17:53
TEDGlobal 2005

Yochai Benkler: The new open-source economics

ヨハイ・ベンクラーの新しいオープンソース経済について

Filmed:

ヨハイ・ベンクラーが Wikipedia や Linux の様な共同プロジェクトがどのように未来の組織体のモデルになり得るのか説明します。

- Legal expert
Yochai Benkler has been called "the leading intellectual of the information age." He proposes that volunteer-based projects such as Wikipedia and Linux are the next stage of human organization and economic production. Full bio

One of the problems of writing, and working, and looking at the Internet
インターネットについて書き、作業し、注目するにあたっての問題点は
00:12
is that it's very hard to separate fashion from deep change.
ファッションと深い変化を見極めるのがとても難しいことです
00:15
And so, to start helping that, I want to take us back to 1835.
それをするにあたり、1835年に戻りたいと思います
00:22
In 1835, James Gordon Bennett founded the first mass-circulation newspaper
1835年、ジェイムズ・ゴードン・ベネットは初めて大衆向けの新聞をニューヨークで
00:26
in New York City.
発行しました
00:33
And it cost about 500 dollars to start it,
始めるにあたり500ドルが必要で、
00:35
which was about the equivalent of 10,000 dollars of today.
それは今日の10,000ドルに相当します
00:38
By 15 years later, by 1850, doing the same thing
15年後、1850年には、同じ事
00:42
-- starting what was experienced as a mass--circulation daily paper
-- 日刊新聞の大量流通を始める
00:46
-- would come to cost two and a half million dollars.
-- をするのに250万ドルかかったでしょう
00:49
10,000, two and a half million, 15 years.
10,000、250万、15年
00:53
That's the critical change that is being inverted by the Net.
これがネットによりひっくり返されている決定的な変化なのです
00:56
And that's what I want to talk about today,
今日はそのことについて、そして
01:03
and how that relates to the emergence of social production.
それが社会的生産物の出現にどう関係するのか話そうと思います
01:06
Starting with newspapers, what we saw was high cost as an initial requirement
新聞の例から我々が見たものは、情報、知識、そして文化のための
01:09
for making information, knowledge and culture, which led to a stark bifurcation
初期投資としての多額の費用で、それにより
01:17
between producers -- who had to be able to raise financial capital,
-- その他の産業組織と同じ様に --
01:23
just like any other industrial organization --
資本を集める事ができる生産者と
01:27
and passive consumers that could choose from a certain set of
この産業モデルが生み出すもののセットから選ぶ事のできる
01:31
things that this industrial model could produce.
受動的な消費者の間にできた大きな格差です
01:34
Now, the term "information society," "information economy,"
さて、「情報社会」や「情報経済」といった用語は
01:39
for a very long time has been used as the thing that comes after
産業革命の後に起こったものとして長い間
01:42
the industrial revolution. But in fact, for purposes of understanding what's happening
使われてきました しかし実際は、今日起こっている事を理解するためには、
01:46
today, that's wrong. Because for 150 years, we've had an information economy.
これは間違いです なぜなら150年間にわたり、情報経済は存在していたのです
01:52
It's just been industrial,
それは産業であり
01:58
which means those who were producing had to have a way of raising money
つまり情報を生み出す側は、250万ドル
02:00
to pay those two and a half million dollars, and later, more for the telegraph,
その後はそれ以上の資金を集め、電報や、
02:04
and the radio transmitter, and the television, and eventually the mainframe.
ラジオ、そしてテレビ、最終的にはメインフレームの費用をまかなわなければなりませんでした
02:08
And that meant they were market based, or they were government owned,
市場の資金によるものなのか、政府の資金によるものかは、
02:13
depending on what kind of system they were in. And this characterized and anchored
組織の立場によって決定づけられました このことがその後150年にわたって
02:16
the way information and knowledge were produced for the next 150 years.
情報と知識が生産される方法を特徴づけたのです
02:21
Now, let me tell you a different story. Around June 2002,
さて、違う例を挙げましょう 2002年頃に、
02:28
the world of supercomputers had a bombshell.
スーパーコンピュータの世界に事件が起きました
02:33
The Japanese had, for the first time, created the fastest supercomputer --
日本人が初めて最速のスーパーコンピュータ -- NEC 地球シミュレータ --
02:37
the NEC Earth Simulator -- taking the primary from the U.S.,
を作り上げ、首位をアメリカから奪ったのです
02:41
and about two years later -- this, by the way, is measuring the trillion floating-point
そして2年後に -- ところでこれはコンピュータが1秒あたり何兆回の浮動小数点計算を
02:44
operations per second that the computer's capable of running --
行う事ができるかを示しています
02:48
sigh of relief: IBM [Blue Gene] has just edged ahead of the NEC Earth Simulator.
安堵のため息:IBM の Gene Blue は NEC の地球シミュレータを僅差で追い抜いたのです
02:52
All of this completely ignores the fact that throughout this period,
これらのことは全て、この期間中世界には他のスーパーコンピュータが
02:58
there's another supercomputer running in the world -- SETI@home.
あることを完全に無視しています -- SETI@Home
03:02
Four and a half million users around the world, contributing their
-- 世界中の450万人のユーザが、パソコンを使っていない間
03:06
leftover computer cycles, whenever their computer isn't working,
余った能力を提供して、スクリーンセーバプログラムを走らせ、
03:10
by running a screen saver, and together sharing their resources to create
リソースを共有させることで巨大なスーパーコンピュータを作り上げました
03:14
a massive supercomputer that NASA harnesses to analyze the data
NASA はこれを使って 電波望遠鏡から来るデータの
03:21
coming from radio telescopes.
分析を進めました
03:26
What this picture suggests to us is that we've got a radical change in the way
この構図は、情報の生産と交換の資金確保の方法に
03:30
information production and exchange is capitalized. Not that it's become
根本的な変化があったことを示しています
03:37
less capital intensive -- that there's less money that's required
費用がかからなくなったというのではありませんが
03:41
-- but that the ownership of this capital, the way the capitalization happens,
資本の持ち主、資金集めが、
03:44
is radically distributed. Each of us, in these advanced economies,
徹底的に分散されたのです 我々は皆、この高度な経済の中で、
03:49
has one of these, or something rather like it -- a computer.
このようなものを持っています -- コンピュータを
03:54
They're not radically different from routers inside the middle of the network.
これらはネットワークの中枢にあるルーターと基本的には変わりません
03:59
And computation, storage and communications capacity are in the hands of
そして演算能力、ストレージ、そして情報通信能力というのは事実上
04:04
practically every connected person -- and these are the basic physical
繋がっている人の手の中にあるのです -- そしてこれは物理的な
04:09
capital means necessary for producing information, knowledge and culture,
情報、知識や文化を生み出すのに必要な資本で、
04:15
in the hands of something like 600 million to a billion people around the planet.
この惑星上の6億から10億の人間の手の中にあるのです
04:20
What this means is that for the first time since the industrial revolution,
これはつまり産業革命が起こってから初めて、
04:26
the most important means, the most important components of the core
最も重要な手段、最も進歩した経済活動の最も重要な部分が
04:32
economic activities -- remember, we are in an information economy
-- 我々が情報経済の中にいる事を忘れないで下さい --
04:38
-- of the most advanced economies, and there more than anywhere else,
最も多くの人々の手の中にあるということなのです
04:42
are in the hands of the population at large. This is completely different than what we've
これは産業革命が起こってから我々が見てきた事とは
04:47
seen since the industrial revolution. So we've got communications and computation
全く異なるものです 情報伝達能力と計算能力を
04:51
capacity in the hands of the entire population,
全人口が持つ様になったのです
04:56
and we've got human creativity, human wisdom, human experience
そして創造性、英知、経験といったものが
04:59
-- the other major experience, the other major input --
別のインプットには必要なものです
05:04
which unlike simple labor -- stand here turning this lever all day long --
単純労働の様な -- ここに立ってこのレバーを一日中ひいているような --
05:07
is not something that's the same or fungible among people.
取り替えが効くようなものではありません
05:12
Any one of you who has taken someone else's job, or tried to give yours
誰かが他の人の仕事をやろうとしたり、他の人に仕事を引き継ぐ時、
05:15
to someone else, no matter how detailed the manual, you cannot transmit
どんなにマニュアルが詳細に書かれていようと、あなたの知識そのものや
05:18
what you know, what you will intuit under a certain set of circumstances.
ある条件のもとで感じる直感を伝える事はできません
05:24
In that we're unique, and each of us holds this critical input
そう言う意味で我々はユニークで、このシステムの中では
05:29
into production as we hold this machine.
我々一人一人が重要なインプットになります
05:33
What's the effect of this? So, the story that most people know
それは何に影響するのか? 殆どの人が知っている物語は
05:37
is the story of free or open source software.
フリー、もしくはオープンソースソフトウェアについてでしょう
05:42
This is market share of Apache Web server
これは Apache ウェブサーバの市場で、
05:46
-- one of the critical applications in Web-based communications.
ウェブのコミュニケーションには必須のアプリケーションの1つです
05:49
In 1995, two groups of people said,
1995年に、2つのグループの人たちが言いました、
05:55
"Wow, this is really important, the Web! We need a much better Web server!"
「ワォ、これは本当に重要だ、ウェブ! もっと良いウェブサーバが必要だ!」
05:59
One was a motley collection of volunteers who just decided,
1つのグループは雑多なボランティアの集まりで、
06:03
you know, we really need this, we should write one,
これは本当に必要なものだ、作らなければならない、
06:07
and what are we going to do with what --
それでどうやってやるのか、
06:09
well, we're gonna share it! And other people will be able to develop it.
そう、皆で共有しよう! それで他の人たちも開発する事ができるだろう
06:12
The other was Microsoft.
もう1つがマイクロソフトでした
06:14
Now, if I told you that 10 years later, the motley crew of people, who didn't control
さて、自分たちが生み出すものに対して支配力を持たない雑多な人たちが
06:16
anything that they produced, acquired 20 percent of the market
10年後、赤い線で示される様に市場の20パーセントを持つようになると話していたら
06:21
and was the red line, it would be amazing! Right?
凄いことになっていたでしょう でしょう?
06:24
Think of it in minivans. A group of automobile
ミニバンで考えてみてください 自動車整備工の
06:27
engineers on their weekends are competing with Toyota. Right?
グループが週末を費やしてトヨタと競い合うようなものです
06:30
But, in fact, of course, the story is it's the 70 percent,
しかし実際には勿論、これは70パーセントで、
06:35
including the major e-commerce site -- 70 percent of a critical application
主要なe-commerceサイトを含むウェブでのコミュニケーションや
06:38
on which Web-based communications and applications work is produced in this form, in
アプリケーションが動いている重要なウェブアプリケーションの70パーセントが
06:43
direct competition with Microsoft. Not in a side issue --
マイクロソフトと競合しているのです、どうでも良い事などではなく
06:49
in a central strategic decision to try to capture a component of the Net.
ネットの構成要素を獲得するための重要な戦略として
06:53
Software has done this in a way that's been very visible, because
ソフトウェアはこれをとても分かりやすい形で示しました、なぜなら
07:00
it's measurable. But the thing to see is that this actually happens throughout the Web.
それは計測可能だからです ここで見るべき事はこうした事がウェブの至る所で起こっているのです
07:05
So, NASA, at some point, did an experiment where they took images of Mars
NASAはある時期にマッピングしていた火星の画像を取るという実験を
07:11
that they were mapping, and they said, instead of having three or four
していました そこで、訓練された3、4人の博士に
07:17
fully trained Ph.D.s doing this all the time, let's break it up into small components,
その作業をやらせる代わりに、問題を小さな部分に分けて、
07:21
put it up on the Web, and see if people, using a very simple interface,
ウェブで公開し、人々がとても簡単なインターフェースを使って、
07:26
will actually spend five minutes here,
こちらで5分 あちらで10分と
07:30
10 minutes there, clicking. After six months,
作業ができるようにしました 6ヶ月後、
07:32
85,000 people used this to generate mapping at a
85,000人がこれに加わりマップを作成しました
07:36
faster rate than the images were coming in, which was, quote,
画像が送られてくるよりも速いスピードで、それは平均すると
07:41
"practically indistinguishable from the markings of a fully-trained Ph.D.,"
「訓練された PhD と実質区別できない程のもの」
07:45
once you showed it to a number of people and computed the average.
と見た人に言わしめたほどです
07:49
Now, if you have a little girl, and she goes and writes to
さて、あなたに小さな娘さんがいて、何かを書こうとしたとき、
07:56
-- well, not so little, medium little -- tries to do research on Barbie.
-- そこまで幼くはなく、既に物心ついた娘が -- バービーについて調査をしようとします
07:59
And she'll come to Encarta, one of the main online encyclopedias.
彼女は「エンカルタ」を見るでしょう 主要なオンライン辞典の1つです
08:03
This is what you'll find out about Barbie. This is it, there's nothing more to the definition,
これがバービーについて書かれているものです 定義以上のことは何も書かれていません、
08:07
including, "manufacturers" -- plural -- "now more commonly produce
「製造業者たち」「今では民族の多様性を反映させた人形が当たり前で、
08:13
ethnically diverse dolls, like this black Barbie." Which is vastly better
黒いバービーもいる」など もちろん encyclopedia.com の内容よりは
08:17
than what you'll find in the encyclopedia.com,
遥かに優れた記述です、
08:21
which is Barbie, Klaus. (Laughter)
そこにはなんとバービー・クラウスの記事しかないのです (笑)
08:24
On the other hand, if they go to Wikipedia, they'll find a genuine article
一方で、Wikipedia ではより真実に近い内容が記述されています
08:28
-- and I won't talk a lot about Wikipedia, because Jimmy Wales is here --
-- ジミー・ウェールズがいるのでここでは Wikipedia についてそれほど語りません --
08:33
but roughly equivalent to what you would find in the Britannica, differently written,
しかし記述の仕方が違うだけで、ブリタニカ百科事典の内容とあまり変わりなく、
08:36
including the controversies over body image and commercialization,
ボディーのイメージに対する議論や商業主義に関する記述、
08:42
the claims about the way in which she's a good role model, etc.
彼女が良いお手本だという主張についてなどです
08:46
Another portion is not only how content is produced, but how relevance is produced.
コンテンツ以外にも、関連性がどのように作られたのかということもあります
08:54
The claim to fame of Yahoo! was, we hire people to look -- originally, not anymore
Yahoo! の評判は、見る人を雇うというものでした -- 今はそうではありません
08:58
-- we hire people to look at websites and tell you --
-- ウェブサイトを見て、それについて書く人を雇っています --
09:02
if they're in the index, they're good. This, on the other hand, is what 60,000
インデックスにあるものであれば、良いものということです 一方でこれは、6万人の
09:07
passionate volunteers produce in the Open Directory Project,
情熱を持ったボランティアが Open Directory プロジェクトで作るものです
09:11
each one willing to spend an hour or two on something they really care about,
各人が自分が大事だと思う事について1、2時間費やすというもので、
09:15
to say, this is good. So, this is the Open Directory Project, with 60,000 volunteers,
つまり良いものということです これが6万人のボランティアを持つ Open Dictionary プロジェクトで、
09:20
each one spending a little bit of time, as opposed to a few hundred
各々が少しずつ時間をかけるもので、数百人の給料を貰っている従業員の
09:26
fully paid employees. No one owns it, no one owns the output,
対極にあるものです 誰もそれを、そしてその成果物を所有してません
09:29
it's free for anyone to use and it's the output of people acting out of social
利用者は誰でも無料で使うことができ、何か楽しい事をしたいという社会的ならびに
09:34
and psychological motivations to do something interesting.
心理的な動機付けのアウトプットなのです
09:39
This is not only outside of businesses. When you think of what is the critical innovation
これはビジネスの外だけで起こっていることではありません グーグルの決定的なイノベーションを
09:43
of Google, the critical innovation is outsourcing the one most important thing --
考えてみると、決定的なイノベーションとは、最も重要なこと
09:49
the decision about what's relevant -- to the community of the Web as a whole,
-- 何が関係のあることなのかの判断を -- ウェブ全体のコミュニティーにアウトソースすることです
09:54
doing whatever they want to do: so, page rank.
やりたい事をやらせるのです それがページランクです
10:01
The critical innovation here is instead of our engineers, or our people saying
決定的なイノベーションというのは何が一番重要なのかということを自分たちの
10:04
which is the most relevant, we're going to go out and count what you,
エンジニアなどに任せる代わりに、外に出てウェブにいる人たちが、
10:10
people out there on the Web, for whatever reason -- vanity, pleasure --
-- うぬぼれや喜びなど-- どんな理由であれ、リンクを作成し、
10:13
produced links, and tied to each other. We're going to count those, and count them up.
自らを結びつけている数を数えるというものです 数を数えてそれらを合計する
10:17
And again, here, you see Barbie.com, but also, very quickly,
そして Barbie.com もありますが、と同時に、
10:23
Adiosbarbie.com, the body image for every size. A contested cultural object,
Adiosbarbie.com、全てのサイズのボディーイメージも 文化的な論争の対象、
10:27
which you won't find anywhere soon on Overture, which is the classic
これらは伝統的なマーケットベースのメカニズムでできた Overture には
10:32
market-based mechanism: whoever pays the most is highest on the list.
現れないでしょう お金を多く払う人がリストに載るのです
10:36
So, all of that is in the creation of content, of relevance, basic human expression.
これはすべてコンテンツ、関係性、表現の作成です
10:41
But remember, the computers were also physical. Just physical materials
しかしコンピュータも物理的なものです 物理的な物質で --
10:46
-- our PCs -- we share them together. We also see this in wireless.
パソコンも共有します 無線でも同じことです
10:50
It used to be wireless was one person owned the license, they transmitted in an
過去には個人が無線のライセンスを所有し、ある場所で信号が送信されると、
10:54
area, and it had to be decided whether they would be licensed or based on property.
それが所有もしくはライセンスされたものか決定しなければなりませんでした
11:00
What we're seeing now is that computers and radios are becoming so sophisticated
最近ではコンピュータと無線通信が非常に洗練されたので
11:05
that we're developing algorithms to let people own machines, like Wi-Fi devices,
アルゴリズムが開発されて 人々は WiFi デバイスなど装置を所有したまま、
11:10
and overlay them with a sharing protocol that would allow a community like this
その上層に覆いかぶせた共有のプロトコルを使って
11:16
to build its own wireless broadband network simply from the simple principle:
以下の様に簡単な法則で独自のブロードバンドネットワークが作成できるようになりました:
11:21
When I'm listening, when I'm not using, I can help you transfer your messages;
私が待ち受け状態か、使用していない時、私はあなたのメッセージの橋渡しをします
11:27
and when you're not using, you'll help me transfer yours.
それであなたが使用していないとき、橋渡しをお願いします
11:33
And this is not an idealized version. These are working models that at least in some
これはまだ定まったバージョンではありません 活動中のモデルが少なくとも米国の
11:36
places in the United States are being implemented, at least for public security.
いくつかの場所で試されています、少なくとも公共の安全のために
11:41
If in 1999 I told you, let's build a data storage and retrieval system.
1999年にこんなことを話すとしましょう、データストレージとデータ検索システムを作ろうと
11:48
It's got to store terabytes. It's got to be available 24 hours a day,
テラバイトのストレージを持ち、いつでも利用できる、
11:54
seven days a week. It's got to be available from anywhere in the world.
世界のどこからでもアクセスする事ができて
11:57
It has to support over 100 million users at any given moment. It's got to
いつでも1億人以上のユーザをサポートすることができ
12:00
be robust to attack, including closing the main index, injecting malicious files,
インデックスを消したり、悪意のあるファイルを埋め込んだり、
12:04
armed seizure of some major nodes. You'd say that would take years.
主要なノードの占拠といった攻撃にも耐えることができる ものすごい期間がかかり
12:09
It would take millions. But of course, what I'm describing is P2P file sharing.
とんでもない費用が必要だと言われていたでしょう しかし勿論これはP2Pファイル交換のことです
12:14
Right? We always think of it as stealing music, but fundamentally,
そうでしょう? 我々はいつも音楽のダウンロードを考えますが、根本的には
12:21
it's a distributed data storage and retrieval system, where people,
これは分散されたストレージならびに検索システムで、人々が
12:24
for very obvious reasons, are willing to share their bandwidth and their
あるとても明確な理由のために、彼らの帯域とストレージを共有させて
12:28
storage to create something.
何かを創り上げているのです
12:32
So, essentially what we're seeing is the emergence of a fourth transactional
そして本質的に我々が目撃しているのは4番目のフレームワークの
12:35
framework. It used to be that there were two primary dimensions along which
出現です 過去には物事を切り分けるための2つの軸が
12:39
you could divide things. They could be market based, or non-market based;
存在しました マーケットベースか、非マーケットベース;
12:45
they could be decentralized, or centralized.
分散されているか、集中管理されているか
12:48
The price system was a market-based and decentralized system.
価格制度(Price System)はマーケットベースで分散されているシステムです
12:50
If things worked better because you actually had somebody organizing them,
誰かが管理する事で物事が効率化するようであれば、
12:53
you had firms, if you wanted to be in the market -- or you had governments
市場であれば会社が -- 非市場であれば政府や
12:57
or sometimes larger non-profits in the non-market.
時には大きな非営利組織が現れます
13:00
It was too expensive to have decentralized social production,
分散された社会的生産物は高価すぎたのです
13:03
to have decentralized action in society. That was not about society itself.
社会で分散された行動を持つ事も -- それは社会についての問題ではなく
13:08
That was, in fact, economic.
経済的な問題でした
13:15
But what we're seeing now is the emergence of this fourth system
しかし我々が今目撃しているのは社会的共有と交換による
13:17
of social sharing and exchange.
第4のシステムの出現です
13:21
Not that it's the first time that we do nice things to each other, or for each other,
社会的な生き物として我々がお互いに初めて良い事をするというのではありません
13:22
as social beings. We do it all the time.
そういうことはいつも行っています
13:27
It's that it's the first time that it's having major economic impact.
初めてそれが経済的な影響を持ったというととなのです
13:31
What characterizes them is decentralized authority.
分散化された権限がその特徴です
13:35
You don't have to ask permission, as you do in a property-based system.
所有されているシステムで行う様に、許可を求める必要はありません
13:40
May I do this? It's open for anyone to create and innovate and share,
これをしてよいですか? それは誰に対してもオープンで、望むのであれば、
13:43
if they want to, by themselves or with others,
自分か誰かと一緒に作成、革新、共有できます
13:49
because property is one mechanism of coordination.
所有と言うのは調整機能の1つだからです
13:53
But it's not the only one.
しかし(調整機能は)それだけではありません
13:55
Instead, what we see are social frameworks for all of the critical things that we use
代わりに、我々が見ているのは市場での所有と契約を使っている重要な物事のための
13:57
property and contract in the market: information flows to decide what are
社会的なフレームワークです 興味深い問題は何かを知るための
14:02
interesting problems; who's available and good for something;
情報の流れ、誰が可能で適しているのか、
14:05
motivation structures -- remember, money isn't always the best motivator.
動機付けの組み立て -- お金は常に最善の動機ではありません
14:09
If you leave a $50 check after dinner with friends,
50ドルの小切手を友人との食事の後に残したとしても、
14:13
you don't increase the probability of being invited back.
逆に招待されるという可能性を高めている訳ではありません
14:17
And if dinner isn't entirely obvious, think of sex. (Laughter)
食事では分かりにくいというのであれば、セックスを考えてください(笑)
14:21
It also requires certain new organizational approaches.
それもなんらかの新しい組織的なアプローチが必要になります
14:27
And in particular, what we've seen is task organization.
特に、我々が見たのは作業の組織化です
14:30
You have to hire people who know what they're doing.
自分の仕事が分かっている人たちを雇わなければなりません
14:34
You have to hire them to spend a lot of time.
雇った人たちに多くの時間を費やしてもらわなければなりません
14:36
Now, take the same problem,
さて、同じ問題を
14:39
chunk it into little modules, and motivations become trivial.
小さなモジュールに切り分けてしうと、動機付けは問題でなくなります
14:41
Five minutes, instead of watching TV?
テレビを見る代わりに5分間?
14:45
Five minutes I'll spend just because it's interesting. Just because it's fun.
面白そうだから5分間やってみよう 楽しいですから
14:47
Just because it gives me a certain sense of meaning, or, in places that are more
何か意味のある事の様に思えるから、またはより複雑な関係を伴なう
14:51
involved, like Wikipedia, gives me a certain set of social relations.
Wikipedia のようなものであれば、社会的な関係を持つことができます
14:55
So, a new social phenomenon is emerging.
それで新しい社会現象が起こっています
15:01
It's creating, and it's most visible when we see it as a new form of competition.
競争が作り出され、その中でも新しい形の競争が目に付きます
15:05
Peer-to-peer networks assaulting the recording industry;
P2Pネットワークは音楽業界を猛攻撃していますし;
15:10
free and open source software taking market share from Microsoft;
フリー、オープンソースソフトウェアはマイクロソフトからシェアを奪っています;
15:13
Skype potentially threatening traditional telecoms;
Skype は潜在的に従来の電話会社を脅かしていますし;
15:17
Wikipedia competing with online encyclopedias.
Wikipedia はオンライン辞書と張り合っています
15:21
But it's also a new source of opportunities for businesses.
しかしそれは新しいビジネスチャンスの源でもあります
15:24
As you see a new set of social relations and behaviors emerging,
新しい社会的な関係性と振る舞いが出現するに従って、
15:27
you have new opportunities. Some of them are toolmakers.
新しいチャンスも生まれています 例えばツールの作成です
15:33
Instead of building well-behaved appliances
前もってどのようなことをするのか分かっている
15:37
-- things that you know what they'll do in advance --
行儀の良いアプリケーションを作る代わりに
15:40
you begin to build more open tools. There's a new set of values,
もっとオープンなツールを作るのです 新しい価値観、
15:42
a new set of things people value.
人々が新しく価値を置くものがあります
15:45
You build platforms for self-expression and collaboration.
自己表現や共同作業のためのプラットホームを作る事もできます
15:48
Like Wikipedia, like the Open Directory Project,
Wikipedia のような、Open Directory プロジェクトの様な
15:52
you're beginning to build platforms, and you see that as a model.
プラットホームを作るのであれば、それをモデルと見る事ができるでしょう
15:56
And you see surfers, people who see this happening, and in some sense
そしてサーファー達がいます、ことの目撃者で、これらを
15:59
build it into a supply chain, which is a very curious one. Right?
消費者のネットワークに広めていくのです 興味深い事です
16:03
You have a belief: stuff will flow out of connected human beings.
信念と言えるでしょう: ネットワーク化された人の中から 新しいものが生み出されます
16:08
That'll give me something I can use, and I'm going to contract with someone.
私が使える何かが提供されたら 私はそれをツールとして使って
16:11
I will deliver something based on what happens. It's very scary
さらに他の人に何かを提供します 恐るべきことです
16:14
-- that's what Google does, essentially.
-- そういうことを Google は基本的に行っています
16:18
That's what IBM does in software services, and they've done reasonably well.
そういうことを IBM はソフトウェアサービスで行っていて、彼らはなかなか良くやっています
16:20
So, social production is a real fact, not a fad.
社会的生産物は実際にあるものであり、ブームではありません
16:24
It is the critical long-term shift caused by the Internet.
それはインターネットにより始まった長い変化なのです
16:28
Social relations and exchange become significantly more important than they ever
社会的な関係と交換は経済的な現象として今までに無かった以上に
16:32
were as an economic phenomenon. In some contexts, it's even more efficient
重要になっています 状況によっては、より効率的でさえあります
16:39
because of the quality of the information, the ability to find the best person,
情報の量と、最高の人材を見つける能力、
16:43
the lower transaction costs. It's sustainable and growing fast.
低い取引費用などが原因です 持続的であり急速に成長しています
16:48
But -- and this is the dark lining -- it is threatened by
しかし -- これが暗い部分なのですが -- それは
16:52
-- in the same way that it threatens -- the incumbent industrial systems.
-- それ自身が脅かしている様に -- 従来の産業システムに脅かされています
16:58
So next time you open the paper, and you see an intellectual property decision,
次に新聞を開いて、知的財産に関する決定や、
17:02
a telecoms decision, it's not about something small and technical.
電話会社の決定について読むことがあれば、それは小さなことや技術的なことがらではありません
17:07
It is about the future of the freedom to be as social beings with each other,
それは将来お互いが社会的な存在となれるかどうかに関わることで、
17:13
and the way information, knowledge and culture will be produced.
情報、知識、そして文化が生産される方法についてなのです
17:19
Because it is in this context that we see a battle over how easy or hard it will be
今の状況で我々が目にしているのは、産業の情報経済が
17:24
for the industrial information economy to simply go on as it goes,
何らかの形でこれからも続いていくのか、
17:31
or for the new model of production to begin to develop alongside that industrial model,
または新しい生産モデルが既存の産業と一緒に発展し、
17:35
and change the way we begin to see the world and report what it is that we see.
我々の世界の見方、見ているものを伝える方法が変わっていくということなのです
17:41
Thank you.
ありがとう
17:46
Translated by Akira KAKINOHANA
Reviewed by Natsuhiko Mizutani

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Yochai Benkler - Legal expert
Yochai Benkler has been called "the leading intellectual of the information age." He proposes that volunteer-based projects such as Wikipedia and Linux are the next stage of human organization and economic production.

Why you should listen

Larry Lessig calls law professor Yochai Benkler "the leading intellectual of the information age." He studies the commons -- including such shareable spaces as the radio spectrum, as well as our shared bodies of knowledge and how we access and change them.

His most recent writings (such as his 2006 book The Wealth of Networks) discuss the effects of net-based information production on our lives and minds and laws. He has gained admirers far beyond the academy, so much so that when he released his book online with a Creative Commons license, it was mixed and remixed online by fans. (Texts can be found at benkler.org; and check out this web-based seminar on The Wealth of Networks.) He was awarded EFF's Pioneer Award in 2007.

He's the Berkman Professor of Entrepreneurial Legal Studies at Harvard, and faculty co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society (home to many of TED's favorite people).

More profile about the speaker
Yochai Benkler | Speaker | TED.com