08:24
TEDxSydney

Tom Uglow: An Internet without screens might look like this

トム・アグロ―: インターネットをスクリーンなしで見ると

Filmed:

デザイナーのトム・アグロ―は、人が愛する自然な解決策とシンプルなツールで情報のニーズを満たし情報機器と共存できる未来を創作しています。 「現実はスクリーンより豊かで」「大好きな情報に囲まれた幸せな場所を電球を灯すように自然に持てる」と彼は言います。

- Designer
Tea Uglow leads part of Google's Creative Lab specializing in work with cultural organizations, artists, writers and producers on experiments using digital technology at the boundaries of traditional cultural practice. Full bio

I'd like to start by asking you all
to go to your happy place, please.
まず始めに
皆さんが幸せになれる場所に行ってみてください
00:12
Yes, your happy place,
そう 幸せになれる場所
00:17
I know you've got one even if it's fake.
フリだったとしても1つはありますよね
00:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:20
OK, so, comfortable?
気持ちいいですね?
00:21
Good.
よかった
00:23
Now I'd like to you to mentally answer
the following questions.
さて 皆さんに次の質問に
心の中で答えて欲しいのです
00:24
Is there any strip lighting
in your happy place?
そこには蛍光灯がありますか?
00:27
Any plastic tables?
プラスチック製のテーブルは?
00:31
Polyester flooring?
ポリエステル素材の床は?
00:33
Mobile phones?
携帯電話は?
00:35
No?
ないですね?
00:36
I think we all know that our happy place
幸せになれる場所といえば
00:37
is meant to be
somewhere natural, outdoors --
自然があって 屋外で
海辺や炉端みたいな場所を
00:39
on a beach, fireside.
誰もが考えるでしょう
00:42
We'll be reading or eating or knitting.
そこで 読書や食事や
編み物をするのです
00:44
And we're surrounded
by natural light and organic elements.
自然な光と有機的な要素に囲まれています
00:48
Natural things make us happy.
自然なものは皆を幸せにしてくれます
00:52
And happiness is a great motivator;
we strive for happiness.
幸せは生きがいであり
追い求めるものです
00:55
Perhaps that's why
we're always redesigning everything,
恐らくそれで より自然な感じがするよう
00:59
in the hopes that our solutions
might feel more natural.
全てを設計し直すのでしょう
01:01
So let's start there --
では そこから始めましょうか
01:06
with the idea that good design
should feel natural.
デザインは自然であるべき
01:08
Your phone is not very natural.
携帯電話は違います
01:12
And you probably think
you're addicted to your phone,
自分はスマホ中毒だと
思っているかもしれませんが
01:17
but you're really not.
でも実はそうではありません
01:19
We're not addicted to devices,
私達はデバイスに依存するのではなく
01:21
we're addicted to the information
that flows through them.
そこに流れる情報に依存しているのです
01:23
I wonder how long you would be
happy in your happy place
外部からの情報なしで 一体どの位の間
01:26
without any information
from the outside world.
皆さんが「幸せな場所」で
幸せでいられるかなと思います
01:29
I'm interested in how we access
that information,
私は人がどう情報にアクセスし
01:33
how we experience it.
経験するのかについて関心があります
01:35
We're moving from a time
of static information,
私たちは本や図書館や
バス停に代表される
01:37
held in books and libraries and bus stops,
静的な情報の時代から
01:41
through a period of digital information,
デジタル情報時代を経て
01:44
towards a period of fluid information,
流動的な情報時代へと
変遷しているのです
01:47
where your children will expect to be able
to access anything, anywhere at any time,
そこでは子供達が
量子物理学から中世のブドウ栽培
01:49
from quantum physics
to medieval viticulture,
ジェンダー理論から天気予報まで
01:55
from gender theory to tomorrow's weather,
ちょうど電灯のスイッチを入れるように
01:59
just like switching on a lightbulb --
いつでもアクセス出来る
ようになるところなのです
02:03
Imagine that.
想像してみてください
02:06
Humans also like simple tools.
人間はシンプルな道具も好きです
02:08
Your phone is not a very simple tool.
でもスマホは
そこまでシンプルではありません
02:11
A fork is a simple tool.
フォークはシンプルな道具ですね
02:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:16
And we don't like them made of plastic,
そして実はスマホが気に入らないのと同様に
02:17
in the same way I don't really like
my phone very much --
プラスチックでできた物は苦手です
02:20
it's not how I want
to experience information.
これで情報を得たくはありません
02:22
I think there are better solutions
than a world mediated by screens.
私はスクリーンを介した世界よりも
もっと良い方策があると思います
02:27
I don't hate screens, but I don't feel --
スクリーンが嫌いなのではないのですが
02:31
and I don't think any of us feel that good
スクリーンに前屈みになって
どれ程の時間を過ごしているのか―
02:34
about how much time
we spend slouched over them.
誰も良いことだとは思っていないでしょう
02:36
Fortunately,
幸いにも
02:40
the big tech companies seem to agree.
テクノロジーの大企業も賛同のようです
02:41
They're actually heavily invested
in touch and speech and gesture,
彼らは実際に巨額の投資を
タッチや会話やジェスチャー
02:43
and also in senses --
そしてセンサーにも行っています
02:48
things that can turn
dumb objects, like cups,
カップなどといった他愛のない物に
02:49
and imbue them with the magic
of the Internet,
インターネットの魔法を吹き込み
02:52
potentially turning this digital cloud
潜在的に このデジタルクラウドを
02:56
into something we might touch and move.
触れたり 動かしたりするものに
変えるのです
02:58
The parents in crisis over screen time
子供が画面を見ている時間が心配な親には
03:01
need physical digital toys
teaching their kids to read,
子どもに読み方を学ばせる
実物のデジタル玩具や
03:04
as well as family-safe app stores.
ファミリー向けのアプリストアが必要です
03:07
And I think, actually,
that's already really happening.
そして実際に
既に起きつつあることだと思います
03:11
Reality is richer than screens.
現実はスクリーンの世界よりも豊かです
03:15
For example, I love books.
例えば 私は本が好きです
03:20
For me they are time machines --
atoms and molecules bound in space,
私にとってはタイムマシンなのです
原子や分子を空間に捕らえ
03:24
from the moment of their creation
to the moment of my experience.
創造した瞬間から
私が体験する瞬間まで送り組むのですから
03:29
But frankly,
でも正直に言うと
03:33
the content's identical on my phone.
内容はスマホで見ても同じなのです
03:35
So what makes this
a richer experience than a screen?
では一体何がスクリーンよりも
豊かな経験にしてくれているのか
03:37
I mean, scientifically.
科学的にということですよ
03:41
We need screens, of course.
もちろん 私たちには
スクリーンが必要です
03:45
I'm going to show film,
I need the enormous screen.
映画をお見せするには
巨大なスクリーンが必要です
03:47
But there's more than you can do
with these magic boxes.
しかし こんな映写機よりも
もっと出来ることがあるのです
03:52
Your phone is not
the Internet's door bitch.
スマホはインターネットの
戸口ではないのです
03:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:59
We can build things --
physical things,
私達は―
物理的なモノを
04:00
using physics and pixels,
物理とピクセルを使ってインターネットを
04:03
that can integrate the Internet
into the world around us.
実世界と統合した物を作れます
04:06
And I'm going to show you
a few examples of those.
幾つか例をお見せしましょう
04:09
A while ago, I got to work
with a design agency, Berg,
少し前に ベルクというデザイン会社と
04:14
on an exploration of what the Internet
without screens might actually look like.
スクリーンなしのインターネットは
一体どの様なものか探究しました
04:17
And they showed us a range ways
すると あらゆる方法を見せてくれました
04:22
that light can work with simple senses
and physical objects
そこでは光が
単純なセンサーや物理的なもので
04:24
to really bring the Internet to life,
to make it tangible.
インターネットを触れるものとして
生活に持ち込むものでした
04:29
Like this wonderfully mechanical
YouTube player.
この素晴らしいYouTubeプレイヤーのように
04:33
And this was an inspiration to me.
そしてこれは私にとって
ひらめきだったのです
04:38
Next I worked with
the Japanese agency, AQ,
次に私はAQという
日本の代理店と仕事をしました
04:42
on a research project into mental health.
メンタルヘルスの調査プロジェクトでした
04:45
We wanted to create an object
私達は診断に欠かせない
04:47
that could capture the subjective data
around mood swings
気分の変動に関する主観的なデータをとらえる
04:49
that's so essential to diagnosis.
オブジェクトを制作したかったのです
04:53
This object captures your touch,
これは人のタッチをとらえます
04:56
so you might press it
very hard if you're angry,
怒っている時は激しく押し
04:58
or stroke it if you're calm.
落ち着いている時は撫でるでしょうね
05:01
It's like a digital emoji stick.
絵文字の記録装置みたいなもので
05:03
And then you might revisit
those moments later,
後で振り返ってオンラインで
05:05
and add context to them online.
状況を追記できます
05:09
Most of all,
たいていは
05:11
we wanted to create
an intimate, beautiful thing
親しみやすく 美しいものを
制作したいと思っていました
05:12
that could live in your pocket
ポケットに入り
05:16
and be loved.
お気に入りになるものです
05:18
The binoculars are actually
a birthday present
この双眼鏡はシドニーのオペラハウスが
05:20
for the Sydney Opera House's
40th anniversary.
40周年のときの誕生日プレゼントです
05:22
Our friends at Tellart in Boston
brought over a pair of street binoculars,
友人であるボストンのテルアートは
観光双眼鏡を持ってきました
05:25
the kind you might find
on the Empire State Building,
エンパイア・ステート・ビルに
ありそうですね
05:29
and they fitted them with 360-degree views
代表的な世界遺産の360度映像が
05:31
of other iconic world heritage sights --
見える装置にしました
05:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:37
using Street View.
ストリート・ビューのデータです
05:38
And then we stuck them under the steps.
そして 階段の下に置いたんです
05:40
So, they became this very physical,
simple reappropriation,
この物体に与えられた役割は
とてもわかりやすいものです
05:43
or like a portal to these other icons.
各地の象徴的な世界遺産への扉です
05:48
So you might see Versailles
or Shackleton's Hut.
ベルサイユ宮殿も南極基地も見えます
05:50
Basically, it's virtual
reality circa 1955.
言うなれば 仮想現実の1955年版です
05:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:56
In our office we use
hacky sacks to exchange URLs.
私達の事務所では
ハッキーサックでURLを交換します
05:59
This is incredibly simple,
it's like your Opal card.
Opalカードみたいに単純ですね
06:02
You basically put a website
on the little chip in here,
ウェブサイトを小さなチップに搭載しています
06:05
and then you do this and ... bosh! --
こうすると ほら!
06:09
the website appears on your phone.
ウェブサイトが携帯電話上に現れます
06:13
It's about 10 cents.
10セント程です
06:15
Treehugger is a project
that we're working on
トゥリーハガーは
Grumpy Sailor and Finchと
06:17
with Grumpy Sailor and Finch,
here in Sydney.
シドニーで進行中のプロジェクトです
06:20
And I'm very excited
about what might happen
何が起きるか楽しみです
06:22
when you pull the phones apart
and you put the bits into trees,
携帯電話を取り出し
木々の上に この小片を載せると
06:25
and that my children
might have an opportunity
子供達には魔法の杖に先導され
06:29
to visit an enchanted forest
guided by a magic wand,
魅惑の森へ訪問の機会が訪れます
06:32
where they could talk to digital fairies
and ask them questions,
そこではデジタルの妖精に質問することができ
06:36
and be asked questions in return.
反対に質問もされます
06:39
As you can see,
ご覧の様に
06:42
we're at the cardboard stage
with this one.
段ボールのステージにいます
06:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:45
But I'm very excited
でも 私は興奮を抑えられません
06:46
by the possibility of getting kids
back outside without screens,
スクリーンのない世界に
子供を取り戻しながらも
06:47
but with all the powerful magic
of the Internet at their fingertips.
インターネットの魔法は全て
指先にあります
06:51
And we hope to have something like this
working by the end of the year.
今年末にはこのようなものを
実現したいと思っています
06:55
So let's recap.
ここで まとめましょう
07:01
Humans like natural solutions.
人は自然な解決策を好みます
07:03
Humans love information.
人は情報が大好きです
07:05
Humans need simple tools.
人にはシンプルな道具が必要です
07:07
These principles should underpin
how we design for the future,
未来のデザインには
この原理を押さえておかなくては
07:10
not just for the Internet.
インターネットだけではなく
07:15
You may feel uncomfortable about the age
of information that we're moving into.
情報化社会には戸惑ってしまいますね
07:18
You may feel challenged,
rather than simply excited.
興奮よりも 困惑することが多いのでは
07:23
Guess what? Me too.
実は私も同じですよ
07:28
It's a really extraordinary period
of human history.
人類史上かつてない時代なんです
07:30
We are the people
that actually build our world,
この世界を作り上げたのは私達です
07:35
there are no artificial intelligences...
人工知能ではありません
07:39
yet.
今のところは
07:41
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:43
It's us -- designers, architects,
artists, engineers.
デザイナー 建築家
アーティスト エンジニア
07:45
And if we challenge ourselves,
私達が真剣に取り組めば
07:50
I think that actually
we can have a happy place
本当に幸せな場所が出来ると思うんです
07:53
filled with the information we love
大好きな情報で充たされながらも
07:57
that feels as natural and as simple
as switching on lightbulb.
自然でシンプル
電球に明かりをつけるみたいに簡単
07:59
And although it may seem inevitable,
時計やウェブサイトや
ウィジェットのように誰もが喜び
08:04
that what the public wants
is watches and websites and widgets,
欠かせない物のようですが
08:06
maybe we could give a bit of thought
to cork and light and hacky sacks.
コルクや灯り
ハッキーサックを思わせるものです
08:11
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございます
08:17
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:19
Translated by Misaki Sato
Reviewed by Takafusa Kitazume

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Tea Uglow - Designer
Tea Uglow leads part of Google's Creative Lab specializing in work with cultural organizations, artists, writers and producers on experiments using digital technology at the boundaries of traditional cultural practice.

Why you should listen

Tea Uglow has worked at Google for nearly 10 years, starting Google's Creative Lab in Europe and, since 2012, building a Creative Lab for the Asia Pacific region in Sydney, Australia. She works with cultural organizations and practitioners to enable artists, writers and performers to look at new ways in which we can use digital technology to augment traditional art, theatre and music. Uglow believes that by experimenting with digital tools at the creative core of culture we can transform existing cultural practice without losing the tradition, values and intangible qualities that make the arts so valuable.

Previous projects include Editions at Play (books), Hangouts in History (education), Dream40 (theatre, with the RSC), Build with Chrome (with LEGO), Web Lab (with London's Science Museum), Life in a Day (YouTube film with Ridley Scott) and the YouTube Symphony Orchestra (with the LSO). Uglow is proud of her early involvement in the Art Project (now Google's Cultural Institute).

Uglow speaks on innovation and digital futures around the world. At the time of her TEDxSydney talk (2015), Tea was still presenting as male and using her boy-name, which is Tom. 

Uglow studied fine art at the Ruskin in Oxford before completing two further degrees in book arts and design management at UAL. She spent six years in art publishing and design management for charities as well as in various digital start-ups before joining Google in 2006. Prior to Google, Uglow worked for the Royal Academy of Arts, the Wellcome Trust, Random House and Christian Aid. She is on the board of the Biennale of Sydney (art) and formerly D&AD (design) and AWARD (advertising).

Uglow is also a very active and proud parent of two small boys. She lives in Sydney, Australia.

More profile about the speaker
Tea Uglow | Speaker | TED.com