sponsored links
TED2016

Prosanta Chakrabarty: Clues to prehistoric times, found in blind cavefish

プロサンタ・チャクラバーティ: 盲目の洞窟魚に見る先史時代へのヒント

February 15, 2016

TEDフェローのプロサンタ・チャクラバーティは、新種の洞窟魚を求め世界の秘境を探検しています。この地下に棲む生物は興味深い適応をしながら進化してきました。洞窟魚は盲目に関する生物学的な知見だけでなく、何百万年も前に起きた大陸の分裂といった地質学的な出来事についてヒントを与えてくれます。チャクラバーティの短いトークを聞きながら、遥かなる時に思いを馳せましょう。

Prosanta Chakrabarty - Ichthyologist
Evolutionary biologist and natural historian Prosanta Chakrabarty explores the world in an effort to understand fundamental aspects of biological diversity. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Ichthyology,
魚類学
00:12
the study of fishes.
魚を研究する学問です
00:14
It looks like a big, boring word,
長ったらしく退屈な言葉に
聞こえるかもしれませんが
00:15
but it's actually quite exciting,
実際にはとても面白いのです
00:18
because ichthyology is the only "ology"
なぜなら魚類学は
「YOLO(人生は一度きり)」がつく
00:21
with "YOLO" in it.
唯一の学問(-ology)だから
00:24
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:25
Now, to the cool kids in the audience,
さて ここにいる
頭のいい若者の皆さんは
00:27
you already know, YOLO stands for
"you only live once,"
YOLOが 「you only live once」の
短縮語だと知っていますよね
00:29
and because I only have one life,
私の人生も一度きりなので
00:33
I'm going to spend it doing
what I always dreamt of doing:
やりたいと常に夢見ていたことを
実行するつもりです
00:34
seeing the hidden wonders of the world
and discovering new species.
隠された神秘の世界をこの目で見て
そして 新種を発見すること
00:37
And that's what I get to do.
これが私の使命です
00:40
Now, in recent years, I really focused
on caves for finding new species.
最近では 新種を探すため
洞窟を集中的に調査しています
00:42
And it turns out, there's lots of new
cavefish species out there.
そして 洞窟には多くの
新種の洞窟魚がいることが判明しました
00:47
You just have to know where to look,
ただ どこを探せば良いか心得ていて
00:50
and to maybe be a little thin.
ちょっとばかりスリムであれば
いいんです
00:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:54
Now, cavefishes can tell me
a lot about biology and geology.
洞窟魚は 生物学と地質学に関する
多くのことを教えてくれます
00:55
They can tell me how the landmasses
around them have changed and moved
魚たちは小さな穴の中に
閉じ込められているので
01:00
by being stuck in these little holes,
周囲の陸塊がどのように
変化し動いたか分かり
01:04
and they can tell me about
the evolution of sight, by being blind.
そして彼らの視力がないことから
視覚の進化が分かるのです
01:06
Now, fish have eyes
that are essentially the same as ours.
魚の目は本質的に
我々の目と同じ構造をしています
01:11
All vertebrates do, and each time
a fish species starts to adapt
全ての脊椎動物には目があります
そして 暗く寒い洞窟の環境に置かれると
01:14
to this dark, cold, cave environment,
ある魚の種は 徐々に適応を始めます
01:18
over many, many generations,
they lose their eyes and their eyesight
何年も何世代もかけて
彼らの目と視力は退化し
01:20
until the end up like an eyeless
cavefish like this one here.
このような目の無い
洞窟魚になるのです
01:24
Now, each cavefish species
has evolved in a slightly different way,
洞窟魚は種類によって
少しずつ異なった進化をするので
01:27
and each one has a unique geological
and biological story to tell us,
地質学的、生物学的な背景を
それぞれに物語っています
01:31
and that's why it's so exciting
when we find a new species.
新種発見の面白さはこの点にあります
01:35
So this is a new species
we described, from southern Indiana.
さて これはインディアナ州南部で
発見した新種です
01:39
We named it Amblyopsis hoosieri,
the Hoosier cavefish.
アンブリオプシス・フージュライ
「インディアナ在住の洞窟魚」と名付けました
01:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:46
Its closest relatives
are cavefishes in Kentucky,
ケンタッキー州の洞窟群
マンモス・ケーヴ・システムの種が
01:47
in the Mammoth Cave system.
彼らの最も近い親類にあたります
01:50
And they start to diverge
when the Ohio River split them
数百万年前 オハイオ川の流れの変化により
棲みかが分かれ
01:52
a few million years ago.
別々に進化し始めました
01:55
And in that time they developed
these subtle differences
その後の進化過程で
盲目に関する遺伝子構造に
01:57
in the genetic architecture
behind their blindness.
極めてわずかな違いが生まれました
02:00
There's this gene called rhodopsin
that's super-critical for sight.
視力に必要不可欠な
ロドプシンという遺伝子があります
02:03
We have it, and these species have it too,
私たち人間も彼らも持っています
02:06
except one species has lost
all function in that gene,
一方の種は この遺伝子の
全機能を失っているのに対し
02:09
and the other one maintains it.
もう片方は維持しています
02:11
So this sets up this beautiful
natural experiment
自然による見事な実験が
行われているようなもので
02:14
where we can look at the genes
behind our vision,
視覚に関する遺伝子と
02:18
and at the very roots of how we can see.
視覚の起源について
考察することができます
02:21
But the genes in these cavefishes
同時に これらの洞窟魚の遺伝子は
02:24
can also tell us
about deep geological time,
遥かなる地質学的な時間の流れを
伝えてくれるのです
02:26
maybe no more so
than in this species here.
特に この種は
そのもっともよい例でしょう
02:29
This is a new species
we described from Madagascar
これはマダガスカル産の新種で
02:31
that we named Typhleotris mararybe.
タイフリオートゥリス・マラリベと
命名しました
02:34
That means "big sickness" in Malagasy,
マダカスカル語で「大いなる病気」を意味し
いかに我々が病みつきになって
02:38
for how sick we got trying
to collect this species.
この種を収集しようとしたかを表しています
02:41
Now, believe it or not,
信じようと信じまいと
02:44
swimming around sinkholes
full of dead things
死骸で埋め尽くされた穴や
02:46
and cave full of bat poop
コウモリの糞だらけの
洞窟を泳ぐのは
02:48
isn't the smartest thing you could
be doing with your life,
人生を費やすのに
最良の選択ではありませんが
02:50
but YOLO.
「人生一度きり」だから!
02:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:54
Now, I love this species despite the fact
that it tried to kill us,
私はこの魚が大好きです
― まあ ずいぶん面倒がありましたが…
02:58
and that's because
this species in Madagascar,
というのも マダガスカルに棲むこの種の
最も近い親類は
03:02
its closest relatives
are 6,000 kilometers away,
遥か6千キロ離れた
オーストラリアの
03:05
cavefishes in Australia.
洞窟魚だったのですから
03:08
Now, there's no way a three-inch-long
freshwater cavefish
体長8センチの淡水魚が
03:10
can swim across the Indian Ocean,
インド洋を渡れるはずがありません
03:14
so what we found when we compared
the DNA of these species
そこでDNAを比較してみると
03:16
is that they've been separated
for more than 100 million years,
種が分かれたのは
1億年以上も前 つまり
03:19
or about the time that the southern
continents were last together.
南半球の大陸が最後に
一続きだった頃でした
03:22
So in fact, these species
didn't move at all.
実際 これらの種族は
一切動かないので
03:27
It's the continents that moved them.
大陸が彼らを運んだのでしょう
03:29
And so they give us, through their DNA,
DNAの情報から
03:31
this precise model and measure
いつ どのように
古代の地殻変動が起きたのか
03:33
of how to date and time
these ancient geological events.
詳細に知ることができます
03:36
Now, this species here is so new
この種が発見されたのは
つい最近なので
03:40
I'm not even allowed
to tell you its name yet,
まだ名前をお伝えすることすら
できませんが
03:43
but I can tell you
it's a new species from Mexico,
メキシコ産の新種と分かっていますが
03:45
and it's probably already extinct.
おそらく すでに
絶滅していると思われます
03:48
It's probably extinct because
the only known cave system it's from
この魚の生息地として唯一知られた洞窟が
近くのダム建設に伴って―
03:50
was destroyed when a dam was built nearby.
破壊されたため
絶滅したであろうと考えられるのです
03:53
Unfortunately for cavefishes,
地下水を棲みかとする
洞窟魚たちにとって
03:56
their groundwater habitat
不幸なことでしたが
03:58
is also our main source of drinking water.
これは人間にとっても
主要な飲み水の水源なのです
04:00
Now, we actually don't know
this species' closest relative, yet.
この魚たちに最も近い種は
まだ分かっていませんが
04:02
It doesn't appear to be
anything else in Mexico,
メキシコではなく
04:07
so maybe it's something in Cuba,
おそらくキューバかフロリダ州
04:10
or Florida, or India.
あるいはインドのものでしょう
04:12
But whatever it is, it might tell us
something new about the geology
いずれにしても カリブ海の地質や
04:14
of the Caribbean, or the biology
of how to better diagnose
あるタイプの盲目型に関する
より優れた生物学的な分析方法の
04:19
certain types of blindness.
新しい発見が期待できます
04:22
But I hope we discover this species
before it goes extinct too.
彼らが絶滅する前に
発見できることを願います
04:24
And I'm going to spend my one life
私は これからも魚類学者として
04:28
as an ichthyologist
trying to discover and save
この惑星の地質学と
04:30
these humble little blind cavefishes
視覚に関する豊富な
生物学的見識をもたらす
04:34
that can tell us so much
about the geology of the planet
つつましく小さな洞窟魚たちの発見と保護に
04:36
and the biology of how we see.
生涯を捧げていきます
04:40
Thank you.
どうもありがとう
04:42
(Applause)
(拍手)
04:43
Translator:Mio Onosaka
Reviewer:Tomoyuki Suzuki

sponsored links

Prosanta Chakrabarty - Ichthyologist
Evolutionary biologist and natural historian Prosanta Chakrabarty explores the world in an effort to understand fundamental aspects of biological diversity.

Why you should listen

Dr. Prosanta Chakrabarty is an Associate Professor and Curator of Fishes at the Museum of Natural Science and Department of Biological Science at Louisiana State University.

Chakrabarty is a systematist and an ichthyologist studying the evolution and biogeography of both freshwater and marine fishes. His work includes studies of Neotropical (Central and South America, Caribbean) and Indo-West Pacific (Indian and Western Pacific Ocean) fishes. His natural history collecting efforts include trips to Japan, Australia, Taiwan, Madagascar, Panama, Kuwait and many other countries. He has discovered over a dozen new species including new anglerfishes and cavefishes.

The LSU Museum of Natural Science fish collection that Chakrabarty oversees includes nearly half a million fish specimens and nearly 10,000 DNA samples covering most major groups of fishes. He earned his PhD at the University of Michigan and his undergraduate degree is from McGill University in Montreal. He has written two books including A Guide to Academia: Getting into and Surviving Grad School, Postdocs and a Research Job. He was named a TED Fellow in 2016.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.