20:09
EG 2007

Mark Bittman: What's wrong with what we eat

マーク・ビットマン 「我々の食料に関する課題」

Filmed:

ニュユーク・タイムズ紙の料理記者のマーク・ビットマンは現代の我々が求める食べ物における問題について主張する。「肉を食べすぎ、野菜を充分に摂取していない・ファストフードをいっぱい食べている反面、家庭調理が少なくなった」という現在の習慣は地球に危機状態をもたらしていくという結論に達する情熱とユーモアに富んだ話。

- Food writer
Mark Bittman is a bestselling cookbook author, journalist and television personality. His friendly, informal approach to home cooking has shown millions that fancy execution is no substitute for flavor and soul. Full bio

I write about food. I write about cooking.
僕は食べ物と料理について書いている
00:16
I take it quite seriously,
まじめに書いているよ
00:18
but I'm here to talk about something
でも今日の話題はこの1、2年の間に
00:20
that's become very important to me in the last year or two.
僕にとって大事なことになった
00:22
It is about food, but it's not about cooking, per se.
食べ物の話だけど別に料理に関する訳ではない
00:26
I'm going to start with this picture of a beautiful cow.
では、初めにこの素敵な牛
00:31
I'm not a vegetarian -- this is the old Nixon line, right?
僕はベジタリアンじゃない(ニクソン大統領のセリフでしょう?)
00:34
But I still think that this --
でもこれは
00:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:39
-- may be this year's version of this.
今年、「これ」と共通点があるかもしれない
00:40
Now, that is only a little bit hyperbolic.
と言ってもそんなに誇張ではない
00:43
And why do I say it?
何でかな?
00:47
Because only once before has the fate of individual people
なぜなら以前に一回しか一人一人の運命と
00:49
and the fate of all of humanity
人類の運命はこんなに
00:53
been so intertwined.
絡み合っていた事がない
00:55
There was the bomb, and there's now.
爆弾があった、今も険しい
00:57
And where we go from here is going to determine
これからどうやって進むかというのは
01:00
not only the quality and the length of our individual lives,
我々の人生や寿命に直結しているし
01:02
but whether, if we could see the Earth a century from now,
100年後の世界が見れるとしたら
01:06
we'd recognize it.
見慣れない光景になっているのかな?
01:08
It's a holocaust of a different kind,
ある意味で虐殺の種だ
01:10
and hiding under our desks isn't going to help.
そして机の下に潜り込んでも避けられない
01:12
Start with the notion that global warming
まず地球温暖化の事は
01:15
is not only real, but dangerous.
危ないと思う
01:17
Since every scientist in the world now believes this,
全ての科学者がそう思っているし
01:19
and even President Bush has seen the light, or pretends to,
ブッシュ大統領でさえやっと解ったらしいので
01:22
we can take this is a given.
危なさは当たり前でしょう
01:25
Then hear this, please.
だからこれを聞き入れてください
01:28
After energy production, livestock is the second-highest contributor
エネルギー生産の次に一番多く温室ガスを排出しているのは
01:30
to atmosphere-altering gases.
畜産業だよ
01:34
Nearly one-fifth of all greenhouse gas
温室ガスの5分の1くらいは
01:36
is generated by livestock production --
畜産の動物によって出されている
01:40
more than transportation.
交通機関より多いんだよ
01:42
Now, you can make all the jokes you want about cow farts,
「って事は牛のおならのせいだ!」という冗談も出来る
01:44
but methane is 20 times more poisonous than CO2,
でもメタンは二酸化炭素より20倍有毒だよ
01:48
and it's not just methane.
そしてメタンの問題だけじゃない
01:51
Livestock is also one of the biggest culprits in land degradation,
畜産業は土壌の浸食、水と大気汚染
01:53
air and water pollution, water shortages and loss of biodiversity.
水不足と生物多様性損失の元凶になっている
01:57
There's more.
まだあるんですよ
02:02
Like half the antibiotics in this country
アメリカで半分ぐらいの抗生物質は
02:03
are not administered to people, but to animals.
人間に充てているんじゃなくて動物にやっている
02:06
But lists like this become kind of numbing, so let me just say this:
こんな風にリストアップするとうんざりするから一つ言う
02:09
if you're a progressive,
あなたはプログレッシブだったら
02:12
if you're driving a Prius, or you're shopping green,
プリウスに乗っていて、自然食品を
02:14
or you're looking for organic,
買っているような人だったら
02:17
you should probably be a semi-vegetarian.
少しベジタリアンになった方がいいよ
02:19
Now, I'm no more anti-cattle than I am anti-atom,
僕は反牛、反核というわけではない
02:23
but it's all in the way we use these things.
でも使い方次第だね
02:27
There's another piece of the puzzle,
この謎にもう一つある
02:29
which Ann Cooper talked about beautifully yesterday,
昨日アーン クーパーさんが雄弁に話した事
02:31
and one you already know.
皆さんもうご存知の事だよ
02:33
There's no question, none, that so-called lifestyle diseases --
間違いなく現代のいわゆる「生活習慣病」
02:36
diabetes, heart disease, stroke, some cancers --
糖尿病、心臓病、脳卒中、ある種類のガン
02:40
are diseases that are far more prevalent here
というの病気がアメリカでは
02:44
than anywhere in the rest of the world.
世界のどこもより多い
02:47
And that's the direct result of eating a Western diet.
これは西洋食事に直結しているよ
02:49
Our demand for meat, dairy and refined carbohydrates --
我々が求めている肉、乳製品、糖分高い炭水化物は
02:53
the world consumes one billion cans or bottles of Coke a day --
一日に世界の皆がコカコーラの10億缶か瓶を飲んでいる
02:57
our demand for these things, not our need, our want,
これは必要とされていないよ、我々の欲望に操られて
03:02
drives us to consume way more calories than are good for us.
高カロリーの物を摂取している私達
03:06
And those calories are in foods that cause, not prevent, disease.
こんな風な食べ物は病気を防ぐんじゃなくて、原因となる
03:10
Now global warming was unforeseen.
そして地球温暖化は予期せぬ現象だった
03:15
We didn't know that pollution did more than cause bad visibility.
スモッグはただ視界を遮るだけだと思っていた。
03:17
Maybe a few lung diseases here and there,
「まぁ肺に悪いものかも、とにかく
03:21
but, you know, that's not such a big deal.
そんな大した事はないな」と
03:23
The current health crisis, however,
でも現代の健康危機は
03:26
is a little more the work of the evil empire.
もうちょっと「悪の帝国」のせいだ
03:28
We were told, we were assured,
今まで勧められたのは
03:31
that the more meat and dairy and poultry we ate,
「もっと鳥獣肉類と乳製品を食べると
03:34
the healthier we'd be.
より健康的になるよ」という事だった
03:36
No. Overconsumption of animals, and of course, junk food,
これは違う。ジャンクフードはもちろん、動物性食品を食べ過ぎというのも
03:38
is the problem, along with our paltry consumption of plants.
野菜不足も中心の問題だ
03:41
Now, there's no time to get into the benefits of eating plants here,
野菜の健康的な大事さという話題に触れる時間はないけど
03:45
but the evidence is that plants -- and I want to make this clear --
証拠はあるからはっきりと言う
03:48
it's not the ingredients in plants, it's the plants.
大事なのは野菜に入っている栄養じゃなくて野菜自体だよ
03:51
It's not the beta-carotene, it's the carrot.
ベータカロチンじゃなくて、人参自体だ
03:55
The evidence is very clear that plants promote health.
明確な証拠は野菜が健康を増進するという事
03:58
This evidence is overwhelming at this point.
今のところは証拠は絶対的だ
04:02
You eat more plants, you eat less other stuff, you live longer.
野菜の摂取量を増やして、悪い物のを減らすとより長生きする
04:04
Not bad.
悪くないね!
04:08
But back to animals and junk food.
動物とジャンクフードに戻ろう
04:10
What do they have in common?
この二つはどこが共通点しているかな?
04:12
One: we don't need either of them for health.
第一、健康促進にはどちらも要らない
04:14
We don't need animal products,
動物性食品は要らないし
04:17
and we certainly don't need white bread or Coke.
ぜったい精白パンとコーラも要りません
04:19
Two: both have been marketed heavily,
第二、どちらも激しくマーケティングされているから
04:22
creating unnatural demand.
需要を膨張している
04:24
We're not born craving Whoppers or Skittles.
「ハンバーグやあめを食べたい」というのは人間の本能じゃないね
04:26
Three: their production has been supported by government agencies
第三、こういう物の生産は政府機関によって促進されている
04:31
at the expense of a more health- and Earth-friendly diet.
でもその反面、健康と地球を害している事
04:34
Now, let's imagine a parallel.
じゃ、ちょっと思い浮かべてみよう
04:37
Let's pretend that our government supported an oil-based economy,
もしアメリカの政府が石油を基盤にした経済を促進している一方で
04:41
while discouraging more sustainable forms of energy,
より持続可能なエネルギーの開拓まで手が回らないし
04:44
knowing all the while that the result would be
ずっと汚染と戦争と物価上昇も起こり続けるという結果を
04:48
pollution, war and rising costs.
もたらす事を知りなが黙認したら。。。
04:50
Incredible, isn't it?
信じられないね?
04:52
Yet they do that.
でもこれは事実だね
04:54
And they do this here. It's the same deal.
そして食料にたいしても同じ行動だ
04:56
The sad thing is, when it comes to diet,
残念な事には食事促進なら
04:58
is that even when well-intentioned Feds
悪気のない政府の役人が助けようとして
05:00
try to do right by us, they fail.
手を入れようとしても失敗するのだ
05:02
Either they're outvoted by puppets of agribusiness,
アグリビジネスに操られた人に力が足りないか
05:07
or they are puppets of agribusiness.
役人自身だってアグリビジネスに操られている人だ!
05:10
So, when the USDA finally acknowledged
米農務省は動物性食品より野菜食品の方が
05:12
that it was plants, rather than animals, that made people healthy,
健康にいいとようやく認めた時に
05:16
they encouraged us, via their overly simplistic food pyramid,
簡単すぎた食生ピラミッドで
05:20
to eat five servings of fruits and vegetables a day,
一日に5人分の野菜と果物と
05:24
along with more carbs.
もっと炭水化物を食べてと勧められたけど
05:27
What they didn't tell us is that some carbs are better than others,
教えてくれていないのは悪質と良質の炭水化物もあるし
05:29
and that plants and whole grains
野菜と穀物類は
05:32
should be supplanting eating junk food.
ジャンクフードより食べるべきだ
05:34
But industry lobbyists would never let that happen.
でも生産ロビイストはこれを絶対に許さない
05:36
And guess what?
おかげで
05:39
Half the people who developed the food pyramid
食生ピラミッドを築き上げた人半分は
05:41
have ties to agribusiness.
アグリビジネスとの関わりがある
05:43
So, instead of substituting plants for animals,
だから動物性食品を野菜食品に取り替えるんじゃなくて
05:45
our swollen appetites simply became larger,
我々の食欲がさらに膨張しちゃった
05:48
and the most dangerous aspects of them remained unchanged.
そして一番危ないところはまだ変わっていない
05:51
So-called low-fat diets, so-called low-carb diets --
このいわゆる「低脂肪、低炭水化物ダイエット」は
05:55
these are not solutions.
助からないよ
05:59
But with lots of intelligent people
そして多くの頭の良い人
06:01
focusing on whether food is organic or local,
地元食品、オーガニック食品を食べようとしている人
06:03
or whether we're being nice to animals,
動物に優しくしようとしている人は
06:06
the most important issues just aren't being addressed.
まだ問題の中心に考慮していないよ
06:08
Now, don't get me wrong.
僕が言っているのを間違えないで
06:11
I like animals,
僕は動物が好きだよ
06:13
and I don't think it's just fine to industrialize their production
そして機械的な畜産業にして、動物の
06:15
and to churn them out like they were wrenches.
自然性をなくすのは平気ではない
06:18
But there's no way to treat animals well,
でもやはり一年に100億頭も殺していると
06:21
when you're killing 10 billion of them a year.
「優しい扱い方」なんてないね
06:24
That's our number. 10 billion.
アメリカでは本当の数字ですよ。100億頭だ
06:27
If you strung all of them --
全部を結びつけようとしたら
06:29
chickens, cows, pigs and lambs -- to the moon,
鳥、牛、豚、羊を月まで
06:31
they'd go there and back five times, there and back.
5回も往復するよ
06:35
Now, my math's a little shaky, but this is pretty good,
僕の数に確信はないけど、だいたい当たっているよ
06:37
and it depends whether a pig is four feet long or five feet long,
そして動物の大きさ次第だし
06:40
but you get the idea.
だけど、だいたい解っているでしょう
06:43
That's just the United States.
そしてこれはアメリカだけ
06:45
And with our hyper-consumption of those animals
この動物を過剰摂取しているせいで
06:48
producing greenhouse gases and heart disease,
温室ガス排出しているし、心臓病も起こしているので
06:50
kindness might just be a bit of a red herring.
「優しさ」という問題は筋違いだ
06:53
Let's get the numbers of the animals we're killing for eating down,
まず食品になる殺している動物の数を減らして
06:56
and then we'll worry about being nice to the ones that are left.
残っているのに対して優しさを考慮するね
07:00
Another red herring might be exemplified by the word "locavore,"
またの筋違いとは「ロウカボー」という言葉だ
07:04
which was just named word of the year by the New Oxford American Dictionary.
これはニューオックスフォードアメリカン辞書が「今年の言葉」賞を与えた
07:08
Seriously.
本当だ
07:11
And locavore, for those of you who don't know,
意味分からない人に、「ロウカボー」というのは
07:13
is someone who eats only locally grown food --
地元産の食材だけを食べている人だよ
07:15
which is fine if you live in California,
カリフォルニア州に住んでいれば大丈夫
07:17
but for the rest of us it's a bit of a sad joke.
だけどそこ以外の私達にとってはいけないもの
07:20
Between the official story -- the food pyramid --
公認された食生ピラミッドのバージョンと
07:23
and the hip locavore vision,
おしゃれな「ロウカボー」のバージョンの間に
07:26
you have two versions of how to improve our eating.
食べ方を改善する方法はあるでしょう
07:28
(Laughter).
(笑)
07:30
They both get it wrong, though.
でも、どっちも違うよ
07:32
The first at least is populist, and the second is elitist.
最初のはポピュリストだ、次のは偉すぎだ
07:34
How we got to this place is the history of food in the United States.
どうしてここにたどり着いたかというとアメリカの食文化の歴史だ
07:38
And I'm going to go through that,
これを説明しましょう
07:42
at least the last hundred years or so, very quickly right now.
というのは100年前からさっと説明するね
07:44
A hundred years ago, guess what?
100年前にどんなものだったかな?
07:47
Everyone was a locavore: even New York had pig farms nearby,
皆はロウカボーだったよ!ニューヨークにも養豚場はあった
07:49
and shipping food all over the place was a ridiculous notion.
そしてあっちこっちに食料品を運送しているなんてなかった
07:53
Every family had a cook, usually a mom.
各家族はコック付き、だいたいお母さんだった
07:57
And those moms bought and prepared food.
このお母さん達が食品を買ったり、料理したりしていた
08:00
It was like your romantic vision of Europe.
理想的なヨローパみたいだったね
08:03
Margarine didn't exist.
マーガリンという物はなかった
08:05
In fact, when margarine was invented,
実は、マーガリンが発明された時
08:07
several states passed laws declaring that it had to be dyed pink,
幾つかの州は色がピンクに染まるような法律を定めた
08:10
so we'd all know that it was a fake.
バターと偽物か分かるためだ
08:14
There was no snack food, and until the '20s,
20年代までスナック食品もなかったし
08:17
until Clarence Birdseye came along, there was no frozen food.
Clarence Birdseyeさんが発明するまで、冷凍食品もなかった
08:19
There were no restaurant chains.
飲食店チェーンもなかった
08:22
There were neighborhood restaurants run by local people,
地元の人が経営している近所のレストランはあった
08:25
but none of them would think to open another one.
でも「二号店」出そうなんて思っていなかった
08:27
Eating ethnic was unheard of unless you were ethnic.
「エスニックを食べよう」という感覚もなっかた
08:29
And fancy food was entirely French.
おしゃれな食べ物はフランス料理だけだった
08:32
As an aside, those of you who remember
ところで、覚えている人がいるかもしれない
08:35
Dan Aykroyd in the 1970s doing Julia Child imitations
70年代にジュリア チャイルドをまねしてお笑いに出たダン エイクロイドが
08:38
can see where he got the idea of stabbing himself from this fabulous slide.
このスライドを見て、「自分を刺そう!」と思いついただろう
08:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:47
Back in those days, before even Julia,
昔は、ジュリアの前でも
08:48
back in those days, there was no philosophy of food.
昔は食事の哲学なんてなかった
08:52
You just ate.
ただ食べただけ
08:54
You didn't claim to be anything.
食事で何も主張していなかった
08:56
There was no marketing. There were no national brands.
マーケティングも全国ブランドもなかった
08:58
Vitamins had not been invented.
ビタミンもまだ発明されていなかった
09:01
There were no health claims, at least not federally sanctioned ones.
政府が認めた保健機能の物はなかった
09:04
Fats, carbs, proteins -- they weren't bad or good, they were food.
脂肪と炭水化物とたんぱく質は善悪の問題ではなくて
09:07
You ate food.
ただの食べ物だった
09:11
Hardly anything contained more than one ingredient,
いっぱい材料がある事もなっかた
09:14
because it was an ingredient.
食べ物自体こそ材料だったから
09:16
The cornflake hadn't been invented.
コーンフレークはまだ発明されていなかった
09:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:20
The Pop-Tart, the Pringle, Cheez Whiz, none of that stuff.
ポップタートやチップスや缶チーズも何もなかった
09:21
Goldfish swam.
ゴルドフィシュと言えば、泳ぐものだった
09:24
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:26
It's hard to imagine. People grew food, and they ate food.
想像しにくいでしょう。皆は栽培したり、本当の食べ物を食べたりしていた
09:28
And again, everyone ate local.
もう一度言う、皆は地元の食品を食べた
09:31
In New York, an orange was a common Christmas present,
ニューヨークでオレンジは普通のクリスマス プレゼントだった
09:34
because it came all the way from Florida.
はるばるとフロリダ州からやってきたからだ
09:37
From the '30s on, road systems expanded,
30年代からアメリカの道路システムが拡大したに従って
09:41
trucks took the place of railroads,
電車の代わりにトラックが現れてきて
09:43
fresh food began to travel more.
フレッシュ食品がより運送されるようになった
09:45
Oranges became common in New York.
ニューヨークでもオレンジが普通の光景になった
09:47
The South and West became agricultural hubs,
アメリカの南部と西部が農業の中心になった
09:49
and in other parts of the country, suburbs took over farmland.
他の所で元農業が郊外に変わった
09:52
The effects of this are well known. They are everywhere.
こういう影響はよく知られている、どこでもある
09:55
And the death of family farms is part of this puzzle,
家族の農業の絶滅はこの謎の一部
09:58
as is almost everything
実はいろんな部分がある
10:01
from the demise of the real community
なくなった共同体意識から
10:03
to the challenge of finding a good tomato, even in summer.
夏にも自然に美味しいトマトが見つかりにくい事まで
10:05
Eventually, California produced too much food to ship fresh,
ついにカリフォルニア州がフレッシュで運送するのに食品を生産し過ぎた
10:09
so it became critical to market canned and frozen foods.
から缶詰と冷凍食品を作り出す事が必要になった
10:13
Thus arrived convenience.
これが「便利さ」の登場だった
10:16
It was sold to proto-feminist housewives
より節約に家事が出来る手段として
10:18
as a way to cut down on housework.
昔のフェミニスト主婦に勧めていたもの
10:20
Now, I know everybody over the age of, like 45 --
じゃ、45歳以上の人は
10:22
their mouths are watering at this point.
なんて美味しそうに思えるでしょう
10:25
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:28
If we had a slide of Salisbury steak, even more so, right?
ソールズベリーステーキのスライドもあれば
10:29
(Laughter)
もっと美味しいだろう(笑)
10:33
But this may have cut down on housework,
これは家事の負担を軽減した反面、
10:35
but it cut down on the variety of food we ate as well.
食事の多様性もなくなったものだ
10:37
Many of us grew up never eating a fresh vegetable
生人参かあるいは材料がレタスだけのサラダ以外
10:40
except the occasional raw carrot or maybe an odd lettuce salad.
大人になるまでフレッシュ野菜を食べた事ない人は少なくない
10:44
I, for one -- and I'm not kidding --
僕なら、これは嘘じゃないよ、
10:48
didn't eat real spinach or broccoli till I was 19.
19歳まで本物のほうれん草とブロッコリーを食べた事ない
10:50
Who needed it though? Meat was everywhere.
「要らない物だな!お肉はいっぱいあったし
10:54
What could be easier, more filling or healthier for your family
やはりステーキより家族に健康的で
10:56
than broiling a steak?
満腹にさせるものはあったのかな?」と思われた
10:59
But by then cattle were already raised unnaturally.
でもその頃にはすでに牛は不自然に育てられていた
11:01
Rather than spending their lives eating grass,
牛は草を消化させるための腹があるのに
11:05
for which their stomachs were designed,
草を食べているんじゃなくて
11:07
they were forced to eat soy and corn.
大豆とコーンを食べせられていた
11:10
They have trouble digesting those grains, of course,
もちろん消化するには苦労するけど
11:12
but that wasn't a problem for producers.
これは生産者達にとっての問題じゃないもの
11:15
New drugs kept them healthy.
新しい薬で動物を健康にさせていた
11:18
Well, they kept them alive.
というか、生きさせていたものだ
11:21
Healthy was another story.
健康というのは別問題だ
11:23
Thanks to farm subsidies,
アグリビジネスと米国会がうまく協力している事と
11:25
the fine collaboration between agribusiness and Congress,
農業補助金のおかげで
11:27
soy, corn and cattle became king.
大豆、コーンと牛はオールマイティーになった
11:30
And chicken soon joined them on the throne.
鶏もすぐにそうなった
11:32
It was during this period that the cycle of
この時期に現代の悪い食事と
11:35
dietary and planetary destruction began,
環境破壊という習慣が始まった
11:38
the thing we're only realizing just now.
たった今ようやく解ってきた事だ
11:40
Listen to this,
これを聞いて、
11:42
between 1950 and 2000, the world's population doubled.
1950年から2000年まで地球の人口が2倍増えた
11:44
Meat consumption increased five-fold.
肉の消費は5倍増えた
11:49
Now, someone had to eat all that stuff, so we got fast food.
誰かがこれを食べなければという問題に答えてファストフードの誕生だ
11:52
And this took care of the situation resoundingly.
これできちんと解決した
11:59
Home cooking remained the norm, but its quality was down the tubes.
家庭料理は通例として続けていたけど、こだわるのを無くしてしまった
12:02
There were fewer meals with home-cooked breads, desserts and soups,
スーパーで手に入れやすい物なので
12:06
because all of them could be bought at any store.
家で作られたパンやデザートやスープ付きの食事は少なくなった
12:10
Not that they were any good, but they were there.
こういうのは別に美味しい訳ではないけど、とにかくあった¼
12:12
Most moms cooked like mine:
だいたいのお母さんも一緒だった
12:15
a piece of broiled meat, a quickly made salad with bottled dressing,
焼いた肉、瓶ドレッシングで急いで作ったサラダ、
12:17
canned soup, canned fruit salad.
缶スープ、缶フルーツサラダ
12:21
Maybe baked or mashed potatoes,
あるいはベイクトかマッシュポテトか
12:23
or perhaps the stupidest food ever, Minute Rice.
あるいは最高に愚かな食べ物、「乾燥ライス」
12:26
For dessert, store-bought ice cream or cookies.
デザートなら、スーパで買ったアイスかクッキーだった
12:29
My mom is not here, so I can say this now.
僕のお母さんがこの世に居ないからこそこれが言えるよ
12:33
This kind of cooking drove me to learn how to cook for myself.
僕はこういう料理のおかげで、自炊生活しなければなと決心した
12:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:41
It wasn't all bad.
そんなに悪くないかもしれない
12:42
By the '70s, forward-thinking people
70年代になると前向きな人々は
12:44
began to recognize the value of local ingredients.
地元産食品の価値に気づき始めた
12:46
We tended gardens, we became interested in organic food,
庭を造ったり、オーガニック食品に興味が沸いたり
12:49
we knew or we were vegetarians.
ベジタリアンを知っていたかあるいは自分がベジタリアンになった
12:52
We weren't all hippies, either.
そして皆はヒッピーだったとは限らない
12:54
Some of us were eating in good restaurants and learning how to cook well.
いいレストランで外食していて、自分でもうまく料理が出来るような人もいた
12:56
Meanwhile, food production had become industrial. Industrial.
一方では、食品生産は工業的になった。工業的だもの!
12:59
Perhaps because it was being produced rationally,
たぶんプラスチックみたいに
13:04
as if it were plastic,
割り当て量を果たす物として作られていたために
13:07
food gained magical or poisonous powers, or both.
食べ物には魔法か毒の力(あるいは両方)が現れてきた
13:09
Many people became fat-phobic.
多くの人は脂っこい物を怖がった
13:13
Others worshiped broccoli, as if it were God-like.
ブロッコリーが神様みたいな物に思えた人もいたけど
13:15
But mostly they didn't eat broccoli.
だいたいブロッコリーを食べていなくて
13:19
Instead they were sold on yogurt,
ヨーグルトに夢中であった
13:21
yogurt being almost as good as broccoli.
ヨーグルトはブロッコリーと同じぐらいに素敵だったから
13:23
Except, in reality, the way the industry sold yogurt
でも実は、ヨーグルトが売れるために
13:25
was to convert it to something much more akin to ice cream.
アイスに近い物に変更しちゃった
13:28
Similarly, let's look at a granola bar.
同じ風にグラノーラ バーも思い浮かべて
13:31
You think that that might be healthy food,
ヘルシーに見えるけど
13:34
but in fact, if you look at the ingredient list,
実は原材料を調べたら
13:36
it's closer in form to a Snickers than it is to oatmeal.
オートミールよりスニッカーズの方に近いよ
13:38
Sadly, it was at this time that the family dinner was put in a coma,
残念ながらこのところに家族との夕食は冬眠してしまった
13:43
if not actually killed --
死んだ同然かもしれない
13:46
the beginning of the heyday of value-added food,
付加価値食品の時代になった
13:49
which contained as many soy and corn products
この食品に大豆とコーン材料を
13:52
as could be crammed into it.
出来るだけ詰め込んでいた
13:54
Think of the frozen chicken nugget.
チキン ナゲットを例にとったら
13:56
The chicken is fed corn, and then its meat is ground up,
鶏はコーンを食べさせられて、それからひき肉にした
13:58
and mixed with more corn products to add bulk and binder,
大きくなり、接着するためにもっとコーン材料に混ぜて
14:01
and then it's fried in corn oil.
それからコーン油で揚げた
14:05
All you do is nuke it. What could be better?
チンするだけで終り。なんて便利でしょう?
14:09
And zapped horribly, pathetically.
でも、悲惨の光景だ
14:12
By the '70s, home cooking was in such a sad state
70年代に家庭料理はなんて惨めになったために
14:15
that the high fat and spice contents of foods
脂っこくて調味料もたくさんある
14:19
like McNuggets and Hot Pockets --
マックナゲットとかホッとポケットは
14:22
and we all have our favorites, actually --
(一人一人に好みの物はあるでしょう)
14:24
made this stuff more appealing than the bland things
家で作られていた味気ない食べ物より
14:27
that people were serving at home.
美味しそうに思えるようにだ
14:29
At the same time, masses of women were entering the workforce,
同時に職場へ進出する女性もいっぱいだったし
14:31
and cooking simply wasn't important enough
時間の無駄遣いだと思った男性達は
14:35
for men to share the burden.
料理に手が回らなかった
14:37
So now, you've got your pizza nights, you've got your microwave nights,
おかげで今の家庭食事には「ピザの日、チンする日
14:39
you've got your grazing nights,
適当に食べる日
14:42
you've got your fend-for-yourself nights and so on.
自分のためにだけ何かを作る日」という風景はある
14:44
Leading the way -- what's leading the way?
何がこの道を開いているかな?
14:47
Meat, junk food, cheese:
肉、ジャンクフード、チーズだ
14:50
the very stuff that will kill you.
最高に悪い物ばかりだ
14:52
So, now we clamor for organic food.
だから今オーガニックを食べようと騒ぎ立ているね
14:54
That's good.
これはいいもの
14:56
And as evidence that things can actually change,
物事が変わっていけるという証明には
14:58
you can now find organic food in supermarkets,
スーパでオーガニック食品は並んでいるようになった
15:00
and even in fast-food outlets.
ファストフード店にもある
15:02
But organic food isn't the answer either,
でも、現代の形でだったら
15:04
at least not the way it's currently defined.
オーガニック食品は何も問題解決しない
15:06
Let me pose you a question.
一つを聞いてみます
15:09
Can farm-raised salmon be organic,
養魚場で育てられたサーモンは、もし
15:11
when its feed has nothing to do with its natural diet,
オーガニック餌をやっているとしても
15:13
even if the feed itself is supposedly organic, and the fish themselves
自然に食べているのと全く違って、魚達は
15:18
are packed tightly in pens, swimming in their own filth?
おりに詰められて、自分の汚れの中に泳ぎ回っていて、
15:22
And if that salmon's from Chile, and it's killed down there
チリ産のサーモン、そこで殺されて、
15:27
and then flown 5,000 miles, whatever,
8000キロルぐらい飛んでいて、
15:31
dumping how much carbon into the atmosphere?
(これでどれぐらい二酸化炭素を空に吐き出しているかな?
15:34
I don't know.
僕には分からない)
15:37
Packed in Styrofoam, of course,
もちろんスタイロフォームに詰め込んで、
15:39
before landing somewhere in the United States,
アメリカのどこかに着陸して、
15:41
and then being trucked a few hundred more miles.
トラックでもう何百キロへも運送されてしまう
15:44
This may be organic in letter, but it's surely not organic in spirit.
これはオーガニックと呼んでも、実質にそうではない
15:46
Now here is where we all meet.
このところにロカボー達、オーガニック食べている人達、ベジタリアン達
15:52
The locavores, the organivores, the vegetarians,
ベーガン達(完全菜食主義)、
15:54
the vegans, the gourmets
グルメ達といい食べ物に興味がある人にも
15:57
and those of us who are just plain interested in good food.
共通点があります
15:59
Even though we've come to this from different points,
皆は違う立場からやってきているにしても
16:03
we all have to act on our knowledge
浸透した食べ物の考え方を改善するには
16:06
to change the way that everyone thinks about food.
私達がこの知識を振るって行動しなければならない
16:08
We need to start acting.
もう行動開始しないと
16:12
And this is not only an issue of social justice, as Ann Cooper said --
これは昨日アーン クッパーさんが言ったような社会正義だけじゃなくて
16:14
and, of course, she's completely right --
確かにそうだけど
16:18
but it's also one of global survival.
これは地球のサバイバルに関している問題だ
16:20
Which bring me full circle and points directly to the core issue,
という事で元に戻って、中心問題を示す
16:22
the overproduction and overconsumption of meat and junk food.
肉とジャンクフードの過剰生産と過剰摂取の事だ
16:27
As I said, 18 percent of greenhouse gases
前に言った通り、温室ガスの18パーセントが
16:31
are attributed to livestock production.
畜産業によって排出されている
16:34
How much livestock do you need to produce this?
どれくらい畜産がこんな量を出しているかというと
16:37
70 percent of the agricultural land on Earth,
地球の農地の70%なのだ
16:40
30 percent of the Earth's land surface is directly or indirectly devoted
地球上の土地の30%は間接的か直接的に
16:43
to raising the animals we'll eat.
食品対象動物を育てるために占めているし
16:49
And this amount is predicted to double in the next 40 years or so.
これからの40年間にこの量が2倍増える見込みである
16:52
And if the numbers coming in from China
そして中国からの数量が
16:55
are anything like what they look like now,
このままだとしたら
16:57
it's not going to be 40 years.
40年間もかからないはず
17:00
There is no good reason for eating as much meat as we do.
このようにいっぱい肉を食べているまともな理由はないのだ
17:02
And I say this as a man who has eaten a fair share of corned beef in his life.
そして僕も自分の人生で充分にコーンビーフを食べた人だよ
17:06
The most common argument is that we need nutrients --
最も一般的な理由とは「栄養が必要だから」でも
17:11
even though we eat, on average, twice as much protein
僕達は生産者の味方の米農務省が勧めているより
17:14
as even the industry-obsessed USDA recommends.
平均2倍ぐらいたんぱく質を摂取しているものだ
17:17
But listen: experts who are serious about disease reduction
でも聞いて、本当に病気を防ぎたい専門者達は
17:22
recommend that adults eat just over half a pound of meat per week.
大人が週に肉の半ポンド(4分の1キロ)ちょっとを食べようと勧めている
17:26
What do you think we eat per day? Half a pound.
一日にどれくらい食べているのかな?半ポンドだよ
17:32
But don't we need meat to be big and strong?
「ちゃんと成長して、強くなるために必要でしょう?
17:36
Isn't meat eating essential to health?
「肉を食べる事は健康に不可欠じゃないか?
17:39
Won't a diet heavy in fruit and vegetables
フルーツと野菜をいっぱい摂取しているとしたら
17:42
turn us into godless, sissy, liberals?
僕たちが無宗教、弱虫の
17:44
(Laughter)
リベラルになってしまうか?」と思われる(笑)
17:47
Some of us might think that would be a good thing.
(これはそんなに悪くないなと思っている人もいるでしょう)
17:48
But, no, even if we were all steroid-filled football players,
でも違う、ステロイド乱用のフットボール選手だとしても
17:51
the answer is no.
答えは「違います」
17:56
In fact, there's no diet on Earth that meets
実は世界中で基本的な栄養必要量を満たして、
17:58
basic nutritional needs that won't promote growth,
成長させない物は存在していない
18:02
and many will make you much healthier than ours does.
そして西洋食事と違う食べ方にしたら逆により健康的になる事が多い
18:06
We don't eat animal products for sufficient nutrition,
充分に栄養を取るために動物性食品を食べているんじゃなくて
18:09
we eat them to have an odd form of malnutrition, and it's killing us.
逆に変な栄養失調になるために食べている、これには閉口だ
18:12
To suggest that in the interests of personal and human health
皆の健康を保つためにアメリカ人達が
18:18
Americans eat 50 percent less meat --
摂取している肉量を半分に減らそうと勧めたら、
18:21
it's not enough of a cut, but it's a start.
これは物足りないが、取っ掛かりなのだ
18:24
It would seem absurd, but that's exactly what should happen,
これが愚かに思っても、こうしなければならない
18:27
and what progressive people, forward-thinking people
前向きなプログレッシブの人達こそが
18:32
should be doing and advocating,
こんな風に行動しているのに従って
18:35
along with the corresponding increase in the consumption of plants.
野菜摂取量を増やさした方がいい
18:38
I've been writing about food more or less omnivorously --
僕はこの30年間、手当り次第に
18:42
one might say indiscriminately -- for about 30 years.
食べ物の事について書いているのだ
18:45
During that time, I've eaten
この間僕はあらゆる食べ物を食べたり、
18:48
and recommended eating just about everything.
勧めたりしているのだよ
18:50
I'll never stop eating animals, I'm sure,
僕は動物性食品を食べる事をやめるつもりではない
18:54
but I do think that for the benefit of everyone,
でも世界中の皆のために動物を
18:57
the time has come to stop raising them industrially
工業的に育ていて、軽卒に食べる事を
18:59
and stop eating them thoughtlessly.
やめるべき時がきたと思う
19:02
Ann Cooper's right.
アーン クッパーさんが言ったのは正しいのだ
19:04
The USDA is not our ally here.
米農務省は僕たちの味方ではない
19:06
We have to take matters into our own hands,
僕たちが自分自身で進み始めないと
19:11
not only by advocating for a better diet for everyone --
より健康的な食事を支持している事だけじゃなくて、
19:13
and that's the hard part -- but by improving our own.
難しいところに、自分の食事の習慣も改善しなければならない
19:16
And that happens to be quite easy.
でもこれは以外と簡単ですよ
19:20
Less meat, less junk, more plants.
あまり肉とジャンクを食べないで、野菜をもっと食べて
19:22
It's a simple formula: eat food.
簡単な方式、ちゃんと食事して
19:25
Eat real food.
本物の食べ物を食べて
19:27
We can continue to enjoy our food, and we continue to eat well,
我々は食事の事を楽しみ続けて、より健康的に
19:29
and we can eat even better.
食べる事も可能なのだ
19:33
We can continue the search for the ingredients we love,
好きな材料を探し続けて、好きな食事について
19:35
and we can continue to spin yarns about our favorite meals.
語っていく事も出来る
19:38
We'll reduce not only calories, but our carbon footprint.
カロリーも、二酸化炭素排出量も減らすよ
19:43
We can make food more important, not less,
食事の事をもっと大事する事も出来る
19:47
and save ourselves by doing so.
そうすると我々を救うのだよ
19:50
We have to choose that path.
この道を選ばなければならない
19:52
Thank you.
ありがとう
19:55
Translated by Brandon Wright
Reviewed by Stuart Ayre

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Mark Bittman - Food writer
Mark Bittman is a bestselling cookbook author, journalist and television personality. His friendly, informal approach to home cooking has shown millions that fancy execution is no substitute for flavor and soul.

Why you should listen

Although Mark Bittman never formally trained as a chef, his pursuits as a curious and tenacious foodie have made him a casual culinary master. His weekly New York Times food column, The Minimalist, meshes accessible and inexpensive ingredients with "anyone-can" cooking techniques to produce exceedingly delicious dishes. Bittman's funny, friendly attitude and trademark informal approach to food-craft extend to his blockbuster TV programs (which retain delays and mishaps that other producers would edit out), his blog, Bitten, and ambitious cookbooks, like How to Cook Everything and The Best Recipes in the World.

After a decade as the "Minimalist," Bittman has emerged a respected spokesperson on all things edible: He's concerned about the ecological and health impacts of our modern diet, which he characterizes as overwhelmingly meat-centered and hooked on fast food. His criticism has the world listening: His revolutionary How to Cook Everything Vegetarian (sequel to How to Cook Everything), is a bestseller, and his memorable talk at the 2007 EG Conference (available now on TED.com) delivered a stinging condemnation of the way we eat now. A subsequent New York Times article pursued the same argument.

Bittman's newest book, Food Matters, explores the link between our eating habits and the environment, offering an accessible plan for a planet-friendly diet.

More profile about the speaker
Mark Bittman | Speaker | TED.com