12:59
TED2016

Lidia Yuknavitch: The beauty of being a misfit

リディア・ユクナヴィッチ: はみ出し者であるということの美しさ

Filmed:

居場所がないと感じている人たちへ — はみ出し者であるということの美しさに気づいてください。作家のリディア・ユクナヴィッチが、喪失や恥、そしてだんだんと自分を受け入れていく経緯といった経験談を切り貼りした個人的な回想を通じて、自らの波乱万丈な半生を語ります。「失敗したその瞬間でさえ、あなたは美しい。自分ではまだ知らなくても、あなたには何度も無限に自分を作り変える力がある。それがあなたの美しさなのだ」

- Author
In her acclaimed novels and memoir, author Lidia Yuknavitch navigates the intersection of tragedy and violence to draw new roadmaps for self­-discovery. Full bio

So I know TED is about a lot
of things that are big,
TEDに出てくる話題といえば
「ビッグ」な物事ばかりですが
00:12
but I want to talk to you
about something very small.
私はすごく小さいことについて
お話ししたいと思います
00:16
So small, it's a single word.
小さな小さな
1つの単語です
00:20
The word is "misfit."
「misfit(はみ出し者)」
という言葉です
00:23
It's one of my favorite words,
because it's so literal.
大好きな言葉の1つです
あまりに文字通りの意味でしょう
00:25
I mean, it's a person
who sort of missed fitting in.
「fit in(なじむ)ことに
miss(失敗)した人」ですから
00:29
Or a person who fits in badly.
「なじめていない人」
と言ってもいいし
00:33
Or this: "a person who is poorly adapted
「新しい状況や環境に
適応しきれていない人」
00:36
to new situations and environments."
という言い方もできますね
00:39
I'm a card-carrying misfit.
私は札付きのはみ出し者です
00:43
And I'm here for the other
misfits in the room,
会場の中にいるはみ出し者の皆さんに
会いに来ました
00:46
because I'm never the only one.
私以外にも必ずいるはずですから
00:49
I'm going to tell you a misfit story.
ある はみ出し者の話をしましょう
00:51
Somewhere in my early 30s,
30代前半のある時
00:55
the dream of becoming a writer
came right to my doorstep.
作家になる夢が扉のすぐ向こうまで
近づいていました
00:57
Actually, it came to my mailbox
実は 郵便受けに入っていました
01:02
in the form of a letter that said
I'd won a giant literary prize
私の書いた短編が
大きな文学賞を獲ったという内容の
01:03
for a short story I had written.
手紙が届いたのです
01:07
The short story was about my life
as a competitive swimmer
その短編は私自身の
競泳選手としての人生や
01:10
and about my crappy home life,
それまでのひどい家庭環境や
01:14
and a little bit about how grief
and loss can make you insane.
喪失感や悲しみで正気を失う様子を
物語にしたものでした
01:17
The prize was a trip to New York City
to meet big-time editors and agents
賞としてニューヨークに招待されました
有名な編集者やエージェント
01:23
and other authors.
他の作家に会える機会です
01:28
So kind of it was the wannabe
writer's dream, right?
作家志望の人なら
夢のような話ですよね
01:30
You know what I did the day
the letter came to my house?
手紙が届いた日 私が何したかって?
01:34
Because I'm me,
私らしいといえばそうですが
01:38
I put the letter on my kitchen table,
手紙をキッチンテーブルに置いて
01:39
I poured myself a giant glass of vodka
大きなグラスいっぱいに
ウォッカを注ぎ
01:42
with ice and lime,
氷とライムを入れて
01:45
and I sat there in my underwear
for an entire day,
下着姿で座ったまま
そこで丸一日
01:48
just staring at the letter.
ただじっと手紙を見ていました
01:52
I was thinking about all the ways
I'd already screwed my life up.
挫折だらけの自分の人生を
振り返りながら
01:56
Who the hell was I to go to New York City
ニューヨークに行って
作家面するなんて私は何様?
01:59
and pretend to be a writer?
そう考えていました
02:02
Who was I?
私は何者だろうって
02:05
I'll tell you.
答えは—
02:07
I was a misfit.
「はみ出し者」でした
02:08
Like legions of other children,
よくあることですが
02:10
I came from an abusive household
荒れた家庭で育ち
02:13
that I narrowly escaped with my life.
命からがら逃げ出した私は
02:16
I already had two epically
failed marriages underneath my belt.
既に2回結婚して 両方とも
盛大に失敗するという過去を持ち
02:19
I'd flunked out of college
not once but twice
大学を成績不良で
1度のみならず2回も辞めて
02:24
and maybe even a third time
that I'm not going to tell you about.
3回目もあったかも
ここでは言いませんけどね
02:27
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:30
And I'd done an episode
of rehab for drug use.
1度は薬物依存で更生施設に入り
02:32
And I'd had two lovely
staycations in jail.
素敵な刑務所暮らしも
2回経験しました
02:36
So I'm on the right stage.
そんな私が検察官の方の後に
ここに立つとはね
02:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:45
But the real reason,
I think, I was a misfit,
でも私がはみ出し者になった
本当の理由は
02:48
is that my daughter died
the day she was born,
自分が産んだばかりの娘を
その日に失うという出来事を背負って
02:52
and I hadn't figured out
how to live with that story yet.
どう生きていけばいいのか
わからないでいたからです
02:55
After my daughter died
I also spent a long time homeless,
赤ん坊を失った私は
長い間ホームレス生活をしていました
03:00
living under an overpass
橋の下に寝泊まりして
03:05
in a kind of profound state
of zombie grief and loss
悲嘆と喪失感でどん底の
ゾンビ状態でした
03:07
that some of us encounter along the way.
同じような経験をする方も
たまにいますよね
03:11
Maybe all of us, if you live long enough.
長く生きていれば
誰もが通る道かもしれません
03:14
You know, homeless people
are some of our most heroic misfits,
ホームレスって はみ出し者の中でも
一番勇敢な人たちなんですよ
03:18
because they start out as us.
もともとは普通の人ですからね
03:22
So you see, I'd missed fitting in
to just about every category out there:
この時点で私は ほぼ全ての役割に
なじむことに失敗していました
03:26
daughter, wife, mother, scholar.
娘として、妻として、母として
学究者としてもです
03:32
And the dream of being a writer
だから作家になるという夢は
03:37
was really kind of like a small,
sad stone in my throat.
まさに喉に引っかかった
悲しみの塊のようなものでした
03:39
It was pretty much in spite of myself
that I got on that plane
そんな自分に似合わず
私は飛行機に乗り
03:46
and flew to New York City,
ニューヨークに行きました
03:50
where the writers are.
作家たちが待っています
03:52
Fellow misfits, I can almost
see your heads glowing.
はみ出し者仲間の皆さん
皆さんの頭が光って見えるかのようです
03:55
I can pick you out of a room.
もう 誰がそうなのかわかりますよ
03:58
At first, you would've loved it.
このニューヨーク行き
最初はすごく楽しいんです
04:00
You got to choose the three
famous writers you wanted to meet,
著名な作家の中から3人選んで
会わせてもらえるうえ
04:03
and these guys went
and found them for you.
開催者が勝手に
お膳立てしてくれるんですよ
04:06
You got set up at the Gramercy Park Hotel,
グラマシー・パーク・ホテルに招待され
04:08
where you got to drink Scotch
late in the night
クールで、優秀で、お洒落な人たちと
04:11
with cool, smart, swank people.
夜遅くにスコッチを
酌み交わしたりもできます
04:14
And you got to pretend you were cool
and smart and swank, too.
自分もクールで、優秀で
洒落てるふりをしていいし
04:16
And you got to meet a bunch
of editors and authors and agents
何人もの編集者、作家や
エージェントと
04:21
at very, very fancy lunches and dinners.
本当にすごく高級なランチや
ディナーで会えるんです
04:24
Ask me how fancy.
どれくらい高級?って訊いて下さい
04:29
Audience: How fancy?
(観客)どれくらい高級なの?
04:31
Lidia Yuknavitch: I'm making a confession:
I stole three linen napkins --
(リディア・ユクナヴィッチ)告白します
テーブルナプキンを3枚盗みました
04:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:38
from three different restaurants.
それぞれ別のレストランからです
04:40
And I shoved a menu down my pants.
ズボンの中にメニューを隠して
持ち帰りもしました
04:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:44
I just wanted some keepsakes
so that when I got home,
記念に何かとっておきたかっただけです
家に帰ったとき
04:46
I could believe it had really
happened to me.
夢じゃなかったんだって
思えるように
04:50
You know?
ね?
04:53
The three writers I wanted to meet
私が会いたかった作家は
04:55
were Carole Maso, Lynne Tillman
and Peggy Phelan.
キャロル・メイソ、リン・ティルマン
ペギー・フィーランです
04:57
These were not famous,
best-selling authors,
有名なベストセラー作家では
ありませんが
05:00
but to me, they were women-writer titans.
私にとっては女性作家界の
巨匠のような存在でした
05:03
Carole Maso wrote the book
that later became my art bible.
キャロル・メイソは私にとって
芸術のバイブルである本を書いた人
05:07
Lynne Tillman gave me
permission to believe
リン・ティルマンのおかげで
私の書く物語が
05:12
that there was a chance
my stories could be part of the world.
世に出てもいいんだと
信じられるようになりました
05:14
And Peggy Phelan reminded me
ペギー・フィーランは
05:18
that maybe my brains
could be more important than my boobs.
私の頭脳はおっぱいより
大事かもしれないと気づかせてくれました
05:20
They weren't mainstream women writers,
メインストリーム系の
女性作家ではないけれど
05:27
but they were cutting a path
through the mainstream
身体をテーマにした作品で
メインストリームの中を
05:30
with their body stories,
切り開いていった人たちです
05:34
I like to think, kind of the way
water cut the Grand Canyon.
グランドキャニオンの真ん中を
川が通るようなイメージです
05:36
It nearly killed me with joy
嬉しすぎて死にそうでした
05:41
to hang out with these three
over-50-year-old women writers.
今や50代の女性作家の巨匠3人と
一緒に過ごせるんですから
05:43
And the reason it nearly
killed me with joy
なぜ死ぬほど嬉しかったかって
05:46
is that I'd never known a joy like that.
そこまでの喜びを感じたことが
なかったからです
05:49
I'd never been in a room like that.
そんな空間にいた経験ゼロでした
05:52
My mother never went to college.
母は高卒だったし
05:54
And my creative career to that point
その時点での
私の作家としてのキャリアは
05:56
was a sort of small, sad, stillborn thing.
小さくて悲しい死産の赤ん坊
みたいなものでした
05:59
So kind of in those first nights
in New York I wanted to die there.
だからニューヨークでの最初の数日は
死にたいくらい幸せで
06:05
I was just like, "Kill me now.
I'm good. This is beautiful."
「今すぐ死んでもいい! 最高すぎる」
って感じでした
06:08
Some of you in the room
will understand what happened next.
会場の一部の方は
この後起きることが理解できるはず
06:13
First, they took me to the offices
of Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
最初にファラー、シュトラウス
そしてジルーという—
06:16
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
was like my mega-dream press.
私にとって夢のまた夢のような
出版社に連れて行ってもらいました
06:21
I mean, T.S. Eliot and Flannery O'Connor
were published there.
何たってT.S. エリオットや
フラナリー・オコナーの出版社ですよ
06:25
The main editor guy sat me down
and talked to me for a long time,
編集の偉い人は私を座らせて
延々と語り続けました
06:29
trying to convince me I had a book in me
水泳選手としての
人生を描いた本が
06:33
about my life as a swimmer.
君の中に眠っているんだよと
06:36
You know, like a memoir.
自叙伝が書けるよと
06:38
The whole time he was talking to me,
その人が話している間ずっと
06:40
I sat there smiling and nodding
like a numb idiot,
私は感覚の麻痺したバカな子みたいに
ニコニコうなずいていました
06:42
with my arms crossed over my chest,
胸の上で腕を組んだまま
06:47
while nothing, nothing, nothing
came out of my throat.
口からは本当に一切何も
出てきませんでした
06:49
So in the end, he patted me
on the shoulder
最後に肩をポンと叩かれました
06:55
like a swim coach might.
まるで水泳コーチみたいに
06:59
And he wished me luck
そして頑張ってねと
07:01
and he gave me some free books
本を何冊かくれて
07:03
and he showed me out the door.
出口まで送ってくれました
07:05
Next, they took me
to the offices of W.W. Norton,
次に連れて行かれたのは
W.W. ノートンという出版社
07:09
where I was pretty sure
I'd be escorted from the building
ドクターマーチンのブーツを
履いていったというだけで
07:12
just for wearing Doc Martens.
追い出されるような場所だと
思っていました
07:15
But that didn't happen.
でも 無事でした
07:18
Being at the Norton offices
ノートンに来ていること自体
07:20
felt like reaching up into the night sky
and touching the moon
夜の空に向かって手を伸ばし
月を触っているような
07:22
while the stars stitched your name
across the cosmos.
星々で自分の名前が
夜空に描かれているような気分でした
07:27
I mean, that's how big
a deal it was to me.
私にとってはそれだけ
おおごとでした
07:31
You get it?
わかりますよね
07:33
Their lead editor, Carol Houck Smith,
編集長の
キャロル・フーク・スミスは
07:35
leaned over right in my face
with these beady, bright, fierce eyes
眼光鋭い小さな目で
私の顔を覗き込んで言いました
07:38
and said, "Well, send me
something then, immediately!"
「では何か原稿を送ってきなさい!
今すぐよ!」
07:42
See, now most people,
especially TED people,
ここで 大体の人は
特にTEDの人たちなら
07:46
would have run to the mailbox, right?
郵便ポストに一直線ですよね?
07:48
It took me over a decade to even imagine
私はそれから10年かかってやっと
07:51
putting something in an envelope
and licking a stamp.
封筒に何かを入れて
切手を貼ろうという気になったのです
07:54
On the last night,
ニューヨーク最後の夜
08:00
I gave a big reading
at the National Poetry Club.
全国朗読クラブで
大人数の前で朗読しました
08:02
And at the end of the reading,
朗読の終わりに
08:06
Katharine Kidde of Kidde,
Hoyt & Picard Literary Agency,
有名著作権エージェントの
キャサリン・キディが
08:08
walked straight up to me and shook my hand
前まで来て 私の手を握り
08:12
and offered me representation,
like, on the spot.
代理人になりましょうと
その場で申し出てくれました
08:15
I stood there and I kind of went deaf.
私はつっ立ったまま
何も聞こえなくなったかのようでした
08:20
Has this ever happened to you?
こんな経験したことある人?
08:23
And I almost started crying
そして泣きそうになりました
08:25
because all the people in the room
were dressed so beautifully,
会場の人が皆あまりに
綺麗な格好をしていたからです
08:27
and all that came out of my mouth was:
私の口から出てきたのは
たった一言
08:31
"I don't know. I have to think about it."
「よくわかりません
考えさせてください」
08:34
And she said, "OK, then," and walked away.
わかったわと言って
キャサリンは去っていきました
08:38
All those open hands out to me,
that small, sad stone in my throat ...
あんなにチャンスだらけだったのに
悲しみの塊は喉に引っかかったまま・・・
08:44
You see, I'm trying to tell you something
about people like me.
私のような はみ出し者には
こんなことがよくあるのです
08:51
Misfit people -- we don't always know
how to hope or say yes
希望の持ち方や イエスと言う方法や
大きなチャンスのつかみ方を
08:55
or choose the big thing,
知らなかったりする人たちです
08:59
even when it's right in front of us.
自分の目の前にあったとしてもです
09:01
It's a shame we carry.
私たちが抱える「恥」のせいです
09:03
It's the shame of wanting something good.
幸せを欲しがるなんて恥ずかしい
09:04
It's the shame of feeling something good.
幸せを感じるなんて恥ずかしい
09:06
It's the shame of not really believing
we deserve to be in the room
憧れの人たちと同じ空間に
自分が居ていいんだと
09:08
with the people we admire.
思えなかった恥ずかしさもです
09:13
If I could, I'd go back
and I'd coach myself.
もしもあの時に戻れるなら
自分に教えてやりたい
09:16
I'd be exactly like those
over-50-year-old women who helped me.
あの時支えてくれた
50代の女性たちと同じように
09:19
I'd teach myself how to want things,
当時の自分に 欲しがるということや
09:23
how to stand up, how to ask for them.
立ち上がり 欲しいものは欲しいと
言う術を教えたい
09:25
I'd say, "You! Yeah, you!
You belong in the room, too."
「あなた! そこのあなた!
ここにはあなたの居場所もあるのよ」と
09:28
The radiance falls on all of us,
光は誰もに降り注ぐものであり
09:32
and we are nothing without each other.
人はお互いがいなければ
成り立たないのですから
09:34
Instead, I flew back to Oregon,
でもその時の私は
オレゴンに帰る飛行機に乗り
09:39
and as I watched the evergreens
and rain come back into view,
見慣れた常緑樹や雨が
視界に入ってくるのを見ながら
09:42
I just drank many tiny bottles
of airplane "feel sorry for yourself."
飛行機で出てくる小さなボトルのお酒を
惨めな気持ちで飲んでいました
09:48
I thought about how, if I was a writer,
I was some kind of misfit writer.
もしも自分が作家だったら
はみ出し者の作家だろうなと思いました
09:53
What I'm saying is,
つまり
09:59
I flew back to Oregon without a book deal,
出版契約も代理人もなしに
10:00
without an agent,
オレゴンに帰り
10:02
and with only a headful
and heart-ful of memories
ただ 憧れの素晴らしい作家たちと
10:03
of having sat so near
あそこまで近くに座っていたんだ
という思い出だけで
10:06
the beautiful writers.
頭も胸もいっぱいでした
10:09
Memory was the only prize
I allowed myself.
思い出だけが 自分自身に
持ってもいいと許したご褒美だったのです
10:12
And yet, at home in the dark,
それでも 暗い部屋の中で
10:17
back in my underwear,
下着姿に戻っても
10:21
I could still hear their voices.
作家たちの声が蘇ってきました
10:23
They said, "Don't listen to anyone
who tries to get you to shut up
「あなたの意見を聞かない人や
書く内容に口を出す人は
10:26
or change your story."
無視しなさいね」
10:30
They said, "Give voice to the story
only you know how to tell."
「自分にしか伝え方がわからない
物語を言葉にしなさい」
10:32
They said, "Sometimes telling the story
「時には 書くという行為に
10:36
is the thing that saves your life."
命を救われることもあるのよ」
10:39
Now I am, as you can see,
the woman over 50.
今の私は ご覧の通り
50代の女性です
10:43
And I'm a writer.
私は作家です
10:48
And I'm a mother.
母親でもあります
10:50
And I became a teacher.
教師にもなりました
10:52
Guess who my favorite students are.
どんな生徒がお気に入りか
わかりますよね
10:54
Although it didn't happen the day
夢のような手紙が届いた—
10:58
that dream letter came through my mailbox,
あの日には実現しなかったけど
11:00
I did write a memoir,
その後自叙伝を書きました
11:02
called "The Chronology of Water."
『水の年代記』という本です
11:04
In it are the stories of how many times
I've had to reinvent a self
自ら選んだ選択の残骸となった
自分自身を何度も何度も
11:06
from the ruins of my choices,
苦労して作り変えていった話です
11:11
the stories of how my seeming failures
were really just weird-ass portals
一見失敗のようでも 実は美しいものが
一風変わった形で現れただけに
11:14
to something beautiful.
過ぎなかったという物語です
11:20
All I had to do
was give voice to the story.
その物語に言葉を与えるだけで
よかったのです
11:22
There's a myth in most cultures
about following your dreams.
ほとんどの文化では
夢を追いかけることを神話化しています
11:27
It's called the hero's journey.
「英雄の旅路」というものです
11:32
But I prefer a different myth,
でも私なら それより少し
11:35
that's slightly to the side of that
横や下にずれたような
11:37
or underneath it.
違った神話を選びます
11:39
It's called the misfit's myth.
「はみ出し者の神話」です
11:41
And it goes like this:
こんな感じです—
11:43
even at the moment of your failure,
失敗したその瞬間でさえ
11:45
right then, you are beautiful.
その時 あなたは美しい
11:47
You don't know it yet,
自分ではまだ知らなくても
11:51
but you have the ability
to reinvent yourself
自分自身を作り変える力がある
11:52
endlessly.
それも無限に
11:55
That's your beauty.
それがあなたの美しさなのだ
11:57
You can be a drunk,
酔っ払いでもいい
11:59
you can be a survivor of abuse,
虐待の経験者でもいい
12:01
you can be an ex-con,
前科者でもいい
12:03
you can be a homeless person,
ホームレスでもいい
12:05
you can lose all your money
or your job or your husband
全財産や、職や、夫を失ったり
12:06
or your wife, or the worst thing of all,
妻を失ったり
最悪の場合
12:09
a child.
子供を失った人でもいい
12:12
You can even lose your marbles.
正気を失ってしまっていてもいい
12:13
You can be standing dead center
in the middle of your failure
挫折して
失意の真っ只中にいたっていい
12:15
and still, I'm only here to tell you,
私がここにいる唯一の目的は
それでもあなたは
12:20
you are so beautiful.
こんなに美しいのだと伝えるため
12:22
Your story deserves to be heard,
あなたの物語には
知られる価値がある
12:25
because you, you rare
and phenomenal misfit,
稀有で並外れた
はみ出し者のあなた
12:27
you new species,
はみ出し者という
新種であるあなたは
12:31
are the only one in the room
あなた自身にしかできない方法で
12:34
who can tell the story
物語を語ることができる—
12:36
the way only you would.
この場で唯一の人間なのだから・・・
12:38
And I'd be listening.
そんな物語を待っています
12:41
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
12:44
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:46
Translated by Riaki Poništ
Reviewed by Moe Shoji

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Lidia Yuknavitch - Author
In her acclaimed novels and memoir, author Lidia Yuknavitch navigates the intersection of tragedy and violence to draw new roadmaps for self­-discovery.

Why you should listen

Writer Lidia Yuknavitch discovered her calling after an interrupted journey as a would­-be Olympic swimmer. Her prose erases the boundaries between memoir and fiction, explodes gender binaries and focuses on the visceral minutiae of the body.

She was inspired by Ken Kesey (with whom she collaborated on a collective novel project at Oregon University); her latest book, The Small Backs of Children, stands as a fictional counterpoint to her memoir The Chronology of Water, which has garnered her a cult following for its honesty and intensity.

More profile about the speaker
Lidia Yuknavitch | Speaker | TED.com