09:28
TEDWomen 2015

Nonny de la Peña: The future of news? Virtual reality

ノニー・デラ・ペーニャ: ニュースの未来?バーチャルリアリティ

Filmed:

もし、心だけでなく身体全体で物語を体験できるとしたら?ノニー・デラ・ペーニャ氏は視聴者を物語の当事者にするべく、伝統的なジャーナリズムと新興のバーチャルリアリティ技術を組み合わせた新たなジャーナリズムの形を模索しています。その成果は、彼女が望みをたくす心揺さぶる体験であり、ニュースを革新的な方法で理解させてくれるものなのです。

- Virtual reality pioneer
Nonny de la Peña uses new, immersive media to tell stories that create empathy in readers and viewers. Full bio

What if I could present you a story
もし 私が皆さんに
00:12
that you would remember
with your entire body
心だけでなく 身体全体で
憶えられるような
00:14
and not just with your mind?
物語を描写できるとしたら?
00:17
My whole life as a journalist,
I've really been compelled
ジャーナリストとしての私の人生では
00:19
to try to make stories
that can make a difference
一石を投じ
人々を鼓舞できるような物語を
00:22
and maybe inspire people to care.
遮二無二なって紡がなくては
なりませんでした
00:24
I've worked in print.
I've worked in documentary.
出版業界、ドキュメンタリー業界
00:26
I've worked in broadcast.
それから放送業界で働きましたが
00:29
But it really wasn't until
I got involved with virtual reality
バーチャルリアリティに関わるまでは
00:30
that I started seeing
these really intense,
目の覚めるような強烈な
00:33
authentic reactions from people
人々の真正な反応を
00:36
that really blew my mind.
見ることはなかったのです
00:38
So the deal is that with VR,
virtual reality,
特筆すべき点は VR-
バーチャルリアリティを用いて
00:40
I can put you on scene
物語のただ中の場面に
00:44
in the middle of the story.
参加してもらえるのです
00:47
By putting on these goggles
that track wherever you look,
ゴーグルをつけることで
どこを見渡しても
00:50
you get this whole-body sensation,
あたかも皆さんがそこに
実際に存在するかのような
00:53
like you're actually, like, there.
身体全体を通じた感覚を得るのです
00:56
So five years ago was about when
I really began to push the envelope
5年前に 私はバーチャルリアリティと
ジャーナリズムを
00:59
with using virtual reality
and journalism together.
併用するという未知の挑戦を始めました
01:02
And I wanted to do a piece about hunger.
私は飢餓に関して
何かしたかったのです
01:05
Families in America are going hungry,
food banks are overwhelmed,
アメリカの家庭は飢え
フードバンクは凌駕され
01:08
and they're often running out of food.
頻繁に食物が不足しています
01:11
Now, I knew I couldn't
make people feel hungry,
さて 私は人々に飢えを
感じさせる事は出来ませんが
01:14
but maybe I could figure out a way
to get them to feel something physical.
物理的に何かを感じさせる方法は
生み出せるかもしれせん
01:17
So -- again, this is five years ago --
繰り返しますが 5年前の事です
01:22
so doing journalism
and virtual reality together
ジャーナリズムとバーチャルリアリティに
同時に携わることは
01:25
was considered
a worse-than-half-baked idea,
生半可な思いつきより
たちが悪いとみなされ
01:29
and I had no funding.
資金もありませんでした
01:32
Believe me, I had a lot
of colleagues laughing at me.
私は沢山の同僚から笑われたものでした
01:33
And I did, though,
have a really great intern,
でも ミカエラ・コブサマークという
01:35
a woman named Michaela Kobsa-Mark.
素晴らしい女性のインターンを
迎えることができ
01:39
And together we went out to food banks
一緒にフードバンクへ行き
01:41
and started recording
audio and photographs.
音声や写真を記録し始めたのです
01:43
Until one day she came back to my office
彼女がただ泣き叫びながら
01:46
and she was bawling, she was just crying.
オフィスに戻って来たあの日までは
01:48
She had been on scene at a long line,
彼女はある女性が取りまとめる
長い行列に居て
01:51
where the woman running the line
was feeling extremely overwhelmed,
その女性は精神的に極限状態まで
追い詰められていました
01:53
and she was screaming,
"There's too many people!
そして
「人が多すぎる!人が多すぎる!」
01:57
There's too many people!"
と叫んでいたのです
02:00
And this man with diabetes
doesn't get food in time,
糖尿を患う男性は
食べ物にありつけず
02:02
his blood sugar drops too low,
and he collapses into a coma.
血糖値が下がりすぎた為
昏睡状態に陥りました
02:06
As soon as I heard that audio,
その音声を聞いてすぐに
02:10
I knew that this would be
the kind of evocative piece
これはフードバンクで
何が起きているかを実際に描き得る
02:12
that could really describe
what was going on at food banks.
ある種の心揺さぶるきっかけに
なり得ると確信しました
02:15
So here's the real line.
You can see how long it was, right?
さて これが実際の列です
どれだけ長いか分かりますよね?
02:19
And again, as I said, we didn't
have very much funding,
繰り返しますが
私達は潤沢な資金は無かったので
02:22
so I had to reproduce it
with virtual humans that were donated,
寄付でいただいた仮想人間と
02:25
and people begged and borrowed favors
to help me create the models
周りの厚意を募って
出来る限り正確に
02:29
and make things as accurate as we could.
モデルを再現しました
02:33
And then we tried to convey
what happened that day
そして私達は あの日に何が起きたのかを
02:35
with as much as accuracy as is possible.
出来る限り正確に伝えようとしたのです
02:38
(Video) Voice: There's too many people!
There's too many people!
(映像)音声:「人が多すぎる! 人が多すぎる!」
02:41
Voice: OK, he's having a seizure.
音声:「オーケー 彼は発作を起こしているわ」
02:54
Voice: We need an ambulance.
音声:「救急車を呼ばなきゃ」
03:11
Nonny de la Peña: So the man on the right,
ペーニャ:右側の男性ー
03:14
for him, he's walking around the body.
彼は倒れた男性の側を歩きまわっています
03:16
For him, he's in the room with that body.
彼はその人と同じ空間に居るのです
03:18
Like, that guy is at his feet.
まるでその男性が足元に居るかのようです
03:21
And even though,
through his peripheral vision,
そして装置の視界を通してさえも
03:23
he can see that he's in this lab space,
彼は実験室に居て
道端に実際にいないことが
03:25
he should be able to see
that he's not actually on the street,
分かっているはずなのに
03:27
but he feels like he's there
with those people.
装置越しの人々と
そこに居るかのように感じています
03:32
He's very cautious not to step on this guy
彼は現実の場に居ないこの男性を
03:35
who isn't really there, right?
踏まないよう 慎重に歩いていますよね?
03:37
So that piece ended up
going to Sundance in 2012,
この作品は2012年の
サンダンス映画祭で上映され
03:39
a kind of amazing thing,
and it was the first virtual reality film
驚くべきことにー
基本的に史上初の
03:42
ever, basically.
バーチャルリアリティ映画となったのです
03:46
And when we went, I was really terrified.
現地に向う時 私は本当に怯えていました
03:49
I didn't really know
how people were going to react
人々がどのように反応するか
何が起こるのか
03:51
and what was going to happen.
全く分からなかったからです
03:53
And we showed up
with this duct-taped pair of goggles.
私達はこのお手製のゴーグルを
持って行きました
03:54
(Video) Oh, you're crying.
You're crying. Gina, you're crying.
(映像)「まぁ あなた泣いてるのね
泣いてるのね ジナ」
03:57
So you can hear
the surprise in my voice, right?
私が驚いているのが
声から分かりますよね?
04:01
And this kind of reaction ended up being
the kind of reaction we saw
そして この類の反応は
私達が幾度と無く見た
04:04
over and over and over:
ある種の反応に帰結したのです
04:08
people down on the ground
trying to comfort the seizure victim,
人々は発作を起こした人を
慰めようと地面に跪き
04:11
trying to whisper something into his ear
何もできないと分かっていても
そっと何かを語りかけ
04:14
or in some way help,
even though they couldn't.
救いの手を差し伸べようとするのです
04:16
And I had a lot of people
come out of that piece saying,
そして多くの人が こう口にしたのです
04:20
"Oh my God, I was so frustrated.
I couldn't help the guy,"
「なんてことだ
助けらずもどかしかった」
04:23
and take that back into their lives.
そしてこれを教訓として
その後の人生に活かすのです
04:26
So after this piece was made,
この作品が作られた後
04:28
the dean of the cinema school at USC,
the University of Southern California,
南カルフォルニア大学の
映画芸術学部長が
04:32
brought in the head of the World
Economic Forum to try "Hunger,"
『Hunger in LA』を世界経済フォーラムの
会長に試してもらいました
04:36
and he took off the goggles,
視聴後 彼はゴーグルを外して
04:40
and he commissioned
a piece about Syria on the spot.
シリアの現場についての映像を委託しました
04:41
And I really wanted to do something
about Syrian refugee kids,
シリアの内戦で最悪の状況下にある
シリア難民の子供たちのために
04:44
because children have been the worst
affected by the Syrian civil war.
私は本当に何かをしたかったのです
04:47
I sent a team to the border of Iraq
to record material at refugee camps,
難民キャンプで素材を記録するために
イラク国境にチームを派遣しました
04:52
basically an area I wouldn't
send a team now,
そこはISIS(イスラム過激派組織)の活動拠点なので
04:56
as that's where ISIS is really operating.
今だったら決してチームを派遣しないでしょう
04:59
And then we also recreated a street scene
さて 私達は少女が歌っている時に
05:02
in which a young girl is singing
and a bomb goes off.
爆弾が爆発した路上のシーンを再現しました
05:05
Now, when you're
in the middle of that scene
皆さんは現場のただ中に居て
05:09
and you hear those sounds,
色んな音が聞こえ
05:11
and you see the injured around you,
周囲には怪我人がいます
05:14
it's an incredibly scary and real feeling.
信じられない程怖い 本物の感情です
05:16
I've had individuals who have been
involved in real bombings tell me
実際に爆発に遭遇したことのある人によると
05:19
that it evokes the same kind of fear.
この映像は同様の恐怖を呼び起こすと言います
05:23
[The civil war in Syria may seem far away]
[シリアの内戦は他人事かもしれない]
05:28
[until you experience it yourself.]
[自分で体験するまでは]
05:34
(Girl singing)
(少女の歌)
05:41
(Explosion)
(爆発)
05:48
[Project Syria]
[シリアプロジェクト]
05:50
[A virtual reality experience]
[バーチャルリアリティ体験]
05:55
NP: We were then invited to take the piece
ペーニャ:ロンドンの
ヴィクトリア&アルバート博物館に
05:58
to the Victoria and Albert
Museum in London.
この作品を出品するよう招待されました
06:00
And it wasn't advertised.
宣伝目的ではありません
06:02
And we were put in this tapestry room.
このタペストリーの展示場に設置しました
06:04
There was no press about it,
何も告知していなかったので
06:06
so anybody who happened to walk
into the museum to visit it that day
その日 偶然博物館に
タペストリーを見に来た誰もが
06:07
would see us with these crazy lights.
電光に包まれた私達を見たのでした
06:11
You know, maybe they would want to see
the old storytelling of the tapestries.
彼らはタペストリーに纏わる由来を
見たかったのでしょうが
06:13
They were confronted
by our virtual reality cameras.
私達のバーチャルリアリティカメラに
直面したのです
06:17
But a lot of people tried it,
and over a five-day run
でも 5日間以上にも渡り
多くの人が試してくれ
06:20
we ended up with 54 pages
of guest book comments,
ゲストブックには54ページに渡り
コメントが書かれました
06:23
and we were told by the curators there
そこの学芸員からは このような盛況ぶりは
06:28
that they'd never seen such an outpouring.
未だかつて見たことがないと言われました
06:30
Things like, "It's so real,"
"Absolutely believable,"
例えば「すごく本物だ」
「はっきり信じられる」とか
06:33
or, of course, the one
that I was excited about,
もちろん 私が興奮してしまったのは
06:37
"A real feeling as if you were
in the middle of something
「普段はテレビのニュースで
見るもののただ中にいるかのような
06:40
that you normally see on the TV news."
本物の感情だ」というコメントです
06:43
So, it works, right? This stuff works.
ということで成功ですよね?
これは成功しました
06:46
And it doesn't really matter
where you're from or what age you are --
そして皆さんの出身だとか年齢だとか
全く問題ではなくー
06:50
it's really evocative.
それは実に心揺さぶるものなのです
06:54
Now, don't get me wrong -- I'm not saying
that when you're in a piece
でも 誤解しないで下さい
皆さんが映像の中にいる時
06:56
you forget that you're here.
ここにいることを忘れている
とは言っていません
07:00
But it turns out we can feel
like we're in two places at once.
でも 1度に2つの場所に居るように
感じることができるわけです
07:03
We can have what I call
this duality of presence,
いわゆる 2重性の存在と呼ぶものを
得ることができ
07:06
and I think that's what allows me
to tap into these feelings of empathy.
それがこれらの共感という感情に
踏み込ませてくれると思うのです
07:09
Right?
そうですよね?
07:14
So that means, of course,
意味するところは もちろん
07:16
that I have to be very cautious
about creating these pieces.
私はこれらの作品を創るにあたって
極めて慎重でなければなりません
07:19
I have to really follow
best journalistic practices
最良のジャーナリズムに忠実に従い
07:24
and make sure that these powerful stories
これらの強烈な物語は
高潔さと共に成り立っている事を
07:28
are built with integrity.
明確にしなければなりません
07:30
If we don't capture
the material ourselves,
もし自身で素材を手に入れる事が
出来ない場合は
07:32
we have to be extremely exacting
出所やどこから来たものなのか
07:34
about figuring out the provenance
and where did this stuff come from
そして真正のものなのか明白にすべく
07:39
and is it authentic?
徹底しなければなりません
07:42
Let me give you an example.
例を挙げましょう
07:44
With this Trayvon Martin case,
this is a guy, a kid,
トレイボン・マーティンの事件ですが
07:45
who was 17 years old and he bought
soda and a candy at a store,
彼は17歳でソーダとキャンディーを
商店で買った帰り道に
07:48
and on his way home he was tracked
by a neighborhood watchman
自警団員のジョージ・ジマーマンに尾行され
07:52
named George Zimmerman
who ended up shooting and killing him.
射殺されました
07:56
To make that piece,
その作品を創るのに
07:59
we got the architectural drawings
of the entire complex,
居住区全体の設計図を手に入れ
08:00
and we rebuilt the entire scene
inside and out, based on those drawings.
設計図を元に徹底的に
当時の現場を再現しました
08:04
All of the action
すべての行動は
08:09
is informed by the real 911
recorded calls to the police.
実際に録音された警察への通報で
論拠づけられました
08:10
And interestingly, we broke
some news with this story.
そして面白いことに この物語について
幾つかのニュースを流したのです
08:16
The forensic house that did the audio
reconstruction, Primeau Productions,
音声の再現をした科学捜査班と
音響映像の会社が
08:19
they say that they would testify
ジョージ・ジマーマンは
車から降りた時
08:23
that George Zimmerman,
when he got out of the car,
マーティン少年を追跡する前に
引き金を引いたと
08:25
he cocked his gun before he went
to give chase to Martin.
証言したと言ったのです
08:27
So you can see that
the basic tenets of journalism,
ジャーナリズムの基本的な信条が
お分かりになりますよね
08:32
they don't really change here, right?
彼らはこの状況を何も変えていません
08:35
We're still following the same principles
that we would always.
私達は今だに そしてこれからも
同じ原則に従うのです
08:37
What is different is the sense
of being on scene,
飢餓で倒れた男性を目撃していようが
08:40
whether you're watching
a guy collapse from hunger
爆発現場のただ中にいる感覚だろうが
08:44
or feeling like you're
in the middle of a bomb scene.
違いは現場に居るという感覚なのです
08:46
And this is kind of what has driven me
forward with these pieces,
これが私を作品とともに前に推し進め
08:48
and thinking about how to make them.
どうやってそれらを創るのかを
考えさせてくれる類のものです
08:53
We're trying to make this, obviously,
beyond the headset, more available.
私達はこれをヘッドセットではなく
もっと利用可能なものにするつもりです
08:55
We're creating mobile pieces
like the Trayvon Martin piece.
トレイボン・マーティンの作品のように
モバイル版も作っています
08:59
And these things have had impact.
そしてこれらの出来事は
強い影響を及ぼしました
09:02
I've had Americans tell me
that they've donated,
シリア難民の子供たちに
09:06
direct deductions from their bank account,
money to go to Syrian children refugees.
預金口座から直接お金を寄付したという
アメリカ人もいました
09:09
And "Hunger in LA," well,
it's helped start
そして『Hunger in LA』プロジェクトは
09:13
a new form of doing journalism
ジャーナリズムの新形態を後押ししています
09:15
that I think is going to join
all the other normal platforms
それは将来的には
既存のプラットフォームに
09:18
in the future.
取り入れられていくことでしょう
09:21
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
09:22
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:23
Translated by Masami Hisai
Reviewed by Masako Kigami

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Nonny de la Peña - Virtual reality pioneer
Nonny de la Peña uses new, immersive media to tell stories that create empathy in readers and viewers.

Why you should listen
As the CEO of Emblematic Group, Nonny de la Peña uses cutting-edge technologies to tell stories — both fictional and news-based — that create intense, empathic engagement on the part of viewers. She has been called “The Godmother of Virtual Reality” by Engadget, while Fast Company named her “One of the People Who Made the World More Creative” for her pioneering work in immersive journalism.

A former correspondent for Newsweek, de la Peña has more than 20 years of award-winning experience in print, film and TV. Her virtual-reality work has been featured by the BBC, Mashable, Vice, Wired and many others, and been screened around the globe at museums and gaming conventions. De la Peña is an Annenberg Fellow at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts.
More profile about the speaker
Nonny de la Peña | Speaker | TED.com