18:50
TEDSummit

Don Tapscott: How the blockchain is changing money and business

ドン・タプスコット: ブロックチェーンはいかにお金と経済を変えるか

Filmed:

ブロックチェーンとは何でしょう? 知らなければ、知っておいたほうが良いです。知っていたとしても、たぶんそれが正確にどう働くのか明確にする必要があることでしょう。お金、ビジネス、政府、社会を大きく変える可能性を持った第2世代のインターネットとも言うべきこの画期的な信用構築技術を、ドン・タプスコットが分かりやすく解説してくれます。

- Digital strategist
Don Tapscott takes the long view on our digital, connected, hyper-collaborative world. Full bio

The technology likely to have
the greatest impact
今後2〜30年で
00:12
on the next few decades
最も大きなインパクトが
あるであろう
00:16
has arrived.
技術が現れました
00:18
And it's not social media.
ソーシャルメディアではなく
00:19
It's not big data.
ビッグデータでも
00:22
It's not robotics.
ロボティクスでもなく
00:23
It's not even AI.
人工知能でさえありません
00:25
You'll be surprised to learn
それがビットコインのような
デジタル通貨の
00:27
that it's the underlying technology
of digital currencies like Bitcoin.
基盤にある技術だと言ったら
驚くかもしれません
00:29
It's called the blockchain. Blockchain.
これは「ブロックチェーン」と
呼ばれています
00:34
Now, it's not the most sonorous
word in the world,
そんなに輝かしい響きの
言葉ではありませんが
00:38
but I believe that this is now
私はこれが
00:42
the next generation of the internet,
次のインターネットになると
信じており
00:44
and that it holds vast promise
for every business, every society
あらゆるビジネス 社会
そして皆さんの1人1人に
00:47
and for all of you, individually.
大いなる恩恵を
約束するものと見ています
00:51
You know, for the past few decades,
we've had the internet of information.
この20年の間 私たちは
情報のインターネットを手にしていました
00:54
And when I send you an email
or a PowerPoint file or something,
メールや PowerPointファイルを
送るときには
00:59
I'm actually not sending you the original,
原本を送っている
わけではなく
01:03
I'm sending you a copy.
コピーを送っています
01:05
And that's great.
これはいいことで
01:07
This is democratized information.
情報の民主化をします
01:08
But when it comes to assets --
しかし送るものが
資産だとしたら?
01:12
things like money,
たとえば お金とか
01:15
financial assets like stocks and bonds,
株や債券のような金融資産
01:17
loyalty points, intellectual property,
ロイヤリティ・ポイント 知的所有権
01:20
music, art, a vote,
音楽 美術品 選挙の票
01:23
carbon credit and other assets --
炭酸ガス排出権
といった資産なら
01:26
sending you a copy is a really bad idea.
コピーを送るというのは
良い考えではありません
01:29
If I send you 100 dollars,
100ドル送金するというとき
01:32
it's really important
that I don't still have the money --
まだお金を持っていないのに
送れたりしないというのは —
01:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:37
and that I can't send it to you.
とても重要なことです
01:38
This has been called
the "double-spend" problem
これは「二重使用の問題」として
01:40
by cryptographers for a long time.
暗号の専門家には
お馴染みの問題です
01:42
So today, we rely entirely
on big intermediaries --
現在 私たちは大きな仲介者に
依存しています
01:45
middlemen like banks, government,
銀行 政府 ソーシャルメディア企業
01:50
big social media companies,
credit card companies and so on --
クレジットカード会社のような
仲立ちとなる存在が
01:53
to establish trust in our economy.
経済における
信用を維持していて
01:56
And these intermediaries perform
all the business and transaction logic
そういった仲介者は
認証 人物の確認から
01:59
of every kind of commerce,
精算 調停 記録管理まで
02:04
from authentication,
identification of people,
商取引等におけるあらゆるビジネスや
トランザクションの
02:06
through to clearing, settling
and record keeping.
処理を行っています
02:09
And overall, they do a pretty good job.
総体的には彼らは
良い仕事をしていますが
02:13
But there are growing problems.
拡大しつつある
問題もあります
02:15
To begin, they're centralized.
まずそれが集中管理
されているということ
02:17
That means they can be hacked,
and increasingly are --
これはハッキングされうることを意味し
実際そういう事例が増えています
02:19
JP Morgan, the US Federal Government,
JPモルガン 米連邦政府
LinkedIn
02:22
LinkedIn, Home Depot and others
ザ・ホーム・デポ などがみんな
02:25
found that out the hard way.
痛い思いをして
それを学んでいます
02:26
They exclude billions of people
from the global economy,
またそれは何十億という人々を
世界経済から除外しています
02:28
for example, people
who don't have enough money
たとえば銀行口座を開けるほど
02:32
to have a bank account.
お金を持たない人たちです
02:34
They slow things down.
それはまた物事を遅らせます
02:36
It can take a second for an email
to go around the world,
電子メールは世界のどこへでも
数秒で届きますが
02:38
but it can take days or weeks
銀行システムで都市をまたいで
お金を移動するのには
02:42
for money to move through
the banking system across a city.
何日 何週間とかかります
02:44
And they take a big piece of the action --
それはまた大きな取り分を
要求します
02:48
10 to 20 percent just to send money
to another country.
外国に送金するだけで
10〜20%も取られます
02:50
They capture our data,
それはまた
我々のデータを握っており
02:54
and that means we can't monetize it
我々自身が
それで収益を得たり
02:55
or use it to better manage our lives.
生活をより良く管理するために使う
といったことができません
02:57
Our privacy is being undermined.
また我々のプライバシーを
危うくします
03:00
And the biggest problem is that overall,
そして最大の問題は
03:03
they've appropriated the largesse
of the digital age asymmetrically:
それがデジタル時代の恩恵を
非対称的に得ているということです
03:06
we have wealth creation,
but we have growing social inequality.
富が生み出されていますが
社会的不平等は拡大しています
03:11
So what if there were not only
an internet of information,
もし情報のインターネットだけでなく
03:17
what if there were an internet of value --
価値のインターネットが
あったとしたらどうでしょう?
03:21
some kind of vast, global,
distributed ledger
1つの巨大な
世界的分散台帳が
03:24
running on millions of computers
何百万というコンピューター上で
運営されていて
03:28
and available to everybody.
誰にでも使えたとしたら?
03:30
And where every kind of asset,
from money to music,
そしてお金から楽曲まで
あらゆる資産が
03:32
could be stored, moved, transacted,
exchanged and managed,
強力な仲介者なしに
03:36
all without powerful intermediaries?
それで保持 移動 取引 交換
管理できたとしたら?
03:42
What if there were
a native medium for value?
もし価値のための媒体が
存在したとしたら?
03:45
Well, in 2008, the financial
industry crashed
2008年に金融危機がありましたが
03:50
and, perhaps propitiously,
都合の良いことに
03:54
an anonymous person or persons
named Satoshi Nakamoto
サトシ・ナカモトという素性不明の
人物ないしはグループが
03:57
created a paper where he developed
a protocol for a digital cash
ビットコインという暗号通貨の
背後にある
04:03
that used an underlying
cryptocurrency called Bitcoin.
電子通貨プロトコルを開発して
論文にしました
04:10
And this cryptocurrency enabled people
to establish trust and do transactions
この暗号通貨は 人々の間に信用を構築して
取引ができるようにし
04:14
without a third party.
第三者を必要としません
04:20
And this seemingly simple act
set off a spark
この一見単純なことが
04:21
that ignited the world,
世界に燃え広がる火花となり
04:25
that has everyone excited
or terrified or otherwise interested
さまざまな所で人々の間に
04:27
in many places.
熱狂や恐怖や関心を
引き起こしています
04:33
Now, don't be confused about Bitcoin --
誤解しないで欲しいのは
04:34
Bitcoin is an asset; it goes up and down,
ビットコインというのは
資産で 上下をし
04:36
and that should be of interest
to you if you're a speculator.
それは相場師には
興味のあることでしょうが
04:39
More broadly, it's a cryptocurrency.
もっと広く言うと
それは暗号通貨であり
04:43
It's not a fiat currency
controlled by a nation-state.
国家によって管理される
法定通貨ではありません
04:45
And that's of greater interest.
それがより興味深い部分です
04:49
But the real pony here
is the underlying technology.
しかし その本当の
虎の巻とも言えるのは
04:51
It's called blockchain.
基盤にある技術
ブロックチェーンです
04:54
So for the first time now
in human history,
人類の歴史において初めて
04:57
people everywhere can trust each other
あらゆる場所の人々が
互いを信用し
05:01
and transact peer to peer.
直接取引できるように
なったのです
05:03
And trust is established,
not by some big institution,
この信用は何かの大組織によって
作り出されたものではなく
05:07
but by collaboration, by cryptography
協力と 暗号と
巧妙なプログラムによって
05:11
and by some clever code.
生み出されたものです
05:14
And because trust is native
to the technology,
信用がこの技術の
本質にあるので
05:16
I call this, "The Trust Protocol."
私はこれを「信用のプロトコル」と
呼んでいます
05:20
Now, you're probably wondering:
How does this thing work?
どういう仕組みなのか疑問に
思っていることでしょう
05:22
Fair enough.
もっともです
05:25
Assets -- digital assets like money
to music and everything in between --
お金から音楽まで
あらゆるデジタル資産が格納されるのは
05:28
are not stored in a central place,
どこかの中心拠点ではなく
05:33
but they're distributed
across a global ledger,
最高度の暗号によって
分散して維持されている
05:35
using the highest level of cryptography.
世界台帳です
05:37
And when a transaction is conducted,
取引が行われるとき
05:40
it's posted globally,
それが世界の何百万という
コンピューターに
05:43
across millions and millions of computers.
送られます
05:45
And out there, around the world,
そこには「採掘者」(マイナー)と
呼ばれる人々がいます
05:49
is a group of people called "miners."
未成年者の
マイナー(minor)ではなく
05:51
These are not young people,
they're Bitcoin miners.
ビットコインを採掘する
マイナー(miner)です
05:53
They have massive computing power
at their fingertips --
採掘者は膨大な計算能力を
保持しています
05:57
10 to 100 times bigger
than all of Google worldwide.
Google全社の10倍から100倍
という規模です
06:00
These miners do a lot of work.
採掘者は多くの作業をしています
06:05
And every 10 minutes,
10分ごとに —
06:08
kind of like the heartbeat of a network,
これはネットワークの
鼓動のようなものですが
06:09
a block gets created
ブロックが1つ作られ
06:11
that has all the transactions
from the previous 10 minutes.
その前の10分間における
すべての取引がそこに含まれています
06:14
Then the miners get to work,
trying to solve some tough problems.
それから採掘者たちが
ある困難な問題を解こうとします
06:17
And they compete:
彼らは競争しています
06:22
the first miner to find out the truth
and to validate the block,
答えを最初に見つけて
ブロックを検証した採掘者には
06:24
is rewarded in digital currency,
電子通貨が与えられます
06:28
in the case of the Bitcoin
blockchain, with Bitcoin.
ビットコインのブロックチェーンの場合は
ビットコインです
06:30
And then -- this is the key part --
そして ここが肝心なところですが
06:34
that block is linked to the previous block
ブロックは前のブロック
06:36
and the previous block
その前のブロックと繋がれて
06:38
to create a chain of blocks.
ブロックの鎖が作られます
06:40
And every one is time-stamped,
それぞれに タイムスタンプが
押されていて
06:43
kind of like with a digital waxed seal.
電子的な封蝋のように働きます
06:44
So if I wanted to go and hack a block
だからもしブロックをハッキングして
06:47
and, say, pay you and you
with the same money,
たとえば同じお金を
2人に払おうとするとしたら
06:49
I'd have to hack that block,
そのブロックだけでなく
06:54
plus all the preceding blocks,
そのブロックチェーン上の
06:55
the entire history of commerce
on that blockchain,
取引履歴全体を
変える必要があり
06:57
not just on one computer
but across millions of computers,
それを1台のコンピュータ—でなく
07:00
simultaneously,
最高度の暗号を使っている
07:04
all using the highest
levels of encryption,
何百万というコンピューター上で
同時に行う必要があり
07:06
in the light of the most powerful
computing resource in the world
しかも世界で最も強力な
計算リソースの
07:09
that's watching me.
監視下で行う
必要があるのです
07:12
Tough to do.
簡単じゃありません
07:13
This is infinitely more secure
これは今日の他の
コンピューターシステムと比べて
07:15
than the computer systems
that we have today.
限りなく高い
安全性があります
07:17
Blockchain. That's how it works.
それがブロックチェーンの仕組みです
07:20
So the Bitcoin blockchain is just one.
ビットコインは
07:23
There are many.
数あるブロックチェーンの
1つにすぎません
07:25
The Ethereum blockchain was developed
by a Canadian named Vitalik Buterin.
イーサリアム・ブロックチェーンは
07:26
He's [22] years old,
ヴィタリック・ブテリンという
22歳のカナダ人が開発したもので
07:31
and this blockchain
has some extraordinary capabilities.
これには際だった機能があります
07:33
One of them is that you can
build smart contracts.
その1つは「スマート・コントラクト」を
作れるということです
07:38
It's kind of what it sounds like.
これは その言葉通りのもので
07:41
It's a contract that self-executes,
実行機能付の契約です
07:43
and the contract handles the enforcement,
the management, performance
人々の間の合意事項に基づいて
07:45
and payment -- the contract kind of has
a bank account, too, in a sense --
契約自体が執行 管理 履行
支払いといった処理をします
07:50
of agreements between people.
契約が銀行口座を
持っているようなものです
07:55
And today, on the Ethereum blockchain,
現在イーサリアム・
ブロックチェーンについて
07:57
there are projects underway
to do everything
様々なプロジェクトが
進められていて
08:00
from create a new replacement
for the stock market
それには株式市場を
置き換えるものの創出から
08:02
to create a new model of democracy,
政治家が市民への
責任を果たすような
08:05
where politicians
are accountable to citizens.
新しい民主主義モデルまであります
08:07
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:10
So to understand what a radical change
this is going to bring,
これがどれほど大きな変化を
もたらすか理解するために
08:14
let's look at one industry,
financial services.
金融サービスを例に見てみましょう
08:18
Recognize this?
これが何か分かりますか?
08:21
Rube Goldberg machine.
ルーブ・ゴールドバーグ・マシンです
08:23
It's a ridiculously complicated machine
that does something really simple,
卵を割るとかドアを閉めるといった
ごく単純なことをするために
08:25
like crack an egg or shut a door.
複雑怪奇に組み上げられた
装置です
08:28
Well, it kind of reminds me
of the financial services industry,
これは金融サービス業界を
思い起こさせますね
08:31
honestly.
ぶっちゃけた話
08:35
I mean, you tap your card
in the corner store,
角の店でカードを使うと
08:36
and a bitstream goes through
a dozen companies,
デジタル情報が何十という
企業を経ていきますが
08:39
each with their own computer system,
それぞれが固有の情報システムを
持っていて
08:42
some of them being 1970s mainframes
中には この場の人の多くが
生まれる前の
08:45
older than many
of the people in this room,
70年代のメインフレームを
使っているところもあり
08:47
and three days later, a settlement occurs.
3日後にようやく決済が
完了するという具合です
08:50
Well, with a blockchain
financial industry,
金融業界がブロックチェーンを
使っていれば
08:53
there would be no settlement,
決済は必要ありません
08:57
because the payment and the settlement
is the same activity,
支払いと決済は
同一の行為で
08:58
it's just a change in the ledger.
単に台帳の上の
1箇所の変更です
09:01
So Wall Street and all around the world,
だからウォールストリートや
世界の金融業界は
09:04
the financial industry
is in a big upheaval about this,
この件で大騒ぎになっています
09:06
wondering, can we be replaced,
自分たちはお払い箱に
なってしまうのか
09:09
or how do we embrace
this technology for success?
自分たちの成功のために
この技術をどう取り入れられるのかと
09:11
Now, why should you care?
なぜこれを 気にかける
必要があるのか?
09:15
Well, let me describe some applications.
いくつかの応用例を
説明しましょう
09:18
Prosperity.
繁栄 —
09:21
The first era of the internet,
インターネットの最初の時代
09:23
the internet of information,
情報のインターネットは
富を生み出しましたが
09:25
brought us wealth
but not shared prosperity,
繁栄は共有されず
09:26
because social inequality is growing.
社会的不平等が
拡大しています
09:30
And this is at the heart
of all of the anger and extremism
これが様々な問題の
核にあります
09:32
and protectionism and xenophobia and worse
怒り 過激思想 保護主義
外国人嫌い その他
09:36
that we're seeing growing
in the world today,
今日の世界で私たちが
目にしているもので
09:40
Brexit being the most recent case.
ブレグジットは
その最近の例です
09:43
So could we develop some new approaches
to this problem of inequality?
この不平等の問題への
新しい解決法を作り出せないでしょうか?
09:46
Because the only approach today
is to redistribute wealth,
現在の唯一の解決法は
富の再分配で
09:52
tax people and spread it around more.
課税して広く配分する
ということです
09:56
Could we pre-distribute wealth?
富をあらかじめ分配することは
できないでしょうか?
09:58
Could we change the way that wealth
gets created in the first place
富の生成のされ方自体を
変えることはできないでしょうか?
10:01
by democratizing wealth creation,
富の生成を民主化し
10:04
engaging more people in the economy,
もっと多くの人が
経済にかかわるようにし
10:07
and then ensuring that they got
fair compensation?
その人達が公正な分け前を
確かにもらえるようにはできないか?
10:09
Let me describe five ways
that this can be done.
それを実現しうる5つの方法を
説明しましょう
10:13
Number one:
1番目
10:16
Did you know that 70 percent
of the people in the world who have land
世界の土地所有者の70%は
10:18
have a tenuous title to it?
貧弱な権利しか持っていないことを
ご存じですか?
10:23
So, you've got a little farm in Honduras,
some dictator comes to power,
ホンジュラスで小さな農地を持ったとしても
権力を掌握した独裁者に言われるかもしれません
10:25
he says, "I know you've got a piece
of paper that says you own your farm,
「お前が土地を所有していると書いた書面を
持っているのは知っているが
10:29
but the government computer
says my friend owns your farm."
政府のコンピューターでは我々の友人が
お前の土地の所有者だということになっている」
10:32
This happened on a mass scale in Honduras,
ホンジュラスでは
そういうことが大規模に起きており
10:36
and this problem exists everywhere.
同じ問題が
至る所に見られます
10:39
Hernando de Soto, the great
Latin American economist,
ラテンアメリカの優れた経済学者
エルナンド・デ・ソトが言っています
10:42
says this is the number one
issue in the world
「経済的流動性の点で
10:45
in terms of economic mobility,
これは世界で
最も大きな問題であり
10:47
more important than having a bank account,
銀行口座の所有よりも
重要である
10:48
because if you don't have
a valid title to your land,
自分の土地に対する正当な権利を
持たないとしたら
10:50
you can't borrow against it,
それを担保に
借金することもできず
10:53
and you can't plan for the future.
将来の計画も
立てられないからだ」
10:55
So today, companies
are working with governments
現在 政府と協力して
10:57
to put land titles on a blockchain.
土地の権利をブロックチェーンに載せようと
取り組んでいる企業があります
11:01
And once it's there, this is immutable.
それができれば
改ざんできなくなります
11:03
You can't hack it.
ハッキングできません
11:06
This creates the conditions for prosperity
これは何十億という人々が
繁栄しうる条件を
11:08
for potentially billions of people.
作り出すことになります
11:11
Secondly:
2番目
11:14
a lot of writers talk about Uber
多くのライターが
11:16
and Airbnb and TaskRabbit
and Lyft and so on
Uber や Airbnb や
TaskRabbit や Lyft といった
11:18
as part of the sharing economy.
共有経済について
話題にしています
11:21
This is a very powerful idea,
対等な個々人がいっしょに富を生み出し
共有するというのは
11:24
that peers can come together
and create and share wealth.
とても強力なアイデアです
11:25
My view is that ...
私に言わせると
11:29
these companies are not really sharing.
そういった企業は本当に
共有をしてはいません
11:31
In fact, they're successful
precisely because they don't share.
実際これらの企業が成功しているのは
まさに 共有しないことによってなのです
11:35
They aggregate services together,
and they sell them.
彼らは人々のサービスを集約し
それを売っているのです
11:39
What if, rather than Airbnb
being a $25 billion corporation,
Airbnbという
250億ドル企業の代わりに
11:43
there was a distributed application
on a blockchain, we'll call it B-Airbnb,
ブロックチェーン上の分散アプリケーションがあって —
これをB-Airbnbとでも呼びましょうか —
11:48
and it was essentially owned
by all of the people
そのブロックチェーンが
11:54
who have a room to rent.
貸せる部屋を持つすべての人に
共有されているとしたらどうでしょう?
11:58
And when someone wants to rent a room,
そして誰かが部屋を
借りたいというときは
12:00
they go onto the blockchain
database and all the criteria,
そのブロックチェーンの
データベースで
12:03
they sift through, it helps
them find the right room,
様々な条件で絞り込んで
適切な部屋を探せ
12:07
and then the blockchain helps
with the contracting,
さらに契約
12:09
it identifies the party,
関係者の識別
12:12
it handles the payments
支払いの処理も
12:14
just through digital payments --
they're built into the system.
システムに組み込まれた
電子支払いシステムで行えます
12:15
And it even handles reputation,
評判もそれで
扱うことができます
12:19
because if she rates a room
as a five-star room,
ゲストが部屋を
五つ星に評価したら
12:20
that room is there,
部屋もレーティングも
そこに記録され
12:24
and it's rated, and it's immutable.
改ざんは不能です
12:26
So, the big sharing-economy
disruptors in Silicon Valley
だから共有経済で革新する
シリコンバレー企業も
12:29
could be disrupted,
淘汰されるかもしれず
12:34
and this would be good for prosperity.
これは人々の繁栄にとって
良いことなのです
12:36
Number three:
3番目
12:38
the biggest flow of funds
from the developed world
先進国から発展途上国への
12:40
to the developing world
最大の資金の流れは
12:42
is not corporate investment,
企業投資ではなく
12:44
and it's not even foreign aid.
海外援助でもなく
12:46
It's remittances.
実は送金なんです
12:49
This is the global diaspora;
全世界規模の
ディアスポラがあり
12:52
people have left their ancestral lands,
祖先の地を離れた人々が
12:54
and they're sending money back
to their families at home.
家族のいる故国に
送金しているのです
12:56
This is 600 billion dollars a year,
and it's growing,
それは年に6千億ドルにもなり
増加しています
13:00
and these people are getting ripped off.
そして彼らは食い物にされています
13:03
AnnaLee Domingo is a housekeeper.
アナリー・ドミンゴは家政婦で
13:06
She lives in Toronto,
トロントに住んでいます
13:09
and every month she goes
to the Western Union office
彼女は毎月お金を手に
13:11
with some cash
ウエスタンユニオンに出向き
13:16
to send her remittances
to her mom in Manila.
マニラにいる母親に
送金しています
13:18
It costs her around 10 percent;
手数料で10%取られます
13:21
the money takes four to seven
days to get there;
お金が向こうに着くのには
4〜7日かかります
13:23
her mom never knows
when it's going to arrive.
母親には
いつ届くのか分かりません
13:26
It takes five hours
out of her week to do this.
これのために彼女は
5時間も無駄にしています
13:28
Six months ago,
半年前のこと
アナリー・ドミンゴは
13:31
AnnaLee Domingo used
a blockchain application called Abra.
Abraというブロックチェーン・
アプリケーションを使って
13:32
And from her mobile device,
she sent 300 bucks.
自分の携帯から
300ドル送りました
13:37
It went directly
to her mom's mobile device
それは母親の携帯に直接
13:40
without going through an intermediary.
中間業者を介することなく
届きます
13:42
And then her mom
looked at her mobile device --
母親が携帯で
そのUberのようなアプリを開くと
13:45
it's kind of like an Uber interface,
there's Abra "tellers" moving around.
移動するAbraの
「出納係」が見られます
13:47
She clicks on a teller
that's a five-star teller,
彼女は家から
7分のところにいる
13:51
who's seven minutes away.
五つ星の出納係を
クリックします
13:54
The guy shows up at the door,
gives her Filipino pesos,
その男が玄関口にやってきて
彼女にフィリピン・ペソを渡し
13:56
she puts them in her wallet.
彼女は財布に収めます
13:59
The whole thing took minutes,
そのすべてに
数分しかかからず
14:01
and it cost her two percent.
手数料は2%だけです
14:03
This is a big opportunity for prosperity.
ここには繁栄の
大きな機会があります
14:06
Number four: the most powerful asset
of the digital age is data.
4番目 デジタル時代における
最も強力な資産は データです
14:09
And data is really a new asset class,
データは
まったく新種の資産で
14:14
maybe bigger than previous asset classes,
農業経済における土地や
14:17
like land under the agrarian economy,
産業経済における工場や
14:20
or an industrial plant,
お金といった
これまでの種類の資産より
14:23
or even money.
大きなものかもしれません
14:24
And all of you -- we -- create this data.
そしてデータを作っているのは
私たちみんなです
14:26
We create this asset,
私たちは生活していく中で
14:29
and we leave this trail
of digital crumbs behind us
このデータという資産を作り
14:31
as we go throughout life.
デジタルのパンくずを
残していきます
14:34
And these crumbs are collected
into a mirror image of you,
そして そのパンくずが集まって
その人の鏡像を作り出します
14:35
the virtual you.
「仮想的な自分」です
14:38
And the virtual you may know
more about you than you do,
「仮想的な自分」は自分のことを
本人以上に知っているかもしれません
14:40
because you can't remember
what you bought a year ago,
なぜなら1年前に何を買ったかとか
何を言ったかとか
14:43
or said a year ago,
or your exact location a year ago.
正確にどこにいたかとか
自分では覚えていないからです
14:45
And the virtual you is not owned by you --
そしてこの「仮想的な自分」を
所有しているのは 本人ではなく
14:48
that's the big problem.
そこが大きな問題です
14:51
So today, there are companies working
ブラックボックスに入った
アイデンティティを作ろうと
14:53
to create an identity in a black box,
現在取り組んでいる
企業があり
14:56
the virtual you owned by you.
そこで「仮想的な自分」を
所有するのは本人です
14:59
And this black box moves around with you
このブラックボックスは
15:01
as you travel throughout the world,
いつも自分についてまわり
15:05
and it's very, very stingy.
ものすごく しまり屋です
15:07
It only gives away
the shred of information
何かするのに
必要最小限の情報しか
15:09
that's required to do something.
渡しません
15:12
A lot of transactions,
多くの商取引において
15:13
the seller doesn't even need
to know who you are.
売り手は相手のことを
知る必要はありません
15:15
They just need to know that they got paid.
お金が支払われることだけ
分かっていればいいのです
15:17
And then this avatar
is sweeping up all of this data
このアバターは
すべてのデータをまとめていて
15:20
and enabling you to monetize it.
本人が収益化することができます
15:24
And this is a wonderful thing,
これは素晴らしいことで
15:28
because it can also help us
protect our privacy,
プライバシーを
守ることにもなります
15:29
and privacy is the foundation
of a free society.
プライバシーというのは
自由社会の基礎になるものです
15:33
Let's get this asset that we create
この私たち自身が作る資産を
15:36
back under our control,
自らの管理下に置き
15:38
where we can own our own identity
自分のアイデンティティを
本人が所有し
15:40
and manage it responsibly.
責任を持って
扱えるようにしましょう
15:42
Finally --
最後は —
15:45
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:46
Finally, number five:
5番目
15:52
there are a whole number
of creators of content
コンテンツの作者の多くが
15:53
who don't receive fair compensation,
公正な報酬を得ていません
15:57
because the system
for intellectual property is broken.
知的所有権のシステムに
欠陥があるためです
15:59
It was broken by the first era
of the internet.
インターネットが現れた時から
それは破綻していたんです
16:02
Take music.
例えば音楽です
16:05
Musicians are left with crumbs
at the end of the whole food chain.
食物連鎖の末端にいるミュージシャンには
パンくずくらいしか残されていません
16:07
You know, if you were a songwriter,
25 years ago, you wrote a hit song,
25年前のソングライターは
16:10
it got a million singles,
ヒットソングを作って
100万枚シングルが売れたら
16:15
you could get royalties
of around 45,000 dollars.
印税として
4万5千ドルくらい入りました
16:18
Today, you're a songwriter,
you write a hit song,
今日のソングライターは
16:21
it gets a million streams,
ヒットソングを作って
100万回ストリーミングされたら
16:23
you don't get 45k,
手に入るのは
4万5千ドルではなく
16:25
you get 36 dollars,
36ドルで
16:27
enough to buy a nice pizza.
ピザが買えるくらいです
16:29
So Imogen Heap,
グラミー賞を
受賞したこともある
16:32
the Grammy-winning singer-songwriter,
シンガー・ソングライターの
イモジェン・ヒープは
16:34
is now putting music
on a blockchain ecosystem.
今 曲をブロックチェーンに
載せています
16:36
She calls it "Mycelia."
彼女はこれを
Myceliaと名付けています
16:40
And the music has
a smart contract surrounding it.
曲は そのスマート・
コントラクトになっていて
16:42
And the music protects
her intellectual property rights.
彼女の知的所有権が
守られるようになっています
16:46
You want to listen to the song?
彼女の曲を聞きたい?
16:50
It's free, or maybe a few micro-cents
that flow into a digital account.
それなら無料か 数マイクロ・セントで
デジタル口座へ支払います
16:51
You want to put the song
in your movie, that's different,
その曲を映画に使いたいとなれば
別の話で
16:54
and the IP rights are all specified.
それぞれの条件が
すべて規定されています
16:57
You want to make a ringtone?
That's different.
着信音を作りたいとなれば
また別の話です
16:59
She describes that the song
becomes a business.
曲が事業になると
彼女は書いています
17:02
It's out there on this platform
marketing itself,
このプラットフォーム上にあって
自分でマーケティングをし
17:05
protecting the rights of the author,
作者の権利を守り
17:08
and because the song has a payment system
そして曲には
17:10
in the sense of bank account,
銀行口座のように
支払いシステムがあるので
17:12
all the money flows back to the artist,
お金はすべて
アーティスト本人に流れ
17:13
and they control the industry,
強力な中間者ではなく
17:16
rather than these powerful intermediaries.
アーティストが音楽業界を
コントロールできます
17:18
Now, this is --
これは —
17:21
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:22
This is not just songwriters,
これはソングライターに
限った話ではなく
17:27
it's any creator of content,
あらゆるコンテンツ作者が使えます
17:29
like art,
アートでも
17:30
like inventions,
発明でも
17:32
scientific discoveries, journalists.
科学的発見でも
ジャーナリストでも
17:34
There are all kinds of people
who don't get fair compensation,
公正な見返りを受けていない
様々な人がいますが
17:37
and with blockchains,
ブロックチェーンによって
17:40
they're going to be able
to make it rain on the blockchain.
彼らがちゃんと報酬を
得られるようになります
17:42
And that's a wonderful thing.
これは良いことです
17:46
So, these are five opportunities
繁栄という問題を解決する
17:48
out of a dozen
何十もの方法のうちの
17:53
to solve one problem, prosperity,
5つをご紹介しましたが
17:54
which is one of countless problems
ブロックチェーンが解決できる問題は
17:57
that blockchains are applicable to.
他にも無数にあります
18:00
Now, technology doesn't create
prosperity, of course -- people do.
繁栄を生み出すのは
テクノロジーではなく 人間です
18:03
But my case to you is that, once again,
しかし私が言いたいのは
18:07
the technology genie
has escaped from the bottle,
テクノロジーの魔神が再び
壺から逃げ出したということです
18:11
and it was summoned
by an unknown person or persons
人類の歴史における
ある不明な時期に
18:15
at this uncertain time in human history,
素性の知れない人によって
この魔神は召還されましたが
18:18
and it's giving us
another kick at the can,
それは私たちに
新しい機会を
18:22
another opportunity to rewrite
the economic power grid
経済の電力網と
古い秩序を書き換え
18:25
and the old order of things,
世界の最も難しい
問題のいくつかを
18:30
and solve some of the world's most
difficult problems,
解決できる機会を
与えているのです
18:32
if we will it.
もし我々がそう望むなら
18:37
Thank you.
どうもありがとう
18:39
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:41
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Masako Kigami

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Don Tapscott - Digital strategist
Don Tapscott takes the long view on our digital, connected, hyper-collaborative world.

Why you should listen

A leading analyst of innovation and the impacts of technology, Don Tapscott has authored or co-authored 15 widely read books about various aspects of the reshaping of our society and economy. His work Wikinomics counts among the most influential business books of the last decade. His new book The Blockchain Revolution, co-authored with his son, Alex, discusses the blockchain, the distributed-database technology that's being deployed well beyond its original application as the public ledger behind Bitcoin. In the book, they analyze why blockchain technology will fundamentally change the internet -- how it works, how to use it and its promises and perils.

Tapscott is an adjunct professor of management at the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto, a Senior Advisor at the World Economic Forum and an Associate of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University.

More profile about the speaker
Don Tapscott | Speaker | TED.com