sponsored links
TED@BCG Paris

Martin Reeves: How to build a business that lasts 100 years

マーティン・リーブス: 百年続くビジネスを築くには

May 18, 2016

何年も続くビジネスを築きたいと思うなら、ヒトの免疫システムほど参考になるものはないかもれません。戦略家のマーティン・リーブスが驚くほど短命になりつつある企業の統計を紹介し、変わりゆく時代の中でレジリエントなビジネスを構築していくために、生命体からヒントを得た6つの原則を経営に生かす方法を説明します。

Martin Reeves - Strategist
BCG's Martin Reeves consults on strategy to global enterprises across a range of industries. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Imagine that you are a product designer.
皆さんが製品開発に
携わっているとしましょう
00:12
And you've designed a product,
製品をデザインしました
00:16
a new type of product,
called the human immune system.
今までにない製品で
「ヒトの免疫システム」と言うものです
00:17
You're pitching this product
皆さんは この製品を
00:22
to a skeptical, strictly
no-nonsense manager.
疑り深く 生真面目な上司に提案します
00:24
Let's call him Bob.
名前はボブとしましょう
00:28
I think we all know
at least one Bob, right?
皆さんの周りにも
1人くらいいるでしょう?
00:29
How would that go?
さあ どうなるでしょう?
00:33
Bob, I've got this incredible idea
ボブ すごいアイデアがあるんです
00:35
for a completely new type
of personal health product.
全く新しいタイプの
個人用の健康商品で
00:37
It's called the human immune system.
ヒトの免疫システムと名付けました
00:40
I can see from your face that
you're having some problems with this.
なにやら難しい顔をされていますね
00:43
Don't worry. I know it's very complicated.
でも 心配無用です
複雑なのはよく分かっています
00:46
I don't want to take you
through the gory details,
事細かな説明をするつもりはありません
00:48
I just want to tell you about some
of the amazing features of this product.
ただ この製品の素晴らしい特徴を
いくつかお伝えしたいのです
00:51
First of all, it cleverly uses redundancy
まず この製品は賢くも
「余剰性(Redundancy)」を使います
00:55
by having millions of copies
of each component --
各部品のコピーを
百万単位で用意しています
00:58
leukocytes, white blood cells --
白血球や白血球細胞など
01:01
before they're actually needed,
それらが実際に必要になる前に
01:03
to create a massive buffer
against the unexpected.
不測の事態に備えて
大幅に余裕を持たせているのです
01:05
And it cleverly leverages diversity
さらに すごいことに
「多様性(Diversity)」もあります
01:10
by having not just leukocytes
but B cells, T cells,
白血球だけではなく
B細胞やT細胞
01:13
natural killer cells, antibodies.
ナチュラルキラー細胞
免疫体があります
01:17
The components don't really matter.
そこに何があるかは あまり関係なく
01:19
The point is that together,
重要なのは
これらが一緒になって
01:21
this diversity of different approaches
can cope with more or less anything
多様なアプローチを可能にし
進化の過程でなしうること
01:23
that evolution has been able to throw up.
ほぼ全てに対応できるということです
01:27
And the design is completely modular.
また この製品は完全な
「モジュール式(Modularity)」です
01:31
You have the surface barrier
of the human skin,
皮膚という表面のバリアがあり
01:35
you have the very rapidly reacting
innate immune system
瞬時に反応する自然免疫システム
01:38
and then you have the highly targeted
adaptive immune system.
さらに 対象をかなり絞った
適応免疫システムがあります
01:42
The point is, that if one system fails,
another can take over,
ここで重要なのは
もし一つのシステムが対応できなくとも
01:46
creating a virtually foolproof system.
他でカバーすることで
事実上 完璧なシステムとなる点です
01:50
I can see I'm losing you, Bob,
but stay with me,
頑張ってついてきてくださいよ ボブ
01:54
because here is the really killer feature.
ここからが 秀逸なんですから
01:57
The product is completely adaptive.
「適合性(Adaptation)」があるんです
02:01
It's able to actually develop
targeted antibodies
これまでに出会ったことすらない抗原に
対抗できるような免疫体を
02:04
to threats that it's never
even met before.
実際に作ることもできるのです
02:09
It actually also does this
with incredible prudence,
また特筆すべきは これを行う上での
「思慮深さ(Prudence)」です
02:12
detecting and reacting
to every tiny threat,
あらゆる小さな脅威を
見つけたり 対処したりし
02:16
and furthermore, remembering
every previous threat,
更には 今後また出会う可能性を考慮して
02:21
in case they are ever encountered again.
これまでの脅威を覚えておくのです
02:25
What I'm pitching you today
is actually not a stand-alone product.
今日 私がご提案する製品は
実は それ単体で使うのではなく
02:28
The product is embedded
in the larger system of the human body,
「組込み式(Embedded)」で
人体という大きなシステムに埋め込むものです
02:33
and it works in complete harmony
with that system,
この製品は 既にあるシステムと
調和しながら
02:37
to create this unprecedented level
of biological protection.
これまでにないレベルの
生物学的な保護を作り上げるのです
02:40
So Bob, just tell me honestly,
what do you think of my product?
ですからボブ 正直に教えてください
この製品をどうお考えですか?
02:43
And Bob may say something like,
するとボブは こう言うでしょう
02:48
I sincerely appreciate
the effort and passion
君がこのプレゼンにつぎ込んだ
努力と情熱を
02:50
that have gone into your presentation,
本当にありがたく思うよ
02:53
blah blah blah --
かくかくしかじか―
02:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:57
But honestly, it's total nonsense.
でも正直言って ナンセンスだよ
02:58
You seem to be saying that the key
selling points of your product
話を聞くところによると
君の製品のセールスポイントは
03:03
are that it is inefficient and complex.
効率が悪くて複雑なことみたいだ
03:07
Didn't they teach you 80-20?
80–20の法則を習っただろう?
03:10
And furthermore, you're saying
that this product is siloed.
それに この製品はサイロ化してるって
言うじゃないか
03:13
It overreacts,
過剰反応して
03:17
makes things up as it goes along
新しいものを作っていって
03:18
and is actually designed
for somebody else's benefit.
他人の利益になるよう
デザインされている
03:20
I'm sorry to break it to you,
but I don't think this one is a winner.
申し訳ないけれど
成功するとは思えないよ
03:23
If we went with Bob's philosophy,
もしボブの考えに同調するなら
03:27
I think we'd actually end up
with a more efficient immune system.
もっと効率的な免疫システムを
作ることができるでしょう
03:29
And efficiency is always important
in the short term.
短期的に見れば
効率性は常に重要です
03:32
Less complex, more efficient,
more bang for the buck.
単純で 効率的で
お金に見合う以上の効果が得られる
03:36
Who could say no to that?
そんな製品にダメとは言いませんよね?
03:40
Unfortunately, there's one
very tiny problem,
残念ながら
ごくごく小さな問題があります
03:41
and that is that the user
of this product, you or I,
この製品を使う側の
皆さんや私がおそらく
03:44
would probably die
within one week of the next winter,
冬が来たら1週間も経たないうちに
死んでしまうんです
03:47
when we encountered a new strain
of the influenza virus.
新型のインフルエンザウイルスに
出会っただけでです
03:51
I first became interested
in biology and business,
生物学とビジネス
そして寿命とレジリエンスとの関係に
03:57
and longevity and resilience,
私が最初に興味を持ったのは
04:01
when I was asked a very unusual question
グローバルなテクノロジー企業のCEOから
04:03
by the CEO of a global tech company.
大変珍しい質問をされた時のことです
04:05
And the question was:
その時の質問は
04:09
What do we have to do to make sure
that our company lasts 100 years?
「我々の会社が百年続くには
何が必要だと考えますか?」
04:10
A seemingly innocent question,
無邪気な質問のようですが
04:18
but actually, it's a little trickier
than you might think,
想像するよりも 少し難しい質問なんです
04:20
considering that the average
US public company now
と言うのも アメリカの公開会社は
04:24
can expect a life span of only 30 years.
平均寿命がたった30年だからです
04:28
That is less than half of the life span
そこで働く従業員の寿命の
04:32
that its employees can expect to enjoy.
半分もないんです
04:35
Now, if you were the CEO
of such a company,
そのような会社のCEOとして
04:39
badgered by investors
and buffeted by change,
出資者にせっつかれ
変化に打ちのめされたとしても
04:42
we might forgive you
for not even worrying too much
30年後の将来に
思い悩まないからと言って
04:46
about what happens 30 years out.
非難はされないかもしれません
04:48
But here's something that should
keep you awake at night:
でも これを聞くと
夜も眠れないかもしれません
04:50
the probability that your company
will not be around in five year's time,
あなたの会社が
5年すらもたない可能性です
04:55
on average, is now
a staggering 32 percent.
平均して32パーセント
信じがたい状態です
04:59
That's a one in three chance
that your company will be taken over
これは3分の1の確率で
5年以内に会社が乗っ取られたり
05:03
or will fail within just five years.
倒産することを意味しています
05:08
Let's come back
to our tech CEO's question.
ここで技術会社の
CEOの質問に戻ります
05:13
Where better to turn
for advice than nature,
こういった話は
自然界に聞いてみるのが得策でしょう
05:15
that's been in the business
of life and death
どんな会社よりも
長い間 生と死を
05:19
for longer than any company?
繰り返しているんですから
05:22
As a lapsed biologist,
えせ生物学者の私は
05:26
I decided to immediately call
a real biologist,
早速 本物の生物学者に
連絡してみることにしました
05:28
my friend Simon Levin,
友人のサイモン・レヴィンです
05:32
Professor of Biology and Mathematics
at Princeton University.
プリンストン大学の
生物学と数学の教授です
05:34
Together, we looked at a variety
of biological systems,
彼と一緒に調べたのは
生物界のあらゆるシステム
05:38
ranging from natural tropical rainforests
自然界の熱帯雨林から
05:41
through to managed forests and fisheries.
人が手を加えた森林や漁場まで
05:45
And we asked ourselves the question:
そして 次のように問いかけました
05:48
What makes these systems
resilient and enduring?
何がこれらのシステムを
レジリエントで永続的なものにしているのか?
05:49
And what we found
was that the same six principles
私たちが見つけた答えは
あの6つの法則―
05:55
that we saw underpinning
the miracle of the human immune system
先ほどお話しした
ヒトの免疫システムの奇跡を支える法則を
06:00
actually cropped up again and again,
常に繰り返しているということです
06:03
from redundancy through to embeddedness.
余剰性から その組込みまで
06:06
In fact, we saw these principles
not only in biologically enduring systems,
実際にこの原則は 生物学的に
長期間続いているシステムだけでなく
06:10
we also found them
being very characteristic
長く息づいている
社会システムの特徴として
06:15
of long-lived social systems,
見出すことができます
06:18
like the Roman Empire
and the Catholic Church,
例えばローマ帝国や
カトリック教会です
06:20
believe it or not.
驚かれるかもしれません
06:22
We also went on to look at business,
私たちはビジネスにも掘り下げていき
06:23
and found that these very same properties
also characterized businesses
全く同じ原則が
レジリエントで恒久的なビジネスの
06:25
that were resilient and long-lived,
特徴として見出せ
06:30
and we noted their absence
from ones which were short-lived.
これが不在の場合には
短命に終わるということが分かりました
06:32
Let's first take a look at what happens
when the corporate immune system
それでは まず
企業の免疫システムが
06:38
collapses.
失敗した例を見てみます
06:43
This beautiful building is part
of the Shitennoji Temple Complex
この美しい建物は
四天王寺の一部で
06:45
in Osaka, Japan.
日本の大阪に所在します
06:49
In fact, it's one of the oldest
temples in Japan.
実は日本でも
最も古い寺院の一つで
06:51
It was built by a Korean artisan,
韓国人の工匠の手によって
建てられました
06:54
because at the time,
Japan was not yet building temples.
当時は日本にお寺はなかったからです
06:57
And this Korean artisan went on
to found a temple-building company.
この工匠らが寺院建設の会社を
立ち上げたのです
07:00
Amazingly, his company, Kongō Gumi,
驚くべきことに この会社
金剛組は―
07:06
was still around 1,480 years later.
1,428年も続きました
07:10
In fact, it became the oldest
continuously operating company
事実 現存する世界最古の
07:15
in the world.
会社になりました
07:19
So how is Kongō Gumi doing today?
では金剛組の現在の様子は
どうでしょうか?
07:21
Not too well, I'm afraid.
残念ながら 思わしくありません
07:26
It borrowed very heavily
日本のバブル景気の時期に
07:28
during the bubble period
of the Japanese economy,
不動産への投資をするために
07:29
to invest in real estate.
多額の借金をしましたが
07:32
And when the bubble burst,
it couldn't refinance its loans.
バブルがはじけたことで
ローンが返せなくなりました
07:34
The company failed,
経営は破たんし
07:38
and it was taken over
by a major construction company.
大手の建設会社に
身を委ねたのです
07:39
Tragically, after 40 generations
of very careful stewardship
不運にも
40代にわたる金剛家の
07:44
by the Kongō family,
慎重な経営の後
07:49
Kongō Gumi succumbed
to a spectacular lapse
金剛組が失敗してしまったのは
07:51
in the ability to apply
a principle of prudence.
思慮深さという原則を適応しないという
ミスをしてしまったからでした
07:55
Speaking of company failures:
企業の失敗と言えば
08:00
we're all familiar
with the failure of Kodak,
コダックの失敗が有名でしょう
08:03
the company that declared bankruptcy
倒産を発表したのは
08:06
in January 2012.
2012年の1月のことでした
08:09
Much more interesting,
however, is the question:
もっと興味深いことがあります
08:13
Why did Fujifilm --
富士フイルムは
08:17
same product, same pressures
from digital technology, same time --
同じ製品を扱い 同じデジタル技術の重圧の下
同じ時期に存在していながら
08:19
why was Fujifilm
able to survive and flourish?
なぜ生き残り
かつ成長することができたのか?
08:24
Fujifilm used its capabilities
in chemistry, material science and optics
富士フイルムは 自らの
化学、材料科学、光学分野の技術を
08:30
to diversify into a number of areas,
実に様々な分野に転用したのです
08:37
ranging from cosmetics to pharmaceuticals,
化粧品から薬品
08:40
to medical systems to biomaterials.
医療システムから生体材料までです
08:43
Some of these diversification
attempts failed.
もちろん 幾つかの分野では
失敗してしまいました
08:45
But in aggregate,
しかし全体としては
08:49
it was able to adapt
its portfolio sufficiently
自身のポートフォリオを
十分に適応させ
08:50
to survive and flourish.
生き残り 成長できたのです
08:55
As the CEO, Mr. Komori, put it,
富士フイルムのCEOである
古森重隆が言われたように
08:58
the strategy succeeded
because it had "more pockets and drawers"
ライバル企業よりも
「多くのポケットと引き出し」があったことで
09:01
than the rivals.
この戦略は成功したのです
09:05
He meant, of course,
彼が意味するところは
09:06
that they were able to create
more options than the rivals.
ライバルに比べて より多くの
選択肢を作ったということでしょう
09:08
Fujifilm survived because it applied
the principles of prudence,
富士フイルムが生き残れたのも
思慮深さと多様性
09:12
diversity
適応力の原則を
09:17
and adaptation.
駆使したからです
09:18
A catastrophic factory fire,
like the one we see here,
ご覧のような
壊滅的な工場火災が
09:21
completely wiped out, in one evening,
たった一夜で 焼き尽くしたのは
09:25
the only plant which supplied Toyota
with valves for car-braking systems.
自動車ブレーキシステムのバルブを
トヨタに供給する唯一の工場でした
09:28
The ultimate test of resilience.
レジリエンスに対する究極の試練です
09:36
Car production ground
to a screeching halt.
車の生産自体が
ギーッと急停止しました
09:40
How was it, then, that Toyota
was able to recover car production?
それではトヨタはどのようにして
車の生産を復活させたのでしょうか?
09:44
Can you imagine how long it took?
どれくらいかかったと思いますか?
09:50
Just five days.
ほんの5日間です
09:52
From having no braking valves
to complete recovery in five days.
ブレーキバルブが全くない状態から
完全に立ち直るまで5日間です
09:53
How was this possible?
どう成し得たのでしょう?
09:58
Toyota managed its network of suppliers
in such a collaborative manner
トヨタは サプライヤーと
強固な連携体制を築いており
10:00
that it could work very quickly
and smoothly with suppliers
トヨタの迅速な行動で
複数のサプライヤーから協力を得て
10:05
to repurpose production,
足りないブレーキバルブに
10:10
fill the missing braking valve capacity
生産能力を振り替えることで
10:12
and have car production come online again.
車の生産を再開できたのです
10:15
Toyota applied the principles
of modularity of its supply network,
トヨタは この原則を用いました
「モジュール式」の供給網
10:19
embeddedness in an integrated system
統合システムに「組込み」
そして―
10:24
and the functional redundancy
to be able to repurpose, smoothly,
機能的な「余剰性」で
スムーズに既存の能力を
10:26
existing capacity.
ほかに転用しました
10:31
Now fortunately, few companies
succumb to catastrophic fires.
幸いにも 破壊的な火災によって
潰れてしまう会社は 多くありません
10:33
But we do read in the newspaper
every day about companies
でも新聞で毎日
目にするのは
10:39
succumbing to the disruption
of technology.
破壊的技術によって
潰れてしまう会社でしょう
10:42
How is it, then, that the consumer
optics giant Essilor
それでは どうやって
メガネレンズの大手 エシロールは
10:46
is able to avoid technology disruption,
and even profit from it?
破壊的技術を免れるだけでなく
そこから利益を得られているのでしょうか?
10:50
And yes, technology disruption
is not only a big deal
そうです 破壊的技術は
ソフトウェアと電子機器業界固有の
10:54
in software and electronics.
問題ではないのです
10:58
Essilor carefully scans
the competitive environment
エシロールは
競合環境を丁寧に調査し
11:01
for potentially disruptive technologies.
破壊的技術になりそうなものを
見つけます
11:06
It acquires those technologies very early,
そういった技術を
非常に早い段階で買収し
11:09
before they've become expensive
or competitors have mobilized around them,
技術が高騰したり
競合会社が集まってくる前にです
11:12
and it then develops
those technologies itself,
そして そういった技術を
自身で開発して行きます
11:15
even at the risk of failure
失敗や自己破滅のリスクを
11:19
or the risk of self-disruption.
負ってでもするのです
11:21
Essilor stays ahead of its game,
エシロールは
常に他者の先を行くことで
11:24
and has delivered spectacular performance
素晴しい成果を上げています
11:26
for over 40 years,
40年以上もです
11:28
by using the principles
of prudence and adaptation.
思慮深さと適応性の原則を
使っているのです
11:30
OK, if these principles are so powerful,
you might be thinking,
オーケー ではこの原則が
そんなにもパワフルなら
11:35
why are they not commonplace in business?
ビジネスにおいて
どうしてこれが常識ではないのか?
11:39
Why do we not use these words every day?
なぜ この言葉を頻繁に耳にしないのか?
11:42
Well, change has to first
start in the mind.
変化とは人の内側から
始まるものでしょう
11:45
If we think back to our pitch to Bob,
ボブへの売り込みを思い出してください
11:47
in order to apply the principles
ヒトの免疫システムの奇跡に
11:49
that underpin the miracle
of the human immune system,
基づく原則を適用するには
11:52
we first need to think differently
ビジネスについての考え方を
11:55
about business.
まず変える必要があります
11:58
Now typically, when we think
about business,
私たちは 普段
ビジネスについて考える際に
11:59
we use what I call "mechanical thinking."
「機械的な考え方」をしています
12:02
We set goals,
ゴールを設定し
12:05
we analyze problems,
問題を分析して
12:07
we construct and we adhere to plans,
計画を立てて それを着実に実行する
12:09
and more than anything else,
そして何よりも
12:11
we stress efficiency
and short-term performance.
効率性と短期的な成果を優先します
12:12
Now, don't get me wrong --
ただ誤解しないでくださいね
12:16
this is a splendidly practical
and effective way
これは比較的 安定した環境で
12:17
of addressing relatively simple challenges
比較的 単純な問題に取り組む際の
12:20
in relatively stable environments.
本当に実践的で効果的な方法なんです
12:23
It's the way that Bob -- and probably
many of us, myself included --
これは ボブだけでなく
おそらく私を含めた多くの人が
12:25
process most business problems
we're faced with every day.
日々 直面している
ほとんどの問題を処理する方法でしょう
12:29
In fact, it was a pretty good
mental model for business --
実際 ビジネスにおいて
かなり良いメンタルモデルではありました
12:33
overall --
全体として―
12:36
until about the mid-1980s,
80年代半ば頃まででしょうか
12:38
when the conjunction of globalization
グローバル化 そして
12:40
and a revolution in technology
and telecommunications
テクノロジーと電気通信分野の革命で
ビジネスが
12:43
made business far more
dynamic and unpredictable.
よりダイナミックで
先が見えなくなった時です
12:46
But what about those more dynamic
and unpredictable situations
しかし現在の私たちが
数多く直面している よりダイナミックで
12:49
that we now increasingly face?
先が見えない状況ではどうでしょうか?
12:52
I think in addition
to the mechanical thinking,
私が考えるに 機械的な考え方に加えて
12:55
we now need to master the art
of biological thinking,
6つの原則に代表される
生物学的 考え方を
12:57
as embodied by our six principles.
マスターする必要があります
13:02
In other words, we need to think
more modestly and subtly
言い換えれば 私たちは
より謙虚に そして繊細に
13:05
about when and how
いつ、どうやって
13:08
we can shape, rather than control,
先が見えない複雑な状況を
コントロールするのではなく
13:11
unpredictable and complex situations.
方向づけていくかを
考える必要があります
13:14
It's a little like the difference
between throwing a ball
ちょっと似ているのが
ボールを投げることと
13:19
and releasing a bird.
鳥を放つことです
13:23
The ball would head in a straight line,
ボールはターゲットに向かって
13:25
probably towards the intended target,
直線を描くでしょうが
13:27
and the bird certainly would not.
鳥なら そうはいかないでしょう
13:29
So what do you think?
皆さんは どうお考えですか?
13:35
Sounds a little impractical,
a little theoretical, perhaps?
少しばかり非実践的で 理論的だと
思われているでしょうか
13:36
Not at all.
実はそうではありません
13:41
Every small entrepreneurial company
小さなベンチャー企業は どこも
13:43
naturally thinks and acts biologically.
自然と生物学的に考えたり
行動したりしているんです
13:46
Why?
なぜか?
13:50
Because it lacks the resources
to shape its environment
無理やり 周りの環境を変えるほどの
13:51
through brute force.
リソースがないからです
13:54
It lacks the scale to buffer change,
変化を受け止める規模もなく
13:55
and it's constantly thinking
about the tough odds
スタートアップ企業の
生き残りという難題を
13:59
for a start-up to survive.
常に考えているのです
14:02
Now, the irony is, of course,
もちろん皮肉な点は
14:06
that every large company started off
as a small, entrepreneurial company.
あらゆる大企業は
昔は小さなベンチャー企業だったわけです
14:07
But along the way somewhere,
ところが いつからか
14:11
many have lost this ability
to think and act biologically.
多くの企業が生物学的に考え
行動する能力を失っています
14:13
They need to rejuvenate
their ability to think biologically
兼ね備えていた 生物学的に考える能力を
活性化させる必要があります
14:18
in order to survive and thrive
in today's environment.
そうして こんにちの厳しい環境で
生き残っていくのです
14:23
So let's not just think
about short-term performance.
ですから短期的な成果だけを
考えるのはやめましょう
14:28
Every company I know spends plenty of time
私が知っている企業だけでも
実際かなりの時間を割いて
14:31
thinking about the central
question of strategy:
戦略の中心となる問題を考えています
14:34
How good is our competitive game?
「我々は このゲームで有利か?」
14:37
In addition, let's also consider
それに加えて
もう一つ 考えてみましょう
14:39
the second, more biological
and equally important question:
より生物学的で
同じぐらい重要な問題です
14:41
How long will that game last?
「このゲームは
いつまで続くだろう?」
14:46
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
14:48
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:50
Translator:Mari Arimitsu
Reviewer:Yuko Yoshida

sponsored links

Martin Reeves - Strategist
BCG's Martin Reeves consults on strategy to global enterprises across a range of industries.

Why you should listen

Martin Reeves is the Director of the BCG Henderson Institute, BCG's think tank for new ideas in strategy and management, and a Senior Partner based in New York City.

Reeves has been with the firm for 26 years and focuses on strategy, dividing his time between the Institute and client strategy work across sectors. He is author of a new book on strategy, Your Strategy Needs a Strategy, which deals with choosing and executing the right approach in today's complex and dynamic business environment, as well as numerous articles in Harvard Business Review and other publications.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.