sponsored links
TEDSummit

Suzanne Simard: How trees talk to each other

スザンヌ・シマード: 森で交わされる木々の会話

June 29, 2016

「森は見えているものが全てではない」と言う生態学者のスザンヌ・シマードは、カナダの森での30年間に渡る研究で、木々はお互いに会話をしているという驚くべき発見をしました。それも、かなりの距離を隔ててでも、しばしば会話をしていたのです。調和のとれた、それでいて複雑な木々の社会生活についての話をお聴き下さい。きっと自然を見る目が一変しますよ。

Suzanne Simard - Forest ecologist
Suzanne Simard studies the complex, symbiotic networks in our forests. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
森の中を歩いていると
想像してみてください
00:12
Imagine you're walking through a forest.
木々の集合体が
頭に浮かんでくるでしょう
00:15
I'm guessing you're thinking
of a collection of trees,
我々 森の管理人たちが
「林分」と呼ぶその集合体は
00:18
what we foresters call a stand,
木々の粗い幹と美しい林冠から
なっています
00:21
with their rugged stems
and their beautiful crowns.
樹木は確かに森林の基盤ですが
00:25
Yes, trees are the foundation of forests,
森林は見えているものが
全てではないのです
00:28
but a forest is much more
than what you see,
今日 私は皆さんの森林観を
変えたいと思います
00:31
and today I want to change
the way you think about forests.
地下には もう1つの世界—
00:35
You see, underground
there is this other world,
延々と経路が張り巡らされた
生物学的世界が
00:39
a world of infinite biological pathways
木々を繋げ互いに交流させ
00:42
that connect trees
and allow them to communicate
00:45
and allow the forest to behave
as though it's a single organism.
森を あたかも1つの生き物のようにしていて
それは知的動物さえをも思わせます
00:49
It might remind you
of a sort of intelligence.
こんな事を どうして知ったのか
00:53
How do I know this?
その経緯をお話しします
00:55
Here's my story.
私はブリティッシュ・コロンビアの
森の中で育ちました
00:57
I grew up in the forests
of British Columbia.
森の中で仰向けに寝転がり
林冠を見上げていたものでした
01:00
I used to lay on the forest floor
and stare up at the tree crowns.
壮観な眺めでした
01:04
They were giants.
私の祖父も大きな人でした
01:06
My grandfather was a giant, too.
01:07
He was a horse logger,
木こりで
内陸部の雨林で杉の木を
択伐して馬で運び出していました
01:09
and he used to selectively cut
cedar poles from the inland rainforest.
祖父は私に森が密やかに1つに繋がり
01:13
Grandpa taught me about the quiet
and cohesive ways of the woods,
その中に私の家族がどのように
編み込まれているか教えてくれました
01:17
and how my family was knit into it.
そして私は祖父の志を継いでいます
01:20
So I followed in grandpa's footsteps.
祖父も私も 森に対する好奇心を
持っていました
01:23
He and I had this curiosity about forests,
最初に私の森に対する目が
大きく開かれたのは
01:26
and my first big "aha" moment
湖畔の屋外トイレでの出来事ででした
01:28
was at the outhouse by our lake.
家族の犬のジグスがその穴に
滑って落ちた時のことです
01:31
Our poor dog Jigs
had slipped and fallen into the pit.
祖父はシャベルを片手に駆けつけ
ジグスを助け出そうとしました
01:35
So grandpa ran up with his shovel
to rescue the poor dog.
可哀想なジグスは
糞尿の中で泳いでいました
01:39
He was down there, swimming in the muck.
祖父が地面を掘ったその時
01:42
But as grandpa dug
through that forest floor,
そこに現れた根に
私はとても興味を覚えました
01:45
I became fascinated with the roots,
その下には のちに私が知ることになる
白菌糸体があり
01:48
and under that, what I learned later
was the white mycelium
さらに その下には
赤や黄色の鉱物の層がありました
01:51
and under that the red
and yellow mineral horizons.
最終的には祖父と私は
ジグスを助け出しましたが
01:55
Eventually, grandpa and I
rescued the poor dog,
その時 私は気付いたのです
01:58
but it was at that moment that I realized
木の根と土壌が一緒になった層が
02:00
that that palette of roots and soil
森林の本当の土台になっているのだと
02:03
was really the foundation of the forest.
私はもっと知りたいと思い
02:06
And I wanted to know more.
林学を勉強しましたが
02:08
So I studied forestry.
気付けば 商業伐採を
管理している有力者の側で
02:11
But soon I found myself working
alongside the powerful people
02:14
in charge of the commercial harvest.
仕事をしていました
森林皆伐はもはや警戒レベルでした
02:17
The extent of the clear-cutting
02:20
was alarming,
そんな仕事の中で 私には葛藤がありました
02:21
and I soon found myself
conflicted by my part in it.
それだけでなくアスペンやカバノキは
除伐や薬剤で取り除かれ その場所に
02:25
Not only that, the spraying
and hacking of the aspens and birches
もっと商業的に価値のある
マツやモミの木を植えるのには
02:30
to make way for the more commercially
valuable planted pines and firs
驚きました
02:34
was astounding.
この容赦ない産業機構の歯車は
何ものも止められないかのようでした
02:36
It seemed that nothing could stop
this relentless industrial machine.
それで私は大学に戻り
02:41
So I went back to school,
森の隠れた分野の研究を始めました
02:44
and I studied my other world.
その頃 研究室での実験で
02:47
You see, scientists had just discovered
in the laboratory in vitro
マツの幼根同士が
02:51
that one pine seedling root
炭素を送り合えると
分かったばかりでした
02:53
could transmit carbon
to another pine seedling root.
これは研究室でのことですが
02:57
But this was in the laboratory,
02:59
and I wondered,
could this happen in real forests?
森林でも起きているのだろうか
きっとそうだと
03:02
I thought yes.
また木々は地下で情報も交換し合っている
かもしれないとも思いました
03:04
Trees in real forests might also
share information below ground.
でもそんな理論はあまりにも問題があり
03:09
But this was really controversial,
03:11
and some people thought I was crazy,
ばかな話だと思う人もいて
研究費が なかなか下りませんでした
03:14
and I had a really hard time
getting research funding.
それでも 私は諦めず
03:17
But I persevered,
森の奥深くに入り
実験をするに至ったのです
03:20
and I eventually conducted
some experiments deep in the forest,
それは25年前のことです
03:23
25 years ago.
3種の樹木から80株の子苗を育てました
03:25
I grew 80 replicates of three species:
アメリカシラカバ
ダグラスモミ、ベイスギです
03:28
paper birch, Douglas fir,
and western red cedar.
シラカバとモミは地下網で繋がっていても
03:32
I figured the birch and the fir
would be connected in a belowground web,
スギはそうではなく
03:36
but not the cedar.
03:37
It was in its own other world.
自分だけの世界にいると
私は予想していました
そこで 私は自分の機器を掻き集め
03:40
And I gathered my apparatus,
03:42
and I had no money,
so I had to do it on the cheap.
お金がなかったので
倹約するため
ホームセンターの
カナディアン・タイヤに行き
03:45
So I went to Canadian Tire --
03:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
ポリ袋、ガムテープ、ブラインド・クロス
03:48
and I bought some plastic bags
and duct tape and shade cloth,
タイマー、使い捨て上着
ガスマスクを買いました
03:51
a timer, a paper suit, a respirator.
それから 大学からハイテク機器—
03:55
And then I borrowed some
high-tech stuff from my university:
ガイガーカウンタ、シンチレーション検出器
質量分析計、顕微鏡を借り
03:59
a Geiger counter, a scintillation counter,
a mass spectrometer, microscopes.
そして とても危険な物を用意しました
04:03
And then I got some
really dangerous stuff:
炭素14、放射性同位体の
炭酸ガスが一杯の注射器と
04:06
syringes full of radioactive
carbon-14 carbon dioxide gas
高圧ボンベです
04:11
and some high pressure bottles
ボンベには炭素13、安定同位体の
炭酸ガスが入っています
04:13
of the stable isotope
carbon-13 carbon dioxide gas.
ちゃんと許可はもらっていましたよ
04:17
But I was legally permitted.
04:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
でも大事なものを忘れてしまいました
04:20
Oh, and I forgot some stuff,
虫除けのスプレーと
04:22
important stuff: the bug spray,
熊除けスプレーと
ガスマスクのフィルター
04:25
the bear spray,
the filters for my respirator.
あーあ
04:28
Oh well.
実験の第一日目
予定の場所に行くと
04:31
The first day of the experiment,
we got out to our plot
子連のハイイログマに
追い払われてしまいました
04:34
and a grizzly bear and her cub
chased us off.
熊除けのスプレーを
持っていなかったからです
04:37
And I had no bear spray.
カナダの森での研究は
こんな宿命にあります
04:40
But you know, this is how
forest research in Canada goes.
(笑)
04:44
(Laughter)
その翌日戻ってみると
04:45
So I came back the next day,
母熊と子熊は
もういませんでした
04:47
and mama grizzly and her cub were gone.
今度こそ ちゃんと研究を始めます
04:49
So this time, we really got started,
紙の使い捨て上着を着て
04:51
and I pulled on my white paper suit,
ガスマスクをつけ
04:54
I put on my respirator,
それから
04:57
and then
ポリ袋を苗木にかぶせ
04:59
I put the plastic bags over my trees.
巨大注射器を取り出し
05:02
I got my giant syringes,
ポリ袋に
05:05
and I injected the bags
炭素同位体トレーサーの
炭酸ガスをまず最初に
05:06
with my tracer isotope
carbon dioxide gases,
カバノキに注入しました
05:10
first the birch.
放射性ガス 炭素14を
05:11
I injected carbon-14, the radioactive gas,
カバノキの苗木にかぶせた袋に注入し
05:14
into the bag of birch.
次はモミの木に
05:15
And then for fir,
炭素同位体 炭素13の
炭酸ガスを注入しました
05:17
I injected the stable isotope
carbon-13 carbon dioxide gas.
同位体は2種類使いました
05:21
I used two isotopes,
これら3種の木々の間で
05:22
because I was wondering
お互いに交流し合っているのか
調べたかったからです
05:24
whether there was two-way communication
going on between these species.
80番目の最後の袋に
05:29
I got to the final bag,
取りかかろうとした所
05:32
the 80th replicate,
突然ハイイログマの母親が再び現れ
05:33
and all of a sudden
mama grizzly showed up again.
私を追ってきました
05:36
And she started to chase me,
私は注射器を頭上に持ち上げ
05:37
and I had my syringes above my head,
蚊を追い払いながら
トラックに飛び乗り
05:39
and I was swatting the mosquitos,
and I jumped into the truck,
思いましたよ
05:42
and I thought,
「だから みんな研究室で
研究するんだ」ってね
05:44
"This is why people do lab studies."
05:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
1時間待ちました
05:48
I waited an hour.
これ位の時間があれば
05:50
I figured it would take this long
木は光合成から二酸化炭素を生成し
05:52
for the trees to suck up
the CO2 through photosynthesis,
それを糖に変えて根に送り
05:54
turn it into sugars,
send it down into their roots,
そして 恐らく
05:58
and maybe, I hypothesized,
地下で近くの木々に炭素を
送っているだろうと推測したのです
06:00
shuttle that carbon belowground
to their neighbors.
1時間して
06:04
After the hour was up,
トラックの窓を開け
06:06
I rolled down my window,
母熊がいないか確かめると・・・
06:08
and I checked for mama grizzly.
良かった!向こうの方で
ハックルベリーを食べていました
06:10
Oh good, she's over there
eating her huckleberries.
それでトラックを降りて
仕事に再び取りかかりました
06:13
So I got out of the truck
and I got to work.
最初のカバノキの袋を外し
06:16
I went to my first bag with the birch.
I pulled the bag off.
ガイガーカウンタを
カバノキの葉に当てると
06:20
I ran my Geiger counter over its leaves.
シューーー!
06:23
Kkhh!
上出来
06:25
Perfect.
カバノキは放射性ガスを
吸い込んでいました
06:26
The birch had taken up
the radioactive gas.
審判の時が来ました
06:29
Then the moment of truth.
モミの苗木まで行き
06:31
I went over to the fir tree.
袋をとり
06:33
I pulled off its bag.
ガイガーカウンタを
モミの木の葉に近づけると
06:34
I ran the Geiger counter up its needles,
世にも美しい音を聞いたのです
06:37
and I heard the most beautiful sound.
シューーー!
06:40
Kkhh!
カバノキがモミの木に
06:42
It was the sound of birch talking to fir,
「お手伝いしましょうか?」と話しかけ
06:45
and birch was saying,
"Hey, can I help you?"
モミの木がこう答えています
「少し炭素を分けてもらえませんか?
06:48
And fir was saying, "Yeah,
can you send me some of your carbon?
誰かが私の上に布を被せて
日陰になっているんです」
06:52
Because somebody
threw a shade cloth over me."
私はスギに近づきガイガーカウンタを
その葉の上にかざしました
06:56
I went up to cedar, and I ran
the Geiger counter over its leaves,
すると予想通り
06:59
and as I suspected,
反応無し
07:02
silence.
スギは自分だけの世界に居て
07:04
Cedar was in its own world.
カバノキとモミの木との会話網には
繋がっていないのです
07:06
It was not connected into the web
interlinking birch and fir.
私は興奮して
07:11
I was so excited,
次から次に80ヶ所全部
植樹した苗を調べて回りました
07:13
I ran from plot to plot
and I checked all 80 replicates.
この結果 明らかに
07:17
The evidence was clear.
炭素13と炭素14で
07:19
The C-13 and C-14 was showing me
アメリカシラカバとダグラスモミの
活発な交流が証明されたのです
07:22
that paper birch and Douglas fir
were in a lively two-way conversation.
この実験をした
07:27
It turns out at that time of the year,
その年の夏には
07:29
in the summer,
カバノキは モミの木からもらう量より
多くの炭素をモミの木に送っていました
07:30
that birch was sending more carbon to fir
than fir was sending back to birch,
特にモミの木が
陰になっている時はそうでした
07:34
especially when the fir was shaded.
それから後の実験で
その反対もあることが分かりました
07:36
And then in later experiments,
we found the opposite,
モミの木はカバノキからもらう量より
多くの炭素をカバノキに与えていました
07:39
that fir was sending more carbon to birch
than birch was sending to fir,
07:43
and this was because the fir was still
growing while the birch was leafless.
葉を落としていたカバノキのそばで
モミの木がまだ成長していた時です
この様にこの2種の樹木は
相互依存の関係にあると検証されました
07:47
So it turns out the two species
were interdependent,
07:50
like yin and yang.
陰と陽のようにです
その時点で 全てが明らかとなり
07:52
And at that moment,
everything came into focus for me.
私はこれは大きな発見だと分かっていました
07:55
I knew I had found something big,
森の樹木の相互関係に対する
それまでの見方を変える大発見—
07:58
something that would change the way
we look at how trees interact in forests,
木々は競い合っているだけではなく
08:02
from not just competitors
協力し合っているのだという
08:04
but to cooperators.
確固たる証拠—
08:07
And I had found solid evidence
壮大なる地下の交流ネットワークという
08:10
of this massive belowground
communications network,
知られざる世界の証拠を見つけたのです
08:13
the other world.
この時 私が心から願い
信じてやまなかったのは
08:15
Now, I truly hoped and believed
この発見で林業のあり方が変わること―
08:17
that my discovery would change
how we practice forestry,
皆伐や薬剤で樹木を枯らす方法から
08:21
from clear-cutting and herbiciding
08:23
to more holistic and sustainable methods,
もっと包括的で持続可能
実用的でもっと低コストな方法に
変わることです
08:26
methods that were less expensive
and more practical.
私は何を考えていたのでしょう?
08:29
What was I thinking?
08:31
I'll come back to that.
そのことは後でお話しします
森林のような複雑な構造を
科学でどうすれば良いのでしょう?
08:35
So how do we do science
in complex systems like forests?
森林の科学者ですから
森林で研究をしなくてはなりません
08:40
Well, as forest scientists,
we have to do our research in the forests,
それは お話しした通り本当に大変です
08:43
and that's really tough,
as I've shown you.
熊からうまく逃げ切らなくてはなりませんが
08:45
And we have to be really good
at running from bears.
なによりも
08:50
But mostly, we have to persevere
いかなる困難が立ちはだかろうと屈せず
08:52
in spite of all the stuff
stacked against us.
直観と経験を頼りに
08:55
And we have to follow our intuition
and our experiences
意義のある疑問を持ち
08:57
and ask really good questions.
データを集め
検証しなければなりません
08:59
And then we've got to gather our data
and then go verify.
私は 森で何百もの実験を行い
それを発表してきました
09:03
For me, I've conducted and published
hundreds of experiments in the forest.
その中でも最も古い実験農園は
30年以上前に作られたものです
09:08
Some of my oldest experimental plantations
are now over 30 years old.
今も確認できます
09:13
You can check them out.
そうやって森の科学者は研究しています
09:15
That's how forest science works.
では科学についてお話ししたいと思います
09:18
So now I want to talk about the science.
アメリカシラカバとダグラスモミは
どう交流していたのでしょう?
09:20
How were paper birch
and Douglas fir communicating?
彼らは 炭素という言葉で
会話していただけでなく
09:23
Well, it turns out they were conversing
not only in the language of carbon
窒素やリンや水
09:27
but also nitrogen and phosphorus
09:31
and water and defense signals
and allele chemicals and hormones --
情報としての防御信号、
アレル化学物質、ホルモンという言葉で
会話をしていました
09:35
information.
実は 私の発見以前にも
科学者の間では
09:37
And you know, I have to tell you,
before me, scientists had thought
地下における「菌根」という
共生関係がこれに関わっていると
09:41
that this belowground
mutualistic symbiosis called a mycorrhiza
考えられていました
09:44
was involved.
菌根とは文字通り「菌の根」です
09:46
Mycorrhiza literally means "fungus root."
森林を歩くと樹木の生殖器官が見られます
09:50
You see their reproductive organs
when you walk through the forest.
キノコがそうです
09:54
They're the mushrooms.
でもキノコは ほんの一部に過ぎません
09:55
The mushrooms, though,
are just the tip of the iceberg,
キノコの柄からは 菌糸が延び
菌糸体を形成しています
09:58
because coming out of those stems
are fungal threads that form a mycelium,
その菌糸体は
樹木を含む全ての植物の根に
10:03
and that mycelium
infects and colonizes the roots
着生し繁殖します
10:05
of all the trees and plants.
真菌細胞が根の細胞と交わると
10:08
And where the fungal cells
interact with the root cells,
栄養分と炭素との交換が行われます
10:10
there's a trade of carbon for nutrients,
菌根菌は 土壌内で広がり
10:13
and that fungus gets those nutrients
by growing through the soil
土の粒子1粒1粒を包み込み
そこから栄養分を吸収します
10:16
and coating every soil particle.
菌糸体はぎっしりと張り巡らされており
我々が一歩踏み出すその下には
10:19
The web is so dense that there can be
hundreds of kilometers of mycelium
何百キロの菌糸体があることでしょう
10:23
under a single footstep.
10:26
And not only that, that mycelium connects
different individuals in the forest,
菌糸体はさらに
同種の樹木間だけでなく
カバノキやモミの木など
異なる樹種間も繋ぎ
10:32
individuals not only of the same species
but between species, like birch and fir,
インターネットのような働きをしています
10:37
and it works kind of like the Internet.
ほかのネットワークと同様
10:41
You see, like all networks,
菌根ネットワークにも
ノードやリンクがあります
10:43
mycorrhizal networks have nodes and links.
我々が作成したこの地図は
ダグラスモミの森の一角にある
10:46
We made this map by examining
the short sequences of DNA
全ての木と菌根菌のDNAの短配列を
1つ1つ調べて作成されたものです
10:50
of every tree and every fungal individual
in a patch of Douglas fir forest.
この絵の丸はダグラスモミのノードです
10:55
In this picture, the circles represent
the Douglas fir, or the nodes,
線は菌根菌で繋がっているリンクです
10:59
and the lines represent the interlinking
fungal highways, or the links.
最も大きな濃い色のノードは
一番頻繁に活動している木です
11:04
The biggest, darkest nodes
are the busiest nodes.
我々は これらをハブとなる「ハブ木」
11:09
We call those hub trees,
もっと愛情を込めて
「母なる木」と呼んでいます
11:11
or more fondly, mother trees,
なぜなら こういうハブ木は
11:13
because it turns out
that those hub trees nurture their young,
低木層の若い木々の
世話をしているからです
11:18
the ones growing in the understory.
黄色い丸が見えると思いますが
11:20
And if you can see those yellow dots,
それは 古い母なる木のネットワーク内で
11:23
those are the young seedlings
that have established within the network
根付いた実生苗です
11:26
of the old mother trees.
1つの森の中で 1つの母なる木が
何百もの木と繋がっていることもあります
11:28
In a single forest, a mother tree can be
connected to hundreds of other trees.
同位体トレーサで調査したところ
11:33
And using our isotope tracers,
母なる木が
11:35
we have found that mother trees
菌根ネットワークを通して
余分の炭素を
11:37
will send their excess carbon
through the mycorrhizal network
低木層の苗に与え
11:40
to the understory seedlings,
苗の生存率を4倍にしていることが
11:42
and we've associated this
with increased seedling survival
分かりました
11:45
by four times.
誰でも自分の子供は可愛いものです
11:47
Now, we know we all
favor our own children,
ダグラスモミも自分の子供を
認識できるのでしょうか?
11:50
and I wondered, could Douglas fir
recognize its own kin,
母熊が自分の子熊が分かるように
11:55
like mama grizzly and her cub?
それで ある実験をしました
11:58
So we set about an experiment,
母なる木の元で その苗木と
他の木からの苗木を一緒に育てました
12:00
and we grew mother trees
with kin and stranger's seedlings.
すると母なる木は自分の子供を
確かに認識するのです
12:04
And it turns out
they do recognize their kin.
母なる木は自分の子供たちを
自分の庇護下に置き 菌根ネットワークを拡げ
12:07
Mother trees colonize their kin
with bigger mycorrhizal networks.
自分の子供たちには
地下でもっと炭素を送ります
12:12
They send them more carbon below ground.
また自分の根が広がりすぎないようにして
12:14
They even reduce
their own root competition
子供たちが根を伸ばせる場所を作ります
12:17
to make elbow room for their kids.
母なる木が傷ついたり死にかけると
12:19
When mother trees are injured or dying,
次の世代に生きる知恵を受け渡します
12:23
they also send messages of wisdom
on to the next generation of seedlings.
同位体トレーサで突き止められたことは
12:28
So we've used isotope tracing
12:30
to trace carbon moving
from an injured mother tree
炭素は 傷ついた母なる木から
幹を通り 菌根ネットワークに
12:33
down her trunk
into the mycorrhizal network
そして周りの若い木々にと
12:35
and into her neighboring seedlings,
防御信号と共に
送られているということでした
12:38
not only carbon but also defense signals.
そしてこれら2つの組み合わせで
12:41
And these two compounds
若木が これから受ける
ストレスに対する耐性が強化されるのです
12:43
have increased the resistance
of those seedlings to future stresses.
そうです 木々は話すのです
12:47
So trees talk.
(拍手)
12:50
(Applause)
ありがとうございます
12:52
Thank you.
木々は会話を交わし合いながら
12:57
Through back and forth conversations,
自分たちのコミュニティ全体の耐性を
強化しています
12:59
they increase the resilience
of the whole community.
それは我々の社会共同体や
家族を思わせます
13:03
It probably reminds you
of our own social communities,
13:06
and our families,
そうでない家族もありますが
13:07
well, at least some families.
(笑)
13:09
(Laughter)
本題に戻りましょう
13:11
So let's come back to the initial point.
森は ただの木の集合体というだけでなく
13:14
Forests aren't simply
collections of trees,
ハブとネットワークを備えた
複雑なシステムです
13:16
they're complex systems
with hubs and networks
その中の幾重にもなる繫がりが
木々を繋げ 互いに交流させ
13:20
that overlap and connect trees
and allow them to communicate,
それが情報交換や環境適応の手段となり
13:23
and they provide avenues
for feedbacks and adaptation,
森の再生能力を高めています
13:27
and this makes the forest resilient.
それは多くのハブ木があり
ネットワークも重なり合っているからです
13:30
That's because there are many hub trees
and many overlapping networks.
しかし森はとても傷つき易いものです
13:34
But they're also vulnerable,
自然の災い—
13:36
vulnerable not only
to natural disturbances
例えば古い大木を好んで攻撃する
キクイムシだけでなく
13:40
like bark beetles that preferentially
attack big old trees
大木を狙った択伐や
皆伐からも痛手を受けます
13:43
but high-grade logging
and clear-cut logging.
ハブ木 1、2本くらい
と思うかも知れませんが
13:47
You see, you can take out
one or two hub trees,
それだけ無くなっても
森は元に戻れなくなってしまいます
13:49
but there comes a tipping point,
13:52
because hub trees are not
unlike rivets in an airplane.
ハブ木は 飛行機の部品
リベットとは違います
リベットの1つや2つが外れたとしても
飛行機は飛べますが
13:55
You can take out one or two
and the plane still flies,
命取りになるのが外れたり
13:59
but you take out one too many,
翼を止めていたリベットが取れると
14:00
or maybe that one holding on the wings,
機体のシステムは崩壊してしまいます
14:03
and the whole system collapses.
さあ 森に対する見方は変わりましたか?
14:06
So now how are you thinking
about forests? Differently?
(観衆)はい
14:09
(Audience) Yes.
いいですね
14:10
Cool.
嬉しいです
14:12
I'm glad.
先程 私の研究での発見で
林業のあり方が変わればいいと
14:14
So, remember I said earlier
that I hoped that my research,
私が言ったことを思い出して下さい
14:18
my discoveries would change
the way we practice forestry.
そうなっているか ここ カナダ西部の
30年後の今を調べてみたいと思います
14:22
Well, I want to take a check on that
30 years later here in western Canada.
ここから約百キロ西に行った
14:34
This is about 100 kilometers
to the west of us,
バンフ国立公園の境界にある森です
14:37
just on the border of Banff National Park.
皆伐された所が多く
14:40
That's a lot of clear-cuts.
あまり自然が残っていません
14:42
It's not so pristine.
2014年に世界資源研究所は
過去10年間でカナダは
14:45
In 2014, the World Resources Institute
reported that Canada in the past decade
世界で最も森林破壊が進んだ国だ
という報告書を出しています
14:50
has had the highest forest disturbance
rate of any country worldwide,
きっとブラジルだと思われていたでしょう
14:55
and I bet you thought it was Brazil.
カナダの森林破壊率は年に3.6%です
14:58
In Canada, it's 3.6 percent per year.
私の推定では それは
再生可能な伐採率の約4倍です
15:02
Now, by my estimation, that's about
four times the rate that is sustainable.
このような大規模な破壊は
水循環に悪影響を及ぼし
15:08
Now, massive disturbance at this scale
is known to affect hydrological cycles,
野生動物の生息環境を乱し
15:13
degrade wildlife habitat,
大気中に温室効果ガスを放出させる
ということが分かっています
15:15
and emit greenhouse gases
back into the atmosphere,
15:18
which creates more disturbance
and more tree diebacks.
これは樹木に取って打撃となり
立ち枯れが増えてしまいます
それだけでなく特定の1、2種だけを植え
15:23
Not only that, we're continuing
to plant one or two species
アスペンやカバノキを除伐し続けることで
15:26
and weed out the aspens and birches.
森が単純化され 多様性がなくなり
15:29
These simplified forests lack complexity,
樹木は感染や害虫に対する
耐性を失ってしまいます
15:31
and they're really vulnerable
to infections and bugs.
気候変動が進むにつれ
15:35
And as climate changes,
あらゆる厄災が
非常事態を起こしています
15:37
this is creating a perfect storm
その極端事象の例として
アメリカマツノキクイムシの大量発生が
15:41
for extreme events, like the massive
mountain pine beetle outbreak
北米で広がったことや
15:44
that just swept across North America,
この数ヶ月間にアルバータ州で起きた
大規模な山火事があります
15:47
or that megafire in the last
couple months in Alberta.
最後の質問に移りたいと思います
15:52
So I want to come back
to my final question:
森林を弱体化させないで
15:56
instead of weakening our forests,
気候変動に立ち向かえるよう
どう森林を強化できるでしょうか?
15:58
how can we reinforce them
and help them deal with climate change?
複雑なシステムである森林が素晴らしいのは
16:03
Well, you know, the great thing
about forests as complex systems
その限りない自己回復力です
16:07
is they have enormous
capacity to self-heal.
最近の我々の実験で
16:11
In our recent experiments,
一部皆伐により ハブ木を残し
16:12
we found with patch-cutting
and retention of hub trees
多様な樹種、遺伝子、遺伝子型の
再生を維持することで
16:16
and regeneration to a diversity
of species and genes and genotypes
菌根ネットワークが
実に早く回復するとわかりました
16:20
that these mycorrhizal networks,
they recover really rapidly.
これを念頭に置き
4つの簡単な解決法を提案します
16:25
So with this in mind, I want to leave you
with four simple solutions.
行動に移すにはあまりに複雑すぎる
という言い訳は通りません
16:30
And we can't kid ourselves
that these are too complicated to act on.
まずは みなさん
森に行かなくてはなりません
16:35
First, we all need
to get out in the forest.
地域と森林との関わりを
再び取り戻すべきです
16:39
We need to reestablish
local involvement in our own forests.
ほとんどの森は現在
16:43
You see, most of our forests now
一律の やり方で管理されていますが
16:45
are managed using
a one-size-fits-all approach,
うまく森林を管理するには
地域の状況を知る必要があります
16:48
but good forest stewardship
requires knowledge of local conditions.
第二に 原生林を残さなくてはなりません
16:54
Second, we need to save
our old-growth forests.
原生林は 遺伝子、母なる木
菌根ネットワークの宝庫だからです
16:58
These are the repositories of genes
and mother trees and mycorrhizal networks.
それには伐採を減らすべきですが
17:06
So this means less cutting.
伐採禁止でなく控えめにという意味です
17:08
I don't mean no cutting, but less cutting.
第三に 伐採をする時は
17:11
And third, when we do cut,
太古から受け継がれて来た自然
17:14
we need to save the legacies,
母なる木 菌根ネットワーク
17:17
the mother trees and networks,
木々 遺伝子などを
保持する必要があります
17:18
and the wood, the genes,
17:20
so they can pass their wisdom
onto the next generation of trees
そうして 母なる木の知恵が
次世代の樹木に受け渡され
若木が これから直面する障害に
対抗できるようにするのです
17:24
so they can withstand
the future stresses coming down the road.
我々は自然保護に
真剣に取り組むべきです
17:28
We need to be conservationists.
第四番目 最後に
17:31
And finally, fourthly and finally,
我々の森を 種や遺伝子型や構造の
多様性が備わった森に
17:35
we need to regenerate our forests
with a diversity of species
17:38
and genotypes and structures
再生させるのです
植樹したり 自然回復させたりして
再生しなければなりません
17:40
by planting and allowing
natural regeneration.
自然が必要とする
道具を用意してあげ
17:44
We have to give Mother Nature
the tools she needs
自らの力で回復させるのです
17:47
to use her intelligence to self-heal.
森林では 木々は
17:51
And we need to remember
that forests aren't just a bunch of trees
ただ生存競争しているだけではなく
17:54
competing with each other,
素晴らしく協力し合っているのです
17:55
they're supercooperators.
私の犬ジグスはというと
17:58
So back to Jigs.
ジグスは屋外トイレに落ちて
私をこの隠れた世界に導いてくれ
18:00
Jigs's fall into the outhouse
showed me this other world,
私の森林観を変えてくれました
18:04
and it changed my view of forests.
皆様の森林観もこの私のトークで
変わったことを願っています
18:07
I hope today to have changed
how you think about forests.
ありがとうございました
18:10
Thank you.
(拍手)
18:12
(Applause)
Translator:Reiko Bovee
Reviewer:Yuko Yoshida

sponsored links

Suzanne Simard - Forest ecologist
Suzanne Simard studies the complex, symbiotic networks in our forests.

Why you should listen

A professor of forest ecology at the University of British Columbia's Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences in Vancouver, Suzanne Simard studies the surprising and delicate complexity in nature. Her main focus is on the below-ground fungal networks that connect trees and facilitate underground inter-tree communication and interaction. Her team's analysis revealed that the fungi networks move water, carbon and nutrients such as nitrogen between and among trees as well as across species. The research has demonstrated that these complex, symbiotic networks in our forests -- at the hub of which stand what she calls the "mother trees" -- mimic our own neural and social networks. This groundbreaking work on symbiotic plant communication has far-reaching implications in both the forestry and agricultural industries, in particular concerning sustainable stewardship of forests and the plant’s resistance to pathogens. She works primarily in forests, but also grasslands, wetlands, tundra and alpine ecosystems.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.