10:06
TEDSummit

Pico Iyer: The beauty of what we'll never know

ピコ・アイヤー: 知りえないことの素晴らしさ

Filmed:

約30年前、ピコ・アイヤーは日本へ旅をし、日本に魅了され、居を移しました。人間の精神を鋭く観察するアイヤーは、30年目と比べて今の方が、日本の事に限らず、あらゆることを遥かに知らないと感じていると言います。詩的にそして瞑想のごとく知恵を熟考するなかで、アイヤーは、年齢を重ねることで得られた知識への興味深い洞察を語ります。人は知れば知るほど、いかに知らないかが分かるというのです。

- Global author
Pico Iyer has spent more than 30 years tracking movement and stillness -- and the way criss-crossing cultures have changed the world, our imagination and all our relationships. Full bio

ある10月の暑い朝
00:13
One hot October morning,
夜汽車を降りたった私は
00:16
I got off the all-night train
マンダレーにいました
00:19
in Mandalay,
00:20
the old royal capital of Burma,
ビルマ王朝
現在のミャンマーの古都です
00:23
now Myanmar.
通りに出ると 荒っぽそうな男達が
たむろしていました
00:25
And out on the street, I ran into
a group of rough men
皆 それぞれの自転車タクシーの側に
立っています
00:29
standing beside their bicycle rickshaws.
その中の一人が私に近づき
00:33
And one of them came up
観光案内を申し出てきました
00:35
and offered to show me around.
彼が提示した値段には呆れました
00:38
The price he quoted was outrageous.
いつも買う1本のチョコバーよりも
安かったのです
00:41
It was less than I would pay
for a bar of chocolate at home.
そこで自転車タクシーに乗り込むと
00:45
So I clambered into his trishaw,
彼は宮殿やパゴダの間を
ゆっくりと自転車を漕ぎ始めます
00:49
and he began pedaling us slowly
between palaces and pagodas.
そして故郷の小さな村から
都会に出てきた経緯を話してくれました
00:55
And as he did, he told me how
he had come to the city from his village.
数学の学位をとり
01:01
He'd earned a degree in mathematics.
教師になる夢をもっていましたが
01:03
His dream was to be a teacher.
独裁軍事政権下での生活は厳しく
01:06
But of course, life is hard
under a military dictatorship,
さしあたり 生計を立てるには
これしか ありませんでした
01:11
and so for now, this was the only way
he could make a living.
自転車タクシーの中で
夜を明かすことも多いそうです
01:16
Many nights, he told me,
he actually slept in his trishaw
早朝に到着する夜汽車の客を
つかまえるためです
01:20
so he could catch the first visitors
off the all-night train.
そんな話をしているとすぐに
私たち二人には
01:27
And very soon, we found
that in certain ways,
多くの共通点があることに気づきました
01:31
we had so much in common --
01:33
we were both in our 20s,
二人とも20代で
異文化に魅了されていました
01:34
we were both fascinated
by foreign cultures --
それで彼は家に招待してくれました
01:38
that he invited me home.
人が溢れる大通りから離れ
01:42
So we turned off the wide,
crowded streets,
荒れた路地をガタガタ揺られながら
進み始めました
01:45
and we began bumping
down rough, wild alleyways.
周りは荒廃した古小屋ばかりでした
01:50
There were broken shacks all around.
すっかり方向感覚を失い
01:52
I really lost the sense of where I was,
いつ何が起こっても
おかしくない状況であることに気づきました
01:56
and I realized that anything
could happen to me now.
襲われようが 薬を飲ませられようが
01:59
I could get mugged or drugged
どんなことに巻き込まれても
02:02
or something worse.
誰も気付かないでしょう
02:03
Nobody would know.
やっと目的地で止まり
あばら屋に案内されました
02:06
Finally, he stopped and led me into a hut,
小さな一部屋だけの住居でした
02:10
which consisted of just one tiny room.
そこで彼はかがみこみ
02:14
And then he leaned down,
ベッドの下に手を伸ばしました
02:16
and reached under his bed.
私は凍りつきました
02:19
And something in me froze.
何を取り出すのかと息を殺し待つと
02:24
I waited to see what he would pull out.
箱を出してきたのです
02:27
And finally he extracted a box.
箱に大切にしまわれていたのは
彼が今までに受け取った
02:31
Inside it was every single letter
he had ever received
海外の訪問客からの手紙でした
02:36
from visitors from abroad,
一部には 新しい外国の友達が写った
02:39
and on some of them he had pasted
ボロボロの小さな白黒の写真が
02:41
little black-and-white worn snapshots
貼られていました
02:44
of his new foreign friends.
その晩 別れ際に 気付いことは
02:48
So when we said goodbye that night,
この体験が旅をする秘めた意義も
02:52
I realized he had also shown me
見せてくれたことでした
02:54
the secret point of travel,
それは思い切って飛び込んでみること
02:56
which is to take a plunge,
外向きにも 内向きにも
02:59
to go inwardly as well as outwardly
自分がいつも行かない所に
行ってみること
03:01
to places you would never go otherwise,
未知の世界を冒険してみること
03:04
to venture into uncertainty,
不透明なこと
03:07
ambiguity,
恐れを体験することさえも
03:09
even fear.
日々の生活では
怖いほど当たり前に
03:12
At home, it's dangerously easy
全ての事を把握してると思いがちです
03:14
to assume we're on top of things.
ところが外に出ると 常にそうではないと
思い知らされます
03:17
Out in the world, you are reminded
every moment that you're not,
全ての事に関して
完璧に理解するのは不可能だと
03:22
and you can't get to the bottom
of things, either.
どこにいても
「人々は落ち着きを求める」
03:26
Everywhere, "People wish to be settled,"
ラルフ・ワルド・エマーソンは
私たちに思い起こさせます
03:29
Ralph Waldo Emerson reminded us,
03:31
"but only insofar
as we are unsettled
「でも 落ち着かないからこそ
我々は希望を持てる」のだと
03:34
is there any hope for us."
このカンファレンスでは
嬉しいことに
03:36
At this conference,
we've been lucky enough
沢山の刺激的なアイデアや発見が
共有されました
03:39
to hear some exhilarating
new ideas and discoveries
実に あらゆる方法で
03:42
and, really, about all the ways
知識の拡大が 刺激的に
推し進められています
03:44
in which knowledge is being
pushed excitingly forwards.
ただある時点で知識では
解決できない事も体験します
03:48
But at some point, knowledge gives out.
その時点が
03:52
And that is the moment
人生の大きな起点なのです
03:54
when your life is truly decided:
恋に落ちたり
03:57
you fall in love;
友達を失ったり
04:00
you lose a friend;
光が消えたその時点です
04:02
the lights go out.
方向性を失い
不安にかられ 自分を見失った時こそ
04:05
And it's then, when you're lost
or uneasy or carried out of yourself,
真の自分を見つめる事ができるのです
04:10
that you find out who you are.
私は「無知は至福」だとは思いません
04:14
I don't believe that ignorance is bliss.
科学の進歩は紛れもなく
我々に 明るくて
04:18
Science has unquestionably made our lives
長く 健やかな人生を
もたらしています
04:21
brighter and longer and healthier.
私は 物理法則を教えてくれた先生や
04:24
And I am forever grateful to the teachers
who showed me the laws of physics
3X3は9と教えてくれた先生には
感謝しきれません
04:29
and pointed out that
three times three makes nine.
それは 必要であれば昼でも夜でも
04:33
I can count that out on my fingers
指で勘定することができます
04:36
any time of night or day.
でも数学者に
04:40
But when a mathematician tells me
−3X−3も9だと言われれば
04:42
that minus three times
minus three makes nine,
その論理は ほぼ そのまま
納得できます
04:45
that's a kind of logic
that almost feels like trust.
言葉を変えて説明すると
知識の反対は 必ずしも無知ではありません
04:52
The opposite of knowledge, in other words,
isn't always ignorance.
驚嘆であるとか
04:56
It can be wonder.
又は 不思議や
04:58
Or mystery.
可能性とも なりえます
04:59
Possibility.
自らの体験で解ったのは
知っていることよりも
05:01
And in my life, I've found
it's the things I don't know
知らないことの方が 断然
気力を高めてくれ
05:05
that have lifted me up
and pushed me forwards
前進する原動力になってきたことです
05:08
much more than the things I do know.
また知らないことがきっかけとなり
05:12
It's also the things I don't know
周りの人との連帯感が生まれることも
多々ありました
05:14
that have often brought me closer
to everybody around me.
過去8年間 毎11月に
05:18
For eight straight Novembers, recently,
ダライ・ラマ法王猊下と共に日本を旅しました
05:20
I traveled every year across Japan
with the Dalai Lama.
彼が毎日 口にすることで
05:26
And the one thing he said every day
人々に安堵と自信を与える言葉が
05:29
that most seemed to give people
reassurance and confidence
「私にも わかりません」でした
05:32
was, "I don't know."
「チベットの将来の見通しは?」
05:36
"What's going to happen to Tibet?"
「世界平和はいつになったら訪れるのか?」
05:39
"When are we ever
going to get world peace?"
「子どもを育てる最適な方法は?」
05:42
"What's the best way to raise children?"
するとこの聡明な方は言うのです
「正直なところ
05:46
"Frankly," says this very wise man,
私にも わかりません」
05:49
"I don't know."
ノーベル賞を受賞した経済学者
ダニエル・カーネマンは
05:52
The Nobel Prize-winning
economist Daniel Kahneman
過去60年以上に渡り
人間の行動を研究してきました
05:55
has spent more than 60 years now
researching human behavior,
彼の研究の結果によると
06:00
and his conclusion is
人間は知っていると思っていることについて
06:02
that we are always much more confident
of what we think we know
必要以上に自信を持っています
06:07
than we should be.
彼の印象的な言葉を引用するなら
06:08
We have, as he memorably puts it,
我々には「無知を無視する
無限大の能力」があるのです
06:11
an "unlimited ability
to ignore our ignorance."
我々は いわば 今週末に
自分のチームが優勝することを予想し
06:16
We know -- quote, unquote -- our team
is going to win this weekend,
その事実を思い出すのは
06:21
and we only remember that knowledge
それが現実となった時だけなのです
06:24
on the rare occasions when we're right.
ほとんどの場合は暗中模索しています
06:27
Most of the time, we're in the dark.
そこに真の親密感が隠れているのです
06:31
And that's where real intimacy lies.
恋人が明日 何をするか知っていますか?
06:36
Do you know what your lover
is going to do tomorrow?
知りたいと思いますか?
06:40
Do you want to know?
一部の人たちが
全人類の祖と呼ぶ
06:43
The parents of us all,
as some people call them,
アダムとエバは
06:46
Adam and Eve,
命の木の実を食べ続ける限り
不死の身でした
06:47
could never die, so long as they
were eating from the tree of life.
しかし 善悪の知識の木から
06:52
But the minute they began nibbling
実を食べ始めた瞬間から
06:54
from the tree of the knowledge
of good and evil,
純白ではなくなったのです
06:57
they fell from their innocence.
二人は自意識が芽生えたことにより
気恥ずかしくなり
06:59
They grew embarrassed and fretful,
落ち着きませんでした
07:02
self-conscious.
二人はすでに手遅れとなった時点で
07:04
And they learned,
a little too late, perhaps,
知るべき事もあるが
07:07
that there are certainly some things
that we need to know,
追究しない方が良い事も
沢山あることを悟った訳です
07:10
but there are many, many more
that are better left unexplored.
私も子供の頃―
07:15
Now, when I was a kid,
もちろん子供なりに
何でも知っているつもりでした
07:17
I knew it all, of course.
20年も学業に没頭し知識を得て
07:21
I had been spending 20 years
in classrooms collecting facts,
その後 情報産業で働き
07:25
and I was actually
in the information business,
情報誌『タイム』に寄稿していました
07:28
writing articles for Time Magazine.
そして初めて日本発見の旅に出た時
2週間半過ごし
07:31
And I took my first real trip to Japan
for two-and-a-half weeks,
40ページの書き下ろしのエッセイを
旅のみやげに持って帰りました
07:36
and I came back with a 40-page essay
事細かに
日本の寺院や
07:39
explaining every last detail
about Japan's temples,
ファッション 野球のこと
07:43
its fashions, its baseball games,
日本の心を描写しました
07:46
its soul.
しかし そうした中で
07:49
But underneath all that,
まだよく解らない事実があることに
07:51
something that I couldn't understand
自分でも理解できない感動をおぼえ
07:54
so moved me for reasons
I couldn't explain to you yet,
日本に居を構える決心をしました
08:00
that I decided to go and live in Japan.
それから28年経った今でも
08:04
And now that I've been there for 28 years,
この第二の故郷については
08:07
I really couldn't tell you
very much at all
十分に語ることができません
08:09
about my adopted home.
そこが素晴らしいのです
08:12
Which is wonderful,
毎日 新しい発見をすることができ
08:13
because it means every day
I'm making some new discovery,
その過程で
08:16
and in the process,
曲がり角を覗くと
私が決して知りえないようなことが
08:18
looking around the corner
and seeing the hundred thousand things
数十万も潜んでいるのですから
08:21
I'll never know.
知識は代え難い賜り物です
08:24
Knowledge is a priceless gift.
しかし 知の幻想は
無知よりも危険なものです
08:28
But the illusion of knowledge
can be more dangerous than ignorance.
恋人を理解してると思い込むのも
08:33
Thinking that you know your lover
敵を知っていると思い込むのも
08:37
or your enemy
相手を知ることなどできないと
08:38
can be more treacherous
認めることよりも
危険だとも言えます
08:40
than acknowledging you'll never know them.
日本の小さな住まいで
毎朝 太陽の光を受けながら
08:43
Every morning in Japan, as the sun
is flooding into our little apartment,
あえて天気予報を見ないようにします
08:48
I take great pains not to consult
the weather forecast,
予報を聞くと
08:52
because if I do,
私の心は曇り 気が散ってしまうからです
08:54
my mind will be overclouded, distracted,
たとえ陽が出ていても
08:57
even when the day is bright.
作家を本業として34年経ちますが
09:02
I've been a full-time
writer now for 34 years.
一つ解ったことは
09:06
And the one thing that I have learned
自分の道を操らずにいる時
09:09
is that transformation comes
when I'm not in charge,
次に何がおきるか解らない時
09:13
when I don't know what's coming next,
周りよりも優れているんだと
驕らない時に 変化が訪れます
09:15
when I can't assume I am bigger
than everything around me.
愛に関しても同じですし
09:21
And the same is true in love
危機に直面した時も そうです
09:23
or in moments of crisis.
突如として 私たちは
あの自転車タクシーに呼び戻されます
09:26
Suddenly, we're back in that trishaw again
電灯に照らされた広い道を外れて
ガタガタと道を進むと
09:30
and we're bumping off the broad,
well-lit streets;
旅の最初の鉄則が蘇るのです
09:34
and we're reminded, really,
of the first law of travel
それは 人生の鉄則でもあります
09:38
and, therefore, of life:
どれだけ身を任せられるかで
自らの強さが決まるということです
09:41
you're only as strong
as your readiness to surrender.
結局のところ
09:47
In the end, perhaps,
人間らしくあることが
09:49
being human
全てを知ってしまうことよりも
09:51
is much more important
ずっと意義深いことなのではないでしょうか
09:53
than being fully in the know.
ありがとうございました
09:56
Thank you.
(拍手)
09:57
(Applause)
Translated by Chiyoko Tada
Reviewed by Yuko Yoshida

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Pico Iyer - Global author
Pico Iyer has spent more than 30 years tracking movement and stillness -- and the way criss-crossing cultures have changed the world, our imagination and all our relationships.

Why you should listen

In twelve books, covering everything from Revolutionary Cuba to the XIVth Dalai Lama, Islamic mysticism to our lives in airports, Pico Iyer has worked to chronicle the accelerating changes in our outer world, which sometimes make steadiness and rootedness in our inner world more urgent than ever. In his TED Book, The Art of Stillness, he draws upon travels from North Korea to Iran to remind us how to remain focused and sane in an age of frenzied distraction. As he writes in the book, "Almost everybody I know has this sense of overdosing on information and getting dizzy living at post-human speeds ... All of us instinctively feel that something inside us is crying out for more spaciousness and stillness to offset the exhilarations of this movement and the fun and diversion of the modern world."

More profile about the speaker
Pico Iyer | Speaker | TED.com