sponsored links
TED2016

Joe Gebbia: How Airbnb designs for trust

ジョー・ゲビア: Airbnbの成功の裏にある信頼のためのデザイン

February 16, 2016

Airbnbの共同創業者ジョー・ゲビアは、家に泊まり合えるくらいに人は信頼し合えるという考えに会社の命運を賭けました。知らない人は危険という人々の持つ先入観はどうやって克服できたのでしょう? 優れたデザインによってです。1億2千3百万泊を経た今、ゲビアは孤立と分断の代わりにコミュニティと繋がりを育むデザインによって共有の文化を実現しようという夢へ乗り出しています。

Joe Gebbia - Designer, co-founder of Airbnb
As a designer, entrepreneur and the co-founder and Chief Product Officer of Airbnb, Joe Gebbia helped redesign the way the world travels and people connect. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I want to tell you the story
マツダ・ロードスターの
00:12
about the time I almost got kidnapped
トランクに詰め込まれ
00:14
in the trunk of a red Mazda Miata.
誘拐されそうになった時の話を
したいと思います
00:18
It's the day after graduating
from design school
美大を卒業した次の日に
00:21
and I'm having a yard sale.
庭先で不要品を
売っていました
00:24
And this guy pulls up in this red Mazda
そこへ 赤いロードスターに
乗った男がやってきて
00:26
and he starts looking through my stuff.
売り物を見始め
00:29
And he buys a piece of art that I made.
私の作った美術作品を
買いました
00:31
And it turns out he's alone
in town for the night,
彼は その晩
街に1人きりで
00:34
driving cross-country on a road trip
アメリカ横断
自動車旅行をしていて
00:37
before he goes into the Peace Corps.
このあと平和部隊に参加する
という話でした
00:40
So I invite him out for a beer
それで一緒に
飲みに行くことになり
00:42
and he tells me all about his passion
彼は世界を変えることへの
00:45
for making a difference in the world.
情熱を語りました
00:47
Now it's starting to get late,
遅い時間になって
00:50
and I'm getting pretty tired.
疲れてきたので
00:51
As I motion for the tab,
お開きにする
合図のつもりで
00:54
I make the mistake of asking him,
まずい質問をしました
00:56
"So where are you staying tonight?"
「今晩はどこに泊まるの?」
00:59
And he makes it worse by saying,
彼の答えが
事態を一層悪くしました
01:01
"Actually, I don't have a place."
「実は泊まるところがないんだ」
01:03
And I'm thinking, "Oh, man!"
私は心の中で「まいったな」と
思いました
01:07
What do you do?
「どうしよう?
01:10
We've all been there, right?
ずっと一緒だったわけだし
01:12
Do I offer to host this guy?
うちに泊まっていくよう
申し出るべきか?
01:15
But, I just met him -- I mean,
でも会ったばかりだしな
01:17
he says he's going to the Peace Corps,
平和部隊に行くとは
言っていたけど
01:19
but I don't really know if he's going
to the Peace Corps
本当に行くのか
わかりゃしないし
01:21
and I don't want to end up kidnapped
in the trunk of a Miata.
ロードスターのトランクに押し込められる
羽目にはなりたくない
01:23
That's a small trunk!
あんなに狭いんだから!」
01:26
So then I hear myself saying,
それから こう言っている
自分の声が聞こえました
01:29
"Hey, I have an airbed you can stay on
in my living room."
「エアーベッドがあるから
うちの居間に泊まってけば」
01:31
And the voice in my head goes,
頭の中の声が言います
01:35
"Wait, what?"
「おい 何だって?」
01:37
That night, I'm laying in bed,
その晩 ベッドに横になって
01:40
I'm staring at the ceiling and thinking,
天井を見ながら
考えていました
01:42
"Oh my god, what have I done?
「ああ なんてこと
したんだろう?
01:45
There's a complete stranger
sleeping in my living room.
見ず知らずの人間が
隣の部屋で寝てるんだぞ!
01:48
What if he's psychotic?"
異常者だったらどうする?」
01:52
My anxiety grows so much,
不安が高じて
01:54
I leap out of bed,
ベッドを抜けだし
01:56
I sneak on my tiptoes to the door,
そっとドアのところまで行くと
01:58
and I lock the bedroom door.
部屋に鍵をかけました
02:00
It turns out he was not psychotic.
幸い彼は異常者では
ありませんでした
02:04
We've kept in touch ever since.
それ以来
連絡を取り合っていて
02:06
And the piece of art
he bought at the yard sale
ガレージセールで彼が買った
私の作品は
02:08
is hanging in his classroom;
he's a teacher now.
先生になった彼の教室に
飾られています
02:10
This was my first hosting experience,
それが私にとって初めての
ホスト役の体験で
02:14
and it completely changed my perspective.
私の考え方を
すっかり変えることになりました
02:16
Maybe the people that my childhood
taught me to label as strangers
子供の頃 「怪しい知らない人」 という
レッテルを貼るよう教えられた人たちは
02:21
were actually friends waiting
to be discovered.
まだ見ぬ友達なのかも
しれないんです
02:25
The idea of hosting people on airbeds
gradually became natural to me
誰かをエアーベッドで家に泊めるというのは
自分にとってだんだんと普通のことになり
02:29
and when I moved to San Francisco,
サンフランシスコに
引っ越したときには
02:33
I brought the airbed with me.
エアーベッドも
持って行きました
02:35
So now it's two years later.
その2年後のことです
02:37
I'm unemployed, I'm almost broke,
職がなく
ほとんど一文無しで
02:38
my roommate moves out,
and then the rent goes up.
ルームメートが引っ越していき
家賃が値上がりしました
02:41
And then I learn there's a design
conference coming to town,
それから街で デザイン系の
カンファレンスが行われるせいで
02:46
and all the hotels are sold out.
ホテルがどこも
いっぱいだと耳にしました
02:48
And I've always believed
that turning fear into fun
怖れを楽しみに変えるのが
クリエイティビティの才能だと
02:50
is the gift of creativity.
私はいつも思ってきました
02:54
So here's what I pitch my best friend
and my new roommate Brian Chesky:
これは親友にして新しいルームメートの
ブライアン・チェスキーに売り込んだ文句です
02:56
"Brian, thought of a way
to make a few bucks --
「おい 小金を稼ぐ方法があるぞ
03:01
turning our place into 'designers
bed and breakfast,'
家を“デザイナーズ・ホテル”に変えるんだ
03:04
offering young designers who come
to town a place to crash,
街にやってくる
若いデザイナーに
03:06
complete with wireless Internet,
a small desk space,
Wi-Fi 小さな作業スペース
敷き布団 朝食付で
03:09
sleeping mat, and breakfast each morning.
泊まる場所を
提供するんだ
03:12
Ha!"
どうだい?」
03:14
We built a basic website
and Airbed and Breakfast was born.
私たちは簡単なウェブサイトを作り
「エアーベッド&ブレックファスト」が生まれました
03:16
Three lucky guests got to stay
3人の幸運な客が
03:20
on a 20-dollar airbed
on the hardwood floor.
木の床に敷いた20ドルのエアーベッドに
寝ることになりました
03:22
But they loved it, and so did we.
しかし彼らは それが気に入り
私たちも気に入りました
03:25
I swear, the ham
and Swiss cheese omelets we made
私たちのハムとスイスチーズの
オムレツさえ
03:28
tasted totally different
because we made them for our guests.
ゲストのために作ると
格別に感じられました
03:31
We took them on adventures
around the city,
私たちは彼らに
街中を案内しました
03:35
and when we said goodbye
to the last guest,
最後の客に別れを告げ
03:37
the door latch clicked,
ドアの鍵をかけた後
03:40
Brian and I just stared at each other.
ブライアンと私は
顔を見合わせました
03:42
Did we just discover
it was possible to make friends
賃貸をしながら
友達を作ることが
03:45
while also making rent?
可能なことを
発見したのかも!
03:49
The wheels had started to turn.
物事が回り始めました
03:51
My old roommate, Nate Blecharczyk,
以前のルームメートの
ネイサン・ブレチャージクが
03:53
joined as engineering co-founder.
技術担当の共同創業者として
加わって
03:55
And we buckled down to see
これをビジネスに
できないものか
03:58
if we could turn this into a business.
3人で真剣に
取り組みました
04:00
Here's what we pitched investors:
私たちの投資家向けの
口上はこうです
04:03
"We want to build a website
「最も個人的な場所の写真を
人々が公開できる
04:08
where people publicly post pictures
of their most intimate spaces,
ウェブサイトを作りたいと
考えています
04:09
their bedrooms, the bathrooms --
寝室や浴室のような
04:13
the kinds of rooms you usually keep closed
when people come over.
来客があるときには通常
隠しておくような場所です
04:15
And then, over the Internet,
そして自分の家に
泊まりに来るよう
04:18
they're going to invite complete strangers
to come sleep in their homes.
ネットで赤の他人を
招待するんです
04:20
It's going to be huge!"
大成功間違いなし!」
04:23
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:25
We sat back, and we waited
for the rocket ship to blast off.
私たちは自分たちの宇宙船が
飛び立つのを待っていましたが
04:27
It did not.
何も起きませんでした
04:31
No one in their right minds
would invest in a service
頭がまともな人なら
04:34
that allows strangers
to sleep in people's homes.
赤の他人を自宅に泊めるためのサービスに
出資したりはしないでしょう
04:37
Why?
というのも
04:39
Because we've all been taught
as kids, strangers equal danger.
「知らない人は危ない」と
子供の頃から教え込まれてきたからです
04:41
Now, when you're faced with a problem,
you fall back on what you know,
人は 問題に直面したとき
自分のよく知っていることを頼みにします
04:45
and all we really knew was design.
私たちに分かっていたのは
デザインでした
04:49
In art school, you learn
that design is much more
美大では デザインというのは
見た目だけのものではなく
04:52
than the look and feel of something --
it's the whole experience.
全体的体験なのだと教わります
04:55
We learned to do that for objects,
ものをデザインすることは
学びましたが
04:58
but here, we were aiming
to build Olympic trust
ここで作り出そうとしているのは
05:00
between people who had never met.
会ったこともない人々の間の
大いなる信頼です
05:04
Could design make that happen?
デザインで実現
できるのでしょうか?
05:08
Is it possible to design for trust?
信頼を生み出すデザインなんて
可能なのか?
05:11
I want to give you a sense
of the flavor of trust
私たちが実現しようとしていた
信頼がどんなものか
05:15
that we were aiming to achieve.
皆さんにも
体感してほしいと思います
05:18
I've got a 30-second experiment
皆さんを安全地帯の
外に押し出す
05:21
that will push you past your comfort zone.
30秒の実験を用意しました
05:22
If you're up for it, give me a thumbs-up.
やろうという人は親指で
賛意を示してください
05:25
OK, I need you to take out your phones.
では携帯を出してください
05:30
Now that you have your phone out,
携帯を出したら
05:38
I'd like you to unlock your phone.
ロックを解除してください
05:40
Now hand your unlocked phone
to the person on your left.
では そのロックしてない携帯を
左隣の人に渡してください
05:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:49
That tiny sense of panic
you're feeling right now --
今 皆さんが感じている
ちょっとしたパニックの感覚は —
06:01
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:04
is exactly how hosts feel the first time
they open their home.
ホストが初めて自宅を公開するとき
感じるのと同じものです
06:06
Because the only thing
more personal than your phone
携帯よりも個人的なものと言えば
06:10
is your home.
自宅くらいのものでしょう
06:13
People don't just see your messages,
メールを見られるだけでなく
06:14
they see your bedroom,
寝室や台所や
06:16
your kitchen, your toilet.
トイレまで見られるのです
06:18
Now, how does it feel holding
someone's unlocked phone?
それではロックされてない
他人の携帯を持つのは どんな感じでしょう?
06:21
Most of us feel really responsible.
多くの人はすごく責任を感じます
06:26
That's how most guests feel
when they stay in a home.
ゲストの多くが滞在中に
感じるのも同じです
06:28
And it's because of this
that our company can even exist.
それがあるからこそ
私たちの会社は存在しているのです
06:32
By the way, who's holding Al Gore's phone?
ちなみにアル・ゴアの携帯は
誰が持っていますか?
06:36
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:38
Would you tell Twitter
he's running for President?
「大統領選に出馬するつもりだ」と
ツイートしてみませんか?
06:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:45
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:47
OK, you can hand your phones back now.
では携帯を持ち主に
返しましょう
06:55
So now that you've experienced
the kind of trust challenge
私たちが直面していた
07:03
we were facing,
信頼の問題を
体験していただきました
07:06
I'd love to share a few discoveries
we've made along the way.
その過程で発見したことを
いくつかお話ししたいと思います
07:07
What if we changed one small thing
今の実験のデザインを
07:11
about the design of that experiment?
少し変えたら
どうなるでしょう?
07:14
What if your neighbor had introduced
themselves first, with their name,
隣の人がまず
自己紹介をして
07:16
where they're from, the name
of their kids or their dog?
自分の名前 出身地
子供や飼い犬の名前を教えていたとしたら?
07:19
Imagine that they had 150 reviews
of people saying,
もしその人が150人から
高評価されていたらどうでしょう?
07:23
"They're great at holding
unlocked phones!"
「ロックしてない携帯を
持たせたら最高の人よ!」
07:27
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:29
Now how would you feel
about handing your phone over?
そうしたら携帯を預ける時の感覚は
どう変わるでしょう?
07:34
It turns out,
うまくデザインされた
評判システムが
07:39
a well-designed reputation system
is key for building trust.
信頼を築くための
鍵であるとわかりました
07:40
And we didn't actually
get it right the first time.
実は最初は
うまくいきませんでした
07:44
It's hard for people to leave bad reviews.
良くないレビューは
書きにくいものです
07:47
Eventually, we learned to wait
until both guests and hosts
その後 ゲストとホストの
レビューがそろうまで
07:51
left the review before we reveal them.
公開しないようにすると
良いことを発見しました
07:55
Now, here's a discovery
we made just last week.
次にお話しするのは
つい先週発見したことです
07:58
We did a joint study with Stanford,
私たちはスタンフォード大と
共同研究をして
08:02
where we looked at people's
willingness to trust someone
年齢や出身や環境といった点で
相手がどれくらい自分に似ているかに応じて
08:04
based on how similar they are in age,
location and geography.
信頼する度合がどう変わるか
調べました
08:07
The research showed, not surprisingly,
驚くことではありませんが
調査結果は
08:13
we prefer people who are like us.
人が自分に似た人を好むことを
示していました
08:16
The more different somebody is,
違いが大きいほど
08:19
the less we trust them.
信用はしにくくなります
08:22
Now, that's a natural social bias.
それが自然な社会的偏見です
08:24
But what's interesting is what happens
興味深いのは
08:28
when you add reputation into the mix,
そこに評判を加えると
どうなるかです
08:30
in this case, with reviews.
今の場合
レビューを使います
08:32
Now, if you've got
less than three reviews,
レビューの数が3件以下だと
08:35
nothing changes.
影響は出ませんが
08:37
But if you've got more than 10,
10件以上のレビューがあると
08:39
everything changes.
話がすっかり変わります
08:42
High reputation beats high similarity.
良い評判は
似ていることに勝ります
08:44
The right design can actually
help us overcome
適切なデザインによって
08:50
one of our most deeply rooted biases.
最も深く根付いた偏見を
克服できるのです
08:52
Now we also learned that building
the right amount of trust
私たちはまた
適度の信頼を築くためには
08:57
takes the right amount of disclosure.
適度の情報開示が必要
ということも学びました
09:00
This is what happens when a guest
first messages a host.
こちらは最初にゲストからホストへ
送るメッセージによる 受け入れ率の違いです
09:03
If you share too little, like, "Yo,"
言うことが「よろしく」だけ
というように短すぎる場合
09:07
acceptance rates go down.
受け入れ率は下がります
09:12
And if you share too much, like,
一方で「母との間で
ゴタゴタがありまして・・・」
09:14
"I'm having issues with my mother,"
みたいに
打ち明けすぎても —
09:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:18
acceptance rates also go down.
受け入れ率は下がります
09:19
But there's a zone that's just right,
ちょうど適量
というのがあるんです
09:22
like, "Love the artwork in your place.
Coming for vacation with my family."
「そこに飾られている絵が好きです
家族と一緒の休暇で行きます」
09:24
So how do we design for just
the right amount of disclosure?
どうすればデザインによって 適量の
情報開示がなされるようにできるでしょう?
09:28
We use the size of the box
to suggest the right length,
私たちは入力欄の大きさで
適切な長さを示しつつ
09:32
and we guide them with prompts
to encourage sharing.
自分のことを話すよう
促しています
09:36
We bet our whole company
「知らない人は危険」という偏見は
09:41
on the hope that,
適切なデザインによって
09:43
with the right design,
克服できるはずだという望みに
09:45
people would be willing to overcome
the stranger-danger bias.
私たちは会社の命運を賭けました
09:47
What we didn't realize
私たちが分かっていなかったのは
09:51
is just how many people
この偏見を捨てる
用意のできている人が
09:53
were ready and waiting
to put the bias aside.
どれほど沢山いるか
ということです
09:55
This is a graph that shows
our rate of adoption.
このグラフは普及の伸びを
示しています
09:59
There's three things happening here.
ここでは3つの要因が
働いています
10:03
The first, an unbelievable amount of luck.
まず信じられないほどの
幸運があります
10:05
The second is the efforts of our team.
第2にスタッフの努力があります
10:10
And third is the existence
of a previously unsatisfied need.
第3に これまで充たされていなかった
ニーズの存在があります
10:13
Now, things have been going pretty well.
すごく順調に進みましたが
10:18
Obviously, there are times
when things don't work out.
もちろん上手くいかない
こともありました
10:21
Guests have thrown unauthorized parties
ゲストが許可されていない
パーティを開いて
10:25
and trashed homes.
家をメチャクチャにしたとか
10:27
Hosts have left guests
stranded in the rain.
ゲストが雨の中
待ちぼうけを食わされたとか
10:29
In the early days, I was customer service,
はじめの頃は
私がカスタマーサービス担当で
10:34
and those calls came
right to my cell phone.
苦情の電話は 直接
私の携帯にかかってきました
10:38
I was at the front lines
of trust breaking.
信頼が裏切られる
最前線にいたのです
10:40
And there's nothing worse
than those calls,
そういう苦情の電話ほど
辛いものはなく
10:45
it hurts to even think about them.
考えただけで心が痛みます
10:47
And the disappointment
in the sound of someone's voice
誰かの声にある
失望感というのは
10:50
was and, I would say, still is
かつて そして 今も
10:53
our single greatest motivator
to keep improving.
私たちが改善をし続ける
最大の原動力になっています
10:56
Thankfully, out of the 123 million nights
we've ever hosted,
ありがたいことに これまで提供されてきた
1億2千3百万泊のうち
10:59
less than a fraction of a percent
have been problematic.
トラブルがあったのは
1%の数分の1足らずです
11:05
Turns out, people
are justified in their trust.
信頼したことが正しかったと
示されたのです
11:10
And when trust works out right,
そして信頼の絆が
できたときには
11:13
it can be absolutely magical.
魔法のように素晴らしく
感じられることがあります
11:15
We had a guest stay
with a host in Uruguay,
ウルグアイのホストの元に
泊まったあるゲストが
11:19
and he suffered a heart attack.
心臓発作を起こしました
11:21
The host rushed him to the hospital.
ホストは大急ぎで
彼を病院に連れて行き
11:24
They donated their own blood
for his operation.
手術のための
献血までしました
11:27
Let me read you his review.
その時のレビューを
読んでみましょう
11:31
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:33
"Excellent house for sedentary travelers
「実に素晴らしい家で
11:40
prone to myocardial infarctions.
運動不足のため心筋梗塞を
起こしかねない旅行者に最適
11:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:45
The area is beautiful and has
direct access to the best hospitals.
とてもきれいな所で
すぐ近くには良い病院もあります
11:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:52
Javier and Alejandra instantly
become guardian angels
ハビエルとアレハンドラは
瞬時に守護天使となって
11:53
who will save your life
without even knowing you.
見ず知らずのあなたのことを
救ってくれることでしょう
11:57
They will rush you to the hospital
in their own car while you're dying
死にかけていれば 車で病院へと
大急ぎで連れて行き
12:01
and stay in the waiting room
while the doctors give you a bypass.
バイパス手術の間中
待合室で待っていてくれるし
12:04
They don't want you to feel lonely,
they bring you books to read.
1人で寂しくないようにと
本を持ってきてくれ
12:09
And they let you stay at their house
extra nights without charging you.
追加料金なしで
滞在を延長してくれました
12:12
Highly recommended!"
すごくオススメ!」
12:16
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:17
Of course, not every stay is like that.
もちろん そういうのが
いつも起きるわけではありませんが
12:26
But this connection beyond the transaction
この金銭的やり取りを
越えた繋がりが
12:28
is exactly what the sharing
economy is aiming for.
共有経済の
目指しているものなんです
12:31
Now, when I heard that term,
確かに私も「共有経済」と
初めて耳にしたとき
12:35
I have to admit, it tripped me up.
引っかかりました
12:37
How do sharing
and transactions go together?
どうして共有と商取引が
共存しうるのか?
12:40
So let's be clear; it is about commerce.
だからはっきりさせておきますが
これは商行為に違いありません
12:43
But if you just called it
the rental economy,
しかし これを単に
「賃貸経済」と呼ぶのは
12:47
it would be incomplete.
不正確です
12:50
The sharing economy is commerce
with the promise of human connection.
共有経済は 人間的な繋がりのある
商行為なんです
12:52
People share a part of themselves,
人が自分の一部を
共有することで
12:57
and that changes everything.
すべてが変わるのです
13:00
You know how most travel today is, like,
今時の旅行のほとんどは
13:03
I think of it like fast food --
ファストフードのようです
13:05
it's efficient and consistent,
効率性と均質さを追求し
13:07
at the cost of local and authentic.
その場所ならではの
本物の体験が犠牲になっています
13:10
What if travel were like
a magnificent buffet
旅行がその土地固有の体験の
13:14
of local experiences?
盛り沢山なバイキング料理のよう
だとしたら どうでしょう?
13:17
What if anywhere you visited,
どこを訪れても
13:19
there was a central marketplace of locals
地元の人が様々なことを提供する
マーケットプレイスがあって
13:22
offering to get you thoroughly drunk
隠れ家的な居酒屋を
はしごして
13:24
on a pub crawl in neighborhoods
you didn't even know existed.
徹底的に飲んだり
13:27
Or learning to cook from the chef
of a five-star restaurant?
五つ星レストランのシェフから
直々に料理を習ったりできたとしたら?
13:32
Today, homes are designed around
the idea of privacy and separation.
今日では 家はプライバシーや
分離という考えの元に設計されています
13:36
What if homes were designed
to be shared from the ground up?
はじめから共有されることを前提に
家が設計されたとしたらどうでしょう?
13:42
What would that look like?
どんな姿を
していることでしょう?
13:46
What if cities embraced
a culture of sharing?
共有の文化が
都会でも普通になったら?
13:49
I see a future of shared cities
that bring us community and connection
私の思い描く
未来の共有的都市は
13:53
instead of isolation and separation.
孤立や分断の代わりに
コミュニティと繋がりをもたらします
13:58
In South Korea, in the city of Seoul,
韓国のソウルでは
14:01
they've actually even started this.
すでにそれが
始まっています
14:03
They've repurposed hundreds
of government parking spots
何百という政府の
駐車スペースが
14:05
to be shared by residents.
住人と共有されています
14:08
They're connecting students
who need a place to live
子供の巣立った
空き部屋のある家の夫婦が
14:10
with empty-nesters who have extra rooms.
住む場所を必要とする
学生を受け入れています
14:13
And they've started an incubator
to help fund the next generation
共有経済を生み出す
次世代のスタートアップを
14:16
of sharing economy start-ups.
支援するインキュベーターもあります
14:20
Tonight, just on our service,
今夜 我々のサービスだけで
14:24
785,000 people
78万5千人が
14:29
in 191 countries
191の国で
14:33
will either stay in a stranger's home
他人の家に泊まり
14:38
or welcome one into theirs.
あるいは他人を自分の家に
迎え入れています
14:41
Clearly, it's not as crazy
as we were taught.
これは私たちが教えられてきたほど
クレージーなことではないようです
14:45
We didn't invent anything new.
私たちは別に新しいものを
作り出した訳ではありません
14:50
Hospitality has been around forever.
もてなしというのは
昔からありました
14:53
There's been many other
websites like ours.
似たようなウェブサイトは
たくさんありました
14:58
So, why did ours eventually take off?
では なぜ我々のサービスが
成功したのでしょう?
15:02
Luck and timing aside,
幸運とタイミングを別にすると
15:08
I've learned that you can take
the components of trust,
信頼の要素を取り出し
15:11
and you can design for that.
それに向けてデザインすることが
可能だと学んだことです
15:13
Design can overcome our most deeply rooted
「知らない人は危険」という
深く根付いた偏見さえ
15:19
stranger-danger bias.
デザインで克服できるんです
15:22
And that's amazing to me.
これは驚くべきことで
15:23
It blows my mind.
感動すら覚えます
15:26
I think about this every time
I see a red Miata go by.
赤いロードスターを見かけるたびに
私はそのことを思います
15:29
Now, we know design won't solve
all the world's problems.
デザインで世界の問題がすべて
解決できるわけではありません
15:33
But if it can help out with this one,
しかしデザインの力で
15:40
if it can make a dent in this,
このような変化を
生み出せるのなら
15:42
it makes me wonder,
what else can we design for next?
次は いったい何が
デザインできるだろうと思います
15:44
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
15:52
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:53
Translator:Yasushi Aoki
Reviewer:Natsuhiko Mizutani

sponsored links

Joe Gebbia - Designer, co-founder of Airbnb
As a designer, entrepreneur and the co-founder and Chief Product Officer of Airbnb, Joe Gebbia helped redesign the way the world travels and people connect.

Why you should listen
When Joe Gebbia first envisioned Airbnb in his living room in 2007, his motivation was simple -- to pay his rent. Starting as a simple room-sharing service, Joe and co-founders Brian Chesky and Nathan Blecharczyk turned Airbnb into a major disruptive force for the hospitality industry, creating a new economy for millions of people in 190 countries around the world.

Gebbia serves as a part-time design partner at Y Combinator, the prestigious startup incubator that helped launch Airbnb. He earned dual degrees in Graphic Design and Industrial Design at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), where he now serves on the institution's Board of Trustees. He plays a leading role in shaping Airbnb’s future innovation, distinctive culture, and design aesthetic, and through his work, seeks to expand the richness of human connection in the world.
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.