19:08
TED2015

BJ Miller: What really matters at the end of life

BJ・ミラー: 人生を終えるとき本当に大切なこと

Filmed:

人生の終わりに、私たちが最も強く願うことは何でしょうか?多くの場合は心の平穏や尊敬、愛でしょう。BJ・ミラーはホスピスの医師で、患者の尊厳に満ちた優美な人生の終わりを創り出す方法について深く考えています。ぜひ時間をとって、死や名誉ある人生についてどう考えるかという大きな問いを投げかけるこのトークを味わってください。

- Palliative caregiver
Using empathy and a clear-eyed view of mortality, BJ Miller shines a light on healthcare’s most ignored facet: preparing for death. He is executive director at Zen Hospice Project in San Francisco. Full bio

Well, we all need a reason to wake up.
目覚めるには 皆
何か理由を必要とするものです
00:13
For me, it just took 11,000 volts.
私の場合それは 1万1千ボルトでした
00:18
I know you're too polite to ask,
皆さん気を遣って
お尋ねにならないでしょうから
00:23
so I will tell you.
自分で言いましょう
00:24
One night, sophomore year of college,
大学2年生のある晩
00:27
just back from Thanksgiving holiday,
感謝祭の祝日から戻ったばかりでした
00:29
a few of my friends and I
were horsing around,
何人かの友達と私は
馬鹿騒ぎをしていました
00:33
and we decided to climb atop
a parked commuter train.
そして停まっていた電車の
てっぺんに上ることにしたんです
00:35
It was just sitting there,
with the wires that run overhead.
電車はただそこに佇んでおり
ワイヤーが上を走っていました
00:40
Somehow, that seemed
like a great idea at the time.
どういう訳か 当時は
それが凄く良い考えに思えたんです
00:43
We'd certainly done stupider things.
明らかに愚かなことでした
00:46
I scurried up the ladder on the back,
私は裏の梯子を駆け上がり
00:50
and when I stood up,
立ち上がったところで
00:53
the electrical current entered my arm,
電流が私の腕から入り
あっという間に―
00:55
blew down and out my feet,
and that was that.
足へと走り抜けました
それだけのことです
00:58
Would you believe that watch still works?
その時の腕時計が
今も動いてるなんて信じられます?
01:03
Takes a licking!
負けたよ!
01:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:09
My father wears it now in solidarity.
その時計は今 父がしています
連帯の意味で
01:10
That night began my formal relationship
with death -- my death --
その晩から 死と正式に付き合い始めました
「自分の死」とです
01:15
and it also began
my long run as a patient.
それは患者としての
長い道のりの始まりでもありました
01:21
It's a good word.
「患者」は良い言葉です
01:25
It means one who suffers.
苦しみを負う人という意味です
01:26
So I guess we're all patients.
誰もが患者なのでしょう
01:28
Now, the American health care system
さて アメリカの医療制度には
01:31
has more than its fair share
of dysfunction --
機能不全が かなりあります
01:33
to match its brilliance, to be sure.
確かに 優れてもいますけどね
01:37
I'm a physician now,
a hospice and palliative medicine doc,
私は現在 医師をしています
ホスピスと緩和医療専門です
01:39
so I've seen care from both sides.
ですから 両サイドから医療を見てきました
01:44
And believe me: almost everyone
who goes into healthcare
そして信じてください
医療に携わる者はほぼ皆
01:47
really means well -- I mean, truly.
善意でやっています 本当ですよ
01:50
But we who work in it
are also unwitting agents
でもそこで働いている私たちは
しばしば知らないうちに
01:54
for a system that too often
does not serve.
役に立たないシステムの
従事者にもなっています
01:58
Why?
なぜかって?
02:03
Well, there's actually a pretty easy
answer to that question,
実は その質問には
とても簡単な答えがあります
02:05
and it explains a lot:
これで説明がつきます
02:09
because healthcare was designed
with diseases, not people, at its center.
医療は本質的に 人のためではなく
病気のためにデザインされたからです
02:11
Which is to say, of course,
it was badly designed.
つまり 当然ながら
ひどいデザインだということです
02:18
And nowhere are the effects
of bad design more heartbreaking
そして人生の終わりほど
ひどいデザインが 胸をはり裂き
02:22
or the opportunity
for good design more compelling
あるいは良いデザインが
心底求められる場面は
02:28
than at the end of life,
他にありません
02:31
where things are so distilled
and concentrated.
それは 物事の本質が明らかになり
凝縮される時なのです
02:33
There are no do-overs.
やり直しはできません
02:38
My purpose today is
to reach out across disciplines
今日の私の目的は
医療の分野を飛び出して
02:42
and invite design thinking
into this big conversation.
デザイン思考を この大きな話題に
取り入れることです
02:46
That is, to bring intention and creativity
つまり 死を迎えるに際して
02:51
to the experience of dying.
意図と創造性を
そこに持ち込むことです
02:56
We have a monumental
opportunity in front of us,
私たちの目前にあるのは
非常に貴重な機会です
03:01
before one of the few universal issues
個人にとっても 社会にとっても
数少ない普遍的な事柄である
03:05
as individuals as well as a civil society:
死を迎える過程について
03:09
to rethink and redesign how it is we die.
考え直し デザインし直す機会です
03:12
So let's begin at the end.
では 終末の話から始めましょう
03:19
For most people, the scariest thing
about death isn't being dead,
死に関して 大半の人が最も怖がるのは
死そのものではなく
03:23
it's dying, suffering.
死にゆくこと 苦しむことです
03:27
It's a key distinction.
これは重要な区別です
03:29
To get underneath this,
it can be very helpful
そこを理解するためには
03:32
to tease out suffering
which is necessary as it is,
やむを得ない苦しみを
変えられる苦しみから 選り分けることが
03:34
from suffering we can change.
とても有用かもしれません
03:39
The former is a natural,
essential part of life, part of the deal,
前者は人生で起きる物事のうち
自然で不可欠な部分です
03:42
and to this we are called
to make space, adjust, grow.
それを受け入れる余地を作り 適応し
自らを成長させることが求められています
03:47
It can be really good
to realize forces larger than ourselves.
自分より大きな力の存在を認識することは
非常に良いことでもあります
03:55
They bring proportionality,
これで釣り合いがとれるようになるんです
04:01
like a cosmic right-sizing.
宇宙的な適正規模化のようなものです
04:04
After my limbs were gone,
私が手足を失った後
04:08
that loss, for example,
became fact, fixed --
例えば その喪失は
確固とした事実となり
04:11
necessarily part of my life,
必然的に私の人生の一部になりました
04:15
and I learned that I could no more
reject this fact than reject myself.
そしてこの事実を拒絶することは
自分を拒絶することに他ならないと学びました
04:19
It took me a while,
but I learned it eventually.
時間はかかりましたが
最終的にはそう学んだんです
04:27
Now, another great thing
about necessary suffering
さてやむを得ない苦しみに関する
もう1つの凄いことは
04:30
is that it is the very thing
それこそがケアの与え手と受け手を
04:33
that unites caregiver and care receiver --
結びつけることです
04:36
human beings.
人間同士を結びつけるのです
04:41
This, we are finally realizing,
is where healing happens.
これこそが癒しの起きる場であると
私たちはようやく気づきつつあります
04:45
Yes, compassion -- literally,
as we learned yesterday --
ええ まさしく昨日ここで習った
「思いやり」ですね
04:49
suffering together.
苦しみを共にすることです
04:53
Now, on the systems side,
on the other hand,
さて一方 システムの点からは
04:56
so much of the suffering
is unnecessary, invented.
非常に多くの苦痛が
不必要に生み出されています
05:00
It serves no good purpose.
何の意味もないことです
05:04
But the good news is,
since this brand of suffering is made up,
でも朗報です
この種の苦しみは作り出されたものなので
05:06
well, we can change it.
変えることもできるんです
05:10
How we die is indeed
something we can affect.
私たちは どう死ぬかに対して
影響力を持っているんです
05:13
Making the system sensitive
to this fundamental distinction
やむを得ない苦しみと 不必要な苦しみの
根本的な違いについて
05:18
between necessary
and unnecessary suffering
システムを敏感にしておくことは
05:22
gives us our first of three
design cues for the day.
今日お話しする3つのデザインの
第1の糸口です
05:25
After all, our role as caregivers,
as people who care,
何といっても ケアの与え手としての
私たちの役割は
05:30
is to relieve suffering --
not add to the pile.
苦しみを和らげることであり
積み上げていくことではありません
05:34
True to the tenets of palliative care,
緩和ケアの主義に則り
05:42
I function as something
of a reflective advocate,
私は医師として
薬を処方するだけでなく 同時に
05:44
as much as prescribing physician.
人生の振り返りを提唱しています
05:47
Quick aside: palliative care -- a very
important field but poorly understood --
余談ですが 緩和ケアは
重要度の割に あまり理解されていません
05:51
while it includes, it is not
limited to end of life care.
緩和ケアは 終末期に
限ったものではありません
05:57
It is not limited to hospice.
ホスピスに限ったものじゃないんです
06:00
It's simply about comfort
and living well at any stage.
これは人生のどの段階でも
心穏やかに 良く生きようということです
06:02
So please know that you don't
have to be dying anytime soon
ですから緩和ケアの恩恵に
あずかりたいからって
06:06
to benefit from palliative care.
今すぐ死のうとする必要はないですよ
06:10
Now, let me introduce you to Frank.
さて フランクを紹介させてください
06:13
Sort of makes this point.
この点を説明するためです
06:17
I've been seeing Frank now for years.
私はフランクをもう何年も診てきました
06:19
He's living with advancing prostate cancer
on top of long-standing HIV.
彼はHIVを長く患っている上に
進行性の前立腺がんも抱えています
06:21
We work on his bone pain and his fatigue,
骨の痛みと疲労感にも
治療を施しますが
06:26
but most of the time we spend thinking
out loud together about his life --
大半の時間 私たちは一緒に
彼の人生について話し合っています
06:28
really, about our lives.
正確には 「私たちの」人生です
06:32
In this way, Frank grieves.
そうすることで 彼は深く悲しみ
06:35
In this way, he keeps up with
his losses as they roll in,
そうすることで 喪失が訪れるなか
彼はそれに持ちこたえているのです
06:37
so that he's ready to take in
the next moment.
これは次に来る瞬間を
迎え入れる準備なんです
06:41
Loss is one thing,
but regret, quite another.
喪失だけでなく
後悔だってあります
06:45
Frank has always been an adventurer --
フランクはずっと
冒険を続けてきた人です
06:51
he looks like something
out of a Norman Rockwell painting --
ノーマン・ロックウェルの絵から
出てきたみたいに見えます
06:53
and no fan of regret.
後悔なんて全く趣味に合いません
06:56
So it wasn't surprising
when he came into clinic one day,
ですから彼がある受診日に
06:58
saying he wanted to raft
down the Colorado River.
「コロラド川をいかだで下りたい」
と言っても 驚きませんでした
07:01
Was this a good idea?
賛成します?
07:05
With all the risks to his safety
and his health, some would say no.
彼の安全と健康のリスクを考え
Noと言う人もいるでしょう
07:07
Many did, but he went for it,
while he still could.
多くの人はそうでしたが 彼は敢行しました
できるうちにね
07:11
It was a glorious, marvelous trip:
それは輝かしく
素晴らしい旅でした
07:15
freezing water, blistering dry heat,
scorpions, snakes,
凍てつくような水、 焼けつくような渇いた暑さ
サソリに ヘビ
07:20
wildlife howling off the flaming walls
of the Grand Canyon --
野生動物の遠吠えがグランドキャニオンの
燃えるように赤い壁に響く―
07:26
all the glorious side of the world
beyond our control.
人間の力の及ばない
世界の 実に輝かしい側面です
07:31
Frank's decision, while maybe dramatic,
フランクの決断は
劇的かもしれませんが
07:36
is exactly the kind
so many of us would make,
自分にとり最良のものを
時間をかけて見出す手助けさえあれば
07:38
if we only had the support to figure out
what is best for ourselves over time.
私たちの多くが
まさに こういう類のことを選ぶでしょう
07:40
So much of what we're talking about today
is a shift in perspective.
今日お話ししていることの多くは
視点の転換についてです
07:49
After my accident,
when I went back to college,
私が事故後に 大学へ戻った時
07:54
I changed my major to art history.
専攻を美術史に変えました
07:56
Studying visual art, I figured
I'd learn something about how to see --
視覚芸術を勉強して
物の見方を学ぼうと思いました
08:00
a really potent lesson
for a kid who couldn't change
これは自分の見方を
そう大きく変えられないでいた子供には
08:05
so much of what he was seeing.
非常に効き目のある課題でした
08:09
Perspective, that kind of alchemy
we humans get to play with,
視点というのは私たちにできる
一種の錬金術です
08:12
turning anguish into a flower.
苦悶を華(はな)に変えてくれます
08:16
Flash forward: now I work
at an amazing place in San Francisco
話を一気に飛ばして― いま私は
サンフランシスコの「禅ホスピス・プロジェクト」という
08:21
called the Zen Hospice Project,
素晴らしい所で働いています
08:25
where we have a little ritual
that helps with this shift in perspective.
そこでは この視点の転換を助ける
ちょっとした儀式を行っています
08:28
When one of our residents dies,
誰か利用者さんが亡くなると
08:32
the mortuary men come, and as we're
wheeling the body out through the garden,
葬儀屋が来ますが
私たちは庭を通って遺体を運び出し
08:35
heading for the gate, we pause.
門に向かって進む途中で
少し立ち止まります
08:39
Anyone who wants --
仲間の利用者さん、 家族、 看護師
08:42
fellow residents, family,
nurses, volunteers,
ボランティアや霊柩車の運転手など
08:44
the hearse drivers too, now --
誰でも希望する人が
08:46
shares a story or a song or silence,
私たちが遺体に
花びらのシャワーをしている間
08:49
as we sprinkle the body
with flower petals.
物語や歌 あるいは沈黙を
分かち合います
08:53
It takes a few minutes;
数分のことです
08:57
it's a sweet, simple parting image
to usher in grief with warmth,
思いやりある シンプルな告別の様子です
悲しみを忌避するのではなく
08:59
rather than repugnance.
温かく迎え入れるのです
09:04
Contrast that with the typical experience
in the hospital setting,
病院での典型的なやり方とは対照的です
09:08
much like this -- floodlit room
lined with tubes and beeping machines
チューブと ピーピーいう機械につながれて
投光照明の部屋で
09:13
and blinking lights that don't stop
even when the patient's life has.
患者の命が終わった時でさえも
チカチカしている光
09:18
Cleaning crew swoops in,
the body's whisked away,
清掃スタッフが さっと入ってきて
遺体は素早く運び出されます
09:23
and it all feels as though that person
had never really existed.
まるでその人が
実在さえしなかったかのようです
09:26
Well-intended, of course,
in the name of sterility,
もちろん良かれと思ってのことです
清潔という観点ではね
09:33
but hospitals tend to assault our senses,
しかし病院にいると 私たちの感覚は
やられてしまいがちです
09:35
and the most we might hope for
within those walls is numbness --
そして私たちがこの塀の内側で最も望むのは
感じなくなることかもしれません
09:39
anesthetic, literally
the opposite of aesthetic.
麻酔(anesthetic)によってです
美(aesthetic)とは 実に正反対です
09:44
I revere hospitals for what they can do;
I am alive because of them.
病院の仕事は尊敬していますよ
私が生きられているのは そのおかげですからね
09:50
But we ask too much of our hospitals.
しかし私たちは 病院に求めすぎです
09:56
They are places for acute trauma
and treatable illness.
病院は急性の外傷や
治療可能な病気を扱う場所です
09:59
They are no place to live and die;
that's not what they were designed for.
人生を過ごし 死にゆく場ではありません
病院はそのようにデザインされていないのです
10:03
Now mind you -- I am not
giving up on the notion
ここで言っておきますが
私は病院が
10:10
that our institutions
can become more humane.
もっと人間味ある場になれるという考えに
見切りをつけた訳ではありません
10:12
Beauty can be found anywhere.
美は至るところで見つかるものです
10:16
I spent a few months in a burn unit
私はニュージャージー州リビングストンにある
10:21
at St. Barnabas Hospital
in Livingston, New Jersey,
聖バルナバ病院の熱傷治療室で
数か月過ごしました
10:23
where I got really
great care at every turn,
そこでは痛みに対する優れた緩和ケアなど
10:26
including good
palliative care for my pain.
何から何まで
非常に素晴らしいケアを受けました
10:30
And one night, it began to snow outside.
ある晩 外では雪が降り始めました
10:33
I remember my nurses
complaining about driving through it.
看護師が雪の中を運転することに
不平を言っていたのを覚えています
10:37
And there was no window in my room,
私の部屋には窓がありませんでしたが
10:42
but it was great to just imagine it
coming down all sticky.
ベタ雪が降ってくるのを
想像するだけで素晴らしかった
10:44
Next day, one of my nurses
smuggled in a snowball for me.
次の日 看護師の1人が
雪玉をこっそり持ってきてくれました
10:49
She brought it in to the unit.
彼女は病室にそれを持ち込んだんです
10:53
I cannot tell you the rapture I felt
holding that in my hand,
あの雪玉を手にした時の歓喜や
10:56
and the coldness dripping
onto my burning skin;
火傷した肌に垂れた水滴の冷たさ
11:02
the miracle of it all,
その奇跡のような感覚
11:05
the fascination as I watched it melt
and turn into water.
雪玉が解け水になるのを見る陶酔感は
言葉で伝えようがありません
11:07
In that moment,
その瞬間
11:15
just being any part of this planet
in this universe mattered more to me
自分が生きるか死ぬかよりも
この宇宙のこの惑星の あらゆる部分が
11:17
than whether I lived or died.
私にとって より重要になりました
11:21
That little snowball packed
all the inspiration I needed
あの小さな雪玉は
私が生きようとするためにも
11:24
to both try to live
and be OK if I did not.
生きられなくてもよいと思えるためにも
必要な刺激を全て内包していました
11:27
In a hospital, that's a stolen moment.
病院では そんな瞬間は失われています
11:31
In my work over the years,
I've known many people
何年も働くなかで私は
死にゆく準備のできた人たちに
11:36
who were ready to go, ready to die.
たくさん会ってきました
11:39
Not because they had found
some final peace or transcendence,
と言ってもそれは 最終的な安寧や
超越を見出したからではなく
11:43
but because they were so repulsed
by what their lives had become --
見捨てられ 醜い姿になった自分の
こんな人生のありように
11:47
in a word, cut off, or ugly.
実にうんざりしてのことです
11:54
There are already record numbers of us
living with chronic and terminal illness,
慢性で死に至る病気を抱えて
年老いていく人の数は
12:03
and into ever older age.
すでに史上最多です
12:09
And we are nowhere near ready
or prepared for this silver tsunami.
そして私たちは こんな高齢者人口の急増に
準備が整ってなどいません
12:11
We need an infrastructure
dynamic enough to handle
この人口の劇的変化に
対処するのに十分なだけの
12:19
these seismic shifts in our population.
強力なインフラが必要です
12:22
Now is the time to create
something new, something vital.
何か新しく 必要不可欠なものを
今こそ創り出す時です
12:27
I know we can because we have to.
できますよ 必要なことですからね
12:30
The alternative is just unacceptable.
やらない手はありません
12:33
And the key ingredients are known:
鍵となる材料は分かっています
12:35
policy, education and training,
それは政策、教育訓練
12:37
systems, bricks and mortar.
システム、建物です
12:41
We have tons of input
for designers of all stripes to work with.
あらゆるデザイナーと協働するための情報を
私たちはどっさり持っています
12:44
We know, for example, from research
例えば 研究知見に基づくと
12:49
what's most important to people
who are closer to death:
死を間近に控えた人々にとって
最も大切なことは
12:51
comfort; feeling unburdened
and unburdening to those they love;
穏やかな心です 重荷がなく
愛しい人にも負担をかけない
12:54
existential peace; and a sense
of wonderment and spirituality.
実存的平穏 そして驚嘆と
スピリチュアリティの感覚です
13:01
Over Zen Hospice's nearly 30 years,
禅ホスピスでの30年近い実践で
13:08
we've learned much more
from our residents in subtle detail.
私たちは利用者さんから
遥かに多くのことを仔細に学びました
13:12
Little things aren't so little.
小さな事でも
意外と大事なんです
13:17
Take Janette.
ジャネットの場合
13:21
She finds it harder to breathe
one day to the next due to ALS.
彼女はALSのため
日ごとに呼吸が困難になりました
13:22
Well, guess what?
何があったと思います?
13:26
She wants to start smoking again --
彼女は 喫煙の再開を希望したんです
13:28
and French cigarettes, if you please.
それもフランスのタバコです
13:31
Not out of some self-destructive bent,
自己破壊的傾向からではなくて
13:36
but to feel her lungs filled
while she has them.
肺が満たされる感覚を味わうためです
そうできる間にね
13:39
Priorities change.
優先順位は変わるんです
13:44
Or Kate -- she just wants to know
またケイトの場合には
13:47
her dog Austin is lying
at the foot of her bed,
ベッドの足元に飼い犬のオースティンが
いることを知らせてほしがりました
13:50
his cold muzzle against her dry skin,
彼女の望みは
血管に化学療法を増すことよりも
13:54
instead of more chemotherapy
coursing through her veins --
かさかさした彼女の肌に
犬の冷たい鼻面が触れることでした
13:57
she's done that.
化学療法はもう済んでますから
14:00
Sensuous, aesthetic gratification,
where in a moment, in an instant,
感覚に訴える 美的な満足です
その瞬間 ほんの一瞬の間
14:02
we are rewarded for just being.
私たちはただ存在しているだけで
報われるんです
14:07
So much of it comes down to
loving our time by way of the senses,
その多くは結局のところ
感覚によって そして身体によって
14:15
by way of the body -- the very thing
doing the living and the dying.
自分の時間を愛おしむことです
まさにこれが 生きること 死にゆくことなんです
14:19
Probably the most poignant room
禅ホスピスのゲストハウス内で
14:26
in the Zen Hospice guest house
is our kitchen,
最も存在感を「匂わせる」のは
キッチンでしょう
14:27
which is a little strange when you realize
少し奇妙ですよね
利用者さんの大多数は
14:30
that so many of our residents
can eat very little, if anything at all.
ほとんど食事がとれないんですから
14:32
But we realize we are providing
sustenance on several levels:
でも私たちが提供している栄養は
1種類ではないと認識しています
14:36
smell, a symbolic plane.
匂いは その1つとして象徴的なものです
14:41
Seriously, with all the heavy-duty stuff
happening under our roof,
真面目な話 この屋根の下で
実に重たい出来事が進行しているなか
14:46
one of the most tried and true
interventions we know of,
私たちが知るうちで
最も多く試みられた 効果的な治療は
14:51
is to bake cookies.
クッキーを焼くことです
14:55
As long as we have our senses --
感覚が生きている限り―
15:10
even just one --
たとえ1つだけでも―
15:11
we have at least
the possibility of accessing
人間らしく 誰かとつながっていると
感じさせてくれるものに
15:13
what makes us feel human, connected.
少なくともアクセスが可能です
15:17
Imagine the ripples of this notion
想像してください この考えが
何百万人もの
15:22
for the millions of people
living and dying with dementia.
認知症と共に生き 死にゆく人々に
どう影響するでしょう
15:25
Primal sensorial delights that say
the things we don't have words for,
原初的な五感の喜びは
言葉で表せない物事を表現します
15:29
impulses that make us stay present --
それは私たちを現在にとどめる力になり
15:33
no need for a past or a future.
過去や未来は必要なくなります
15:36
So, if teasing unnecessary suffering out
of the system was our first design cue,
ですから不必要な苦しみをシステムから除くことが
第1のデザインの糸口だとすれば
15:42
then tending to dignity
by way of the senses,
感覚によって
身体という美的な領域によって
15:50
by way of the body --
the aesthetic realm --
人としての尊厳を尊重することは
15:53
is design cue number two.
第2のデザインの糸口になります
15:57
Now this gets us quickly to the third
and final bit for today;
これで第3は ぐっと分かりやすくなりました
今日最後のお話です
15:59
namely, we need to lift our sights,
to set our sights on well-being,
つまり私たちは 視点を上げ 
よりよい生に 目を向ける必要があるのです
16:03
so that life and health and healthcare
人生や健康 医療を
16:10
can become about making life
more wonderful,
単に人生の恐怖を低減するのではなく
16:13
rather than just less horrible.
より素晴らしくするためのものに
していくためにです
16:16
Beneficence.
「与益」です
16:20
Here, this gets right at the distinction
ここに来て
ケアのモデルが病気中心か
16:22
between a disease-centered and a patient-
or human-centered model of care,
患者すなわち人間中心かが
きちんと区別されます
16:25
and here is where caring
becomes a creative, generative,
そしてここに来て ケアという営みは
創造的で生産的で
16:30
even playful act.
遊び心に満ちたものにさえなるのです
16:33
"Play" may sound like a funny word here.
「遊び心」は おかしな響きかもしれません
16:36
But it is also one of our
highest forms of adaptation.
しかしこれは私たちの
最も高度な適応の1つでもあります
16:39
Consider every major compulsory effort
it takes to be human.
人間らしくあるために必須の努力のうち
主なものを考えてみましょう
16:42
The need for food has birthed cuisine.
食の必要性は 調理法を生みました
16:47
The need for shelter
has given rise to architecture.
危険をよける必要性は 建築を生みました
16:49
The need for cover, fashion.
保護の必要性は
ファッションを生みました
16:52
And for being subjected to the clock,
そして時の流れに従う必要性が
あったおかげで
16:54
well, we invented music.
音楽が生まれたんです
16:57
So, since dying
is a necessary part of life,
では死にゆくという
人生に不可欠な事実から
17:03
what might we create with this fact?
私たちは何を生み出せるでしょう?
17:06
By "play" I am in no way suggesting
we take a light approach to dying
私は「遊び」という言葉によって
死への軽薄なアプローチを提言したり
17:12
or that we mandate
any particular way of dying.
特定の死に方を
押し付けたりするつもりはありません
17:15
There are mountains of sorrow
that cannot move,
山のような悲しみの存在は
動かしようがなく
17:18
and one way or another,
we will all kneel there.
あれこれしても結局
私たちはそこに ひざまずきます
17:20
Rather, I am asking that we make space --
むしろ 私が言いたいのは
受け入れる余地を作ることです
17:24
physical, psychic room, to allow life
to play itself all the way out --
それは生を最後まで全うするための
物理的・精神的余地です
17:28
so that rather than just
getting out of the way,
それによって
歳をとることや死にゆくことは
17:34
aging and dying can become
a process of crescendo through to the end.
単に人生を離脱することではなく
終末のクライマックスに向かう過程になりえます
17:37
We can't solve for death.
死なないで済む方法はありません
17:44
I know some of you are working on this.
これに取り組んでいる方も
おられますけどね
17:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
17:52
Meanwhile, we can --
それが叶うまでの間 私たちの方では―
17:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
17:58
We can design towards it.
死に向けたデザインを
しておきましょう
18:00
Parts of me died early on,
私の一部は 早い段階で死にましたが
18:04
and that's something we can all say
one way or another.
それは誰もが通る道なのです
18:05
I got to redesign my life
around this fact,
この事実に基づいて
私は人生を再設計しましたが
18:08
and I tell you it has been a liberation
それは解放だったんですよ
18:11
to realize you can always find
a shock of beauty or meaning
残された人生のなかで
美や意味に気づくという衝撃には
18:14
in what life you have left,
いつでも出会えるのだと気づいたんです
18:17
like that snowball lasting
for a perfect moment,
たとえば ある絶好の瞬間にだけ形をとどめ
18:20
all the while melting away.
解けていく あの雪玉のようにです
18:22
If we love such moments ferociously,
私たちがそのような瞬間を
猛烈に愛しく思うなら
18:26
then maybe we can learn to live well --
より良く生きることを
学べるかもしれません
18:32
not in spite of death,
それは「死ぬにもかかわらず」 ではなく
18:35
but because of it.
「死ぬからこそ」です
18:37
Let death be what takes us,
想像力の欠如にではなく
18:42
not lack of imagination.
死に私たちを導かせましょう
18:44
Thank you.
ありがとう
18:48
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:50
Translated by Naoko Fujii
Reviewed by Emi Kamiya

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

BJ Miller - Palliative caregiver
Using empathy and a clear-eyed view of mortality, BJ Miller shines a light on healthcare’s most ignored facet: preparing for death. He is executive director at Zen Hospice Project in San Francisco.

Why you should listen

Along with the Zen Hospice Project he directs, palliative care specialist BJ Miller helps patients face their own deaths realistically, comfortably, and on their own terms. Through the work of Zen Hospice Project, Miller is cultivating a model for palliative care organizations around the world, and emphasizing healthcare’s quixotic relationship to the inevitability of death.

Miller’s passion for palliative care stems from personal experience -- a shock sustained while a Princeton undergraduate cost him three limbs and nearly killed him. But his experiences form the foundation of a hard-won empathy for patients who are running out of time.

More profile about the speaker
BJ Miller | Speaker | TED.com