合って
生まれたアイデアだったからです
建物を隣り合わせで建てる事で
16:44
building things next to each other, making --
都市の比喩的表現が実現します
16:47
it's all about [a] metaphor for a city, maybe.
そして スタンリーの小さなドームの製作ですが
16:49
And so Stanley did the little dome thing.
電話とファックスのやり取りで作りました
16:52
And we did it over the phone and by fax.
16:54
He would send me a fax and show me something.
スタンリーがファックスで
ビジュアルを送ってきます
16:57
He'd made a building with a dome and he had a little tower.
すると ドーム型の建物で小塔までありました
17:00
I told him, "No, no, that's too ongepotchket.
それを見て私は言いました
「いや これじゃ派手すぎてダメだ
17:03
I don't want the tower."
塔はいらない」ってね
それで もっとシンプルな設計に
修正してくれました
17:07
So he came back with a simpler building,
17:11
but he put some funny details on it,
でも 変な微調整が加わっていました
17:17
and he moved it closer to my building.
私のビルに
にじり寄ってきたんです
それで 彼の方の地盤を
少し窪ませました
17:21
And so I decided to put him in a depression.
17:25
I put him in a hole and made a kind of a hole that he sits in.
ドームを穴の中に入れた感じです
17:29
And so then he put two bridges -- this all happened on the fax,
それに対抗して 二つの橋を架けてきました
全てファックスでのやり取りです
数週間このやりとりが続いて
17:33
going back and forth over a couple of weeks' period.
17:35
And he put these two bridges with pink guardrails on it.
次は2つの橋に
ピンクのガードレールまで付いていました
それで背後に
大きなビルボードを追加しました
17:39
And so then I put this big billboard behind it.
名付けて「ダビデとゴリアテ」です
17:42
And I call it, "David and Goliath."
これが私の設計したカフェテリアです
17:48
And that's my cafeteria.
17:55
In Boston, we had that old building on the left.
左は ボストンにある古いビルです
高速のすぐ横にある
目立つビルです
18:00
It was a very prominent building off the freeway,
一階追加し 
きれいに修繕しました
18:03
and we added a floor and cleaned it up and fixed it up
18:07
and used the kind of -- I thought -- the language of the neighborhood,
地元の空気を読んで
設計に取り入れました
18:12
which had these cornices, projecting cornices.
角が飛び出ているデザインです
気持ち華やかにしました
素材は鉛銅です
18:16
Mine got a little exuberant, but I used lead copper,
18:23
which is a beautiful material, and it turns green in 100 years.
百年もすると緑色を帯びる
美しい素材です
18:28
Instead of, like, copper in 10 or 15.
銅だと10~15年で緑になります
18:34
We redid the side of the building
側面はやり直しました
18:36
and re-proportioned the windows so it sort of fit into the space.
周りの空間と調和が取れるよう
窓のサイズを調整しました
18:40
And it surprised both Boston and myself that we got it approved,
許可が下りて
ボストンの人達も私もびっくりでした
18:44
because they have very strict kind of design guideline,
ボストンの都市設計ガイドラインは
とにかく厳格ですから
18:50
and they wouldn't normally think I would fit them.
ボストンでは 私のデザインは
うまく調和しないと言われてます
18:55
The detailing was very careful with the lead copper
鉛銅で慎重に
細部を加工しました
18:58
and making panels and fitting it tightly
製作したパネルが
19:04
into the fabric of the existing building.
既存のビルの素材に
きっちりはまるようにしました
19:10
In Barcelona, on Las Ramblas for some film festival,
バルセロナの
ランブラス通りで開かれた映画祭では
19:16
I did the Hollywood sign going and coming,
行ったり来たりする
ハリウッドサインを製作しました
19:19
made a building out of it, and they built it.
それを使って建物を作りました
夜便で飛んで撮ってきた写真です
19:22
I flew in one night and took this picture.
私に断りもせず
模型より3割小さくされました
19:25
But they made it a third smaller than my model without telling me.
19:32
And then more metal and some chain link in Santa Monica --
他にもサンタモニカで
メタルと金網を使った作品があります
小さなショッピングセンターです
19:38
a little shopping center.
19:45
And this is a laser laboratory at the University of Iowa,
これはアイオワ州立大学の
レーザー研究所です
19:50
in which the fish comes back as an abstraction in the back.
裏手に抽象的なイメージで
また「魚」を加えてみました
19:54
It's the support labs, which, by some coincidence, required no windows.
それは補助施設で
偶然にも窓が要りませんでした
20:07
And the shape fit perfectly.
形もぴったり合いました
20:12
I just joined the points.
数か所を接合しただけです
20:14
In the curved part there's all the mechanical equipment.
カーブを帯びた部分には
機械装置が収まっています
背後の壁は配管を納める
ハウジングとなっています
20:18
That solid wall behind it is a pipe chase -- a pipe canyon --
20:23
and so it was an opportunity that I seized,
絶好の条件でした
20:26
because I didn't have to have any protruding ducts or vents or things in this form.
表面にダクトや通気孔等を
出す必要がなかったからです
それを彫刻にする
ベストな環境でした
20:32
It gave me an opportunity to make a sculpture out of it.
20:37
This is a small house somewhere.
場所は忘れましたが
小さな住居を設計しました
あまりにも工事が長引いて
どこか忘れてしまいました
20:44
They've been building it so long I don't remember where it is.
20:47
It's in the West Valley.
ウエストバレーシティです
20:49
And we started with the stream
手始めに小川あたりから始めました
20:53
and built the house along the stream -- dammed it up to make a lake.
その小川に沿って家屋を建て
流れをせき止めて池を作りました
20:58
These are the models.
これはモデルです
21:03
The reality, with the lake --
実は池もそうですが
21:06
the workmanship is pretty bad.
造りは かなりひどくて
21:10
And it reminded me why I play defensively in things like my house.
自宅のようなものを設計するとき
なぜ 自己防衛が働くのか思い出します
21:16
When you have to do something really cheaply,
費用を切り詰める必要があると
21:20
it's hard to get perfect corners and stuff.
隅をきっちり合わせるような建築は
出来ません
21:36
That big metal thing is a passage, and in it is --
大きな金属の部分は
渡り廊下です
下のリビングに繋がっていて
その下は寝室です
21:42
you go downstairs into the living room and then down into the bedroom,
右側が寝室です
21:45
which is on the right.
21:53
It's kind of like a whole built town.
町を丸ごと作った感じです
22:00
I was asked to do a hospital for schizophrenic adolescents at Yale.
イェール大学の依頼で
統合失調症の青少年に病院を設計しました
22:07
I thought it was fitting for me to be doing that.
自分にふさわしい仕事だと思いました
22:16
This is a house next to a Philip Johnson house in Minnesota.
ミネソタのフィリップ・ジョンソンの家の
お隣です
22:22
The owners had a dilemma -- they asked Philip to do it.
依頼主は迷っていましたが
結局フィリップに依頼しました
でも フィリップは忙しくてできなかった
22:26
He was too busy.
22:29
He didn't recommend me, by the way.
ちなみにフィリップが私を
紹介してくれた訳じゃないです
22:32
(Laughter)
(笑)
22:34
We ended up having to make it a sculpture, because the dilemma was,
結局は住居が
彫刻作品になるようデザインしました
ジレンマだったのは
「主張」に見えない建物をどう作るか とか
22:40
how do you build a building that doesn't look like the language?
22:43
Is it going to look like this beautiful estate is sub-divided?
この美しい邸宅が分割されているように
見えるのでは 等
22:47
Etc. etc.
いろいろでしたから
云わんとしてる事 わかるでしょう
22:49
You've got the idea.
最終的にアイデアが固まり建築しました
22:51
And so we finally ended up making it.
オーナーは美術品収集家です
22:53
These people are art collectors.
22:55
And we finally made it so it appears very sculptural
主屋からの見ると
彫刻作品のような眺めです
窓は全部反対側に設置しました
22:59
from the main house and all the windows are on the other side.
23:07
And the building is very sculptural as you walk around it.
建物の周りを歩いて眺めると
本当に彫刻作品のようです
23:12
It's made of metal and the brown stuff is Fin-Ply --
これは金属で茶色の部分は
「Fin-Ply」と言う
フィンランド製の加工木材です
23:18
it's that formed lumber from Finland.
ロヨラのチャペルに使いましたが
うまく行きませんでした
23:22
We used it at Loyola on the chapel, and it didn't work.
それ以来試し続けてる素材です
23:25
I keep trying to make it work.
この私邸で細部仕上げの
コツがつかめました
23:27
In this case we learned how to detail it.
23:33
In Cleveland, there's Burnham Mall, on the left.
左はクリーブランドの公共広場です
今でも未完成のままです
23:40
It's never been finished.
湖に向かって進むと
私達が手掛けたビルが見えてきます
23:42
Going out to the lake, you can see all those new buildings we built.
ここにビル設計の話が来ました
23:47
And we had the opportunity to build a building on this site.
23:53
There's a railroad track.
線路が間を突っ切っていて
23:55
This is the city hall over here somewhere, and the courthouse.
市庁舎がここで
裁判所がここに入っています
24:00
And the centerline of the mall goes out.
広場の中心線はここです
24:04
Burnham had designed a railroad station that was never built,
(ダニエル)バーナム設計の駅は
結局実現しませんでした
そして 我々のビルも
中止となりました
24:09
and so we followed.
Sohio社が
こちら側の軸となり
24:11
Sohio is on the axis here,
それに沿い我々のビルがあり
両端の柱となる配置です
24:13
and we followed the axis, and they're two kind of goalposts.
これが我々の設計したビルです
24:16
And this is our building,
保険会社の本社ビルです
24:18
which is a corporate headquarters for an insurance company.
24:22
We collaborated with Oldenburg and put the newspaper on top, folded.
オルデンバーグとコラボして
折り畳んだ新聞を頭に付けました
24:33
The health club is fastened to the garage
駐車場にはジムが付いています
24:37
with a C-clamp, for Cleveland.
クリーブランドの「C」を文字って
C型クランプで留めています
24:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
24:42
You drive down.
駐車場を降りる際は
10階建てのC型クランプを
降りる訳です
24:44
So it's about a 10-story C-clamp.
24:47
And all this stuff at the bottom is a museum,
地上階の建物群は美術館です
24:50
and an idea for a very fancy automobile entry.
大変洗練された
ガレージの入口を作る計画で
オーナーが入口に大変こだわった方で
24:54
This owner has a pet peeve about bad automobile entries.
これはホテルになる予定です
24:58
And this would be a hotel.
この中心線を
生かすデザインを考えていました
25:00
So, the centerline of this thing -- we'd preserve it,
新設ビルの規模に合わせて
設計を開始する予定でした
25:02
and it would start to work with the scale of the new buildings
シーザー・ペリやKPF等による
プロジェクトが進行中でした
25:06
by Pelli and Kohn Pederson Fox, etc., that are underway.
25:22
It's hard to do high-rise.
高層ビルの設計は
やはり難しいです
25:24
I feel much more comfortable down here.
私は背の低い建物の方に
親近感を覚えます
これはブレントウッドの物件です
25:28
This is a piece of property in Brentwood.
25:31
And a long time ago, about '82 or something, after my house --
82年頃 かなり前です
自宅の設計の後に手掛けました
25:37
I designed a house for myself
中庭を囲む複数の建物から成る
小さな村のような構成です
25:40
that would be a village of several pavilions around a courtyard --
25:45
and the owner of this lot worked for me
オーナーは以前
私の下で働いていた女性で
25:50
and built that actual model on the left.
左の実模型は
彼女が製作しました
25:52
And she came back,
その彼女が再び私の所にやってきて
25:54
I guess wealthier or something -- something happened --
いきなりお金持ちになったようです
25:58
and asked me to design a house for her on this site.
この土地に
自宅を設計して欲しいと頼まれました
26:06
And following that basic idea of the village,
それでまず
村のイメージを基本に進めました
26:11
we changed it as we got into it.
作業を重ねる内に少しずつ変わり
26:13
I locked the house into the site by cutting the back end --
裏手のそぎ落とした部分に
家屋を入れ込みました
26:18
here you see on the photographs of the site --
これが写真です
26:21
slicing into it and putting all the bathrooms and dressing rooms
擁壁のように分割して
バスとドレッシングルームを埋め込みます
26:25
like a retaining wall, creating a lower level zone for the master bedroom,
そして 一段低いエリアを設けて
そこに主寝室を置きました
26:30
which I designed like a kind of a barge,
平底の荷積船のような
デザインの寝室です
26:33
looking like a boat.
ボートのようにも見えますね
26:37
And that's it, built.
これが完成後です
26:44
The dome was a request from the client.
ドームはクライアントからの注文で付けました
26:48
She wanted a dome somewhere in the house.
「家のどこかにドームを入れて欲しい
26:50
She didn't care where.
場所は任せる」との事でした
26:52
When you sleep in this bedroom, I hope --
この寝室で眠ると
まだ寝た事はないですが
26:54
I mean, I haven't slept in it yet.
26:57
I've offered to marry her so I could sleep there,
「この寝室で寝たいから
僕と結婚して」と言いましたが
「その必要はない」と言われました
(笑)
27:01
but she said I didn't have to do that.
27:09
But when you're in that room,
とにかく この寝室に入ると
27:12
you feel like you're on a kind of barge on some kind of lake.
まるで湖上に浮く船に
乗っているような感覚があります
27:16
And it's very private.
そして とてもプライベートな空間です
27:18
The landscape is being built around to create a private garden.
この土地の景観がちょうど
プライベートな庭園を造り上げている
27:21
And then up above there's a garden on this side of the living room,
そして上のリビングの
こちら側にも庭園があります
27:26
and one on the other side.
その裏側にもあります
27:31
These aren't focused very well.
この写真はピントが
合っていませんね
27:33
I don't know how to do it from here.
ここから調整できるのかな
27:37
Focus the one on the right.
右側のにピントを合わせてくれますか?
27:41
It's up there.
こっちです
左か 私から見て右側
27:43
Left -- it's my right.
27:47
Anyway, you enter into a garden with a beautiful grove of trees.
とにかく 
美しい木立ちに覆われた庭園を通って
27:53
That's the living room.
ここがリビングで
27:55
Servants' quarters.
使用人の控室がここです
27:57
A guest bedroom, which has this dome with marble on it.
ゲスト用寝室に
大理石を使ったドームが付いています
またリビングがあってといった具合です
28:01
And then you enter into the living room and then so on.
28:11
This is the bedroom.
これが先ほどの寝室です
この階には階段で降ります
28:13
You come down from this level along the stairway,
寝室の入口があって
池につながります
28:15
and you enter the bedroom here, going into the lake.
ベッドがこちらです
28:18
And the bed is back in this space,
28:20
with windows looking out onto the lake.
窓から池を見渡せます
28:23
These Stonehenge things were designed to give foreground
このストーンヘンジみたいなブロックを
前景に組み込むことで
28:28
and to create a greater depth in this shallow lot.
狭い土地に
奥行感を持たせる効果があります
28:32
The material is lead copper, like in the building in Boston.
素材はボストンのビルと同じ
鉛銅を使いました
28:41
And so it was an intent to make this small piece of land --
イメージは2,300平米程の小さな土地を
28:46
it's 100 by 250 -- into a kind of an estate by separating these areas
幾つかのエリアに分けて
大邸宅に見せようとしました
28:52
and making the living room and dining room into this pavilion
この建物を
リビングとダイニングスペースにして
28:58
with a high space in it.
高さのある空間を演出しました
これは偶然ですが
29:05
And this happened by accident that I got this right on axis
ダイニングの食卓が
ちょうど軸線上に来ています
29:08
with the dining room table.
29:12
It looks like I got a Baldessari painting for free.
まるでバルデッサリの絵画を
ただで飾ったように見えます
でもこのデザインの特徴は
29:17
But the idea is, the windows are all placed
家屋の部分部分が
窓から見える点です
29:19
so you see pieces of the house outside.
ここはいずれ
スクリーンが要るでしょう
29:23
Eventually this will be screened -- these trees will come up --
外の植木が育てば
プライバシーも守られます
29:27
and it will be very private.
29:29
And you feel like you're in your own kind of village.
まるで自分の村で
生活してるような感じです
29:37
This is for Michael Eisner -- Disney.
これはマイケル・アイズナーから依頼を受けた
ディズニーの社屋です
29:42
We're doing some work for him.
今 ディズニーのプロジェクトを進めています
29:45
And this is in Anaheim, California, and it's a freeway building.
カリフォルニア州アナハイムの拠点で
下を高速道路が通過します
29:50
You go under this bridge at about 65 miles an hour,
ここの橋の下を
時速約105キロで車が走り抜けます
もう一つここに橋があります
29:54
and there's another bridge here.
一瞬にして
部屋の下を通り抜けます
29:56
And you're through this room in a split second,
その様子が
ビルに映る仕組みです
29:58
and the building will sort of reflect that.
30:00
On the backside, it's much more humane -- entrance,
裏手はずっと人間味があって
入口や食堂等があります
30:03
dining hall, etc.
30:05
And then this thing here -- I'm hoping as you drive by you'll hear
この部分には
走りながら音も楽しめるよう
ピケットフェンス状にして 
走り去る音が反響する仕組みです
30:10
the picket fence effect of the sound hitting it.
30:14
Kind of a fun thing to do.
遊び心を加えました
30:20
I'm doing a building in Switzerland, Basel,
今 スイスのバーゼルにある
オフィスビルの設計を進めています
家具の会社です
30:24
which is an office building for a furniture company.
会社のイメージを
表現するのに苦戦しました
30:27
And we struggled with the image.
初期のリサーチの段階ですが
一般向けに家具を販売してるので
30:30
These are the early studies, but they have to sell furniture
30:33
to normal people, so if I did the building and it was too fancy,
その本社が
豪勢になりすぎると
「展示されてる時は よく見えたけど
30:38
then people might say, "Well, the furniture looks OK in his thing,
自宅に置くともう一つだった」と
言われかねない
30:42
but no, it ain't going to look good in my normal building."
それで このセクションは二期工事で
実用的なスラブ仕立てにしました
30:44
So we've made a kind of pragmatic slab in the second phase here,
会議室等を全部
この「離れ」にまとめました
30:48
and we've taken the conference facilities and made a villa out of them
その結果 大変造形的な共有エリアとなり
他との区分にもなります
30:52
so that the communal space is very sculptural and separate.
30:56
And you're looking at it from the offices and you create a kind of
オフィスから眺めると
個々の建物が
肩を寄せ合う情景が楽しめます
31:00
interaction between these pieces.
31:04
This is in Paris, along the Seine.
これはパリのセーヌ川の畔です
31:08
Palais des Sports, the Gare de Lyon over here.
パレ・デ・スポールそしてリヨン駅があって
31:12
The Minister of Finance -- the guy that moved from the Louvre -- goes in here.
ルーブルから移転してきた
財務大臣がここに来ます
31:16
There's a new library across the river.
これは セーヌ川向こう岸の
新しい図書館です
31:19
And back in here, in this already treed park,
この裏手の
木々に囲まれた公園の中に
31:23
we're doing a very dense building called the American Center,
アメリカン・センターという
複合施設を建設中です
31:27
which has a theater, apartments, dance school, an art museum,
シアター、マンション
ダンス教室、美術館、レストラン等
ぎっしり詰まった建物です
31:34
restaurants and all kinds of -- it's a very dense program --
31:38
bookstores, etc.
書店等もあります
31:41
In a very tight, small --
大変小さな敷地です
31:43
this is the ground level.
ここが1階です
フランスでは全てを台無しにする
ありえない技法があり―
31:46
And the French have this extraordinary way of screwing things up
きれいな形の土地の角を
切り取ってしまいます
31:49
by taking a beautiful site and cutting the corner off.
31:53
They call it the plan coupe.
「plan coupe(面取り法)」と呼びます
31:55
And I struggled with that thing --
この面取りには苦戦しました
32:01
how to get around the corner.
角のない部分をうまく使おうと
32:03
These are the models for it.
これが模型です
もう一つの模型を
先程お見せしましたが
32:06
I showed you the other model, the one --
図面に先立ち
スケッチして頭を整理しました
32:14
this is the way I organized myself so I could make the drawing --
32:17
so I understood the problem.
描く事で
問題点が見えてきます
32:23
I was trying to get around this plan coupe -- how do you do it?
面取り部分を
如何に処理するかばかり考えていました
32:27
Apartments, etc.
マンションにしようか等々
これが その時の研究模型で
32:30
And these are the kind of study models we did.
32:32
And the one on the left is pretty awful.
左手の模型はひどいです
32:36
You can see why I was ready to commit suicide when this one was built.
これを見た時には
いつ身投げしてもよい気持ちでした
32:41
But out of it came finally this resolution, where the elevator piece
最終的に
良い解決案に辿り着きました
エレベーターを正面に置き
32:48
worked frontally to this, parallel to this street,
両側の道に
それぞれ平行にしてます
32:51
and also parallel to here.
32:53
And then this kind of twist, with this balcony and the skirt,
このバルコニーとスカートには
ひねりを入れました
32:57
kind of like a ballerina lifting her skirt to let you into the foyer.
正面でバレリーナがチュチュの両端を持って
迎え入れているような印象です
33:03
The restaurants here -- the apartments and the theater, etc.
レストランがここで
マンションと劇場等が詰ってます
33:06
So it would all be built in stone, in French limestone,
素材は全て
現地の石灰石を使用しました
33:10
except for this metal piece.
ここだけ金属です
33:12
And it faces into a park.
こちらが公園に向いています
33:15
And the idea was to make this express the energy of this.
テーマはこの集合体から
自らのエネルギーが伝わるデザインです
33:23
On the side facing the street it's much more normal,
道に面した方は
控えめにしています
33:27
except I slipped a few mansards down, so that coming on the point,
屋根だけはマンサードにして
勾配を2段階にしています
33:33
these housing units made a gesture to the corner.
居住エリアが角に向けて
招き入れる姿を醸し出します
33:46
And this will be some kind of high-tech billboard.
ここにはハイテクな
ビルボードが付く予定です
いい案をお持ちの方は
ぜひ教えて下さい
33:51
If any of you guys have any ideas for it, please contact me.
33:53
I don't know what to do.
まだアイデアが固まっていないので
33:58
Jay Chiat is a glutton for punishment, and he hired me
ジェイ・チアトが懲りずに
また設計を依頼してきました
34:01
to do a house for him in the Hamptons.
ハンプトンズの彼の住居の設計です
34:03
And it's got a fish.
勿論 「魚」付です
34:05
And I keep thinking, "This is going to be the last fish."
「もうこれで魚はお終い」と
言い聞かせながら作業しました
34:08
It's like a drug addict.
中毒患者みたいにね
34:11
I say, "I'm not going to do it anymore -- I don't want to do it anymore --
「もう魚はモチーフにしない 
もう飽きた、もうお終い」
34:13
I'm not going to do it."
と言い聞かせながら
気付くと魚を付けているんです
34:15
And then I do it.
これがその魚です
(笑)
34:17
(Laughter)
34:18
There it is.
今回はリビングに登場です
34:19
But it's the living room.
この長細い物体が―
34:20
And this piece here is --
34:22
I don't know what it is.
さて 何でしょうね
取りあえず十分に予算を確保するために
付けたんです
34:24
I just added it so that we'd have enough money in the budget
34:26
so we could take something out.
後で削れるように
(笑)
34:29
(Applause)
34:37
This is Euro Disney, and I've worked with all of the guys
これはユーロディズニーの施設です
34:41
that presented to you earlier.
先程のディズニーの皆さんとは
全員一緒に仕事をした事があります
ディズニーとのプロジェクトは
とても楽しいです
34:44
We've had a lot of fun working together.
34:46
I think I'm from Mars for them, and they are for me,
お互い異星人のように
かけ離れた者どうしなのに
34:50
but somehow we all manage to work together,
どういうわけか
チームとしてまとまりが良くて
34:53
and I think, productively.
非常に効率的に
作業が進みます
34:57
So far.
少なくとも今のところ
スムーズです
34:59
This is a shopping thing.
これはショッピングエリアです
35:02
You come into the Magic Kingdom
マジックキングダムに入ってきて
35:05
and the hotel that Tony Baxter's group is doing out here.
ここにはトニー・バクスター指揮の
ホテルが建ちます
35:09
And then this is a kind of a shopping mall,
ショッピングモールのようになっていて
35:12
with a rodeo and restaurants.
ロデオとかレストランが併設されます
さらにレストランがあります
35:15
And another restaurant.
35:18
What I did -- because of the Paris skies being quite dull,
この施設での仕掛けは
パリは曇り空で有名なので
駅に直角に
光が格子状に降り注ぐ構造です
35:23
I made a light grid that's perpendicular to the train station,
線路に対しても直角です
35:26
to the route of the train.
35:28
It looks like it's kind of been there,
元々あったかのように
溶け込んでいます
35:31
and then crashed all these simpler forms into it.
周りのシンプルな建物と
融合しています
35:35
The light grid will have a light, be lit up at night and give a
夜にはライトアップされて
天井がきらびやかに彩られます
35:41
kind of light ceiling.
35:52
In Switzerland -- Germany, actually -- on the Rhine across from Basel,
これはバーゼルを隔てた
ドイツ側ライン川の近くです
35:56
we did a furniture factory and a furniture museum.
家具工場と併設する
家具ミュージアムです
36:00
And I tried to -- there's a Nick Grimshaw building over here,
ニック・グリムショーが
デザインしたビルがここにあり
36:03
there's an Oldenburg sculpture over here --
こちらに
オルデンバーグの彫刻があります
36:06
I tried to make a relationship urbanistically.
彼らの作品を含む
地域一帯との調和を意識しました
このスライドは分かりにくいですね
ちょうど完成したばかりで
36:10
And I don't gave good slides to show -- it's just been completed --
ここが中央のこれで
ここが左右のこれとこれで
36:13
but this piece here is this building, and these pieces here and here.
36:17
And as you pass by it's always part -- you see it as all of these pieces
通りすがりに眺めると
全ての建物が大きな塊となって
36:22
accrue and become part of an overall neighborhood.
周辺と一つになります
36:32
It's plaster and just zinc.
素材は漆喰と亜鉛だけです
36:35
And you wonder, if this is a museum,
「美術館か何かかな」
36:38
what it's going to be like inside?
「中はどうなっているのかな」と
気になる人もいるでしょう
36:40
If it's going to be so busy and crazy that you wouldn't show anything,
騒々しい外観にしておいて
中は見せないで
36:44
and just wait.
見に来るのを待っているだけ
36:46
I'm so cunning and clever -- I made it quiet and wonderful.
切れ者の自分としては
内部は逆におとなしく立派に仕上げました
36:51
But on the outside it does scream out at you a bit.
外観は少し訴えかける感じを
残してます
36:59
It's actually basically three square rooms
実際の中身は
三つの四角い部屋と
37:04
with a couple of skylights and stuff.
天窓等が幾つかあるだけです
37:06
And from the building in the back, you see it as
裏手の建物から眺めると
氷山が丘を漂流してるように見えます
37:09
an iceberg floating by in the hills.
37:15
I know I'm over time.
時間オーバーしてますね
37:33
See, that skylight goes down and becomes that one.
天窓の傾斜がここと繋がります
37:36
So it's pretty quiet inside.
中はとても静かです
37:43
This is the Disney Hall -- the concert hall.
これはディズニーの
コンサートホールです
37:47
It's a complicated project.
複雑なプロジェクトです
室内楽ホールがあって
37:51
It has a chamber hall.
37:53
It's related to an existing Chandler Pavilion that was built
既設のチャンドラー・パビリオンと
関連付けられています
芸術に対する
深い想いと情熱により実現した劇場です
37:57
with a lot of love and tears and caring.
38:00
And it's not a great building, but I approached it optimistically,
卓越したデザインとは言い難いですが
ポジティブに取り組みました
38:05
that we would make a compositional relationship between us
それぞれの建物が
互いを構成要素として認識し
38:13
that would strengthen both of us.
引き立て合う関係を築きました
38:16
And the plan of this -- it's a concert hall.
なんと言ってもコンサートホールなので
38:18
This is the foyer, which is kind of a garden structure.
エントランスホールは
庭園構造を取りました
38:21
There's commercial at the ground floor.
地上階に商業施設が入ります
38:23
These are offices, which, really, in the competition,
ここには オフィスのテナントが入ります
38:27
we didn't have to design.
コンペの対象ではないので
この設計はしていません
38:29
But finally, there's a hotel there.
そして ここにホテルが入ります
38:33
These were the kind of relationships made to the Chandler,
チャンドラーホールとの関係が
よく分かるアングルです
ゆるやかな傾斜を共に構成して
38:38
composing these elevations together and relating them
MOCA等
周りの建物と調和を図ります
38:42
to the buildings that existed -- to MOCA, etc.
38:51
The acoustician in the competition gave us criteria,
コンペでは
音響条件が出されました
条件を満すため
仕切りで区切る方法を取りました
38:56
which led to this compartmentalized scheme,
しかし コンペの後
これが機能しない構造と判明しました
39:00
which we found out after the competition would not work at all.
でも 既に皆さん
このフォームと空間を気に入ってしまって
39:04
But everybody liked these forms and liked the space,
39:09
and so that's one of the problems of a competition.
コンペから入るプロジェクトの
難しい点です
39:11
You have to then try and get that back in some way.
またやり直して
どうにか原案を実現しないといけない
39:17
And we studied many models.
何体も模型を作って
研究しました
39:21
This was our original model.
これが原案模型です
39:23
These were the three buildings that were the ideal --
理想的な構造のホール3棟です
39:27
the Concertgebouw, Boston and Berlin.
コンセルトヘボウ、ボストン、ベルリン交響楽団の
コンサートホールです
39:30
Everybody liked the surround.
皆このサラウンドを
気に入りました
39:33
Actually, this is the smallest hall in size,
これは一番小さいホールです
でも 座席数は他を上回ります
39:36
and it has more seats than any of these
39:39
because it has double balconies.
バルコニー席が
二重になっているからです
39:41
Our client doesn't want balconies, so --
しかし クライアントは
バルコニーは入れたくなかった
それで 新しい音響専門家を迎えて
39:44
and when we met our new acoustician, he told us
音響的に正しい形状について
講義を受けました
39:46
this was the right shape or this was the right shape.
39:49
And we tried many shapes, trying to get the energy
幾つもの形状を試し
原案のエネルギーを失わずに
39:53
of the original design within an acoustical, acceptable format.
音響許容条件を満たす
形状を達成しました
40:01
We finally settled on a shape that was
最終的には
40:03
the proportion of the Concertgebouw
コンセルトヘボウ管弦楽団の構造に
落ち着きました
40:06
with the sloping outside walls, which the acoustician said
音響専門家に極めて重要と言われ
傾斜のある外壁にしました
40:11
were crucial to this and later decided they weren't,
しかし 後から傾斜は特に必要ないと
言われました
40:14
but now we have them.
結局付いたままです
40:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
40:18
And our idea is to make the seating carriage very sculptural
ここでのこだわりは
座席エリアを彫刻のように造り上げ
40:23
and out of wood and like a big boat sitting in this plaster room.
漆喰で出来た空間に
大きな木製ボートが停泊するイメージです
40:29
That's the idea.
そのイメージで進めて
40:31
And the corners would have skylights
四隅には天窓を付け
40:37
and these columns would be structural.
構造体の一部として
柱を加えました
40:41
And the nice thing about introducing columns is they give you a
この柱を加える事で
どの客席からも
40:44
kind of sense of proscenium from wherever you sit,
正面舞台を
眺めているような感覚を生み
40:47
and create intimacy.
舞台との親密感が生まれます
40:49
Now, this is not a final design -- these are just on the way to being --
これは完成品ではなく
作業中のデザインです
40:54
and so I wouldn't take it literally, except the feeling of the space.
よって イメージを掴む程度で
見てください
41:00
We studied the acoustics with laser stuff,
音響条件の確認には
レーザー機器を駆使しました
41:05
and they bounce them off this and see where it all works.
反響音の位置をレーザーで映し出し
音響を確認します
41:08
But you get the sense of the hall in section.
ホールの断面図を見ると
感じがつかめます
41:10
Most halls come straight down into a proscenium.
大抵コンサートホールは舞台正面に向かって
下がっていく構造を取りますが
41:16
In this case we're opening it back up
このケースでは
後ろに向かって開かれ
41:18
and getting skylights in the four corners.
四隅から自然光が
差し込む仕組みです
41:21
And so it will be quite a different shape.
そのため 大変特異な形状となります
(笑)
41:28
(Laughter)
これは原案模型です
カエルのような格好なので
41:30
The original building, because it was frog-like,
41:35
fit nicely on the site and cranked itself well.
折れ曲がりが
敷地にきれいに収まります
あるイメージが頭の中で固まると
なかなか払拭できません
41:38
When you get into a box, it's harder to do it -- and here we are,
41:41
struggling with how to put the hotel in.
この時もホテルをどこに置くかで
苦戦しました
41:43
And this is a teapot I designed for Alessi.
これは私がデザインした
アレッシのティーポットです
41:46
I just stuck it on there.
これをここにくっ付けました
まさにこれが私のアプローチです
幾つもの塊に分解して観察して
41:49
But this is how I do work. I do take pieces and bits and look at it
41:54
and struggle with it and cut it away.
いろいろ悩んで切り離してみる
41:56
And of course it's not going to look like that,
勿論最終的には
きれいに仕上げます
41:58
but it is the crazy way I tend to work.
でもまさにこれが
私の邪道な作業過程です
42:03
And then finally, in L.A. I was asked to do a sculpture
そして これは
ロスで設計を頼まれた彫刻です
42:06
at the foot of Interstate Bank Tower, the highest building in L.A.
ロスで最も高い
バンク・タワーの足元を飾ります
42:12
Larry Halprin is doing the stairs.
階段は
ローレンス・ハルプリンのデザインです
42:15
And I was asked to do a fish, and so I did a snake.
魚のデザインを依頼されたので
敢えて蛇を造りました
(笑)
42:19
(Laughter)
42:20
It's a public space, and I made it kind of a garden structure,
公共スペースなので
庭園の構造にしました
42:23
and you can go in it.
中にも入れるデザインです
42:25
It's a kiva, and Larry's putting some water in there,
ここが地下貯水タンクになっていて
ラリーはここに水を貯めておきます
42:28
and it works much better than a fish.
魚よりもはるかに優れ者です
42:31
In Barcelona I was asked to do a fish, and we're working on that,
バルセロナでも魚を頼まれ
現在取り組んでいます
リッツ・カールトンタワーの
足元に置かれます
42:36
at the foot of a Ritz-Carlton Tower being done by
42:39
Skidmore, Owings and Merrill.
スキッドモア・オーウィングズ・アンド・メリルの設計です
42:41
And the Ritz-Carlton Tower is being designed with exposed steel,
タワー自体は露出型の鋼材で
42:44
non-fire proof, much like those old gas tanks.
防火性のない
旧式のガスタンクのようなデザインです
42:48
And so we took the language of this exposed steel and used it,
この「露出型の鋼材」というイメージを
我々の作品に取り入れました
42:54
perverted it, into the form of the fish, and created a kind of
少しひねって
魚の形状に仕立てています
そして 19世紀の機械仕掛けのように
ここに乗っかります
43:02
a 19th-century contraption that looks like, that will sit --
43:07
this is the beach and the harbor out in front,
目の前には
ビーチと港が広がります
43:09
and this is really a shopping center with department stores.
ここはデパートが入った
ショッピングセンターです
この橋は分割しました
43:13
And we split these bridges.
43:15
Originally, this was all solid with a hole in it.
元々は穴が開いた
大きな塊でしたが
43:17
We cut them loose and made several bridges and created a kind of
何本かに切り分けて
43:22
a foreground for this hotel.
ホテル正面を形作る
装飾のように仕上げました
43:24
We showed this to the hotel people the other day,
このイメージを
先日 ホテル関係者に見せました
43:27
and they were terrified and said that nobody would come
皆さん顔面蒼白で驚愕して
こう言いました
43:32
to the Ritz-Carlton anymore, because of this fish.
「これでは客足が途絶える
理由はこの魚だ」と
43:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
43:46
And finally, I just threw these in -- Lou Danziger.
最後にスライドを何枚か
ルイス・ダンジガーのスタジオです
43:48
I didn't expect Lou Danziger to be here,
今日 彼が来てると思わなくて
確か1964年に設計したものです
43:50
but this is a building I did for him in 1964, I think.
43:54
A little studio -- and it's sadly for sale.
小さなスタジオで
今は売りに出てるそうで 悲しいです
43:58
Time goes on.
時の流れは止められませんね
44:00
And this is my son working with me on a small fast-food thing.
これは息子と一緒に手掛けた
ファーストフード店です
44:07
He designed the robot as the cashier, and the head moves,
レジのロボットは息子がデザインして
頭が動きます
残りは私が担当しました
44:10
and I did the rest of it.
ただ肝心の味がそれほどではなくて
失敗に終わりました
44:12
And the food wasn't as good as the stuff, and so it failed.
何といっても
まず味が先に来て
44:16
It should have been the other way around --
44:17
the food should have been good first.
デザインは二の次のはずですから
44:19
It didn't work.
結局ダメでした
44:20
Thank you very much.
以上です
ご清聴ありがとうございました
Translator:HONG RYUN ISA
Reviewer:Masaki Yanagishita

sponsored links

Frank Gehry - Architect
A living legend, Frank Gehry has forged his own language of architecture, creating astonishing buildings all over the world, such as the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the Walt Disney Concert Hall in LA, and Manhattan's new IAC building.

Why you should listen

Frank Gehry is one of the world's most influential architects. His designs for the likes of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in LA are bold statements that have imposed a new aesthetic of architecture on the world at large, enlivening streetscapes and creating new destinations. Gehry has extended his vision beyond brick-and-mortar too, collaborating with artists such as Claes Oldenberg and Richard Serra, and designing watches, teapots and a line of jewelry for Tiffany & Co.

Now in his 80s, Gehry refuses to slow down or compromise his fierce vision: He and his team at Gehry Partners are working on a $4 billion development of the Atlantic Yards in Brooklyn, and a spectacular Guggenheim museum in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, which interprets local architecture traditions into a language all his own. Incorporating local architectural motifs without simply paying lip service to Middle Eastern culture, the building bears all the hallmarks of a classic Gehry design.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.