15:33
TEDGlobal>London

Tim Harford: How frustration can make us more creative

ティム・ハワード: 障害こそが人をクリエイティブにさせる

Filmed:

障害や問題は人の創造的プロセスを狂わせるのか?それとも、これまでにないほど人の創造性を高める可能性があるのか?空前のベストセラーとなったピアノ独奏のアルバムの驚くべき裏話を例にとりながら、ティム・ハワードは、ちょっとした障害や問題に取り組まなければならないことにはメリットがあると説明します。

- Economist, journalist and broadcaster
Tim Harford's writings reveal the economic ideas behind everyday experiences. Full bio

Late in January 1975,
1975年の1月の終わりごろ
00:12
a 17-year-old German girl
called Vera Brandes
ベラ・ブランダースという
17歳のドイツ人少女が
00:15
walked out onto the stage
of the Cologne Opera House.
ケルンオペラハウスのステージに歩み出ました
00:19
The auditorium was empty.
客席は空でした
00:24
It was lit only by the dim, green glow
of the emergency exit sign.
ただグリーンの非常口のサインが
淡く光るだけでした
00:27
This was the most
exciting day of Vera's life.
この日はベラの人生で最も心踊る日でした
00:32
She was the youngest
concert promoter in Germany,
彼女はドイツで最年少の
コンサート主催者でした
00:36
and she had persuaded
the Cologne Opera House
ケルンオペラハウスを説き伏せ
00:39
to host a late-night concert of jazz
アメリカのミュージシャン
キース・ジャレットの
00:41
from the American musician, Keith Jarrett.
レイトナイト・ジャズ・コンサートを
開く予定でした
00:45
1,400 people were coming.
1400人が来ることになっていました
00:48
And in just a few hours,
ほんの数時間後には
00:51
Jarrett would walk out on the same stage,
ジャレットがステージに上がり
00:53
he'd sit down at the piano
ピアノの前に座り
00:55
and without rehearsal or sheet music,
一切のリハーサルも楽譜もなしに
00:57
he would begin to play.
演奏を始める予定でした
01:01
But right now,
しかし ここで
01:04
Vera was introducing Keith
to the piano in question,
ベラが手配したピアノを
キースに見せたときに
01:05
and it wasn't going well.
問題が起きました
01:09
Jarrett looked to the instrument
a little warily,
ジャレットはそのピアノを少し注意深く見て
01:11
played a few notes,
鍵盤をいくつか鳴らし
01:13
walked around it,
ピアノのまわりを歩き
01:15
played a few more notes,
またピアノを弾き
01:16
muttered something to his producer.
プロデューサーに何かをつぶやきました
01:18
Then the producer
came over to Vera and said ...
プロデューサーが
ベラのところに来て言うには
01:19
"If you don't get a new piano,
Keith can't play."
「新しいピアノを用意しなければ
キースは演奏できない」
01:24
There'd been a mistake.
手違いがあったのです
01:30
The opera house had provided
the wrong instrument.
オペラハウスが問題のある
ピアノを提供したのです
01:31
This one had this harsh,
tinny upper register,
このピアノの高音域は
耳障りで音量も小さく
01:33
because all the felt had worn away.
ハンマーフェルトが擦り切れていたからです
01:36
The black notes were sticking,
黒鍵はひっかかるし
01:39
the white notes were out of tune,
白鍵の音は外れていて
01:42
the pedals didn't work
ペダルは使い物にならず
01:44
and the piano itself was just too small.
ピアノ自体も小さすぎました
01:46
It wouldn't create the volume
これでは音量が小さすぎて
01:48
that would fill a large space
such as the Cologne Opera House.
ケルンオペラハウスのような
大空間は満たせないでしょう
01:50
So Keith Jarrett left.
キース・ジャレットはホールを後にして
01:54
He went and sat outside in his car,
会場の外の車に乗り込んでしまい
01:58
leaving Vera Brandes
後に残されたベラは
02:01
to get on the phone
to try to find a replacement piano.
なんとか代わりのピアノを
探そうと電話をかけました
02:03
Now she got a piano tuner,
ピアノの調律師は見つかりましたが
02:07
but she couldn't get a new piano.
新しいピアノは無理でした
02:09
And so she went outside
だから彼女は外に出て
02:12
and she stood there in the rain,
雨の中に立って
02:14
talking to Keith Jarrett,
キース・ジャレットに話し
02:17
begging him not to cancel the concert.
どうかコンサートを中止しないで
と懇願しました
02:20
And he looked out of his car
彼は車のなかから
02:24
at this bedraggled,
rain-drenched German teenager,
このみすぼらしい ずぶぬれの
ドイツ人の女の子を見て
02:25
took pity on her,
不憫に思い
02:30
and said,
彼は言いました
02:32
"Never forget ... only for you."
「これはあなただから してあげることですよ」
02:33
And so a few hours later,
そして数時間後
02:39
Jarrett did indeed step out
onto the stage of the opera house,
ジャレットは
オペラハウスのステージに立ち
02:40
he sat down at the unplayable piano
彼は演奏不可能なピアノの前に座り
02:45
and began.
演奏をはじめたのです
02:49
(Music)
(音楽)
02:51
Within moments it became clear
that something magical was happening.
すぐに 奇跡が起こっていることが
明らかになりました
03:04
Jarrett was avoiding
those upper registers,
ジャレットは高音域を避けて
03:10
he was sticking to the middle
tones of the keyboard,
中音域だけを使いながら
03:12
which gave the piece
a soothing, ambient quality.
うっとりするような
心地よい音で奏でたのです
03:15
But also, because the piano was so quiet,
さらに ピアノの音量不足を補うため
03:19
he had to set up these rumbling,
repetitive riffs in the bass.
低音に うなるような反復楽句を低音に
アレンジせねばなりませんでした
03:22
And he stood up twisting,
pounding down on the keys,
また 椅子から立ち上がり体をツイストさせて
叩きつけるように演奏することで
03:26
desperately trying to create enough volume
to reach the people in the back row.
最後列の観客まで聞こえるよう
最善をつくしたのです
03:32
It's an electrifying performance.
しびれるような演奏でした
03:37
It somehow has this peaceful quality,
演奏は 穏やかでありながら
03:39
and at the same time it's full of energy,
同時にパワフルで
03:42
it's dynamic.
ダイナミックでした
03:44
And the audience loved it.
この演奏は今日に至るまで
03:47
Audiences continue to love it
人々に長く愛され続けています
03:49
because the recording of the Köln Concert
そのため「ザ・ケルン・コンサート」の
収録アルバムは
03:51
is the best-selling piano album in history
ピアノアルバムとして
史上最高の売り上げとなり
03:54
and the best-selling
solo jazz album in history.
ジャズのアルバムとしても
史上最高の売り上げとなりました
03:56
Keith Jarrett had been handed a mess.
キース・ジャレットは
ひどい状況に置かれましたが
04:02
He had embraced that mess, and it soared.
彼はピンチを受け入れ
チャンスへと昇華したのです
04:06
But let's think for a moment
about Jarrett's initial instinct.
でも最初のジャレットの直感は
どうだったでしょうか
04:12
He didn't want to play.
彼は演奏したくないと言いましたね
04:17
Of course,
もちろん
04:18
I think any of us,
in any remotely similar situation,
誰だって同じような境遇に置かれたら
04:20
would feel the same way,
we'd have the same instinct.
同じような気持ちになるでしょう
人間誰しも同じです
04:23
We don't want to be asked
to do good work with bad tools.
ダメな道具で良い結果を出せとは
言われたくありませんよね
04:25
We don't want to have to overcome
unnecessary hurdles.
不必要なハードルを
乗り越えたいと思いません
04:29
But Jarrett's instinct was wrong,
でもジャレットの直感は
間違いでした
04:34
and thank goodness he changed his mind.
彼が心変わりをしてくれて幸いでした
04:37
And I think our instinct is also wrong.
そして私たちの直感も
間違いだと思います
04:39
I think we need to gain
a bit more appreciation
多少の障害の対処を迫られると
思いがけない利点があることに
04:44
for the unexpected advantages
of having to cope with a little mess.
私たちは もっと認識を深める
必要があると思います
04:48
So let me give you some examples
いくつか例をあげさせてください
04:55
from cognitive psychology,
認知心理学から
04:57
from complexity science,
複雑系の科学から
05:00
from social psychology,
社会心理学から
05:01
and of course, rock 'n' roll.
そして ロックンロールです
05:03
So cognitive psychology first.
まず認知心理学から行きましょう
05:05
We've actually known for a while
先ほど 示したように
05:07
that certain kinds of difficulty,
ある種の問題や
05:09
certain kinds of obstacle,
ある種の障害は
05:11
can actually improve our performance.
パフォーマンスを
高めることがあります
05:13
For example,
例えば
05:15
the psychologist Daniel Oppenheimer,
心理学者のダニエル・オッペンハイマーは
05:17
a few years ago,
数年前
05:18
teamed up with high school teachers.
高校教師と共同研究を行いました
05:20
And he asked them to reformat the handouts
彼は教師たちに授業で出す配布物の
05:22
that they were giving
to some of their classes.
字体を変えてもらうようにお願いしました
05:24
So the regular handout would be formatted
in something straightforward,
通常 配布物はヘルベチカや
タイムズ・ニュー・ローマンといった
05:28
such as Helvetica or Times New Roman.
読みやすい字体で設定されます
05:31
But half these classes were getting
handouts that were formatted
実験では 生徒の半分に
ヘッテン・シュヴァイラー等の癖のある字体や
05:34
in something sort of intense,
like Haettenschweiler,
コミック・サンス斜体字の
ような風味のあるフォントに
05:37
or something with a zesty bounce,
like Comic Sans italicized.
変えたものが配布されることになります
05:41
Now, these are really ugly fonts,
さあ おかしな字体で
05:45
and they're difficult fonts to read.
読みにくい配布物になりました
05:47
But at the end of the semester,
しかし学期末に
05:49
students were given exams,
生徒たちはテストを受けたのですが
05:51
and the students who'd been asked
to read the more difficult fonts,
その結果は 読みにくい字体の
配布物を出された生徒たちのほうが
05:54
had actually done better on their exams,
なんと さまざまな科目で
05:58
in a variety of subjects.
良い成績を収めたのです
06:00
And the reason is,
理由として考えられるのは
06:01
the difficult font had slowed them down,
読みにくい字体のせいで
読む速度が遅くなり
06:03
forced them to work a bit harder,
少し頑張って取り組み
06:06
to think a bit more
about what they were reading,
少し 読む内容を 熟慮し
06:08
to interpret it ...
解釈し…
06:11
and so they learned more.
そのため 多くを学んだからです
06:13
Another example.
次の例です
06:16
The psychologist Shelley Carson
has been testing Harvard undergraduates
心理学者のシェリー・カーソンは
ハーバード大学の学部生に
06:18
for the quality
of their attentional filters.
外部情報のフィルタリング能力を
測る実験をしました
06:23
What do I mean by that?
いったい何のことでしょう?
06:26
What I mean is,
imagine you're in a restaurant,
これはつまり
あなたがレストランにいて
06:28
you're having a conversation,
会話をしているとしましょう
06:30
there are all kinds of other conversations
going on in the restaurant,
レストランには他にも様々な
会話をしている人たちがいます
06:32
you want to filter them out,
自分の会話に集中するため
06:35
you want to focus
on what's important to you.
他の人の会話を遮断したいでしょう
06:36
Can you do that?
遮断できるでしょうか?
06:38
If you can, you have
good, strong attentional filters.
もしできるならあなたは良い
フィルタリング能力をお持ちです
06:40
But some people really struggle with that.
ですが 中には苦労する人もいます
06:43
Some of Carson's undergraduate
subjects struggled with that.
学生の被験者にも
苦労する人がいました
06:45
They had weak filters,
they had porous filters --
フィルター能力が弱く
穴だらけなせいで
06:49
let a lot of external information in.
外部情報がとめどなく
入ってきてしまう
06:52
And so what that meant is they were
constantly being interrupted
従って 彼らは
周囲のあらゆる音や視覚情報に
06:55
by the sights and the sounds
of the world around them.
いつも遮られていることになります
06:58
If there was a television on
while they were doing their essays,
小論文を書いているときに
テレビがついていたら
07:01
they couldn't screen it out.
彼らはそれを無視できません
07:04
Now, you would think
that that was a disadvantage ...
みなさんはこれを不利に思う
かもしれませんが…
07:05
but no.
実際は 違うのです
07:09
When Carson looked at what
these students had achieved,
カーソンが学生の過去の成績に注目したとき
07:10
the ones with the weak filters
フィルタリング能力に乏しい
07:14
were vastly more likely
学生のほうが総じて
07:16
to have some real
creative milestone in their lives,
人生で 創造的な目標を達成していました
07:18
to have published their first novel,
それは初めての小説の出版や
07:21
to have released their first album.
初アルバムのリリースでした
07:24
These distractions were actually
grists to their creative mill.
気を散らされたおかげで
創造的な成果が出たのです
07:27
They were able to think outside the box
because their box was full of holes.
フィルターが穴だらけだからこそ
既成概念にとらわれずに考えられたのです
07:30
Let's talk about complexity science.
次に複雑系の科学についてです
07:36
So how do you solve a really complex --
実に複雑な問題をいかに解決するか―
07:37
the world's full
of complicated problems --
世界は複雑な問題であふれています
07:39
how do you solve
a really complicated problem?
あなたは複雑な問題をどう解決しますか
07:41
For example, you try to make a jet engine.
たとえばジェットエンジンを
作ろうというとき
07:44
There are lots and lots
of different variables,
そこには数多くの不確定要素があります
07:46
the operating temperature, the materials,
動作温度や素材
07:48
all the different dimensions, the shape.
様々な大きさや形状
07:50
You can't solve that kind
of problem all in one go,
これらを一気に
解決することはできません
07:52
it's too hard.
それは大変に難しい
07:55
So what do you do?
ではどうするか?
07:56
Well, one thing you can do
is try to solve it step-by-step.
ひとつは ステップ・バイ・ステップ
で進めることです
07:57
So you have some kind of prototype
まずプロトタイプを作り
08:02
and you tweak it,
you test it, you improve it.
調整してテストして改善する
08:04
You tweak it, you test it, you improve it.
そしてまた調整してテストして改善する
08:08
Now, this idea of marginal gains
will eventually get you a good jet engine.
小さな積み重ねというアイデアは最後には
良いジェットエンジンにつながるでしょう
08:12
And it's been quite widely
implemented in the world.
そしてこのアイデアは世界中で幅広く
実施されています
08:17
So you'll hear about it, for example,
in high performance cycling,
だから例えば
ウェブデザイナーは
08:20
web designers will talk about trying
to optimize their web pages,
このサイクルを高速に回して行う
ページの最適化を語るでしょう
08:24
they're looking
for these step-by-step gains.
少しずつ改善策を模索していくのです
08:27
That's a good way
to solve a complicated problem.
それが複雑な問題を解決するのに
適した方法だからです
08:30
But you know what would
make it a better way?
でも何が加われば
もっと良い方法になるか?
08:34
A dash of mess.
少しの障害です
08:38
You add randomness,
初期の段階で
08:41
early on in the process,
でたらめさが加われば
08:43
you make crazy moves,
変則的な動きをすることになり
08:44
you try stupid things that shouldn't work,
役に立ちそうにない
馬鹿な試みをすることになり
08:46
and that will tend to make
the problem-solving work better.
その試みのおかげで
問題解決の取り組みが向上するのです
08:49
And the reason for that is
なぜかといえば
08:52
the trouble with the step-by-step process,
ステップ・バイ・ステップで
08:54
the marginal gains,
トラブルを抱えてしまうと
08:56
is they can walk you
gradually down a dead end.
徐々に袋小路にはまってしまう
ことがあるからです
08:57
And if you start with the randomness,
that becomes less likely,
でも 最初がでたらめだったら
そういうことは起こりにくく
09:01
and your problem-solving
becomes more robust.
問題解決までの道筋がはっきりします
09:05
Let's talk about social psychology.
続いて社会心理学にまいりましょう
09:10
So the psychologist Katherine Phillips,
with some colleagues,
心理学者のキャサリン・フィリップスは
同僚とともに
09:12
recently gave murder mystery
problems to some students,
殺人事件のミステリ問題を学生に出しました
09:15
and these students
were collected in groups of four
学生たちは4人ずつのグループに分かれ
09:19
and they were given dossiers
with information about a crime --
各グループに提示されたのは
犯罪情報を記した事件簿—
09:22
alibis and evidence,
witness statements and three suspects.
アリバイ、証拠、目撃者の供述
及び3人の容疑者でした
09:26
And the groups of four students
were asked to figure out who did it,
そして4人組の学生は
誰が殺し 誰が罪を犯したかの
09:31
who committed the crime.
特定を求められました
09:35
And there were two treatments
in this experiment.
この実験では
2種類のグループが作られました
09:37
In some cases these were four friends,
ひとつは4人がそれぞれ友人関係で
09:40
they all knew each other well.
お互いを良く知っているグループ
09:44
In other cases,
もうひとつは
09:46
three friends and a stranger.
3人の友人と知らない1人のグループです
09:47
And you can see where I'm going with this.
私が何を言おうとしているかおわかりでしょう
09:51
Obviously I'm going to say
そのとおり
09:53
that the groups with the stranger
solved the problem more effectively,
3人と知らない1人のグループの方が
効果的に事件を解決しました
09:54
which is true, they did.
本当ですよ
09:57
Actually, they solved the problem
quite a lot more effectively.
ずっと効果的だったのです
09:59
So the groups of four friends,
対して友人同士のグループでは
10:03
they only had a 50-50 chance
of getting the answer right.
正しく犯人を特定できたのは半分でした
10:07
Which is actually not that great --
これはいい成績とは言えませんね
10:10
in multiple choice, for three answers?
50-50's not good.
3択で正解率5割はひどいですね
10:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:14
The three friends and the stranger,
3人と知らない1人のグループは
10:16
even though the stranger
didn't have any extra information,
その1人が何か追加情報を持っていた
わけでもないのに
10:17
even though it was just a case
そこに他人がいるという
10:20
of how that changed the conversation
to accommodate that awkwardness,
気まずさを補うために
会話に変化が起きただけなのに
10:22
the three friends and the stranger,
3人と知らない1人のグループは
10:28
they had a 75 percent chance
of finding the right answer.
正解率75%でした
10:30
That's quite a big leap in performance.
成績に大きな向上があったと言えます
10:32
But I think what's really interesting
しかし私が興味深いと思うのは
10:34
is not just that the three friends
and the stranger did a better job,
彼らの方が成績が良かったことだけではなく
10:36
but how they felt about it.
彼らがどう感じたか なのです
10:40
So when Katherine Phillips
interviewed the groups of four friends,
キャサリン・フィリップスが
友人同士のグループに感想を求めたとき
10:42
they had a nice time,
彼らは楽しかったと言いました
10:47
they also thought they'd done a good job.
また彼らは良い仕事ができたとも言いました
10:49
They were complacent.
彼らは満足していました
10:52
When she spoke to the three
friends and the stranger,
対して3人と知らない1人のグループでは
10:54
they had not had a nice time --
彼らは楽しくなかったと言いました
10:57
it's actually rather difficult,
it's rather awkward ...
厄介で 気まずい時間だったと言い
10:58
and they were full of doubt.
そして不信感でいっぱいでした
11:02
They didn't think they'd done a good job
even though they had.
彼らは事実に反して
良い仕事ができたとは言いませんでした
11:06
And I think that really exemplifies
このことが実証しているのは
11:10
the challenge that we're
dealing with here.
今回取り上げている障害だと 思います
11:11
Because, yeah --
なぜなら―
11:14
the ugly font,
読みにくい字体や
11:16
the awkward stranger,
気まずい他人や
11:18
the random move ...
でたらめな行動などは
11:20
these disruptions help us solve problems,
私たちを問題解決へ導く障害です
11:22
they help us become more creative.
これらの障害のおかげで
私たちは独創的になります
11:25
But we don't feel that they're helping us.
でも私たちは障害が役立つとは思っていません
11:28
We feel that they're
getting in the way ...
障害は行く手を阻むと感じ
11:30
and so we resist.
受け入れようとしない
11:33
And that's why the last example
is really important.
だから最後の例が本当に大事です
11:36
So I want to talk about somebody
ロック界の舞台裏を背負ってきた
11:39
from the background
of the world of rock 'n' roll.
ある人の話をしたいと思います
11:41
And you may know him,
he's actually a TED-ster.
皆さんご存知かもしれません
彼はTEDにも出演しています
11:46
His name is Brian Eno.
ブライアン・イーノです
11:49
He is an ambient composer --
rather brilliant.
彼は才能ある環境音楽の作曲者です
11:50
He's also a kind of catalyst
彼はある種のカタリストとしても
11:53
behind some of the great
rock 'n' roll albums of the last 40 years.
40年間 ロックのヒットアルバム
製作の舞台裏を支えてきました
11:57
He's worked with David Bowie on "Heroes,"
デヴィッド・ボウイの『ヒーローズ』や
12:01
he worked with U2 on "Achtung Baby"
and "The Joshua Tree,"
U2の『アクトン・ベイビー』や
『ヨシュア・トゥリー』
12:04
he's worked with DEVO,
ディーヴォや
12:08
he's worked with Coldplay,
he's worked with everybody.
コールドプレイやたくさんの
アーティストと組んできました
12:09
And what does he do to make
these great rock bands better?
偉大なロックバンドを更に良くするため
彼は何をしているのか?
12:12
Well, he makes a mess.
そう 邪魔をしているのです
12:17
He disrupts their creative processes.
アルバム制作を
混乱させているのです
12:19
It's his role to be the awkward stranger.
彼の役割は
気まずい他人になることです
12:21
It's his role to tell them
彼の役目はバンドに
12:23
that they have to play
the unplayable piano.
演奏不可能なピアノを弾けと
いうことです
12:25
And one of the ways
in which he creates this disruption
彼がこの手の混乱を作り出すのに
使った手法の1つが
12:28
is through this remarkable
deck of cards --
この素晴らしいカードセットです
12:31
I have my signed copy here --
thank you, Brian.
ここにサインをしてもらっています—
ブライアンに感謝
12:34
They're called The Oblique Strategies,
『オブリーク・ストラテジーズ』です
12:38
he developed them with a friend of his.
彼はこれを友人と一緒に作りました
12:40
And when they're stuck in the studio,
スタジオで行き詰まると
12:42
Brian Eno will reach for one of the cards.
ブライアンはこのカードから1枚ひきます
12:46
He'll draw one at random,
ランダムな1枚をひいて
12:49
and he'll make the band
follow the instructions on the card.
カードの指示通りのことを
バンドにやらせるのです
12:50
So this one ...
たとえばこれは…
12:54
"Change instrument roles."
「楽器の役割を変えよ」
12:57
Yeah, everyone swap instruments --
Drummer on the piano --
そう 全員が楽器を交換します
ドラマーはピアノを―
12:58
Brilliant, brilliant idea.
実に素晴らしいアイデアですね
13:01
"Look closely at the most
embarrassing details. Amplify them."
「今までで一番恥ずかしかったことを
細かく吟味して 大きな声で話せ」
13:03
"Make a sudden, destructive,
unpredictable action. Incorporate."
「突然の破壊的で予測不能な行動を取り込め」
13:08
These cards are disruptive.
どのカードも混乱を招きます
13:14
Now, they've proved their worth
in album after album.
でもカードの価値はアルバムで
次々と証明されました
13:17
The musicians hate them.
アーティストは
このカードが大嫌いです
13:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:24
So Phil Collins was playing drums
on an early Brian Eno album.
ブライアン・イーノの初期アルバムで
ドラムを演奏したフィル・コリンズは
13:25
He got so frustrated he started
throwing beer cans across the studio.
不満を抱くあまり スタジオ中に
ビールの缶を投げ散らかしました
13:29
Carlos Alomar, great rock guitarist,
偉大なるロックギタリストの
カルロス・アロマーは
13:34
working with Eno
on David Bowie's "Lodger" album,
デビッド・ボウイのアルバム『ロジャー』で
ブライアンとの制作中に
13:36
and at one point
he turns to Brian and says,
ある時 ブライアンに向かって言いました
13:40
"Brian, this experiment is stupid."
「ブライアン こんな実験は馬鹿げている」
13:43
But the thing is
it was a pretty good album,
でも出来上がったアルバムはとても良かった
13:49
but also,
しかも 35年後の今
13:53
Carlos Alomar, 35 years later,
now uses The Oblique Strategies.
カルロス・アロマーも
『オブリーク・ストラテジーズ』を使っています
13:55
And he tells his students
to use The Oblique Strategies
彼は生徒たちにもこれを
使うように教えています
13:59
because he's realized something.
なぜなら彼は気づいたのです
14:02
Just because you don't like it
doesn't mean it isn't helping you.
嫌いだからといって
それが自身のためにならないわけではないと
14:05
The strategies actually
weren't a deck of cards originally,
このストラテジーズは元々
カードセットではなく
14:12
they were just a list --
最初は単なるリストで
14:14
list on the recording studio wall.
収録スタジオの壁に貼られていたのです
14:16
A checklist of things
you might try if you got stuck.
行き詰ったときに
試すリストとして です
14:17
The list didn't work.
でもリストではだめでした
14:23
Know why?
なぜでしょう?
14:26
Not messy enough.
混乱が足りなかったのです
14:29
Your eye would go down the list
誰もがそのリストを上から読んでいき
14:31
and it would settle on whatever
was the least disruptive,
結局は一番簡単で
当たり障りのないものを
14:33
the least troublesome,
選んでしまったからです
14:37
which of course misses the point entirely.
これでは焦点を外してしまいます
14:40
And what Brian Eno came to realize was,
そこでブライアン・イーノが気づいたのは
14:46
yes, we need to run
the stupid experiments,
馬鹿げた実験は必要で
14:48
we need to deal
with the awkward strangers,
気の置ける他人との駆け引きも必要で
14:53
we need to try to read the ugly fonts.
読みにくい字体を読む努力も必要ということ
14:55
These things help us.
こういったことが助けとなり
14:57
They help us solve problems,
自分たちが問題を解決でき
14:58
they help us be more creative.
創造的な行動ができるのだと
15:00
But also ...
それだけではなく—
15:01
we really need some persuasion
if we're going to accept this.
この気づきを受け入れるなら
ある種の信念が必要です
15:04
So however we do it ...
何がきっかけにせよ
15:08
whether it's sheer willpower,
純粋な意志の力にせよ
15:10
whether it's the flip of a card
引いたカードのせいにせよ
15:12
or whether it's a guilt trip
from a German teenager,
10代のドイツ人の女の子を
不憫に思ったにせよ
15:15
all of us, from time to time,
私たちは皆 ときには
15:19
need to sit down and try and play
the unplayable piano.
使い物にならないピアノの前に座り
弾いてみることも必要なのです
15:21
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
15:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:28
Translated by Yuya Koike
Reviewed by Hiroko Kawano

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Tim Harford - Economist, journalist and broadcaster
Tim Harford's writings reveal the economic ideas behind everyday experiences.

Why you should listen

In the Undercover Economist column he writes for the Financial Times, Tim Harford looks at familiar situations in unfamiliar ways and explains the fundamental principles of the modern economy. He illuminates them with clear writing and a variety of examples borrowed from daily life.

His book, Adapt: Why Success Always Starts With Failure, argues that the world has become far too unpredictable and complex for today's challenges to be tackled with ready-made solutions and expert opinions. Instead, Harford suggests, we need to learn to embrace failure and to constantly adapt, to improvise rather than plan, to work from the bottom up rather than the top down. His next book, Messy: Thriving in a Tidy-Minded World will be published in September 2016. 

Harford also presents the BBC radio series More or Less, a rare broadcast program devoted, as he says, to "the powerful, sometimes beautiful, often abused but ever ubiquitous world of numbers."

He says: "I’d like to see many more complex problems approached with a willingness to experiment."

More profile about the speaker
Tim Harford | Speaker | TED.com