17:44
TED2008

Yves Behar: Designing objects that tell stories

イブ・ベアール「物語を持つ作品」

Filmed:

デザイナー イブ・ベアールが彼の仕事を象徴する作品(葉っぱ型ランプ、Jawboneヘッドセット)を通じて創造性の原点を語ります。また、100ドルPCのような今手がけている機知にとんだ、驚くようでいて上品な作品も紹介します。

- Designer
Yves Behar has produced some of the new millennium's most coveted objects, like the Leaf lamp, the Jawbone headset, and the XO laptop for One Laptop per Child. Full bio

Being a child, and sort of crawling around the house,
家中を這いずり回っていた子供のときに見た
00:12
I remember these Turkish carpets,
トルコカーペットの柄
00:14
and there were these scenes, these battle scenes, these love scenes.
戦闘や情事のシーンをよく覚えています
00:16
I mean, look, this animal is trying to fight back this spear
この動物は兵士が持っている槍に
00:21
from this soldier.
戦いを挑んでいます
00:26
And my mom took these pictures actually, last week,
実際には母が先週撮影したものですが
00:27
of our carpets, and I remember this to this day.
あのころのものと思い出せます
00:30
There was another object, this sort of towering piece of furniture
他にも家具の一部には
00:33
with creatures and gargoyles and nudity --
生物や怪物 裸など
00:37
pretty scary stuff, when you're a little kid.
子供には恐ろしいものもありました
00:39
What I remember today from this is that objects tell stories,
振り返ると これらは何かしらの物語を持っていて
00:42
so storytelling has been a really strong influence in my work.
それが故に物語は私の仕事にとても大きな影響を与えてきました
00:46
And then there was another influence.
他にも影響があったものがあります
00:54
I was a teenager, and at 15 or 16, I guess like all teenagers,
10代 15か16才くらいのころは多くの10代と同じように
00:55
we want to just do what we love and what we believe in.
自分がやりたいもの 信じていることだけをやっていました
00:58
And so,
それが
01:01
I fused together the two things I loved the most,
スキーとウィンドサーフィンであり
01:04
which was skiing and windsurfing.
その好きなもの2つを合体させてしまいました
01:06
Those are pretty good escapes from the drab weather in Switzerland.
この2つはスイスの単調な気候でも楽しめるんです
01:09
So, I created this compilation of the two:
そこで私は二つを合体させることにしたのです
01:14
I took my skis and I took a board and I put a mast foot in there,
スキーとサーフボードをあわせて固定具や足場
01:17
and some foot straps, and some metal fins,
金属のフィンを取り付けて完成
01:21
and here I was, going really fast on frozen lakes.
凍った湖の上でとても速く走りました
01:25
It was really a death trap. I mean, it was incredible,
それが落とし穴だったのです 驚くぐらい
01:28
it worked incredibly well, but it was really dangerous.
本当に良くできていました しかしとても危険だったのです
01:31
And I realized then I had to go to design school.
美術学校へも行かなければいけないと感じました
01:34
(Laughter)
(笑い)
01:38
I mean, look at those graphics there.
ここの絵を見てください
01:39
(Laughter)
(笑い)
01:41
So, I went to design school,
美術学校に行き
01:44
and it was the early '90s when I finished.
卒業したのが90年代初め
01:48
And I saw something extraordinary happening in Silicon Valley,
シリコンバレーで革命が起きるのを目の当たりにしました
01:53
so I wanted to be there,
流れに乗りたかった
01:57
and I saw that the computer was coming into our homes,
そしてコンピュータが家庭に入ってきましたが
01:58
that it had to change in order to be with us in our homes.
家庭で使うには改良が必要でした
02:02
And so I got myself a job and I was working for a consultancy,
それで私はコンサルタントとして働くようになりました
02:06
and we would get in to these meetings,
会議に出席し
02:10
and these managers would come in,
マネージャーが入ってくるなり
02:11
and they would say,
こう言うのです
02:14
"Well, what we're going to do here is really important, you know."
「これから話すことはとても大事なことなんだ」
02:16
And they would give the projects code names, you know,
そしてプロジェクトの名前をおもむろにつけます
02:19
mostly from "Star Wars," actually: things like C3PO, Yoda, Luke.
よくあるのはC3POやヨーダ ルークみたいなスターウォーズものですね
02:22
So, in anticipation, I would be this young designer
振り返ると 私はまだ若いデザイナーで
02:30
in the back of the room, and I would raise my hand,
後ろのほうで手を上げて
02:33
and I would ask questions.
質問をするのです
02:35
I mean, in retrospect, probably stupid questions,
振り返るとばかばかしい質問ですが
02:37
but things like, "What's this Caps Lock key for?"
「Caps Lockキーの使い道は?」や
02:40
or "What's this Num Lock key for?" You know, that thing?
「Num Lockキーの使い道は?」「あれは?」
02:44
"You know, do people really use it?
「本当に使う人がいるの?」
02:49
Do they need it? Do they want it in their homes?"
「家庭で?」
02:50
(Laughter)
(笑い)
02:53
What I realized then is, they didn't really want to change
そこで気づいたのは 彼らは昔ながらのものは
02:56
the legacy stuff; they didn't want to change the insides.
変えたくない 中身はそのまま残したいということでした
03:01
They were really looking for us, the designers, to create the skins,
彼らが求めていたのは 外箱を作るデザイナー
03:04
to put some pretty stuff outside of the box.
きれいな見た目を求めていたのです
03:14
And I didn't want to be a colorist.
カラリストは
03:18
It wasn't what I wanted to do.
私のやりたい仕事ではなかったし
03:20
I didn't want to be a stylist in this way.
スタイリストも違いました
03:22
And then I saw this quote:
こんな言い回しがあります
03:24
"advertising is the price companies pay for being unoriginal."
「企業はマネをするために宣伝にお金をかける」
03:26
(Laughter)
(笑い)
03:31
So, I had to start on my own. So I moved to San Francisco,
なので私は自力で始めるしかなく サンフランシスコへ移り住み
03:34
and I started a little company, fuseproject.
FuseProjectという小さな会社を始めました
03:37
And what I wanted to work on is important stuff.
私がやりたかったことは重要なことでした
03:41
And I wanted to really not just work on the skins,
外見だけでなく
03:43
but I wanted to work on the entire human experience.
人類の経験そのものに働きかけたかったのです
03:48
And so the first projects were sort of humble,
最初のプロジェクトはつつましいものでしたが
03:51
but they took technology and maybe made it into things
技術を形にし
03:55
that people would use in a new way,
新しい使い道を見つけ
04:00
and maybe finding some new functionality.
新しい側面を発見することができました
04:03
This is a watch we made for Mini Cooper, the car company,
これはミニクーパーという自動車会社の創立時に
04:04
right when it launched,
作った時計で
04:08
and it's the first watch that has a display
文字盤が横ではなく
04:09
that switches from horizontal to vertical.
縦に並んだ最初の時計です
04:12
And that allows me to check my timer discretely, here,
腕を曲げる必要なく時刻をそれぞれ
04:14
without bending my elbow.
読むことができます
04:19
And other projects, which were really about transformation,
他のプロジェクトでは必要性に応じて変形するものを
04:20
about matching the human need.
手がけました
04:24
This is a little piece of furniture for an Italian manufacturer,
これはイタリア製の家具の一部ですが出荷時には
04:27
and it ships completely flat,
完全に平らで 組み上げると
04:30
and then it folds into a coffee table and a stool and whatnot.
コーヒーテーブルや椅子になります
04:32
And something a little bit more experimental:
実験的なものとしては
04:37
this is a light fixture for Swarovski,
スワロフスキーの 形を変える
04:38
and what it does is, it changes shape.
照明です
04:42
So, it goes from a circle, to a round, to a square, to a figure eight.
小さなスクリーンに自分の好きな形を描くと
04:44
And just by drawing on a little computer tablet,
円や四角など
04:48
the entire light fixture adjusts to what shape you want.
思った形に変形します
04:51
And then finally, the leaf lamp for Herman Miller.
最後はハーマン・ミラーの葉っぱ型ランプです
04:56
This is a pretty involved process;
これは実に難しいプロジェクトで
04:58
it took us about four and a half years.
4年半を費やしました
05:00
But I really was looking for creating a unique experience of light,
しかし私はランプの独創的かつ新しい体験を
05:02
a new experience of light.
探していたのです
05:07
So, we had to design both the light and the light bulb.
そのためランプと電球両方をデザインする必要がありました
05:08
And that's a unique opportunity, I would say, in design.
デザインという観点から言うと とてもユニークな機会でした
05:13
And the new experience I was looking for
新しい体験とは
05:17
is giving the choice for the user to go from
暖かくぼんやりとした灯りから
05:19
a warm, sort of glowing kind of mood light,
仕事で使うはっきりとした明かりまでを
05:22
all the way to a bright work light.
選べるようなものでした
05:25
So, the light bulb actually does that.
それを電球が担うのです
05:28
It allows the person to switch,
明かりを切り替えたり
05:31
and to mix these two colorations.
2つをあわせたり
05:33
And it's done in a very simple way:
それはとても簡単に
05:35
one just touches the base of the light,
ランプの下部をタッチするだけ
05:38
and on one side, you can mix the brightness,
一方が明るさを
05:41
and on the other, the coloration of the light.
もう一方が色味を変化させます
05:43
So, all of these projects have a humanistic sense to them,
これらのプロジェクトは人間的な感覚を取り入れていて
05:46
and I think as designers we need to really think
企業向けや
05:51
about how we can create a different relationship
私がこれからお見せする民生品でも
05:53
between our work and the world,
自身の仕事と世間をどのように
05:57
whether it's for business,
関連させられるかを
06:00
or, as I'm going to show, on some civic-type projects.
もっと考える必要があると思います
06:01
Because I think everybody agrees that as designers we bring
なぜならビジネスの場やユーザに価値を与えるのが
06:06
value to business, value to the users also,
デザイナーの仕事というのが一般認識ですが
06:11
but I think it's the values that we put into these projects
私はさらなる価値を生み出すためのプロジェクトこそが
06:16
that ultimately create the greater value.
価値と信じているからです
06:20
And the values we bring
私たちが創造する価値とは
06:24
can be about environmental issues,
環境問題や持続性
06:25
about sustainability, about lower power consumption.
低消費電力のことであったりするわけです
06:29
You know, they can be about function and beauty;
これらは機能と美を兼ね備えているものであり
06:32
they can be about business strategy.
ビジネスの軸となりえます
06:36
But designers are really the glue
ここでデザイナーが橋渡しとして
06:37
that brings these things together.
必要になるのです
06:40
So Jawbone is a project that you're familiar with,
皆さんご存知のJawboneプロジェクトは
06:42
and it has a humanistic technology.
ユーザ中心設計に基いています
06:48
It feels your skin. It rests on your skin,
自分の肌のようにフィットし
06:51
and it knows when it is you're talking.
話を感知します
06:54
And by knowing when it is you're talking,
また話していることを感知すると
06:55
it gets rid of the other noises that it knows about,
環境雑音と呼ばれるノイズを
06:58
which is the environmental noises.
取り除きます
07:00
But the other thing that is humanistic about Jawbone
しかし この製品では
07:03
is that we really decided to take out all the techie stuff,
最新の機能や余分な機能を省き
07:05
and all the nerdy stuff out of it,
できる限り
07:11
and try to make it as beautiful as we can.
美しくしようとした点です
07:13
I mean, think about it:
考えてみてください
07:15
the care we take in selecting sunglasses, or jewelry,
サングラスや宝石 アクセサリーを選ぶときに
07:16
or accessories is really important,
気をかけるところはどこでしょうか
07:23
so if it isn't beautiful, it really doesn't belong on your face.
美しくないものは似合うはずがありません
07:27
And this is what we're pursuing here.
私たちが追い求めているのはそこなのです
07:31
But how we work on Jawbone is really unique.
Jawboneへの取り組みはとても斬新なものでした
07:34
I want to point at something here, on the left.
この左の部分を見てください
07:38
This is the board, this is one of the things that goes inside
この基板こそがこの技術を可能にする
07:40
that makes this technology work.
とても重要な部品です
07:44
But this is the design process:
デザインの過程に
07:46
there's somebody changing the board,
基板を設計して
07:48
putting tracers on the board, changing the location of the ICs,
図面を引く人がいて ICの位置を調整している横で
07:49
as the designers on the other side are doing the work.
デザイナーが仕事をしている
07:53
So, it's not about slapping skins, anymore, on a technology.
技術に外箱を取り付けるだけの時代は終わったのです
07:56
It's really about designing from the inside out.
まさしく内面からデザインするのです
08:00
And then, on the other side of the room,
部屋の反対側ではデザイナーが
08:02
the designers are making small adjustments,
微調整をしたり
08:05
sketching, drawing by hand, putting it in the computer.
手書きのスケッチをコンピュータに入力します
08:06
And it's what I call being design driven.
これがデザイン主導と呼ばれるものです
08:11
You know, there is some push and pull,
もちろんバランスは必要ですが
08:15
but design is really helping define
デザインは商品体験を定義することに
08:17
the whole experience from the inside out.
大きな役割を果します
08:19
And then, of course, design is never done.
デザインには終わりがありません
08:23
And this is -- the other new way that is unique
それが私たちの仕事術の中で
08:25
in how we work is, because it's never done,
特別なところです
08:29
you have to do all this other stuff.
他のすべての部分もやらなければいけません
08:31
The packaging, and the website, and you need to continue
包装やウェブサイト そしてさまざまな方法で
08:33
to really touch the user, in many ways.
消費者へアピールする必要があるでしょう
08:36
But how do you retain somebody, when it's never done?
では終わりのない仕事を誰がやるのか?
08:40
And Hosain Rahman, the CEO of Aliph Jawbone,
Aliph Jawbone社のホセイン・ラーマン社長は
08:44
you know, really understands that you need a different structure.
全く別の枠組みが必要なことを認識していました
08:51
So, in a way, the different structure is that we're partners,
別の枠組みとは私たちがパートナーであること
08:54
it's a partnership. We can continue to work
つまりパートナーシップのことです
08:58
and dedicate ourselves to this project,
私たちはこのプロジェクトに専念し
09:03
and then we also share in the rewards.
そして利益を分かち合ったのです
09:06
And here's another project, another partnership-type approach.
パートナーシップを採用した別の例を紹介します
09:08
This is called Y Water,
この「Y Water」は
09:13
and it's this guy from Los Angeles, Thomas Arndt,
オーストリア出身でロサンゼルス在住の
09:15
Austrian originally, who came to us,
トーマス・アーントが私たちのところに来て
09:19
and all he wanted to do was to create a healthy drink,
糖分だらけの炭酸水から自分の子供を
09:21
or an organic drink for his kids,
遠ざけるために
09:25
to replace the high-sugar-content sodas
健康で有機的な
09:28
that he's trying to get them away from.
飲み物を作りたいといったのです
09:32
So, we worked on this bottle,
そこで私たちはこのボトル
09:34
and it's completely symmetrical in every dimension.
完全に対称なボトルを作成したのです
09:37
And this allows the bottle to turn into a game.
このボトルを使えばゲームができます
09:39
The bottles connect together,
ボトル同士が組み合わさり
09:46
and you can create different shapes, different forms.
異なる形を作ることができます
09:47
(Laughter)
(笑い)
09:51
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:52
Thank you.
ありがとう
09:54
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:55
And then while we were doing this,
このプロジェクトの最中
09:57
the shape of the bottle upside down reminded us of a Y,
ボトルをさかさまにしたらYの形に見えることに気づきました
09:58
and then we thought, well these words, "why" and "why not,"
そして子供にとって一番重要な言葉は「なぜ(ホワイ)」
10:02
are probably the most important words that kids ask.
ではないかと考えたのです
10:07
So we called it Y Water. And so this is
そこで「Y(ワイ) Water」と名づけたのです
10:10
another place where it all comes together in the same room:
一つの部屋の中で
10:13
the three-dimensional design, the ideas, the branding,
三次元のデザインとアイディア ブランド戦略の全てが行われ
10:16
it all becomes deeply connected.
それぞれが深く紐付いているのです
10:22
And then the other thing about this project is,
このプロジェクトでは他にも
10:25
we bring intellectual property,
知的財産権や
10:27
we bring a marketing approach,
販売戦略など
10:31
we bring all this stuff, but I think, at the end of the day,
いろいろなものを取り入れましたが
10:33
what we bring is these values,
結果的にそれら自身の価値が
10:35
and these values create a soul for the companies we work with.
私たちのパートナーの会社の心を作っていったのです
10:37
And it's especially rewarding when your design work
デザインしたものが
10:41
becomes a creative endeavor,
新たな創造性を生み
10:42
when others can be creative and do more with it.
生産性を上げられることはとても名誉です
10:45
Here's another project,
このプロジェクトは
10:47
which I think really emulates that.
まさしくそれを実現しています
10:48
This is the One Laptop per Child, the $100 laptop.
子供一人にひとつずつ100ドルのノートPCを配るのです
10:51
This picture is incredible.
この写真を見てください
10:58
In Nigeria, people carry their most precious belongings on their heads.
ナイジェリアでは一番大切なものを頭に載せて運びます
10:59
This girl is going to school with a laptop on her head.
この少女は頭にノートPCを載せて登校しています
11:05
I mean, to me, it just means so much.
これはすごいことですよ
11:07
But when Nicholas Negroponte --
ニコラス・ネグロポンテ
11:11
and he has spoken about this project a lot,
このOLPCプロジェクトの発案者である彼は
11:13
he's the founder of OLPC -- came to us
既に多くを語ってくれましたが
11:15
about two and a half years ago,
二年半ほど前に私たちのところに来たときには
11:20
there were some clear ideas.
明確な考えを持っていました
11:24
He wanted to bring education and he wanted to bring technology,
教育と技術を届けたい
11:26
and those are pillars of his life,
それは彼の生活の礎であり
11:30
but also pillars of the mission of One Laptop per Child.
またこのOLPCプロジェクトの礎でもありました
11:31
But the third pillar that he talked about was design.
しかし彼が第三の礎と考えていたものはデザインでした
11:37
And at the time, I wasn't really working on computers.
当時私はコンピュータには疎く
11:41
I didn't really want to, from the previous adventure.
前回の経験から気が進みませんでした
11:45
But what he said was really significant,
しかし彼は 子供たちがこの製品を
11:47
is that design was going to be why the kids
好きになってくれるかどうかは
11:50
were going to love this product,
デザインにかかっていると言いました
11:52
how we were going to make it low cost, robust.
低価格で丈夫なものをつくること
11:54
And plus, he said he was going to get rid of the Caps Lock key --
また 彼はCapsLockキーを取り払うと言いました
11:56
(Laughter) --
(笑い)
12:03
and the Num Lock key, too.
NumLockキーもです
12:05
So, I was convinced. We designed it to be iconic,
それで納得し 私たちは象徴的で特別製の
12:07
to look different. To look like it's for a kid, but not like a toy.
かつ子供用だが安っぽく見えないようにデザインしました
12:11
And then the integration of
中にはご存知の
12:17
all these great technologies, which you've heard about,
優れた技術
12:19
the Wi-Fi antennas that allow the kids to connect;
Wifiアンテナや
12:22
the screen, which you can read in sunlight;
日光の下でも読めるディスプレイ
12:25
the keyboard, which is made out of rubber,
ゴム製のキーボードなどが組み込まれ
12:29
and it's protected from the environment.
外部環境にも耐えうるよう設計されました
12:31
You know, all these great technologies really happened
このようにすばらしい技術が組み合わさったのは
12:33
because of the passion and
OLPCスタッフとエンジニアの
12:36
the OLPC people and the engineers.
情熱のおかげです
12:40
They fought the suppliers,
自分たちの理想に向けて
12:43
they fought the manufacturers.
それは激しく仕入先や
12:45
I mean, they fought like animals
メーカーと
12:49
for this to remain they way it is.
交渉しました
12:53
And in a way, it is that will that makes projects like this one --
このようにして もともとのアイディアを
12:55
allows the process
崩すことなく
13:02
from not destroying the original idea.
プロジェクトを成功させたのです
13:03
And I think this is something really important.
私はこれをとても重要だと思います
13:06
So, now you get these pictures --
思い描いてください
13:08
you get up in the morning, and you see the kids in Nigeria
朝目を覚ますと ナイジェリアやウルグアイ モンゴルの
13:11
and you see them in Uruguay
子供たちが
13:14
with their computers, and in Mongolia.
コンピュータを持っているのです
13:16
And we went away from obviously the beige.
セピア色から彩り豊かな楽しい世界に
13:20
I mean it's colorful, it's fun.
踏み出しているのです
13:23
In fact, you can see each logo is a little bit different.
実はロゴが少しずつ違うのが見えるかと思います
13:24
It's because we were able
製造過程の中で
13:29
to run, during the manufacturing process,
コンピュータの名前にもなっている
13:31
20 colors for the X and the O,
XとOが
13:37
which is the name of the computer,
それぞれ20色 つまり
13:38
and by mixing them on the manufacturing floor,
組み合わせで
13:41
you get 20 times 20: you get
400種類のオプションを
13:44
400 different options there.
選ぶことができるのです
13:48
So, the lessons from seeing the kids
発展途上国の子供たちに使われているのは
13:50
using them in the developing world are incredible.
とても素敵なことです
13:52
But this is my nephew, Anthony, in Switzerland,
スイスにいる甥のアンソニーです
13:54
and he had the laptop for an afternoon,
昼過ぎまでノートPCを使っていましたが
13:58
and I had to take it back. It was hard.
取り上げるのにとても苦労しました
14:00
(Laughter)
(笑い)
14:03
And it was a prototype. And a month and a half later,
試作機でしたが 一ヵ月半後に
14:04
I come back to Switzerland,
私がスイスへ戻ると
14:08
and there he is playing with his own version.
彼は自分専用のものを持っていました
14:09
(Laughter)
(笑い)
14:15
Like paper, paper and cardboard.
厚紙などで作ったやつです
14:16
So, I'm going to finish with one last project,
最後のプロジェクトを紹介しましょう
14:21
and this is a little bit more of adult play.
少し大人よりの話です
14:26
(Laughter)
(笑い)
14:29
Some of you might have heard about the New York City condom.
ニューヨーク市コンドームプロジェクトはご存知でしょうか
14:30
It's actually just launched, actually launched on Valentine's Day,
実際には10日ほど前 2月14日バレンタイン・デイに
14:34
February 14, about 10 days ago.
始まったばかりなのです
14:39
So, the Department of Health in New York came to us,
ニューヨークの保健省が訪ねてきて
14:42
and they needed a way to distribute
市民に360万個のコンドームを
14:46
36 million condoms for free to the citizens of New York.
無料で配る方法を探しているとのことでした
14:51
So a pretty big endeavor, and we worked on the dispensers.
きわめて大きい試みで 私たちは配布機を担当しました
14:56
These are the dispensers. There's this friendly shape.
これがそうです 親しみのある形ですよね
15:01
It's a little bit like designing a fire hydrant,
どこか消火栓に似ていて
15:04
and it has to be easily serviceable:
簡単に使うことができ
15:09
you have to know where it is and what it does.
場所や用途がすぐにわかるものである必要がありました
15:14
And we also designed the condoms themselves.
私たちはコンドームそのものもデザインしました
15:17
And I was just in New York at the launch,
ニューヨークでこれが始まったとき
15:22
and I went to see all these places where they're installed:
導入されたところを全部見て回りました
15:24
this is at a Puerto Rican little mom-and-pop store;
これはプエルトリコ人の小さなお店
15:27
at a bar in Christopher Street; at a pool hall.
クリストファーストリートのバー ビリヤード場
15:32
I mean, they're being installed in homeless clinics -- everywhere.
ホームレス診療所にも 至る所に導入されました
15:36
Of course, clubs and discos, too.
もちろんクラブやディスコにもです
15:39
And here's the public service announcement for this project.
これがこのプロジェクトのCMです
15:43
(Music)
(音楽)
15:45
(Laughter)
(笑い)
16:00
Get some.
おひとつどうぞ
16:01
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:03
So, this is really where design
これこそデザインが交流を
16:09
is able to create a conversation.
生み出している例です
16:13
I was in these venues, and people were,
店の中で見ていると みんなが
16:14
you know, really into getting them. They were excited.
持っていってくれるのです うれしそうに
16:17
It was breaking the ice,
緊張や恥を
16:20
it was getting over a stigma,
解き放てることも
16:25
and I think that's also what design can do.
デザインがなしうることなのです
16:27
So, I was going to
そこで私は
16:31
throw some condoms in the room and whatnot,
ここでコンドームを撒くことにしました
16:32
but I'm not sure it's the etiquette here.
エチケットかと思ったのですが
16:36
(Laughter)
(笑い)
16:40
Yeah? All right, all right. I have only a few.
そうそう そんなに持ってないからね
16:41
(Laughter)
(笑い)
16:43
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:46
So, I have more, you can always ask me for some more later.
もう少しあります 残りの分はまた後でね
16:49
(Laughter)
(笑い)
16:56
And if anybody asks why you're carrying a condom,
もしコンドームを持っている理由を聞かれたら
16:57
you can just say you like the design.
デザインが好きだと答えてください
17:01
(Laughter)
(笑い)
17:02
So, I'll finish with just one thought:
最後に考えを共有させてください
17:06
if we all work together on creating value,
価値を創る仕事をしているときに
17:08
but if we really keep in mind the values of the work that we do,
自分たちの仕事の価値を常に頭に置いていれば
17:12
I think we can change the work that we do.
仕事のあり方を変えられるのではないでしょうか
17:16
We can change these values, can change the companies we work with,
これらの価値を変えることで ともに働く企業が変革し
17:22
and eventually, together, maybe we can change the world.
最後にはともに世界を変えられるかもしれません
17:25
So, thank you.
ありがとう
17:30
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:31
Translated by Shogo Kobayashi
Reviewed by Takafusa Kitazume

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Yves Behar - Designer
Yves Behar has produced some of the new millennium's most coveted objects, like the Leaf lamp, the Jawbone headset, and the XO laptop for One Laptop per Child.

Why you should listen

Over the past decade, Yves Behar and his firm fuseproject have become the design group that companies turn to for a game-changing idea. Take the re-invention of the Bluetooth headset, for one; or the re-envigoration of the venerable but dowdy Birkenstock line; or Behar's LED-chic Leaf lamp for Herman Miller.

And yes, Behar and fuseproject are the people who put the green bunny ears on the XO laptop -- and are redesigning the next-gen XOXO laptop due in 2010. This quirky but deeply felt project encapsulates much of his recent work, fusing gotta-have-it design with a mission of social responsibility.

More profile about the speaker
Yves Behar | Speaker | TED.com