15:56
TEDGlobal>Geneva

Caleb Harper: This computer will grow your food in the future

ケイレブ・ハーパー: コンピュータが食物を育てる未来

Filmed:

世界中のどこにいても室内で、美味かつ栄養豊かな食物を育てることが出来たなら?マセチューセッツ工科大学(MIT)メディア・ラボ、CitiFARMの所長であるケイレブ・ハーパーは、生産者を技術でつなぐことによって食糧生産システムを変革することを望んでいます。ハーパーの「フード・コンピュータ」を通して、未来の農業がどのような姿になるのかを垣間見てみましょう。

- Principal Investigator and Director of the Open Agriculture Initiative
Caleb Harper leads a group of engineers, architects, urban planners, economists and plant scientists in the exploration and development of high performance urban agricultural systems. Full bio

Food crisis.
食糧危機
00:13
It's in the news every day.
日頃からニュースになっています
00:14
But what is it?
どういう意味でしょう?
00:16
Some places in the world
it's too little food,
世界では場所によって
食料が不足していたり
00:17
maybe too much.
供給過剰になったりしています
00:20
Other places, GMO is saving the world.
一方 GMO(遺伝子組み換え作物)は
世界を救っています
00:21
Maybe GMO is the problem?
GMOにも問題点があるかもしれません
00:24
Too much agricultural runoff
creating bad oceans, toxic oceans,
過剰な農業排水は
海を汚染し 毒物を流入させ
00:27
attenuation of nutrition.
栄養価を低減させています
00:30
They go on and on.
こんなことが 延々と続いています
00:32
And I find the current climate
of this discussion
環境に関するこんにちの議論には
00:34
incredibly disempowering.
とても落胆しています
00:38
So how do we bring that
to something that we understand?
どうやったら我々の知識により
解決を図れるでしょうか?
00:41
How is this apple food crisis?
リンゴの食糧問題を見てみましょう
00:45
You've all eaten an apple
in the last week, I'm sure.
皆さんは先週
リンゴを1つは食べた事でしょう
00:48
How old do you think it was
from when it was picked?
そのリンゴは摘み取ってから
どの位たったものだと思いますか?
00:51
Two weeks?
2週間?
00:55
Two months?
2か月?
00:56
Eleven months --
11か月 ―
00:58
the average age of an apple
in a grocery store in the United States.
アメリカの食料品店に並ぶ
リンゴでの平均です
01:00
And I don't expect it
to be much different in Europe
ヨーロッパや世界の他の国でも
01:03
or anywhere else in the world.
さほど違いがあるとは思えません
01:05
We pick them,
リンゴを摘み取り
01:07
we put them in cold storage,
冷蔵庫に保存し そこに
01:08
we gas the cold storage --
保存用の気体を封入します
01:10
there's actually documented proof
作業員がこの保存庫に入り
01:12
of workers trying to go
into these environments
リンゴを取ろうとして
01:13
to retrieve an apple,
亡くなったという記録も
01:16
and dying,
残っています
01:17
because the atmosphere
なぜなら
01:19
that they slow down the process
of the apple with is also toxic to humans.
リンゴの腐敗を遅らせる空気は
人間にとって有毒だからです
01:20
How is it that none of you knew this?
このことを誰も知らなかったのはなぜ?
01:25
Why didn't I know this?
なぜ私は知らなかったのでしょう?
01:27
Ninety percent of the quality
of that apple --
リンゴに含まれる
抗酸化作用成分の90%が
01:29
all of the antioxidants -- are gone
by the time we get it.
食べる時までに失われています
01:31
It's basically a little ball of sugar.
これでは単なる糖分の塊です
01:34
How did we get so information poor
なぜ我々はこれほどにも
情報不足になっているのでしょう?
01:38
and how can we do better?
改善の手立ては?
01:40
I think what's missing is a platform.
プラットフォーム(ネット上の討論の場)が
欠けているからです
01:43
I know platforms -- I know computers,
プラットフォームと言えばコンピュータ
01:46
they put me on the Internet
when I was young.
若い頃 ネット上で
とてもヤバイことを
01:48
I did very weird things --
やりました
01:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:51
on this platform.
このプラットフォーム上でね
01:52
But I met people,
and I could express myself.
しかし 人々に会ったり
自己表現することもできました
01:54
How do you express yourself in food?
食べ物を使って
自分を表現する方法は?
01:56
If we had a platform,
プラットフォームがあれば
01:58
we might feel empowered
to question: What if?
「もしも・・・」と問いかけることも
自在になります
02:00
For me, I questioned:
私の疑問はこうでした
02:04
What if climate was democratic?
もしも気候が皆にとって平等だったら?
02:05
So, this is a map of climate in the world.
これは 世界の気候マップです
02:09
The most productive areas in green,
the least productive in red.
生産性が高い場所は緑
低い場所は赤で示されています
02:11
They shift and they change,
色は移動し変化します
02:15
and Californian farmers
now become Mexican farmers.
カリフォルニアにあった農業の中心は
今やメキシコに移っています
02:16
China picks up land in Brazil
to grow better food,
中国はより良い食物を
ブラジルの土地で育てています
02:19
and we're a slave to climate.
我々は気候に服従しています
02:22
What if each country had
its own productive climate?
もしそれぞれの国が
生産に適した気候を有していたら?
02:26
What would that change about how we live?
それは人々の生活を
どう変化させるでしょうか?
02:29
What would that change
about quality of life and nutrition?
生活と栄養の質を
変えるのでしょうか?
02:32
The last generation's problem
was, we need more food
前世代の人たちにとっての問題は
より多くの食料を―
02:36
and we need it cheap.
安く手にすることでした
02:39
Welcome to your global farm.
グローバル農場の世界へようこそ
02:41
We built a huge analog farm.
人類は巨大な
アナログ農場を建設しました
02:43
All these traces --
ここに描かれている線は
02:45
these are cars, planes,
trains and automobiles.
車、飛行機、鉄道などで繋がれた
食料輸送を示します
02:47
It's a miracle that we feed
seven billion people
70億人の人口を支える食料が
02:50
with just a few of us involved
in the production of food.
僅かな割合の人々によって
生産されているとは奇跡的です
02:53
What if ...
もしも・・・
02:57
we built a digital farm?
デジタル農場を建設できたら?
02:59
A digital world farm.
世界に広がるデジタル農場です
03:01
What if you could take this apple,
このリンゴを取り出して
何らかの方法で
03:02
digitize it somehow,
デジタル化し
03:06
send it through particles in the air
粒子として空気中を伝搬させ
03:07
and reconstitute it on the other side?
別の場所で
再構成することが出来たら?
03:10
What if?
もしも・・・
03:13
Going through some of these quotes,
私はここに書かれている文章を読み
03:15
you know, they inspire me to do what I do.
刺激を受けて
この研究を始めたのです
03:17
First one:
1つ目―
03:19
["Japanese farming has no youth,
no water, no land and no future."]
日本の農業には若い労働力も
水も、土地も将来もないんだ
03:20
That's what I landed to the day
that I went to Minamisanriku,
これを見てその当時
私は震災を被った
03:24
one stop south of Fukushima,
福島の直ぐ [北] にある
03:28
after the disaster.
[南相馬]へと向かったのです
03:30
The kids have headed to Sendai and Tokyo,
土地が汚染されていたため
子供たちは―
03:31
the land is contaminated,
仙台や東京へと移っていきました
03:34
they already import 70 percent
of their own food.
日本は既に70%もの食料を
輸入に頼っています
03:35
But it's not unique to Japan.
食糧問題は
日本に限ったことではありません
03:38
Two percent of the American population
is involved in farming.
アメリカで
農業に携わっている人口は2%です
03:40
What good answer comes
from two percent of any population?
どの国であろうと2%なんて
少なさで出来ることなど限られています
03:45
As we go around the world,
他の国を見渡してみると―
03:49
50 percent of the African
population is under 18.
アフリカの人口の50%は18歳未満です
03:51
Eighty percent don't want to be farmers.
彼らの80%は
農家にはなりたくないと思っています
03:55
Farming is hard.
農業は重労働ですから
03:58
The life of a small-shareholder
farmer is miserable.
小規模農業を営む
農民の生活は惨めで
04:00
They go into the city.
都市部へと流れていきます
04:05
In India:
インドでは―
04:06
farmers' families not being able
to have basic access to utilities,
農家は水や電気の
供給すら受けておらず
04:08
more farmer suicides this year
and the previous 10 before that.
今年自殺した農民の数は
過去10年間で最高でした
04:11
It's uncomfortable to talk about.
実に嫌な話です
04:15
Where are they going?
農民はどこへ行くのでしょう?
04:17
Into the city.
都市部です
04:18
No young people, and everyone's headed in.
若者は地元に残らず
皆が都市部へと流れ込みます
04:20
So how do we build this platform
that inspires the youth?
では どうやったら若者に刺激を与えるような
プラットフォームを構築できるでしょうか?
04:22
Welcome to the new tractor.
新型のトラクターのご紹介!
04:27
This is my combine.
これが私が生み出したコンバインです
04:29
A number of years ago now,
何年も前のこと
04:32
I went to Bed Bath and Beyond
and Home Depot
日用品店やDIYの店に行き
04:33
and I started hacking.
工作を始めました
04:35
And I built silly things
変なものを作り始めたのです
04:36
and I made plants dance
植物にダンスをさせようとして
04:38
and I attached them to my computer
植物をコンピュータに接続すると
04:39
and I killed them all --
全て枯れてしまいました
04:41
a lot.
大変な数でした
04:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:44
I eventually got them to survive.
ついには枯れない
ように出来ました
04:45
And I created one of the most
intimate relationships
私の人生において
最も親密な関係の1つとなるものを
04:47
I've ever had in my life,
構築したのです
04:49
because I was learning
the language of plants.
それは植物の言葉を
理解し始めたということです
04:51
I wanted to make it bigger.
もっと大きく育てたいと願うと
04:55
They said, "Knock yourself out, kid!
彼らは言いました
「おおいにやれ!
04:56
Here's an old electronics room
that nobody wants.
ここには誰も入りたがらない
古い電気実験室があるだけだ
04:58
What can you do?"
何が出来ると思う?」
05:01
With my team, we built a farm
inside of the media lab,
仲間と共にMITメディアラボに
農場を建設しました
05:03
a place historically known
not for anything about biology
この場所ははこれまで
生物学ではなく
05:05
but everything about digital life.
デジタルライフの研究所として
知られてきました
05:09
Inside of these 60 square feet,
この約6平方メートルのスペースで
05:12
we produced enough food to feed
about 300 people once a month --
毎月 3百人分の
十分な食料を生産しました
05:14
not a lot of food.
大量とは言えませんが・・・
05:18
And there's a lot of interesting
technology in there.
そこには多くの興味深い技術が
投入されていますが
05:19
But the most interesting thing?
その中でもっとも興味深いことは?
05:21
Beautiful, white roots,
美しい 白い根
05:24
deep, green colors
濃緑色野菜
05:26
and a monthly harvest.
そして 毎月の刈り入れ
05:29
Is this a new cafeteria?
これは新しいタイプの
カフェテリアでしょうか?
05:31
Is this a new retail experience?
新しい小売業体験?
05:34
Is this a new grocery store?
新しい食料品店?
05:38
I can tell you one thing for sure:
ひとつ確実に言えることがあります
05:39
this is the first time
メディアラボにおいて
05:42
anybody in the media lab
ripped the roots off of anything.
根から何かを摘み取った
初めての事例であることです
05:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:46
We get our salad in bags;
袋にサラダが入っていますが
05:48
there's nothing wrong with that.
何の問題もありません
05:50
But what happens
しかし
05:52
when you have an image-based
processing expert,
画像処理のエキスパート
05:53
a data scientist,
データ・サイエンティスト
05:57
a roboticist,
ロボットの研究者がいて
05:58
ripping roots off and thinking,
根から何かを摘みながら
06:00
"Huh. I know something about --
「自分の知識を使えば
こんなこと出来るさ
06:02
I could make this happen, I want to try."
試してみよう」
と考えたら何が起きるでしょう?
06:04
In that process we would
bring the plants out
我々は ここの植物を外に持ち出す前に
06:07
and we would take some back to the lab,
まずはラボに留めておこうとします
06:09
because if you grew it,
you don't throw it away;
なぜって 育てたものは
捨てたくないですからね
06:11
it's kind of precious to you.
貴重なものなのです
06:13
I have this weird tongue now,
私の舌は変わっていて―
06:15
because I'm afraid to let anybody eat
anything until I've eaten it first,
まずは自分が試食します
まともな食品であることを確かめるまでは
06:16
because I want it to be good.
人には食べさせたくありません
06:20
So I eat lettuce every day
それで 毎日レタスを食べています
06:21
and I can tell the pH
of a lettuce within .1.
レタスのpHは
0.1以内の誤差でわかるので
06:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:25
I'm like, "No, that's 6.1 -- no,
no, you can't eat it today."
「ああ それはPH6.1だ
今日は食べられないよ」こんな感じです
06:26
(Applause)
(笑)
06:29
This lettuce that day was hyper sweet.
この日のレタスは
もの凄く甘かったです
06:34
It was hyper sweet
because the plant had been stressed
植物がストレスにさらされ
自らを守ろうとして
06:37
and it created a chemical reaction
in the plant to protect itself:
内部で化学反応が起こるので
とても甘くなるのです
06:39
"I'm not going to die!"
「死にたくないよ」
06:43
And the plants not-going-to-die,
taste sweet to me.
そんな植物の叫びが
私好みの とても甘い味にしてくれます
06:44
Technologists falling backwards
into plant physiology.
植物生理学に転向した科学技術者・・・
06:48
So we thought other people
needed to be able to try this.
この実験を他の人も行えるように
しようと思いました
06:51
We want to see what people can create,
何が作り出されるのか
興味津々です
06:54
so we conceived of a lab
that could be shipped anywhere.
そこで どこにでも配達できるラボを
考えてみました
06:56
And then we built it.
まずは作ってみました
06:59
So on the facade
of the media lab is my lab,
メディアラボの正面側に
私のラボがあります
07:02
that has about 30 points
of sensing per plant.
植物1つにつき30個程の
センサーが取り付けられています
07:04
If you know about the genome or genetics,
ゲノムや遺伝子工学について
ご存知でしたら
07:08
this is the phenome, right?
これはいわゆる
フェノーム(表現型)です
07:11
The phenomena.
「現象」という言葉に由来します
07:13
When you say, "I like
the strawberries from Mexico,"
たとえば「メキシコ産のイチゴが好みだ」
ということは
07:15
you really like the strawberries
from the climate
実際にはあなた好みの
味に育つような気候の下で
07:17
that produced the expression
that you like.
育ったイチゴが
好みなのです
07:19
So if you're coding climate --
だから
その気候をプログラムで造り出せば―
07:22
this much CO2, this much O2 creates
a recipe -- you're coding
二酸化炭素や酸素の濃度といった
組み合わせをレシピとして
07:24
the expression of that plant,
the nutrition of that plant,
植物の風味、栄養分
07:27
the size of that plant, the shape,
the color, the texture.
大きさ、形、色や歯ごたえといったものを
プログラミングするのです
07:30
We need data,
これにはデータが必要で
07:35
so we put a bunch of sensors in there
状況を知るために
07:36
to tell us what's going on.
多くのセンサーを取り付けています
07:38
If you think of your houseplants,
室内園芸植物について思い浮かべ
07:40
and you look at your houseplant
これを眺めていると
07:41
and you're super sad, because you're like,
とても悲しくなるでしょう
07:43
"Why are you dying? Won't you talk to me?"
「なぜ死にかけているの?
僕に話しかけてよ」
07:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:47
Farmers develop the most beautiful
fortune-telling eyes
農家の人々は植物の成長を予測する
最高に素晴らしい眼力を
07:48
by the time they're in their
late 60s and 70s.
60歳代後半から70歳代ごろに
開花させます
07:51
They can tell you when you
see that plant dying
植物が枯れかけているとき
彼らにはその理由が
07:53
that it's a nitrogen deficiency,
a calcium deficiency
窒素不足だとか
カルシウム不足とか
07:55
or it needs more humidity.
湿気が必要だとかが
分かります
07:58
Those beautiful eyes
are not being passed down.
この素晴らしい眼力は
継承されません
07:59
These are eyes in the cloud of a farmer.
これはある農民がクラウド上に
保存したデータです
08:03
We trend those data points over time.
データの経時変化を追い
08:06
We correlate those data points
to individual plants.
これらのデータと
個々の植物との相関をとります
08:08
These are all the broccoli
in my lab that day, by IP address.
これらはある日の研究室のブロッコリが
IPアドレスで表されたものです
08:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:15
We have IP-addressable broccoli.
IPアドレス付与可能な
ブロッコリなのです
08:16
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:20
So if that's not weird enough,
まだ奇妙さが足りない
とお思いならば
08:24
you can click one
and you get a plant profile.
ここをクリックして
植物のプロフィールを見てみましょう
08:27
And what this tells you
is downloadable progress on that plant,
さきほどの植物の成長に関する
ダウンロード可能なデータです
08:29
but not like you'd think,
おそらく皆さんの想像以上で
08:32
it's not just when it's ready.
いつ食べられるかだけでなく
08:34
When does it achieve
the nutrition that I need?
自分が必要とする栄養が
得られる時期や
08:35
When does it achieve
the taste that I desire?
好みの味になるタイミングまで
予測します
08:37
Is it getting too much water?
水をやりすぎていないか?
08:41
Is it getting too much sun?
日光を取り込みすぎていないか?
08:42
Alerts.
警告も発します
08:44
It can talk to me, it's conversant,
私に話しかけます
知的なんです
08:46
we have a language.
私と共通の
言葉を持っています
08:47
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:50
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:51
I think of that as the first user
on the plant Facebook, right?
私は 植物界のフェースブック
ユーザー第1号だと思ったりもします
08:56
That's a plant profile
先ほどのは植物のプロフィール
09:01
and that plant will start making friends.
そして その植物が
友人を作り始めます
09:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:04
And I mean it -- it will make
friends with other plants
より少量の窒素、より多くのリン
09:05
that use less nitrogen, more phosphorus,
より少量のカリウムを消費する
他の植物とは
09:08
less potassium.
相性が良いはずです
09:10
We're going to learn about a complexity
今のところ推測しかできない
09:11
that we can only guess at now.
植物間関係の複雑さも学んでいます
09:13
And they may not friend us back --
I don't know, they might friend us back,
植物は我々を友人と認めてくれないかも―
でも可能性はあります
09:16
it depends on how we act.
それは我々の行動次第です
09:19
So this is my lab now.
これが現在の私のラボです
09:20
It's a little bit more systematized,
以前より少しだけ秩序だっています
09:23
my background is designing data centers
in hospitals of all things,
私は様々な病院でデータセンターを
整える事に経験があり
09:25
so I know a little bit about creating
a controlled environment.
管理された環境をつくることには
少し知識があります
09:28
And so --
それから
09:31
inside of this environment,
私はこの環境下において
09:32
we're experimenting
with all kinds of things.
あらゆる実験を試みています
09:34
This process, aeroponics, was developed
by NASA for Mir Space Station
この方法 気耕栽培はNASAによって
ミール宇宙ステーション向けに
09:36
for reducing the amount of water
they send into space.
宇宙空間に運び出す
水を減らすために開発されました
09:41
What it really does is give the plant
exactly what it wants:
ここでは 植物に必要なもの―
水、ミネラルや酸素を
09:43
water, minerals and oxygen.
ちょうど必要なだけ与えています
09:46
Roots are not that complicated,
根の成長はシンプルで
09:48
so when you give them that,
you get this amazing expression.
必要なものを与えるだけで
この様に見事に育ちます
09:49
It's like the plant has two hearts.
植物にはまるで心臓が2つあるようです
09:54
And because it has two hearts,
2つの心臓があるので
09:57
it grows four or five times faster.
4倍にも5倍にも速く育ちます
09:59
It's a perfect world.
完全な世界です
10:02
We've gone a long way into technology
and seed for an adverse world
人類は長年にわたって技術を進歩させ
厳しい環境でも育つ種を得ました
10:03
and we're going to continue to do that,
技術改革は続けられていますが
10:07
but we're going to have a new tool, too,
今や新しい方法を産み出しました
10:08
which is perfect world.
完全な世界です
10:10
So we've grown all kinds of things.
我々は様々な種類の植物を育てました
10:12
These tomatoes hadn't been
in commercial production for 150 years.
この種のトマトは150年間
商業生産されていませんでした
10:14
Do you know that we have
rare and ancient seed banks?
人類は希少かつ古来の種子バンクを
持っていることをご存知ですか?
10:18
Banks of seed.
種子の貯蔵庫のことです
10:22
It's amazing.
素晴らしいことです
10:24
They have germplasm alive
and things that you've never eaten.
生殖質が生きたまま保存され
誰も口にしたことが無い種もあります
10:25
I am the only person in this room
that's eaten that kind of tomato.
ラボでこのトマトを食べたのは
私だけです
10:28
Problem is it was a sauce tomato
and we don't know how to cook,
問題はこれはソース用トマトであり
調理法が分からないことです
10:31
so we ate a sauce tomato,
which is not that great.
ソース用トマトを食べてみましたが
美味しくありません
10:34
But we've done things with protein --
we've grown all kinds of things.
タンパク質を用いて―
様々なものを育ててみました
10:37
We've grown humans --
人間だってね―
10:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:41
Well maybe you could, but we didn't.
出来るかも
でも本当はやっていません
10:44
But what we realized is,
さて分かってきたことは
10:45
the tool was too big,
it was too expensive.
装置が大型で
非常に費用がかかることです
10:47
I was starting to put them
around the world
世界中に広めようと思いましたが
10:49
and they were about 100,000 dollars.
1千万円ほどかかる装置になりました
10:51
Finding somebody with 100 grand
in their back pocket isn't easy,
1千万円をさっと出せる人は
なかなか見つかりません
10:53
so we wanted to make a small one.
そこで小さなものを作ろうと思いました
10:56
This project was actually
one of my student's --
このプロジェクトは
実際には私の学生の一人であり
10:58
mechanical engineering
undergraduate, Camille.
機械工学を学ぶ学部生
カミールが進めていきました
11:00
So Camille and I and my team,
カミール、私と仲間たちは
11:03
we iterated all summer,
夏の間中 繰り返し実験し
11:05
how to make it cheaper,
how to make it work better,
より安価に
より上手く機能し
11:07
how to make it so other
people can make it.
誰でも作れるような
ものを目指しました
11:09
Then we dropped them off in schools,
seventh through eleventh grade.
次に これを中学
高校に持ち込みました
11:11
And if you want to be humbled,
try to teach a kid something.
人にばかにされたいと思ったら
子供に何かを教えてみて下さい
11:15
So I went into this school and I said,
私は学校に行って
こう言いました
11:18
"Set it to 65 percent humidity."
「湿度を65%に設定して」
11:20
The seventh grader
said, "What's humidity?"
中1の生徒が質問します
「湿度ってなーに?」
11:21
And I said, "Oh, it's water in air."
私は答えました
「空気中の水のことだよ」
11:24
He said, "There's no water
in air, you're an idiot."
彼は言い返します
「空気に水なんてないね バカじゃない」
11:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:28
And I was like, "Alright, don't trust me.
私もこう返します
「私を信じなくてもいいさ
11:29
Actually -- don't trust me, right?
信じ無くていい
11:31
Set it to 100.
100%に設定してみて」
11:33
He sets it to 100 and what happens?
彼は100%に設定し―何が起こるかって?
11:34
It starts to condense, make a fog
and eventually drip.
水分が凝集し 霧となって
ついに水滴が落ちてきます
11:36
And he says, "Oh. Humidity is rain.
彼は「なんだ 湿度って雨のことだね
11:39
Why didn't you just tell me that?"
何でそう言ってくれなかったの?」
11:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:45
We've created an interface
for this that's much like a game.
我々はまるでゲームのような
入力画面を作りました
11:47
They have a 3D environment,
3次元表示です
11:50
they can log into it anywhere in the world
世界中のどこからでも
ログインできます
11:51
on their smartphone, on their tablet.
スマートフォンでもタブレットでもOK
11:53
They have different parts of the bots --
the physical, the sensors.
ボット(栽培器)の
様々な装置やセンサーを操作できます
11:55
They select recipes that have
been created by other kids
世界中の他の子どもたちが
作ったレシピを
11:58
anywhere in the world.
選んでもよし
12:01
They select and activate that recipe,
they plant a seedling.
レシピを選んで起動すると
苗木が植えられます
12:02
While it's growing, they make changes.
成長の間も
変化を与えられます
12:06
They're like, "Why does a plant
need CO2 anyway? Isn't CO2 bad?
「植物はなぜCO2を必要とするの?
有害では?人を殺してしまうよね」
12:08
It kills people."
なんて言葉も聞かれます
12:11
Crank up CO2, plant dies.
CO2濃度を上げると
植物は死にます
12:12
Or crank down CO2, plant does very well.
CO2を下げると
植物はとても元気になります
12:14
Harvest plant,
植物を収穫が済むと
12:17
and you've created a new digital recipe.
新しいデジタル・レシピの出来上がり
12:19
It's an iterative design and development
繰り返しデザインし 開発し
12:21
and exploration process.
探求するプロセスです
12:23
They can download, then,
彼らが開発した
12:25
all of the data about that new plant
that they developed
新しい植物に関するデータや
新しいデジタル・レシピを
12:27
or the new digital recipe
and what did it do --
ダウンロードできます
そして変更点は―
12:30
was it better or was it worse?
効果的か 逆だったのか?
12:32
Imagine these as little cores
of processing.
これらが開発プロセスの
核心部分だと考えて下さい
12:33
We're going to learn so much.
我々は多くを学ぶでしょう
12:36
Here's one of the food computers,
as we call them,
これはフード・コンピュータと
我々が呼んでいるものです
12:39
in a school in three weeks' time.
学校での3週間
12:42
This is three weeks of growth.
3週間でこれだけ成長します
12:45
But more importantly,
もっと大切なことは
12:47
it was the first time that this kid
ever thought he could be a farmer --
この子が初めて
「自分も農民になれるかな」と思ったこと
12:49
or that he would want to be a farmer.
もしかすると
「農民になりたいと」と思ったかも
12:53
So, we've open-sourced all of this.
そこで我々はデータを
全てオープンにしました
12:56
It's all online; go home, try to build
your first food computer.
全てオンラインです 家で
フード・コンピュータを組み立ててみましょう
12:58
It's going to be difficult --
I'm just telling you.
ちょっと難しいかもしれません
でも―
13:01
We're in the beginning,
but it's all there.
始まったばかりの試みですが
全てが整っています
13:03
It's very important to me
that this is easily accessible.
簡単に入手できることが
とても重要なことです
13:05
We're going to keep making it more so.
もっと身近なものにして行きます
13:08
These are farmers,
彼らは農民
13:10
electrical engineer, mechanical engineer,
電気技師
機械技師
13:13
environmental engineer,
computer scientist,
環境技師
コンピュータ科学者
13:15
plant scientist,
economist, urban planners.
植物科学者、経済学者や
都市計画家です
13:17
On one platform, doing
what they're good at.
1つのプラットフォーム上で
自分の得意なことを行います
13:20
But we got a little too big.
このラボでは
手狭になってきました
13:22
This is my new facility
that I'm just starting.
これが私が使い始めたばかりの
新しい施設です
13:24
This warehouse could be anywhere.
このような倉庫は
どこにでもあるでしょう
13:27
That's why I chose it.
それが選んだ理由です
13:30
And inside of this warehouse
倉庫の中で
13:31
we're going to build something
kind of like this.
こんなものを
作ろうとしています
13:33
These exist right now.
これは既に実在しています
13:35
Take a look at it.
ご覧ください
13:37
These exist, too.
こちらも既にあります
13:40
One grows greens,
それぞれ緑色野菜と
13:42
one grows Ebola vaccine.
エボラワクチンを
育てています
13:43
Pretty amazing that plants
and this DARPA Grand Challenge winner
国防高等研究計画局のグランド・チャレンジで
これらの植物が優勝した理由の1つが
13:46
is one of the reasons
we're getting ahead of Ebola.
エボラ研究で先行していたことです
素晴らしいことです
13:50
The plants are producing
the protein that's Ebola resistant.
この植物はエボラに抵抗力のある
タンパク質を生成します
13:53
So pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals,
医薬品、栄養補助食品から
13:57
all they way down to lettuce.
レタスに至ります
13:59
But these two things look nothing alike,
レタスとは全く似ていませんが
14:01
and that's where I am with my field.
これこそ私が研究する分野です
14:03
Everything is different.
全ての点で異なっています
14:05
We're in that weird "We're alright" stage
我々はまだ初期のカオス状態にあって―
14:07
and it's like, "Here's my black box --"
まるで「当社のブラックボックスです—」
14:10
"No, buy mine."
「僕のを買いなよ」
14:12
"No, no, no -- I've got intellectual
property that's totally valuable.
「だめだ とても貴重な知的所有権は
僕が保有しているんだ
14:14
Don't buy his, buy mine."
彼のはダメ 僕のを買って」
14:17
And the reality is,
we're just at the beginning,
実際のところは
まだ始まったばかりで
14:18
in a time when society is shifting, too.
社会が変わろうと
しているところです
14:20
When we ask for more, cheaper food,
より多くの安価な
食品を求める一方
14:23
we're now asking for better,
environmentally friendly food.
より良質な環境に優しい食品を
求めるようになっているのです
14:24
And when you have McDonald's advertising
what's in the Chicken McNugget,
いつの時でも最も怪しい食べ物とされていた
チキンナゲットの中身を
14:28
the most mysterious
food item of all time --
マクドナルドが公表したということは
14:33
they are now basing
their marketing plan on that --
彼らは世の中の変化に合わせて
マーケティングを
14:36
everything is changing.
行っていることを示しています
14:38
So into the world now.
では現代の世界について
見てみましょう
14:40
Personal food computers,
個人用のフード・コンピュータ
14:41
food servers
フード・サーバー
14:44
and food data centers
それにフード・データ・センターが―
14:47
run on the open phenome.
オープン型フェノームで
運用されます
14:50
Think open genome, but we're going
to put little climate recipes,
オープンゲノムと異なり 我々のは
気候のレシピが少し加えられた
14:53
like Wikipedia,
ウィキのようなものです
14:56
that you can pull down, actuate and grow.
プルダウンメニューから選んで起動し
成長させることが出来ます
14:57
What does this look like in a world?
この試みは世界的には
どう見えるでしょう?
15:03
You remember the world
connected by strings?
世界は線で結ばれていたことを
覚えていますか?
15:05
We start having beacons.
まずは発振器を設置し
15:07
We start sending information about food,
食糧そのものを
送るのではなく
15:09
rather than sending food.
食糧に関する情報の
発信を始めます
15:11
This is not just my fantasy,
単に私の幻想ではなく
15:13
this is where we're already deploying.
既に このような場所で
広めています
15:14
Food computers, food servers,
フード・コンピュータと
フード・サーバー
15:17
soon-to-be food data centers,
それにフード・データ
センターも出来て
15:19
connecting people together
to share information.
情報の共有により
人々が繋がっていきます
15:20
The future of food is not about fighting
over what's wrong with this.
将来の食糧供給とは
内包する欠点と戦うことではありません
15:24
We know what's wrong with this.
欠点が何かは分かっています
15:30
The future of food is about networking
the next one billion farmers
将来の食糧供給は次の10億人の農民をつなぐ
ネットワークのことであって
15:33
and empowering them with a platform
プラットフォームの提供により
15:37
to ask and answer the question,
問題の提起と解の提供を可能にします
15:39
"What if?"
「もしも・・・」
15:42
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
15:44
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:45
Translated by Tomoyuki Suzuki
Reviewed by Eriko T.

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Caleb Harper - Principal Investigator and Director of the Open Agriculture Initiative
Caleb Harper leads a group of engineers, architects, urban planners, economists and plant scientists in the exploration and development of high performance urban agricultural systems.

Why you should listen

What do we know about the food we eat? What if there was climate democracy? These and other questions inform the work of Caleb Harper and his colleagues as they explore the future of food systems. He is the principal investigator and director of the Open Agriculture Initiative (OpenAG) at the MIT Media Lab. Under his guidance, a diverse group of engineers, architects, urbanists, economists and plant scientists (what he calls an “anti-disciplinary group”) is developing an open-source agricultural hardware, software and data common aiming to create a more agile, transparent and collaborative food system.

More profile about the speaker
Caleb Harper | Speaker | TED.com