06:11
TED Residency

Jeff Kirschner: This app makes it fun to pick up litter

ジェフ・キルシュナー: アプリで楽しくゴミ拾い

Filmed:

地球はあまりにも広すぎて、きれいに保つのは難しいものです。TEDレジデントのジェフ・キルシュナーは世の中のゴミを特定・収集・場所特定できるアプリLitteratiを開発し、クラウドソーシング型の地球清掃コミュニティを生み出しました。そして100か国以上からゴミのデータが集まった今、データの活用をとおして企業や組織と協力し、道にゴミが捨てられることを未然に防げる未来を目指しています。

- Entrepreneur
Jeff Kirschner created a global community that's eradicating litter one piece at a time. Full bio

This story starts with these two --
すべてはこの2人から始まりました
00:13
my kids.
私の子供たちです
00:16
We were hiking in the Oakland woods
オークランドの森へ
ハイキングに出かけたときに
00:17
when my daughter noticed
a plastic tub of cat litter in a creek.
娘が川に落ちている猫用の
プラスチック製トイレを見つけ
00:19
She looked at me and said,
私を見て言いました
00:23
"Daddy?
「ねぇパパ?
00:25
That doesn't go there."
コレ ここにあるのは変だよね?」
00:27
When she said that,
it reminded me of summer camp.
私はふと サマーキャンプでの光景が
頭に浮かびました
00:29
On the morning of visiting day,
参観日の朝
00:31
right before they'd let our anxious
parents come barreling through the gates,
心配性の親たちが門から
なだれ込んでくる直前に
00:33
our camp director would say,
リーダーが子供たちに
00:37
"Quick! Everyone pick up
five pieces of litter."
「ひとり5個ゴミを拾うんだ! 急げ!」
と号令するのです
00:38
You get a couple hundred kids
each picking up five pieces,
200人の子供が5個ずつゴミを集めたら
00:40
and pretty soon, you've got
a much cleaner camp.
あっという間にきれいになります
00:43
So I thought,
そこで私は考えたんです
00:46
why not apply that crowdsourced
cleanup model to the entire planet?
このクラウドソーシング型の清掃法を
世界規模で実施できないか?と
00:47
And that was the inspiration
for Litterati.
そのひらめきから
生まれたのがLitteratiです
00:52
The vision is to create
a litter-free world.
ビジョンはゴミのない世界の実現です
00:55
Let me show you how it started.
どうやって始まったかというと
00:58
I took a picture of a cigarette
using Instagram.
まず インスタグラムで
たばこの写真を撮りました
01:00
Then I took another photo ...
それから別の写真を
01:04
and another photo ...
また別の
01:06
and another photo.
さらに別の写真を撮り
01:07
And I noticed two things:
2つのことに気が付きました
01:08
one, litter became artistic
and approachable;
ひとつ目 ゴミは芸術作品となり
嫌悪感が薄れたこと
01:10
and two,
そして2つ目
01:14
at the end of a few days,
I had 50 photos on my phone
写真がたった数日で50枚に達したことです
01:15
and I had picked up each piece,
撮影したゴミはすべて拾いましたから
01:17
and I realized that I was keeping a record
自分が地球のためにしたことの
01:19
of the positive impact
I was having on the planet.
記録にもなっていることに気が付きました
01:21
That's 50 less things that you might see,
世の中から みなさんが目にしたり
01:25
or you might step on,
踏んだり
01:27
or some bird might eat.
鳥が誤食し得るゴミが
50個減ったのです
01:28
So I started telling people
what I was doing,
そこでこの活動の発信を始め
01:30
and they started participating.
参加者が増えていきました
01:33
One day,
ある日
01:36
this photo showed up from China.
この写真が中国から届きました
01:38
And that's when I realized
そのときに気付いたのです
01:42
that Litterati was more
than just pretty pictures;
Litteratiは ただ素敵な写真を
寄せ集めたものではなく
01:43
we were becoming a community
that was collecting data.
データ収集の集団に
変貌してきていることに
01:46
Each photo tells a story.
1枚1枚の写真の裏には物語があります
01:50
It tells us who picked up what,
だれが何を拾ったのか分かりますし
01:53
a geotag tells us where
ジオタグが場所を
01:55
and a time stamp tells us when.
タイムスタンプが時を教えてくれます
01:57
So I built a Google map,
そこで私はグーグルマップを用い
02:00
and started plotting the points
where pieces were being picked up.
ゴミが拾われた場所のプロットを始めました
02:02
And through that process,
the community grew
そうしている間に参加者は増えつづけ
02:06
and the data grew.
データ数も膨らみました
02:10
My two kids go to school
right in that bullseye.
私の子供たちの学校はこのド真ん中にあります
02:12
Litter:
ゴミは
02:17
it's blending into
the background of our lives.
私たちの生活の風景に溶け込んできています
02:18
But what if we brought it
to the forefront?
でももし前面に引き出したとしたら?
02:21
What if we understood exactly
what was on our streets,
もし道に落ちているゴミや
02:23
our sidewalks
歩道のゴミ
02:26
and our school yards?
校庭のゴミの正体を正確に把握できたら?
02:27
How might we use that data
to make a difference?
そのようなデータは
どう役立てられるでしょう?
02:29
Well, let me show you.
それをお見せしましょう
02:33
The first is with cities.
まずは都市の話です
02:34
San Francisco wanted to understand
what percentage of litter was cigarettes.
サンフランシスコはゴミに占める
たばこの割合を調査しようとしていました
02:36
Why?
なぜかというと
02:41
To create a tax.
課税するためです
02:42
So they put a couple of people
in the streets
そこで調査員が派遣され
02:44
with pencils and clipboards,
クリップボードと鉛筆を持ち
02:46
who walked around collecting information
足で情報が収集されました
02:47
which led to a 20-cent tax
on all cigarette sales.
その結果 たばこの売上全体に対して
20%の税が課せられました
02:49
And then they got sued
ところが訴訟を起こされてしまったのです
02:53
by big tobacco,
たばこ業界は強力ですからね
02:55
who claimed that collecting information
with pencils and clipboards
クリップボードと鉛筆で集めたデータなんて
02:57
is neither precise nor provable.
正確性も実証性も欠くという主張でした
03:00
The city called me and asked
if our technology could help.
そこで私たちの技術の力を借りたいと
市から電話がありました
03:03
I'm not sure they realized
その技術が単に私の
インスタグラムのアカウントだという
03:07
that our technology
was my Instagram account --
認識が先方にあったかは不明ですが
03:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:10
But I said, "Yes, we can."
でも「いいですよ」と答えました
03:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:13
"And we can tell you
if that's a Parliament or a Pall Mall.
「たばこがパーラメントなのか
ポール・モールなのかも分かりますし
03:14
Plus, every photograph
is geotagged and time-stamped,
すべての写真にはジオタグと
タイムスタンプが付きますから
03:18
providing you with proof."
証拠にもなりますよ」と
03:21
Four days and 5,000 pieces later,
4日後 5,000個のゴミが拾われた後に
03:23
our data was used in court
to not only defend but double the tax,
私たちのデータは反対弁論にだけでなく
税率を倍増するために使用されました
03:27
generating an annual recurring revenue
of four million dollars
結果 サンフランシスコ市が
清掃事業に費やせる経常歳入が
03:32
for San Francisco to clean itself up.
新たに400万ドル生み出されたのです
03:36
Now, during that process
I learned two things:
この出来事から2つのことを学びました
03:40
one, Instagram is not the right tool --
まず インスタグラムは不向きだということ
03:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:44
so we built an app.
ですからアプリを作成しました
03:45
And two, if you think about it,
そして もう1つは
03:47
every city in the world
has a unique litter fingerprint,
世界各地の街には
それぞれ独自の特徴があり
03:49
and that fingerprint provides
both the source of the problem
その特徴が問題の原因と
03:52
and the path to the solution.
解決策に導いてくれるということです
03:56
If you could generate a revenue stream
ゴミに占めるたばこの割合を調べるだけで
03:59
just by understanding
the percentage of cigarettes,
収入源が生み出されるなら
04:02
well, what about coffee cups
コーヒーの紙コップや
04:04
or soda cans
空き缶や
04:06
or plastic bottles?
ペットボトルでも可能なのでは?
04:08
If you could fingerprint San Francisco,
well, how about Oakland
サンフランシスコの特徴を把握できるなら
オークランドだって
04:10
or Amsterdam
アムステルダムだって
04:13
or somewhere much closer to home?
自分の家のすぐ近くだって可能なはずです
04:15
And what about brands?
企業はどうでしょう?
04:19
How might they use this data
環境的および経済的利益のために
04:20
to align their environmental
and economic interests?
このデータをどう利用できるでしょうか?
04:22
There's a block in downtown Oakland
that's covered in blight.
オークランドの中心街に
ゴミであふれている一角があります
04:27
The Litterati community got together
and picked up 1,500 pieces.
そこにLitteratiのユーザーが集い.
1,500個のゴミを拾いました
04:31
And here's what we learned:
そこから明らかになったのは
04:35
most of that litter came
from a very well-known taco brand.
ゴミはある有名な
タコス店の物ばかりだったこと
04:37
Most of that brand's litter
were their own hot sauce packets,
その大半は店の辛口ソースの小袋で
04:41
and most of those hot sauce packets
hadn't even been opened.
しかもほとんどが未開封のままでした
04:46
The problem and the path
to the solution --
問題と解決策ですが
04:51
well, maybe that brand only
gives out hot sauce upon request
例えばソースは欲しい人だけに渡すとか
04:54
or installs bulk dispensers
店内に大容器で設置するとか
04:58
or comes up with more
sustainable packaging.
よりエコな包装に変えるとか
05:00
How does a brand take
an environmental hazard,
企業は環境への悪影響を
05:03
turn it into an economic engine
どのようにして経済的原動力に変え
05:06
and become an industry hero?
業界のヒーローになるかを
考えなければなりません
05:08
If you really want to create change,
でも真に変化を望むのであれば
05:11
there's no better place to start
than with our kids.
子供たちから始めることが一番効果的です
05:13
A group of fifth graders picked up
1,247 pieces of litter
ある学校では5年生の子供たちが校庭で
05:16
just on their school yard.
1,247個のゴミを拾い
05:19
And they learned that the most
common type of litter
一番多いゴミは
05:21
were the plastic straw wrappers
from their own cafeteria.
学食にあるストローの袋
であることを突きとめました
05:24
So these kids went
to their principal and asked,
そこで子供たちは校長を訪ね
05:27
"Why are we still buying straws?"
「どうしてストローが必要なの?」と問い
05:30
And they stopped.
その結果 ストローは廃止されました
05:33
And they learned that individually
they could each make a difference,
子供たちは
一人一人の行いには意味があること
05:34
but together they created an impact.
協力すればもっと大きな力に
なることも学びました
05:38
It doesn't matter
if you're a student or a scientist,
このコミュニティは
学生であろうと科学者であろうと
05:41
whether you live in Honolulu or Hanoi,
ホノルルに住んでいようと
ハノイに住んでいようと
05:45
this is a community for everyone.
関係なく だれもが参加できるものです
05:48
It started because of two little kids
in the Northern California woods,
北カルフォルニアの森に連れて行った
2人の幼い子供たちがきっかけの活動が
05:51
and today it's spread across the world.
今や世界中に広まっています
05:56
And you know how we're getting there?
その道のりはどう歩んできたかって?
05:59
One piece at a time.
1つずつ 1つずつです
06:02
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
06:04
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:05
Translated by Tomoko Kubota
Reviewed by Riaki Poništ

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Jeff Kirschner - Entrepreneur
Jeff Kirschner created a global community that's eradicating litter one piece at a time.

Why you should listen

When his 4-year old daughter saw a plastic tub of cat litter in the woods, little did Jeff Kirschner realize that it would be the spark for creating Litterati -- a global movement that's "crowdsource-cleaning" the planet one piece of litter at a time. 

Featured in National Geographic, Time Magazine, Fast Company and USA Today, Litterati has become a shining example of how communities are using technology and data to solve our world's most complex problems. 

Kirschner has shared the Litterati story at Fortune 500 companies such as Google, Facebook and Uber, keynoted environmental summits at the Monterey Bay Aquarium and Keep America Beautiful, as well as leading schools including Stanford, MIT and the University of Michigan. He was recently a TED Resident, where he developed Litterati into an idea worth spreading.

More profile about the speaker
Jeff Kirschner | Speaker | TED.com