10:11
Mission Blue II

Thomas Peschak: Dive into an ocean photographer's world

トーマス・ペスチャック: 海洋写真家の世界へ飛び込もう

Filmed:

宙返りするオニイトマキエイ、威勢の良いイルカ、群泳する魚、むしゃむしゃ食べるサメ。ほとんどの人が見る機会のない海面下では、こんな生き物が暮らしています。保護活動写真家のトーマス・ペスチャックは世界中の素晴らしい海景を訪れ、写真を通じて、この隠された生態系を知らしめています。「存在を知らなければ、それを大切にして擁護することもできません」と彼は言います。彼の見事な作品や尊重すべき海との共存という将来への夢を、新しい形の引き込まれるようなTEDトークで体感してください。

- Conservation photographer
Thomas Peschak strives to merge photojournalism and cutting edge science to create powerful media projects that tackle critical marine conservation issues. Full bio

As a kid, I used to dream about the ocean.
私は子供の時から
海に憧れてきました
00:12
It was this wild place
full of color and life,
それは色と生命にあふれた
素晴らしい場所で
00:15
home to these alien-looking,
fantastical creatures.
エイリアンのような
奇妙な生き物たちの住処です
00:19
I pictured big sharks
ruling the food chain
大きなサメが食物連鎖を
支配しているところを想像したり
00:23
and saw graceful sea turtles
dancing across coral reefs.
優雅なウミガメがサンゴ礁を
泳ぎ渡るのを思い描いていました
00:25
As a marine biologist turned photographer,
私は海洋生物学者から
写真家に転向したので
00:28
I've spent most of my career
looking for places
仕事のほとんどを
自分が小さい時に夢見たような
00:30
as magical as those I used
to dream about when I was little.
魔法がかった場所を
探すのに捧げてきました
00:33
As you can see,
ご覧の通り
00:37
I began exploring bodies of water
at a fairly young age.
私はかなり小さい時から
水中を探検してきました
00:38
But the first time
I truly went underwater,
でも初めて本当に水中に潜ったのは
00:41
I was about 10 years old.
私が10歳ぐらいの時でした
00:43
And I can still vividly remember
furiously finning
今でも猛烈に泳いだことを
鮮明に覚えています
00:44
to reach this old, encrusted
cannon on a shallow coral reef.
浅いサンゴの上の古い大砲を
触ろうとしたのです
00:47
And when I finally managed
to grab hold of it,
そして やっとそれがつかめて
00:50
I looked up, and I was instantly
surrounded by fish
見上げると
00:53
in all colors of the rainbow.
私は たちまち
色とりどりの魚に囲まれました
00:56
That was the day
I fell in love with the ocean.
それが私が海に恋した日でした
00:58
Thomas Peschak
トーマス・ペスチャック
01:00
Conservation Photographer
保護活動 写真家
01:02
In my 40 years on this planet,
40年間 地球で暮らしてきて
01:04
I've had the great privilege to explore
私は 『ナショナル ジオグラフィック』と
01:06
some of its most incredible seascapes
Save Our Seas 財団のために
01:08
for National Geographic Magazine
素晴らしい海の姿を探求するという
01:10
and the Save Our Seas Foundation.
貴重な機会をいただきました
01:12
I've photographed everything
from really, really big sharks
私は何でも撮影してきました
とてつもなく大きいサメから
01:14
to dainty ones that fit
in the palm of your hand.
手のひらに収まるような
可愛らしいものまで
01:17
I've smelled the fishy, fishy breath
of humpback whales
寒冷なカナダのグレートベア・
レインフォレスト沖で
01:20
feeding just feet away from me
とても生臭い息のザトウクジラが
01:23
in the cold seas off Canada's
Great Bear Rainforest.
ほんの30cm先で餌を取る場に
立ち会いました
01:25
And I've been privy to the mating rituals
of green sea turtles
また モザンビーク海峡での
アオウミガメの交尾の場にも
01:28
in the Mozambique Channel.
居合わせてきました
01:31
Everyone on this planet affects
and is affected by the ocean.
地球上のすべての人と海は
影響を与え合ってきました
01:32
And the pristine seas
I used to dream of as a child
そして 私が子供の頃に
夢見たような 手つかずの海は
01:36
are becoming harder and harder to find.
見つけることが
ますます大変になってきています
01:38
They are becoming more compressed
どんどん追い詰められて
01:41
and more threatened.
脅かされているのです
01:43
As we humans continue to maintain our role
私たち人類は地球上の
01:45
as the leading predator on earth,
主力な捕獲者であり続けてきましたが
01:48
I've witnessed and photographed
many of these ripple effects firsthand.
私は次第に広がるその影響を
直に目撃し 撮影してきました
01:50
For a long time, I thought
I had to shock my audience
私は 衝撃的な写真で
ショックを受けてもらうことで
01:55
out of their indifference
with disturbing images.
関心を持ってもらおうと
長い間 思っていました
01:58
And while this approach has merits,
この取り組みにも利点はあるのですが
02:00
I have come full circle.
私は原点に立ち返ってきました
02:02
I believe that the best way
for me to effect change
変化を引き起こす一番の方法は
02:04
is to sell love.
愛に訴えかけることだと
思ったのです
02:07
I guess I'm a matchmaker of sorts
私はある種の仲人なのかもしれません
02:08
and as a photographer,
写真家として
02:10
I have the rare opportunity
私には海面下に隠された
02:12
to reveal animals and entire ecosystems
動物や生態系の全体を明らかにする
02:14
that lie hidden beneath
the ocean's surface.
貴重な機会に恵まれました
02:16
You can't love something
and become a champion for it
存在を知らなければ
それを大切にすることも
02:19
if you don't know it exists.
擁護することもできません
02:22
Uncovering this -- that is the power
of conservation photography.
隠れた姿を明らかにすることこそが
保護活動の写真の力なのです
02:24
(Music)
(音楽)
02:29
I've visited hundreds of marine locations,
何百もの海水域を訪れましたが
02:32
but there are a handful of seascapes
特に深く感銘を受けたものが
02:35
that have touched me incredibly deeply.
いくつかあります
02:37
The first time I experienced
that kind of high
そのような興奮を初めて経験したのは
02:40
was about 10 years ago,
10年前のことで
02:43
off South Africa's rugged, wild coast.
南アフリカの岩だらけの
未開の海岸沖でのことでした
02:45
And every June and July,
毎年 6月と7月に
02:47
enormous shoals of sardines
travel northwards
イワシの巨大な群れが北の方へ
02:49
in a mass migration
we call the Sardine Run.
サーディン・ランという大移動を行います
02:51
And boy, do those fish
have good reason to run.
これには きちんとした理由があるのです
02:54
In hot pursuit are hoards
of hungry and agile predators.
お腹を空かせた素早い捕獲者が
密かにすごい勢いで追っているからです
02:56
Common dolphins hunt together
一般に イルカは複数で狩りをして
03:01
and they can separate some
of the sardines from the main shoal
一部のイワシを群れから引き離して
ベイト・ボールという
03:02
and they create bait balls.
球形の群れを作ります
03:05
They drive and trap the fish upward
against the ocean surface
海の表面まで魚を追いやって
03:07
and then they rush in to dine
この生きて動いているご馳走に
03:11
on this pulsating and movable feast.
ありつくのです
03:12
Close behind are sharks.
すぐ後ろにはサメがいます
03:15
Now, most people believe
多くの人はイルカとサメは
03:17
that sharks and dolphins
are these mortal enemies,
天敵同士だと信じていますが
03:18
but during the Sardine Run,
they actually coexist.
サーディン・ラン中は
実は共存しています
03:20
In fact, dolphins actually
help sharks feed more effectively.
イルカはサメが
効率よく餌取りをするのを助けます
03:23
Without dolphins, the bait balls
are more dispersed
イルカなしではベイト・ボールは
もっと分散してしまい
03:27
and sharks often end up
with what I call a sardine donut,
サメは いわゆるサーディン・ドーナツにはまり
水を口いっぱいに含んで
03:31
or a mouth full of water.
何も得られません
03:35
Now, while I've had a few spicy moments
with sharks on the sardine run,
さて 私はサーディン・ランで
サメとの刺激的な瞬間も経験し
03:36
I know they don't see me as prey.
彼らが私を餌と見ていないことは
分かります
03:40
However, I get bumped and tail-slapped
just like any other guest
しかし この荒々しい宴会で
他の魚たちと同様に
03:42
at this rowdy, rowdy banquet.
ぶつかったりヒレで打たれたりはします
03:46
From the shores of Africa we travel east,
アフリカの海岸から東に移動して
03:49
across the vastness
that is the Indian Ocean
広大なインド洋を横切ると
03:52
to the Maldives, an archipelago
of coral islands.
サンゴでできている
モルジブ諸島に行き着きます
03:54
And during the stormy southwest monsoon,
激しい南西モンスーンの時期には
03:58
manta rays from all across the archipelago
諸島の至るところから
オニイトマキエイが
04:01
travel to a tiny speck
in Baa Atoll called Hanifaru.
ハニファルと呼ばれるバア環礁の
とても小さな所へやってきます
04:03
Armies of crustaceans,
大抵は人の瞳より小さい
04:06
most no bigger than the size
of your pupils,
大量の甲殻類が
04:08
are the mainstay of the manta ray's diet.
オニイトマキエイの主食です
04:10
When plankton concentrations
become patchy,
プランクトンの居場所にムラがあると
オニイトマキエイは
04:14
manta rays feed alone
単独で餌をとります
04:16
and they somersault themselves
backwards again and again,
そして 何度も
後ろに宙返りをします
04:18
very much like a puppy
chasing its own tail.
その様子は自分の尾を追いかける
子犬にそっくりです
04:20
(Music)
(音楽)
04:23
However, when plankton densities increase,
しかし プランクトンが一カ所に集中すると
04:27
the mantas line up head-to-tail
to form these long feeding chains,
エイたちは直列になって
餌取りのための長い鎖を作ります
04:29
and any tasty morsel that escapes
the first or second manta in line
先頭近くのエイが
少しプランクトンを取り逃がしても
04:33
is surely to be gobbled up
by the next or the one after.
必ずその後のエイが
飲み込むことでしょう
04:37
As plankton levels peak in the bay,
プランクトンの量が多くなるにつれ
04:41
the mantas swim closer and closer together
エイは互いに より近づくように泳ぎます
04:43
in a unique behavior
we call cyclone feeding.
この独特な行動は
サイクロン・フィーディングと呼ばれます
04:46
And as they swirl in tight formation,
エイは 堅固な編隊で旋回しながら
04:48
this multi-step column of mantas
何階層もの円柱となり
04:51
creates its own vortex, sucking in
and delivering the plankton
プランクトンを渦を作って集め
吸い込むようにして
04:52
right into the mantas' cavernous mouths.
自らの洞窟のような口に
運んでいきます
04:56
The experience of diving
amongst such masses of hundreds of rays
何百匹ものエイの集団に囲まれて
ダイビングした経験は
04:59
is truly unforgettable.
本当に忘れがたいものです
05:03
(Music)
(音楽)
05:06
When I first photographed Hanifaru,
ハニファルで初めて撮影したとき
05:54
the site enjoyed no protection
そこは保護を受けておらず
05:55
and was threatened by development.
開発によって脅かされていました
05:57
And working with NGOs
like the Manta Trust,
Manta TrustのようなNGOと
一緒に活動することで
05:59
my images eventually helped Hanifaru
私の写真はやがてハニファルが
06:01
become a marine-protected area.
海洋保護域になる手助けになりました
06:03
Now, fisherman from neighboring islands,
近隣の島の漁師たちは
06:05
they once hunted these manta rays
エイの皮で伝統的な太鼓を作るため
06:07
to make traditional drums
from their skins.
かつてはエイを捕っていました
06:09
Today, they are the most ardent
conservation champions
現在 彼らは誰よりも
熱心な保護活動をしており
06:12
and manta rays earn the Maldivian economy
エイのおかげでモルジブでは
06:15
in excess of 8 million dollars
every single year.
毎年 8百万ドル多く
収入を得るようになりました
06:18
I have always wanted
to travel back in time
私はいつも過去に戻って
地図がほとんど空白だったり
06:23
to an era where maps were mostly blank
"ここにドラゴンあり"と書かれている
06:25
or they read, "There be dragons."
時代に行ってみたいと思っていました
06:28
And today, the closest I've come
is visiting remote atolls
私が行った中で
そのような時代の海に一番近かったのは
06:30
in the western Indian Ocean.
インド洋の西側の環礁でした
06:33
Far, far away from shipping lanes
and fishing fleets,
海上交通路や漁船団から遠く離れて
06:35
diving into these waters
is a poignant reminder
このような海に潜ると
かつての海の様子が
06:38
of what our oceans once looked like.
痛烈に感じられます
06:42
Very few people have heard
of Bassas da India,
ほとんどの人は
バサス・ダ・インディアという
06:44
a tiny speck of coral
in the Mozambique Channel.
モザンビーク海峡の小さなサンゴ礁について
聞いたことがないでしょう
06:47
Its reef forms a protective outer barrier
そのサンゴ礁は防壁になっていて
06:51
and the inner lagoon is a nursery ground
中の礁湖はガラパゴスザメのための
06:54
for Galapagos sharks.
生育場となっています
06:57
These sharks are anything but shy,
even during the day.
このサメは たとえ日中でも
とても臆病とは言えません
06:58
I had a bit of a hunch
that they'd be even bolder
私には 夜になったら
もっと大胆になって
07:03
and more abundant at night.
たくさん出てくるのではないか
という勘がありました
07:05
(Music)
(音楽)
07:08
Never before have I encountered
今までに一つのサンゴの露頭で
07:16
so many sharks on a single coral outcrop.
これほど多くのサメに
遭遇したことがあったでしょうか
07:18
Capturing and sharing moments like this --
このような瞬間を捉えて共有することで
07:21
that reminds me why I chose my path.
自分がこの道に進んだ理由を
思い出します
07:25
Earlier this year, I was on assignment
for National Geographic Magazine
今年すでに
『ナショナル ジオグラフィック』の仕事を
07:29
in Baja California.
バハ・カリフォルニア半島でしました
07:33
And about halfway down the peninsula
on the Pacific side
半島の太平洋側を半分ほど行った所に
07:34
lies San Ignacio Lagoon,
コククジラの繁殖場として重要な
07:37
a critical calving ground for gray whales.
サン・イグナシオ・ラグーンがあります
07:39
For 100 years, this coast was the scene
of a wholesale slaughter,
この沿岸は 大量殺りくが
100年間 続いた場所で
07:41
where more than 20,000
gray whales were killed,
2万以上のコククジラが殺され
07:45
leaving only a few hundred survivors.
数百だけが生き残りました
07:48
Today the descendents of these same whales
現在 そのクジラの子孫は
07:50
nudge their youngsters to the surface
自分の子どもたちを海面にそっと押しあげて
07:53
to play and even interact with us.
遊ばせたり私たちと交流したりさえします
07:55
(Music)
(音楽)
07:59
This species truly has made
a remarkable comeback.
この種は本当に驚くべき復活を遂げました
08:08
Now, on the other side
of the peninsula lies Cabo Pulmo,
さて 半島の反対側には
カボ・プルモという
08:14
a sleepy fishing village.
静かな漁師町があります
08:17
Decades of overfishing
had brought them close to collapse.
そこは何十年もの乱獲によって
崩壊寸前の状態でした
08:19
In 1995, local fisherman
convinced the authorities
1995年に地元の漁師が
08:22
to proclaim their waters a marine reserve.
その海を海洋保護区として
指定するように訴えました
08:25
But what happened next
was nothing short of miraculous.
そのあとに起こったことは
奇跡としか言いようのないものでした
08:27
In 2005, after only
a single decade of protection,
2005年には 保護を始めてから
10年しか経っていないにもかかわらず
08:31
scientists measured the largest
recovery of fish ever recorded.
魚の数は
前代未聞の回復を遂げました
08:35
But don't take my word
for it -- come with me.
でも 自分の目で見てください
一緒に行きましょう
08:39
On a single breath, swim with me in deep,
息を吸って 奥深くに潜り
08:42
into one of the largest
and densest schools of fish
私が遭遇した中で最も
大きく密な魚の群れの中に
08:45
I have ever encountered.
泳いで行ってみましょう
08:48
(Music)
(音楽)
08:51
We all have the ability
to be creators of hope.
誰もが希望を生むことができます
09:03
And through my photography,
私の写真を通して
09:05
I want to pass on the message
that it is not too late for our oceans.
私たちの海を守るのに まだ手遅れでないと
伝えたいのです
09:07
And particularly, I want to focus
on nature's resilience
特に 73億人の人を前にしたときの
09:11
in the face of 7.3 billion people.
自然の回復力に焦点を当てたいのです
09:14
My hope is that in the future,
私の願いは
09:18
I will have to search much, much harder
将来 よほどよく探さなければ
09:20
to make photographs like this,
このような写真は撮れなくなり
09:22
while creating images that showcase
海との共存を示す見本となるような
09:24
our respectful coexistence with the ocean.
写真を撮っていくことです
09:27
Those will hopefully become
an everyday occurrence for me.
それが日常的な出来事になることを
願うばかりです
09:30
To thrive and survive in my profession,
私の職業で生き残って進むためには
09:34
you really have to be a hopeless optimist.
どうしようもない楽天家でなければなりません
09:37
And I always operate on the assumption
私はいつも仮定の下で仕事をしています
09:40
that the next great picture
that will effect change
変化を促すような素晴らしい写真は
09:42
is right around the corner,
すぐ そこの角を曲がった所や
09:45
behind the next coral head,
そこのサンゴの向こう
09:47
inside the next lagoon
その礁湖の中
09:49
or possibly, in the one after it.
あるいは そのもう一つ先に
あるのではないかと思うのです
09:51
(Music)
(音楽)
09:54
Translated by Mio Yabuki
Reviewed by Yuko Yoshida

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Thomas Peschak - Conservation photographer
Thomas Peschak strives to merge photojournalism and cutting edge science to create powerful media projects that tackle critical marine conservation issues.

Why you should listen

Thomas P. Peschak is an assignment photographer for National Geographic Magazine and the Director of Conservation for the Save our Seas Foundation (SOSF). He is a senior fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers and has been named as one of the 40 most influential nature photographers in the world.

Originally trained as a marine biologist, he retired from science fieldwork in 2004. He became an environmental photojournalist after realizing that he could have a greater conservation impact with photographs than statistics. Yet he remains rooted in marine science through his roles as Director of Conservation for SOSF and Founding/Associate Director of the Manta Trust.

Thomas has written and photographed five books: Currents of Contrast, Great White Shark, Wild Seas Secret Shores and Lost World. His latest book, Sharks and People, was released in 2013 and chronicles the relationship between people and sharks around the world.

He is a multiple winner in the BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year Awards and in 2011 and 2013 he received World Press Photo Awards for his work.

More profile about the speaker
Thomas Peschak | Speaker | TED.com