sponsored links
TED Talks Live

Danielle Feinberg: The magic ingredient that brings Pixar movies to life

ダニエル・フェインバーグ: ピクサー映画に命を吹き込む魔法の成分

November 5, 2015

ピクサーの撮影監督であるダニエル・フェインバーグは、数学と科学とプログラミングを使い、魂のこもった、驚きに満ちた物語を作り出しています。『ファインディング・ニモ』、『トイ・ストーリー』、『メリダとおそろしの森』、『ウォーリー』などの舞台裏に行って、ピクサーがどのようにアートと科学を織り合わせ、夢見たことが現実になりうる素晴しい世界を創造しているのか覗いてみましょう。この講演はPBS特別番組『TEDトーク — 科学と不思議』の一部です。

Danielle Feinberg - Director of photography, Pixar
At Pixar, Danielle Feinberg delights in bending the rules of light to her every whim. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
When I was seven years old,
私が7歳の時
人の良さそうな大人に
00:12
some well-meaning adult asked me
what I wanted to be when I grew up.
「大きくなったら何になりたい?」
と聞かれました
00:14
Proudly, I said: "An artist."
誇らしげに
「アーティストよ」答えましたが
00:18
"No, you don't," he said,
「いや なれないよ」と
彼は言います
00:20
"You can't make a living being an artist!"
「アーティストなんかじゃ
生活していけないぞ」
00:22
My little seven-year-old
Picasso dreams were crushed.
小さな7歳のピカソの夢は
粉々に砕かれました
00:24
But I gathered myself,
ですが 気を取り直して
00:27
went off in search of a new dream,
新しい夢を探し始めました
00:29
eventually settling on being a scientist,
そのうちに 科学者でもいいと
思うようになりました
00:31
perhaps something like
the next Albert Einstein.
次のアインシュタインみたいな
00:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:37
I have always loved math and science,
私はずっと数学と科学が
大好きでした
00:39
later, coding.
後にはプログラミングも
00:41
And so I decided to study
computer programming in college.
なので 大学では
プログラミングを学ぶ事にしました
00:43
In my junior year,
2年生のとき
00:47
my computer graphics professor
showed us these wonderful short films.
コンピュータグラフィックスの教授が
素晴らしい短編映画を見せてくれました
00:48
It was the first computer animation
any of us had ever seen.
生まれて初めて見た
コンピューターアニメーションでした
00:52
I watched these films
in wonder, transfixed,
私は魅せられ 食い入るように
その映画を見ました
00:56
fireworks going off in my head,
頭の中で花火がはじけ
00:59
thinking, "That is what
I want to do with my life."
「これが人生でやりたいことだ!」
と思いました
01:01
The idea that all the math, science
and code I had been learning
私の学んできた 数学、科学
そしてプログラミングのすべてが
01:04
could come together to create
these worlds and characters
これらの世界とキャラクターを作り出し
01:08
and stories I connected with,
ストーリーで繋ぎ合わせるのに
使えるという考えは
01:11
was pure magic for me.
魔法のように感じられました
01:13
Just two years later, I started working
ちょうど2年後
あの映画を作った会社の
01:15
at the place that made those films,
Pixar Animation Studios.
ピクサー・アニメーション・スタジオで
働き始めました
01:17
It was here I learned how
we actually execute those films.
実際に映画をどう作り上げるかを
学んだ場所です
01:20
To create our movies,
私たちはピクサー映画を作るために
01:24
we create a three-dimensional
world inside the computer.
3次元(3D)の世界を
コンピューターの中に創造します
01:25
We start with a point that makes
a line that makes a face
点から始まり 点が線を作り
線が顔を作り
01:28
that creates characters,
キャラクターが出来上がります
01:32
or trees and rocks
that eventually become a forest.
または 木や岩が
最終的には森となります
01:34
And because it's
a three-dimensional world,
これは3次元の世界ですから
01:37
we can move a camera
around inside that world.
その中でカメラを
あちこち動かすことが可能です
01:39
I was fascinated by all of it.
このすべてに私は魅了されました
01:42
But then I got my first taste of lighting.
そして 初めての
ライティングを経験したのです
01:45
Lighting in practice is placing lights
inside this three-dimensional world.
ライティングとは3次元の世界に
光を配置していくことです
01:48
I actually have icons of lights
I move around in there.
光源を動かせるアイコンがあります
01:52
Here you can see I've added a light,
ここに光源を追加したのが 見えますね
01:54
I'm turning on the rough version
of lighting in our software,
ソフトウェアを使い
大まかにライティングをしていきます
01:56
turn on shadows
影をつけて
01:59
and placing the light.
光源を置いていきます
02:00
As I place a light,
光源を置きながら
02:02
I think about what it might
look like in real life,
実際の世界ではどう見えるだろうか
ということを考えますが
02:03
but balance that out with what we need
artistically and for the story.
芸術的に そしてストーリー的に
必要なものとバランスをとっていきます
02:06
So it might look like this at first,
初めはこんな感じで 見えているものを
02:10
but as we adjust this and move that
何週間にもおよぶ作業の中
あれこれ調節したり
02:13
in weeks of work,
動かしたりするうちに
02:16
in rough form it might look like this,
ラフでは このようになり
02:17
and in final form, like this.
そして 完成版ではこうなります
02:21
There's this moment in lighting
that made me fall utterly in love with it.
ライティングには
私をすっかり虜にした瞬間があります
02:28
It's where we go from this
それは これが
02:32
to this.
これへと変わり
02:34
It's the moment where
all the pieces come together,
すべてのピースがはまる瞬間です
02:35
and suddenly the world comes to life
突然 世界が命を持ち始めるのです
02:38
as if it's an actual place that exists.
まるで 実在する
場所であるかのように
02:41
This moment never gets old,
この瞬間は
色褪せることがありません
02:43
especially for that little seven-year-old
girl that wanted to be an artist.
アーティストになりたかった
小さな7歳の少女にとっては 特に
02:45
As I learned to light,
光について学ぶにつれ
様々な光の使い方を知りました
02:49
I learned about using light
to help tell story,
ストーリーを語る光
02:50
to set the time of day,
時を示す光
02:54
to create the mood,
雰囲気を生む光
02:57
to guide the audience's eye,
観客の視線を導く光
02:59
how to make a character look appealing
キャラクターを魅力的にしたり
03:02
or stand out in a busy set.
雑然としたセットの中で目立たせる光
03:04
Did you see WALL-E?
「ウォーリー」に気がつきました?
03:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:09
There he is.
ここにいますね
03:10
As you can see,
ご覧のとおり
03:13
we can create any world that we want
inside the computer.
コンピューターの中には
どんな世界も作ることが出来るのです
03:14
We can make a world with monsters,
モンスターの世界も作れますし
03:17
with robots that fall in love,
恋に落ちるロボットも
03:20
we can even make pigs fly.
豚を飛ばせることだって
03:23
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:25
While this is an incredible thing,
こんな世界は驚くべきものですが
03:30
this untethered artistic freedom,
制限のないアートの自由は
03:31
it can create chaos.
カオスを作り出し
03:34
It can create unbelievable worlds,
見ている方が不快になるような
03:36
unbelievable movement,
ありそうにない世界や動きを
03:39
things that are jarring to the audience.
作ってしまう可能性もあるのです
03:40
So to combat this, we tether
ourselves with science.
それを防ぐため
私たちは科学の手綱を付けます
03:43
We use science and the world we know
科学と現実の世界を
03:46
as a backbone,
バックボーンとして使うのです
03:48
to ground ourselves in something
relatable and recognizable.
共感でき 認識できるところから
離れないためにです
03:49
"Finding Nemo" is an excellent
example of this.
『ファインディング・ニモ』は
これの良い例です
03:53
A major portion of the movie
takes place underwater.
映画の大部分は
水の中でのお話ですが
03:56
But how do you make it look underwater?
どうすれば 水の中のように
見えるのでしょう?
03:58
In early research and development,
初期の研究開発では
04:01
we took a clip of underwater footage
and recreated it in the computer.
水中の映像素材を撮り
CGで再現しました
04:02
Then we broke it back down
それから どれが
04:06
to see which elements make up
that underwater look.
水中らしく見える要素なのか
細かく見ていきました
04:07
One of the most critical elements
重要な要素の一つは
04:11
was how the light travels
through the water.
光が水の中を
どう進むかということでした
04:12
So we coded up a light
that mimics this physics --
私たちはこの物理学を取り入れ
光をプログラミングしました
04:15
first, the visibility of the water,
初めに 水中での視界
04:18
and then what happens with the color.
それから色への影響
04:19
Objects close to the eye
have their full, rich colors.
手前にあるものは
フルカラーで色彩豊かですが
04:22
As light travels deeper into the water,
光が水中深くへと届くにつれ
04:25
we lose the red wavelengths,
赤色の波長を失い
04:28
then the green wavelengths,
次には緑色の波長を
04:30
leaving us with blue at the far depths.
深部で残るのは青色だけです
04:31
In this clip you can see
two other important elements.
この映像では
もう2つの重要な要素があります
04:34
The first is the surge and swell,
1つ目は波のうねりと波打ち―
04:37
or the invisible underwater current
海中の微粒子を押し流す
04:39
that pushes the bits of particulate
around in the water.
目に見えない水の流れです
04:41
The second is the caustics.
2つ目はコースティック―
04:44
These are the ribbons of light,
これは光のリボンです
04:46
like you might see
on the bottom of a pool,
プールの底で見られるようなもので
04:48
that are created when the sun
bends through the crests
太陽の光が海面の
波や波紋の峰で
04:50
of the ripples and waves
on the ocean's surface.
屈折した時に発生するものです
04:52
Here we have the fog beams.
ここでは 光の筋が
04:56
These give us color depth cues,
色の深度の手がかりを与え
04:58
but also tells which direction is up
海面が映らない場面でも
04:59
in shots where we don't
see the water surface.
どちらの方向が上か
教えてくれます
05:01
The other really cool thing
you can see here
ここで他に見られるすごい所は
05:04
is that we lit that particulate
only with the caustics,
微粒子に当たる光は
コースティックだけで
05:06
so that as it goes in and out
of those ribbons of light,
微粒子が 光のリボンに
出入りするたびに
05:09
it appears and disappears,
現れたり消えたりして
05:12
lending a subtle, magical
sparkle to the underwater.
繊細な魔法のようなきらめきを
水中の世界に加えることです
05:14
You can see how we're using the science --
このように 私たちが
どう科学を用い
05:18
the physics of water,
light and movement --
水や 光や 動きの 物理的性質により
芸術的自由を制限しているか
05:20
to tether that artistic freedom.
見ていただけたかと思います
05:23
But we are not beholden to it.
ですが それにただ頼るのではなく
05:26
We considered each of these elements
それぞれの要素を検討し
05:28
and which ones had to be
scientifically accurate
どれが科学的に正しくなければならず
05:30
and which ones we could push and pull
to suit the story and the mood.
どれがストーリーや雰囲気に応じて
調整できるか考えました
05:33
We realized early on that color
was one we had some leeway with.
私たちは早い段階で
色彩には裁量の余地があると気がつきました
05:37
So here's a traditionally colored
underwater scene.
これは伝統的な色合いの
水中のシーンですが
05:41
But here, we can take Sydney Harbor
and push it fairly green
ここではシドニー湾を撮り
緑寄りに色調整することで
05:44
to suit the sad mood of what's happening.
起きている出来事の
悲しい雰囲気に合わせています
05:47
In this scene, it's really important
we see deep into the underwater,
このシーンでは水中深くを見ることが
とても重要です
05:50
so we understand what
the East Australian Current is,
東オーストラリア海流がどんなもので
05:53
that the turtles are diving into
and going on this roller coaster ride.
そのジェットコースターに
飛び込むウミガメたちの様子が分かるように
05:56
So we pushed the visibility of the water
そのため 海流の視認性を
現実の世界では
05:59
well past anything you would
ever see in real life.
あり得ないところまで
大きく調節しています
06:01
Because in the end,
なぜなら 最終的には
06:04
we are not trying to recreate
the scientifically correct real world,
私たちは科学的に正確な世界を
再現しようとしているのではなく
06:05
we're trying to create a believable world,
見ている人が熱中し
実際に物語の中にいるかのような
06:10
one the audience can immerse
themselves in to experience the story.
真実味のある世界を
創ろうとしているからです
06:12
We use science to create
something wonderful.
素晴らしいものを創り出すために
科学を使っています
06:17
We use story and artistic touch
to get us to a place of wonder.
驚きに満ちた世界へと連れていくために
ストーリーと芸術的手法を使っています
06:20
This guy, WALL-E, is a great
example of that.
このウォーリーは
そのとても良い例です
06:25
He finds beauty in the simplest things.
彼はシンプルなものに
美しさを見出しています
06:27
But when he came in to lighting,
we knew we had a big problem.
ですが ライティングのこととなると
彼には困らされました
06:30
We got so geeked-out on making
WALL-E this convincing robot,
私たちは ウォーリーを
リアルなロボットにすることにこだわり
06:33
that we made his binoculars
practically optically perfect.
彼の双眼鏡を光学的に
ほぼ完璧なものにしたのです
06:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:40
His binoculars are one of the most
critical acting devices he has.
双眼鏡はウォーリーにある
もっとも重要な演出用の装置です
06:43
He doesn't have a face or even
traditional dialogue, for that matter.
彼には顔がありませんし
ついでに言えば 従来のセリフもありません
06:47
So the animators were heavily
dependent on the binoculars
アニメーターたちは彼の演技や
感情を演出するために
06:50
to sell his acting and emotions.
双眼鏡に頼らざるを得ません
06:53
We started lighting and we realized
私たちはライティングを始めましたが
06:56
the triple lenses inside his binoculars
were a mess of reflections.
双眼鏡の中の3つのレンズが
複雑な反射を生むことに気付きました
06:58
He was starting to look glassy-eyed.
ウォーリーは ガラスのような
生気のない目をしています
07:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:04
Now, glassy-eyed
is a fundamentally awful thing
さて 生気のない目は
観ている人を―
07:06
when you are trying
to convince an audience
ロボットにも人格があり
恋に落ちることだって
07:10
that a robot has a personality
and he's capable of falling in love.
可能なのだと説得するためには
根本的に最悪としか言えず
07:12
So we went to work on these optically
perfect binoculars,
私たちは
この光学的に完璧な双眼鏡で
07:16
trying to find a solution that would
maintain his true robot materials
まさにロボット的な部分は維持しつつ
反射の問題を解決する方法を
07:19
but solve this reflection problem.
見つけようと取り組むことにしました
07:23
So we started with the lenses.
まずはレンズから始めることに
07:25
Here's the flat-front lens,
平らなフロントレンズがあり
07:27
we have a concave lens
凹レンズがあり
07:28
and a convex lens.
そして凸レンズがあります
07:30
And here you see all three together,
3つが一緒になると こんな感じで
07:31
showing us all these reflections.
反射光が何重にも見えてしまいます
07:33
We tried turning them down,
それらを弱めたり
07:36
we tried blocking them,
遮断してみたりしましたが
07:37
nothing was working.
何一つうまくいきませんでした
07:39
You can see here,
ご覧のように
07:41
sometimes we needed something specific
reflected in his eyes --
時々 特定の何かを
ウォーリーの目に映す必要があって―
07:42
usually Eve.
大抵 イヴなんですが
07:45
So we couldn't just use some faked
abstract image on the lenses.
そのため ただ適当に抽象的な映像を
レンズに映すわけにもいかず
07:47
So here we have Eve on the first lens,
イヴを一つ目のレンズに置いてみても
07:50
we put Eve on the second lens,
二つ目のレンズに置いてみても
07:52
it's not working.
うまくいきませんでした
07:54
We turn it down,
そこで光を弱めてみましたが
07:56
it's still not working.
まだうまくいきません
07:57
And then we have our eureka moment.
そこに「これだ!」
という瞬間が訪れたのです
07:59
We add a light to WALL-E
that accidentally leaks into his eyes.
ウォーリーに光を足していたのですが
それが偶然に眼の中にもれたのです
08:01
You can see it light up
these gray aperture blades.
グレーの絞り羽根が
照らされているのが見えるでしょうか
08:05
Suddenly, those aperture blades
are poking through that reflection
突然 この絞り羽根が
反射の背後から浮き出て
08:10
the way nothing else has.
他では解決出来なかった問題を
解決したのです
08:13
Now we recognize WALL-E as having an eye.
これで今や ウォーリーには
眼があるといえるでしょう
08:15
As humans we have the white of our eye,
人間の私たちには白目があり
08:19
the colored iris
色付きの虹彩があり
08:22
and the black pupil.
そして黒い瞳があります
08:23
Now WALL-E has the black of an eye,
今や ウォーリーにも黒目があり
08:24
the gray aperture blades
グレーの絞り羽根
08:28
and the black pupil.
そして黒い瞳があります
08:29
Suddenly, WALL-E feels like he has a soul,
突然 ウォーリーには魂があると
感じられるようになります
08:31
like there's a character
with emotion inside.
感情のある人格が
彼の中に存在するかのように
08:35
Later in the movie towards the end,
映画の終わりにさしかかるころ
08:39
WALL-E loses his personality,
ウォーリーは人格を失います
08:41
essentially going dead.
本質的に死へと向かうのです
08:43
This is the perfect time to bring back
that glassy-eyed look.
あの生気のないガラスのような眼に
戻すには完璧なタイミングでした
08:45
In the next scene,
WALL-E comes back to life.
次のシーンでは
ウォーリーが甦ります
08:49
We bring that light back to bring
the aperture blades back,
私たちは絞り羽根を戻すために
光を呼びもどします
08:51
and he returns to that sweet,
soulful robot we've come to love.
そして 私たちが好きになった
可愛く感情豊かなロボットが戻ってくるのです
08:55
(Video) WALL-E: Eva?
(ウォーリー)イヴ?
09:02
Danielle Feinberg: There's a beauty
in these unexpected moments --
これらの予期せぬ瞬間には
美しさがあります
09:06
when you find the key
to unlocking a robot's soul,
ロボットの魂を解き放つ
カギを見つけた時
09:09
the moment when you discover
what you want to do with your life.
自分が人生をかけてやりたいことを
見つけた瞬間
09:13
The jellyfish in "Finding Nemo"
was one of those moments for me.
『ファインディング・ニモ』でのクラゲは
私にとってそんな瞬間の一つでした
09:16
There are scenes in every movie
that struggle to come together.
どの映画にも
まとめるのに苦労するシーンが存在します
09:20
This was one of those scenes.
これはそんなシーンの一つでした
09:23
The director had a vision for this scene
監督には このシーンのビジョンがあって
09:25
based on some wonderful footage
of jellyfish in the South Pacific.
それは南太平洋のクラゲの
美しい映像から得たものでした
09:28
As we went along,
事を進めるにつれて
09:32
we were floundering.
私たちは四苦八苦するようになり
09:34
The reviews with the director
監督とのレビューでは
09:36
turned from the normal
look-and-feel conversation
通常の見た目や感触の話から
09:38
into more and more questions
about numbers and percentages.
数字や割合についての
質問ばかりになり
09:41
Maybe because unlike normal,
もしかしたら 通常とは異なり
09:45
we were basing it on
something in real life,
現実の世界のものを
ベースにしていたせいか
09:47
or maybe just because we had lost our way.
もしくは ただ私たちがやり方を
見失ったせいだけかも
09:49
But it had become about using
our brain without our eyes,
目を使わずに頭を使い
09:52
the science without the art.
芸術抜きで科学を
使うようになっていました
09:55
That scientific tether
was strangling the scene.
科学的な束縛が
このシーンを阻害していましたが
09:58
But even through all the frustrations,
どれだけ行き詰っていようとも
10:02
I still believed it could be beautiful.
私はこのシーンが
美しくなると信じていました
10:04
So when it came in to lighting,
ライティングの段階になると
10:06
I dug in.
私は熱心に取り組みました
10:07
As I worked to balance
the blues and the pinks,
ブルーとピンクの
バランスを取るにつれ
10:09
the caustics dancing
on the jellyfish bells,
コースティックが
クラゲの上で踊るように動き
10:13
the undulating fog beams,
緩やかに波打つ光の帯とで
10:16
something promising began to appear.
何か期待できるものが
現れてきたのです
10:18
I came in one morning and checked
the previous night's work.
ある朝 出勤し
昨夜の作業を確認していて
10:21
And I got excited.
興奮を覚えました
10:24
And then I showed it
to the lighting director
それから ライティングの責任者に
見せたのですが
10:26
and she got excited.
彼女も興奮していました
10:28
Soon, I was showing to the director
in a dark room full of 50 people.
すぐに 50人ほどの人でいっぱいの
暗室で監督に見せました
10:29
In director review,
監督のレビューでは 一般に
10:34
you hope you might get some nice words,
まず何か良い言葉をかけてもらい
10:35
then you get some notes
and fixes, generally.
それからコメントや修正点を
指示されるものです
10:38
And then, hopefully, you get a final,
それから 出来れば 最終的な
10:41
signaling to move on to the next stage.
次のステージに進める指示を
もらいたいですね
10:43
I gave my intro, and I played
the jellyfish scene.
私が紹介をした後
クラゲのシーンを上映したのですが
10:46
And the director was silent
for an uncomfortably long amount of time.
戸惑うぐらいの長い間
監督は沈黙していました
10:50
Just long enough for me to think,
「ああ これは絶望的かも」
10:55
"Oh no, this is doomed."
そう思うのに十分なくらい
10:57
And then he started clapping.
その後 彼は拍手を始めました
11:00
And then the production
designer started clapping.
それから 美術監督も拍手を始め
11:03
And then the whole room was clapping.
最後には部屋全体が
拍手で充たされました
11:06
This is the moment
that I live for in lighting.
この瞬間のために
私はライティングをして生きているのです
11:14
The moment where it all comes together
すべてが一つになり
11:17
and we get a world that we can believe in.
私たちが信じられる世界を
手にする瞬間です
11:19
We use math, science and code
to create these amazing worlds.
素晴らしい世界を創造するために
数学、科学、プログラミングを用い
11:22
We use storytelling and art
to bring them to life.
物語と芸術を用い命を吹き込みます
11:26
It's this interweaving of art and science
この芸術と科学を織りなすことによって
世界は高められるのです
11:30
that elevates the world
to a place of wonder,
驚きに満ちた世界へと
11:34
a place with soul,
魂のこもった場所へと
11:37
a place we can believe in,
信じられる場所へと
11:39
a place where the things
you imagine can become real --
心に描くものが
現実になりえる場所へと
11:42
and a world where a girl suddenly realizes
そして女の子が ふと
自分は科学者というだけではなく
11:46
not only is she a scientist,
アーティストでもあるのだと
11:50
but also an artist.
実感する世界へと
11:52
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
11:54
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:55
Translator:Mai Ohta
Reviewer:Eriko T.

sponsored links

Danielle Feinberg - Director of photography, Pixar
At Pixar, Danielle Feinberg delights in bending the rules of light to her every whim.

Why you should listen

Danielle Feinberg began her career at Pixar Animation Studios in 1997 on the feature film A Bug's Life. She quickly discovered her love for lighting and went on to light on many of Pixar's feature films including Toy Story 2, Monsters, Inc., the Academy Award®-winning Finding Nemo, The Incredibles and Ratatouille. Feinberg was the director of photography for lighting on Pixar’s Academy Award®-winning films WALL-E and Brave and is now working on Pixar's upcoming film, Coco

Feinberg's love of combining computers and art began when she was eight years old and first programmed a Logo turtle to create images. This eventually led her to a Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science from Harvard University. Now, in addition to her Pixar work, she mentors teenage girls, encouraging them to pursue code, math and science.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.