sponsored links
TEDxPenn

Vijay Kumar: The future of flying robots

ヴィージェイ・クーマー: 空飛ぶロボットの未来

April 12, 2015

ペンシルベニア大学の研究室でヴィージェイ・クーマーのチームは蜜蜂の動きに触発された自律飛行ロボットを作りました。彼らの最新の成果は精密農業への応用で、ロボットの一群が果樹園にある個々の果樹や果実を解析してモデルを作成し、収穫量を増やしたり水の管理を改善する上で重要な情報を農家に提供するというものです。

Vijay Kumar - Roboticist
As the dean of the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science, Vijay Kumar studies the control and coordination of multi-robot formations. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
In my lab, we build
autonomous aerial robots
私の研究室では ご覧のような
00:13
like the one you see flying here.
自律飛行ロボットを作っています
00:16
Unlike the commercially available drones
that you can buy today,
今時 お店で売っているような
ドローンとは違って
00:20
this robot doesn't have any GPS on board.
GPSは搭載していません
00:24
So without GPS,
GPSなしでは
00:27
it's hard for robots like this
to determine their position.
このようなロボットが
自分の位置を特定するのは困難です
00:29
This robot uses onboard sensors,
cameras and laser scanners,
このロボットの場合 搭載したセンサー、
カメラ、レーザースキャナーで
00:34
to scan the environment.
周囲を走査していて
00:38
It detects features from the environment,
周りにあるものを検知し
00:40
and it determines where it is
relative to those features,
三角測量によって
それらに対する
00:43
using a method of triangulation.
相対的な位置を把握しています
00:46
And then it can assemble
all these features into a map,
それらのデータをまとめて
後ろに出ているような
00:48
like you see behind me.
マップを構築することが出来ます
00:52
And this map then allows the robot
to understand where the obstacles are
こうやってマップができると
どこに障害物があるか分かり
00:53
and navigate in a collision-free manner.
ロボットは衝突することなく
飛行することが出来ます
00:57
What I want to show you next
次にお見せしたいのは
01:00
is a set of experiments
we did inside our laboratory,
このロボットに
もっと長い距離を飛行させてみた
01:03
where this robot was able
to go for longer distances.
私たちの研究所で行った
一連の実験です
01:06
So here you'll see, on the top right,
what the robot sees with the camera.
右上にあるのは
ロボットのカメラが撮った映像です
01:10
And on the main screen --
メインスクリーンでは
01:15
and of course this is sped up
by a factor of four --
―4倍速でお見せしていますが―
01:16
on the main screen you'll see
the map that it's building.
マップ構築の様子をご覧になれます
01:18
So this is a high-resolution map
of the corridor around our laboratory.
これは研究室周辺の廊下を
高解像度でマップ化したもので
01:21
And in a minute
you'll see it enter our lab,
まもなく研究室へと入ってきます
01:25
which is recognizable
by the clutter that you see.
散らかっている様子で
それと分かるかと思いますが—
01:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:31
But the main point I want to convey to you
ここで最も強調したいのは
01:32
is that these robots are capable
of building high-resolution maps
これらのロボットは
5センチという高い解像度で
01:34
at five centimeters resolution,
マップを作成することが
出来るということで
01:37
allowing somebody who is outside the lab,
or outside the building
研究室や建物の外部にいる人でも
01:40
to deploy these
without actually going inside,
このロボットを放つことで
実際に中に入ることなく
01:44
and trying to infer
what happens inside the building.
中で何が起こっているか
推察することができます
01:47
Now there's one problem
with robots like this.
このようなロボットには
問題点があります
01:52
The first problem is it's pretty big.
1つ目の問題は
大きいということです
01:55
Because it's big, it's heavy.
大きいので重量もあります
01:57
And these robots consume
about 100 watts per pound.
1キログラムにつき約200ワットの
電力を消費します
02:00
And this makes for
a very short mission life.
ですからあまり長くは作業できません
02:04
The second problem
2つ目の問題は
02:07
is that these robots have onboard sensors
that end up being very expensive --
ロボットに搭載されている
レーザースキャナーやカメラや
02:09
a laser scanner, a camera
and the processors.
CPUがとても高価だということです
02:13
That drives up the cost of this robot.
そのためロボットのコストが
跳ね上がります
02:17
So we asked ourselves a question:
そこで私達は自問しました
02:21
what consumer product
can you buy in an electronics store
消費者が電気屋で買えるような
02:23
that is inexpensive, that's lightweight,
that has sensing onboard and computation?
センサーやCPUを搭載した
高価でない軽量な商品はないだろうか?
02:27
And we invented the flying phone.
そうやって空飛ぶ携帯電話が
生まれました
02:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:38
So this robot uses a Samsung Galaxy
smartphone that you can buy off the shelf,
このロボットは お店ですぐに買える
サムスンのギャラクシー携帯を利用し
02:40
and all you need is an app that you
can download from our app store.
アプリはAppストアから
ダウンロードできます
02:46
And you can see this robot
reading the letters, "TED" in this case,
このロボットは 今
「TED」の文字を読み取っているところです
02:50
looking at the corners
of the "T" and the "E"
「T」と「E」の角を探し出し
02:55
and then triangulating off of that,
flying autonomously.
三角測量しつつ自律飛行しています
02:57
That joystick is just there
to make sure if the robot goes crazy,
ジョイスティックは
ロボットが暴走した時のためで
03:02
Giuseppe can kill it.
その時にはジュゼッペ君が
止めてくれます
03:05
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:07
In addition to building
these small robots,
単に小さなロボットを
作るというだけでなく
03:10
we also experiment with aggressive
behaviors, like you see here.
このような激しい動きをさせる
実験もしています
03:14
So this robot is now traveling
at two to three meters per second,
このロボットは秒速2-3メートルで動き
03:19
pitching and rolling aggressively
as it changes direction.
方向転換をするときには
上下運動や回転運動を素早く行います
03:25
The main point is we can have
smaller robots that can go faster
重要な点は 小さなロボットは
素早く動け
03:28
and then travel in these
very unstructured environments.
障害の多い環境中を
うまく移動できることです
03:32
And in this next video,
次のビデオでお見せするのは
03:36
just like you see this bird, an eagle,
gracefully coordinating its wings,
鷲のような鳥が
羽と目と足を優雅に連携させて
03:39
its eyes and feet
to grab prey out of the water,
水中の獲物を捉まえるように
03:44
our robot can go fishing, too.
私たちのロボットにも
魚採りができることです
03:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:51
In this case, this is a Philly cheesesteak
hoagie that it's grabbing out of thin air.
どこからともなくやって来て
チーズ & ステーキのロールパンサンドを
03:52
(Laughter)
かっさらっています (笑)
03:56
So you can see this robot
going at about three meters per second,
このロボットは人の歩く速さよりも速い
秒速約3メートルで動き
03:59
which is faster than walking speed,
coordinating its arms, its claws
腕と爪と飛行を
絶妙なタイミングで連携させ
04:02
and its flight with split-second timing
to achieve this maneuver.
このような動作を達成しています
04:07
In another experiment,
別の実験でお見せするのは
04:13
I want to show you
how the robot adapts its flight
枠の幅よりも長い紐で
04:15
to control its suspended payload,
重りを吊したロボットが
04:18
whose length is actually larger
than the width of the window.
その枠の中を
上手くくぐり抜ける様子です
04:21
So in order to accomplish this,
これを成し遂げるには
04:25
it actually has to pitch
and adjust the altitude
上下に動いて 高度を調整することで
04:27
and swing the payload through.
重りをスイングさせる
必要があります
04:30
But of course we want
to make these even smaller,
しかし もっと小さいものが
作れたらと思っています
04:38
and we're inspired
in particular by honeybees.
特にミツバチにヒントを得ました
04:41
So if you look at honeybees,
and this is a slowed down video,
これはスローモーションで
再生したビデオですが
04:44
they're so small,
the inertia is so lightweight --
ミツバチはとても小さく
その慣性力は僅かです
04:47
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:51
that they don't care --
they bounce off my hand, for example.
例えば 私の手にぶつかっても
ほとんど気にかけません
04:52
This is a little robot
that mimics the honeybee behavior.
これはミツバチの動きをまねた
小型ロボットです
04:56
And smaller is better,
小さいほど
05:00
because along with the small size
you get lower inertia.
慣性力が小さくなるので
都合がいいのです
05:01
Along with lower inertia --
慣性力が小さいと—
05:05
(Robot buzzing, laughter)
(周りをブンブン飛び回るロボット) (笑)
05:06
along with lower inertia,
you're resistant to collisions.
慣性力が小さいと
衝突に対し強くなります
05:09
And that makes you more robust.
より丈夫になるということです
05:12
So just like these honeybees,
we build small robots.
そういうわけでミツバチのように
小さなロボットを作ります
05:15
And this particular one
is only 25 grams in weight.
これは僅か25グラムしかありません
05:18
It consumes only six watts of power.
消費電力はほんの6ワットです
05:21
And it can travel
up to six meters per second.
秒速6メートルまで出せます
05:24
So if I normalize that to its size,
ボーイング787の大きさだったら
05:26
it's like a Boeing 787 traveling
ten times the speed of sound.
音速の10倍に相当する速さです
05:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:35
And I want to show you an example.
実例をお見せしましょう
05:37
This is probably the first planned mid-air
collision, at one-twentieth normal speed.
これはたぶん初めての空中衝突実験で
20分の1のスピードでお見せしています
05:40
These are going at a relative speed
of two meters per second,
(ロボット同士の) 相対速度は
毎秒2メートルで
05:45
and this illustrates the basic principle.
お話しした基本原理を例示しています
05:48
The two-gram carbon fiber cage around it
prevents the propellers from entangling,
機体を保護する2グラムの炭素繊維のカゴは
プロペラ同士が絡まるのを防いでいます
05:52
but essentially the collision is absorbed
and the robot responds to the collisions.
衝撃は吸収され
ロボットは衝突に対応しています
05:57
And so small also means safe.
小さいということは安全も意味します
06:02
In my lab, as we developed these robots,
研究室ではこんなロボットを作ってきました
06:05
we start off with these big robots
大型のロボットから始め
06:07
and then now we're down
to these small robots.
小型のものへと移っていきました
06:08
And if you plot a histogram
of the number of Band-Aids we've ordered
これまで研究室で発注した絆創膏の数を
ヒストグラムにしたら
06:11
in the past, that sort of tailed off now.
どんどん小さくなっていることが
分るでしょう
06:15
Because these robots are really safe.
ロボットが安全になってきたからです
06:17
The small size has some disadvantages,
小さいと不利な点もあります
06:20
and nature has found a number of ways
to compensate for these disadvantages.
自然はこの不利な点を補う方法を
進化させてきました
06:23
The basic idea is they aggregate
to form large groups, or swarms.
基本的には集団や群れを作る
ということです
06:27
So, similarly, in our lab,
we try to create artificial robot swarms.
我々の研究室でも 同様に
人工的なロボットの集団を試してみました
06:32
And this is quite challenging
これはかなり難しい技術です
06:36
because now you have to think
about networks of robots.
ロボット間のネットワークを
考慮しなければならないからです
06:37
And within each robot,
各ロボットの
06:41
you have to think about the interplay
of sensing, communication, computation --
センサー、通信、計算の
連携を考えなければなりません
06:42
and this network then becomes
quite difficult to control and manage.
このネットワークの制御、管理が
実にやっかいなのです
06:48
So from nature we take away
three organizing principles
自然から3つの(自己)組織化の原理を
見習うことによって
06:53
that essentially allow us
to develop our algorithms.
制御のアルゴリズムを
開発することができます
06:57
The first idea is that robots
need to be aware of their neighbors.
1つ目のアイデアは
ロボットが近くの個体を認識することです
07:01
They need to be able to sense
and communicate with their neighbors.
近隣の個体を認識して
互いに通信できなければなりません
07:06
So this video illustrates the basic idea.
このビデオはその基本原理を示しています
07:09
You have four robots --
4機のロボットがいます
07:12
one of the robots has actually been
hijacked by a human operator, literally.
その内1機が 文字通り
人間のオペレータによってハイジャックされています
07:13
But because the robots
interact with each other,
ロボットは互いに相互作用し
07:19
they sense their neighbors,
近くの個体を認識しているので
07:21
they essentially follow.
動きに追従します
07:22
And here there's a single person
able to lead this network of followers.
この例では1人の人間が
追従するロボットを先導しています
07:24
So again, it's not because all the robots
know where they're supposed to go.
どのロボットもどこへ行くべきか
分っているわけではなく
07:31
It's because they're just reacting
to the positions of their neighbors.
ただ近くのロボットの位置に対し
反応しているだけです
07:36
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:43
So the next experiment illustrates
the second organizing principle.
次の実験は
組織化の2つ目の原理を示すものです
07:48
And this principle has to do
with the principle of anonymity.
この原理は匿名性の原理と関連しています
07:54
Here the key idea is that
ここで基本となる考えは
07:59
the robots are agnostic
to the identities of their neighbors.
ロボットは近隣の個体を
識別していないということです
08:03
They're asked to form a circular shape,
円陣を組めという指令を受けると
08:08
and no matter how many robots
you introduce into the formation,
編隊を組むロボットの数を
いかに増やそうと
08:10
or how many robots you pull out,
あるいは 何体か取り除こうと
08:14
each robot is simply
reacting to its neighbor.
各ロボットは単に
隣にいるロボットに反応するだけなのです
08:16
It's aware of the fact that it needs
to form the circular shape,
円陣を組むという
指示を受けるものの
08:19
but collaborating with its neighbors
隣のロボットと協調するだけで
08:24
it forms the shape
without central coordination.
中央制御によって
編隊を形成しているわけではありません
08:26
Now if you put these ideas together,
これらのアイデアを一緒にすると
08:31
the third idea is that we
essentially give these robots
3つ目のアイデアが得られます
08:33
mathematical descriptions
of the shape they need to execute.
ロボットに編隊の形の
数学的記述を与えるということです
08:37
And these shapes can be varying
as a function of time,
形は時間と共に変わっていきます
08:42
and you'll see these robots
start from a circular formation,
ご覧の様に
円形から始まり
08:45
change into a rectangular formation,
stretch into a straight line,
長方形を形作った後
直線状に広がり
08:50
back into an ellipse.
また楕円に戻ります
08:53
And they do this with the same
kind of split-second coordination
自然界における生物の群れと同様に
08:54
that you see in natural swarms, in nature.
瞬間瞬間の協調によって
こういったことを成し遂げています
08:58
So why work with swarms?
なぜ群れについて研究しているのか?
09:02
Let me tell you about two applications
that we are very interested in.
我々がとても興味を抱いている
2つの応用があります
09:05
The first one has to do with agriculture,
1つ目は農業に関するものです
09:09
which is probably the biggest problem
that we're facing worldwide.
我々が世界で直面している
最大の問題と言って良いでしょう
09:12
As you well know,
ご存知の通り
09:16
one in every seven persons
in this earth is malnourished.
世界では
7人に1人が栄養失調です
09:17
Most of the land that we can cultivate
has already been cultivated.
耕作可能な土地は
既に殆ど開拓されています
09:21
And the efficiency of most systems
in the world is improving,
こんにちの世界では
多くのシステムの効率が向上していますが
09:25
but our production system
efficiency is actually declining.
農業の生産効率は低下しています
09:29
And that's mostly because of water
shortage, crop diseases, climate change
原因はおそらく 水不足、穀物の病気
気候変動や
09:32
and a couple of other things.
その他の理由にあります
09:37
So what can robots do?
ロボットに何が出来るでしょう?
09:39
Well, we adopt an approach that's
called Precision Farming in the community.
この分野で精密農業(プレシジョンファーミング)
と呼ばれる手法を取り入れてみました
09:41
And the basic idea is that we fly
aerial robots through orchards,
基本的な考えはこうです
果樹園にロボットを飛ばし
09:45
and then we build
precision models of individual plants.
個々の木の精密なモデルを作成します
09:51
So just like personalized medicine,
個々の患者の
遺伝体質に合わせた
09:54
while you might imagine wanting
to treat every patient individually,
オーダーメード医療のように
09:56
what we'd like to do is build
models of individual plants
個々の木のモデルを製作することによって
10:01
and then tell the farmer
what kind of inputs every plant needs --
農家はそれぞれの木が必要とするもの―
10:04
the inputs in this case being water,
fertilizer and pesticide.
この場合 水、肥料や殺虫剤といったものですが
それを知ることができます
10:09
Here you'll see robots
traveling through an apple orchard,
ロボットがリンゴ園を飛び交っています
10:14
and in a minute you'll see
two of its companions
仲間の2機が同じようなことを
しているのが
10:18
doing the same thing on the left side.
すぐに 左手に見えてきます
10:20
And what they're doing is essentially
building a map of the orchard.
果樹園のマップを作成しているところで
10:22
Within the map is a map
of every plant in this orchard.
果樹園にある1本1本の木を
マッピングしています
10:26
(Robot buzzing)
(ブンブン)
10:29
Let's see what those maps look like.
ではそのマップを見てみましょう
10:30
In the next video, you'll see the cameras
that are being used on this robot.
次のビデオではロボットに搭載された
カメラの映像をご覧になれます
10:32
On the top-left is essentially
a standard color camera.
左上は通常のカラー映像です
10:37
On the left-center is an infrared camera.
左中央は赤外線映像で
10:41
And on the bottom-left
is a thermal camera.
左下はサーマルカメラのものです
10:44
And on the main panel, you're seeing
a three-dimensional reconstruction
中央のパネルでは
各センサーが木々を通過するのに合わせ
10:48
of every tree in the orchard
as the sensors fly right past the trees.
果樹園の木の状態が
3次元的に再構成されていく様子が見られます
10:51
Armed with information like this,
we can do several things.
こういった情報を用いて
多くのことが出来ます
10:59
The first and possibly the most important
thing we can do is very simple:
1つ目はおそらく最も重要なことですが
とても単純なこと
11:04
count the number of fruits on every tree.
木になっている果実の数を
数えるということです
11:08
By doing this, you tell the farmer
how many fruits she has in every tree
これによって農家は
個々の木になる果実の数を知り
11:11
and allow her to estimate
the yield in the orchard,
果樹園全体の収穫量を見積もり
11:15
optimizing the production
chain downstream.
生産販売経路を
最適化することができます
11:20
The second thing we can do
2つ目に可能なことは
11:23
is take models of plants, construct
three-dimensional reconstructions,
木のモデルに基づき
3次元形状を再構成し
11:25
and from that estimate the canopy size,
そこから樹冠の面積を
推定することで
11:29
and then correlate the canopy size
to the amount of leaf area on every plant.
土地単位面積あたりの
葉面積を求めるということです
11:32
And this is called the leaf area index.
これは葉面積指数と呼ばれます
11:35
So if you know this leaf area index,
葉面積指数は
11:38
you essentially have a measure of how much
photosynthesis is possible in every plant,
それぞれの木がどれだけの光合成を
行っているかの指標となり
11:40
which again tells you
how healthy each plant is.
個々の木の健康度を示します
11:45
By combining visual
and infrared information,
可視光と赤外線データを組み合わせると
11:49
we can also compute indices such as NDVI.
正規化植生指標といった指標を
計算することができます
11:53
And in this particular case,
you can essentially see
ご覧の例では
11:56
there are some crops that are
not doing as well as other crops.
ある作物が他の作物に比べて
状態が悪いことが見て取れます
11:59
This is easily discernible from imagery,
これは通常の可視光だけでなく
12:02
not just visual imagery but combining
可視光と赤外線イメージを
組み合わせることで
12:06
both visual imagery and infrared imagery.
容易に識別できるようになります
12:09
And then lastly,
最後に
12:11
one thing we're interested in doing is
detecting the early onset of chlorosis --
我々が関心を持っているのは
植物の黄白化の早期発見です
12:13
and this is an orange tree --
これはオレンジの木です
12:17
which is essentially seen
by yellowing of leaves.
葉が黄色くなっています
12:18
But robots flying overhead
can easily spot this autonomously
上空にロボットを飛ばすことで
これは自動で容易に発見できます
12:21
and then report to the farmer
that he or she has a problem
そして果樹園のこの区域に
異常があることを
12:25
in this section of the orchard.
農家に知らせます
12:28
Systems like this can really help,
このようなシステムはとても有効で
12:30
and we're projecting yields
that can improve by about ten percent
10%の収穫量増加が期待できますが
12:33
and, more importantly, decrease
the amount of inputs such as water
さらに重要なのは
飛行ロボットを使うことで
12:39
by 25 percent by using
aerial robot swarms.
水の25%削減など
投入資源を減らせることです
12:42
Lastly, I want you to applaud
the people who actually create the future,
最後になりますが 未来を創造する
この人達に拍手をお願いしたいと思います
12:47
Yash Mulgaonkar, Sikang Liu
and Giuseppe Loianno,
ヤッシュ・ムルガンカー、シカン・リウ
ジュゼッペ・ロイアーノ
12:52
who are responsible for the three
demonstrations that you saw.
彼らがご覧になった3つのデモを
作成してくれました
12:57
Thank you.
有難うございました
13:01
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:02
Translator:Tomoyuki Suzuki
Reviewer:Misaki Sato

sponsored links

Vijay Kumar - Roboticist
As the dean of the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science, Vijay Kumar studies the control and coordination of multi-robot formations.

Why you should listen

At the General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception (GRASP) Lab at the University of Pennsylvania, flying quadrotor robots move together in eerie formation, tightening themselves into perfect battalions, even filling in the gap when one of their own drops out. You might have seen viral videos of the quads zipping around the netting-draped GRASP Lab (they juggle! they fly through a hula hoop!). Vijay Kumar headed this lab from 1998-2004. He's now the dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, where he continues his work in robotics, blending computer science and mechanical engineering to create the next generation of robotic wonders.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.