sponsored links
TED2008

Paul Collier: The "bottom billion"

ポール・コリアー 最底辺の10億人 最も貧しい国々のために本当になすべきことは何か?

March 3, 2008

世界中で現在、貧しい国や崩壊しつつある国から逃れられずにいる人が10億人もいます。どうやったら彼らを救えるのか? 経済学者ポール・コリアーは貧富の差をなくす大胆かつ思いやりのある計画を示します。

Paul Collier - Economist
Paul Collier’s book The Bottom Billion shows what is happening to the poorest people in the world, and offers ideas for opening up opportunities to all. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So, can we dare to be optimistic?
さて 我々は楽観的でいられるか?
00:16
Well, the thesis of "The Bottom Billion"
私の著書の要点は
00:19
is that a billion people have been stuck living
10億人が過去40年間におよぶ
00:20
in economies that have been stagnant for 40 years,
経済停滞の中から抜け出せず
00:25
and hence diverging from the rest of mankind.
そのため その他の人類から引き離されたこと
00:30
And so, the real question to pose is not, "Can we be optimistic?"
ここでの本当の問題は 「楽観的でいられるか」ではなく
00:34
It's, "How can we give credible hope to that billion people?"
「どうしたら この10億の人に確かな望みを与えることができるか?」
00:37
That, to my mind, is the fundamental challenge now of development.
今 これは 開発における根本的な挑戦です
00:42
What I'm going to offer you is a recipe,
ここで皆さんに提供するのは
00:48
a combination of the two forces that changed the world for good,
世界を良くした二つの力を組み合わせた処方箋
00:51
which is the alliance of compassion and enlightened self-interest.
思いやりと啓発された自己利益の同盟です
00:56
Compassion, because a billion people are living in societies
「思いやり」は 10億人が確かな望みをもてない
01:03
that have not offered credible hope.
社会に住んでいるからです
01:08
That is a human tragedy.
これは人類の悲劇です
01:13
Enlightened self-interest, because if that economic divergence
「啓発された自己利益」は このまま経済相違が
01:16
continues for another 40 years,
世界的な社会統合と兼ねあって
01:21
combined with social integration globally,
後40年も続くなら
01:26
it will build a nightmare for our children.
我々の子供達にとって悪夢となるからです
01:30
We need compassion to get ourselves started,
行動を起こすには思いやりが必要で
01:34
and enlightened self-interest to get ourselves serious.
真剣に取り組むには啓発された自己利益が必要です
01:38
That's the alliance that changes the world.
これは世界を変える同盟です
01:44
So, what does it mean to get serious about providing hope for the bottom billion?
最底辺10億人に望みを与えることに真剣に取り組むとは 何を意味するのか?
01:47
What can we actually do?
実際なにができるでしょう?
01:54
Well, a good guide is to think,
こう考えて下さい
01:58
"What did we do last time the rich world got serious
「豊かな国が世界の他の領域の開発に
02:01
about developing another region of the world?"
真剣に取り組んだ時 何をしたか?」
02:06
That gives us, it turns out, quite a good clue,
結構良い手がかりが掴めます
02:10
except you have to go back quite a long time.
かなり昔まで遡らなければならないのが難ですが
02:14
The last time the rich world got serious
以前 豊かな国が他の領域を開発するのに
02:17
about developing another region was in the late 1940s.
真剣に取り組んだのは1940年代後半です
02:19
The rich world was you, America,
豊かな国は あなた方 アメリカで
02:25
and the region that needed to be developed was my world, Europe.
発展の必要があった領域は私が住む ヨーロッパ
02:30
That was post-War Europe.
戦後のヨーロッパです
02:35
Why did America get serious?
なぜアメリカは真剣に取り組んだか?
02:38
It wasn't just compassion for Europe, though there was that.
ヨーロッパへの同情もありましたが それだけではなく
02:41
It was that you knew you had to,
そうせざるを得なかったのです
02:45
because, in the late 1940s, country after country in Central Europe
1940年代後期は中央ヨーロッパ諸国が次々と
02:48
was falling into the Soviet bloc, and so you knew you'd no choice.
ソ連側に陥っていったので 他に選択がなかったのです
02:53
Europe had to be dragged into economic development.
ヨーロッパを経済発展に引き込む必要に迫られていました
02:59
So, what did you do, last time you got serious?
では そのとき 何をしたか?
03:02
Well, yes, you had a big aid program. Thank you very much.
大規模な援助支援です ありがとうございました
03:06
That was Marshall aid: we need to do it again. Aid is part of the solution.
マーシャル プランです 我々は再びこれを行う必要があります 援助は解決策の一部です
03:10
But what else did you do?
他には何をしたでしょう
03:15
Well, you tore up your trade policy, and totally reversed it.
貿易政策を根本から覆しました
03:18
Before the war, America had been highly protectionist.
戦争前のアメリカは全く保護貿易主義でした
03:25
After the war, you opened your markets to Europe,
戦後 市場をヨーロッパに開放し
03:29
you dragged Europe into the then-global economy, which was your economy,
アメリカ経済に引き入れることで グローバル経済となり
03:33
and you institutionalized that trade liberalization
関税や貿易の一般規定を定めることで
03:37
through founding the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.
自由貿易を組織化しました
03:39
So, total reversal of trade policy.
貿易政策の転換です
03:43
Did you do anything else?
他に何かしましたか?
03:46
Yes, you totally reversed your security policy.
防衛政策を全面的に覆しましたね
03:47
Before the war, your security policy had been isolationist.
戦前のアメリカの防衛政策は孤立主義者でした
03:50
After the war, you tear that up, you put 100,000 troops in Europe
戦後 アメリカはそれを覆し 10万人の軍隊をヨーロッパに
03:54
for over 40 years.
40年にわたって配置します
04:00
So, total reversal of security policy. Anything else?
防衛政策を全面的に覆した他には?
04:02
Yes, you tear up the "Eleventh Commandment" --
国家主権の11戒を
04:07
national sovereignty.
破棄しました
04:11
Before the war, you treated national sovereignty as so sacrosanct
戦前のアメリカは国家主権を神聖なものと位置付け
04:14
that you weren't even willing to join the League of Nations.
国際連盟に加わる気など全くなかった
04:19
After the war, you found the United Nations,
戦後 アメリカは国連を設立し
04:22
you found the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development,
経済協力開発機構を設立し
04:25
you found the IMF, you encouraged Europe to create the European Community --
IMFを設立し ヨーロッパに欧州共同体をつくるよう促しました
04:29
all systems for mutual government support.
どれも 政府を支えあうためのシステムです
04:34
That is still the waterfront of effective policies:
それは未だに効果的方針の重要な部分です
04:38
aid, trade, security, governments.
援助 貿易 防衛 政府
04:44
Of course, the details of policy are going to be different,
もちろん 課題が異なるので
04:48
because the challenge is different.
方針の詳細は違ってきます
04:51
It's not rebuilding Europe, it's reversing the divergence
ヨーロッパを再建するのでなく
04:53
for the bottom billion, so that they actually catch up.
相違をなくし最下層10億が追いつけるようにする
04:59
Is that easier or harder?
より簡単か より難しいか?
05:02
We need to be at least as serious as we were then.
少なくとも前と同じくらい真剣に取り組む必要があります
05:06
Now, today I'm going to take just one of those four.
今日は四つのうち一つだけ取り上げます
05:11
I'm going to take the one that sounds the weakest,
一番弱く聞こえるものを取り上げます
05:16
the one that's just motherhood and apple pie --
我々にとって身近な存在でもある政府です
05:19
governments, mutual systems of support for governments --
具体的には 政府を支持する相互システムです
05:22
and I'm going to show you one idea
統治を強化するにはどうしたら良いか
05:25
in how we could do something to strengthen governance,
一つのアイデアを提案します
05:29
and I'm going to show you that that is enormously important now.
そしてこれが今 いかに重要であるか明らかにしましょう
05:34
The opportunity we're going to look to
我々が注目する機会は
05:41
is a genuine basis for optimism about the bottom billion,
最下層10億人を楽観的なものにする真の基盤で
05:46
and that is the commodity booms.
それは資源ブームです
05:52
The commodity booms are pumping unprecedented amounts of money
資源ブームは今までにない金額を 全てではないにせよ
05:55
into many, though not all, of the countries of the bottom billion.
多くの最貧国に注ぎ込んでいます
06:01
Partly, they're pumping money in because commodity prices are high,
商品価値が高いという理由もありますが
06:07
but it's not just that. There's also a range of new discoveries.
それだけではありません 新しい発見があります
06:11
Uganda has just discovered oil, in about the most disastrous location on Earth;
ウガンダは 地球上最も壊滅的な場所で原油を発見したところです
06:18
Ghana has discovered oil;
ガーナも原油を発見しました
06:24
Guinea has got a huge new exploitation of iron ore coming out of the ground.
ギニアは 大規模な鉄鉱石を新しく開発しました
06:26
So, a mass of new discoveries.
たくさんの新発見があります
06:31
Between them, these new revenue flows dwarf aid.
これらの新しい収益は 援助を小さくします
06:34
Just to give you one example:
一つの例をあげると
06:39
Angola alone is getting 50 billion dollars a year in oil revenue.
アンゴラだけで 原油収益は年間500億ドルです
06:42
The entire aid flows to the 60 countries of the bottom billion last year were 34 billion.
60カ国にまたがる最底辺10億人への昨年における援助金は340億ドルでした
06:47
So, the flow of resources from the commodity booms
資源ブームに帰する最下層への
06:53
to the bottom billion are without precedent.
資金の流れはかつてありませんでした
06:58
So there's the optimism.
ですから希望が持てます
07:03
The question is, how is it going to help their development?
問題は どうすればこれが開発の助けになるか
07:05
It's a huge opportunity for transformational development.
これは転換発展する大きな機会です
07:09
Will it be taken?
有効に使えるか
07:13
So, here comes a bit of science, and this is a bit of science I've done
ここで多少の科学の出番です
07:15
since "The Bottom Billion," so it's new.
本を出版してからのことなので 新しいです
07:19
I've looked to see what is the relationship between
私は 輸出品の物価の高さと
07:22
higher commodity prices of exports,
商品の輸出国の成長の
07:26
and the growth of commodity-exporting countries.
関係を調べました
07:29
And I've looked globally, I've taken all the countries in the world
世界規模で見て 世界中の国の
07:31
for the last 40 years,
過去40年の
07:34
and looked to see what the relationship is.
関係を見てみました
07:36
And the short run -- say, the first five to seven years -- is just great.
さしあたり最初の5-7年は素晴らしいです
07:39
In fact, it's hunky dory: everything goes up.
実際 結構なことで すべて上がります
07:48
You get more money because your terms of trade have improved,
交易条件がよくなったので より多くのお金を得ます
07:53
but also that drives up output across the board.
しかしそれはまた全面的に生産を促進します
07:55
So GDP goes up a lot -- fantastic! That's the short run.
国内総生産が著しく上がり 素晴らしいです! これが短期です
07:58
And how about the long run?
長期では?
08:04
Come back 15 years later.
15年後
08:06
Well, the short run, it's hunky dory,
短期は好調
08:09
but the long run, it's humpty dumpty.
長期は急落
08:11
You go up in the short run, but then most societies
短期で成長しますが その後多くの社会は歴史的に
08:16
historically have ended up worse than if they'd had no booms at all.
好況が全くなかった状態より更に悪い状態に陥ります
08:20
That is not a forecast about how commodity prices go;
これは物価の行方に関しての予想ではなく
08:25
it's a forecast of the consequences, the long-term consequences,
価格上昇の成長における
08:29
for growth of an increase in prices.
長期的な影響の予想です
08:33
So, what goes wrong? Why is there this "resource curse," as it's called?
何が うまくいかないのか?なぜ「資源の呪縛」と呼ばれるものがあるのか?
08:38
And again, I've looked at that, and it turns out
調べてわかったことは
08:43
that the critical issue is the level of governance,
資源ブームが生じたときの当初の
08:46
the initial level of economic governance,
経済的統治レベルに
08:50
when the resource booms accrue.
重大な問題があるということ
08:52
In fact, if you've got good enough governance,
実際 しっかりした統治下では
08:55
there is no resource boom.
資源ブームはないのです
08:57
You go up in the short term, and then you go up even more in the long term.
短期的に成長し そして長期的にはさらなる成長をとげます
08:59
That's Norway, the richest country in Europe. It's Australia. It's Canada.
ヨーロッパで最も豊かな国ノルウェー オーストラリア カナダがそうです
09:04
The resource curse is entirely confined to countries
資源の呪縛は 統治の限界以下で
09:10
below a threshold of governance.
まったく国に限定されたものです
09:12
They still go up in the short run.
それでも短期成長があります
09:14
That's what we're seeing across the bottom billion at the moment.
それが現在 最底辺10億人に見られます
09:16
The best growth rates they've had -- ever.
今までにない最高の成長率
09:20
And the question is whether the short run will persist.
問題は短期が持続するか
09:23
And with bad governance historically, over the last 40 years, it hasn't.
過去40年をみると悪い統治下では持続しません
09:29
It's countries like Nigeria, which are worse off than if they'd never had oil.
ナイジェリアなどの国は 原油が発見されなかった場合よりも ひどい状況です
09:33
So, there's a threshold level above which you go up in the long term,
そこには長期的に成長できるか後退するかの
09:41
and below which you go down.
しきい値があります
09:46
Just to benchmark that threshold,
その しきい値の評価基準は
09:48
it's about the governance level of Portugal in the mid 1980s.
1980年代中頃のポルトガルの統治レベルです
09:50
So, the question is, are the bottom billion above or below that threshold?
さて問題は最底辺10億人は しきい値の上か下か?
09:57
Now, there's one big change since the commodity booms of the 1970s,
1970年代の資源ブーム以降に大きな変化がありました
10:02
and that is the spread of democracy.
それは民主主義の広がりです
10:07
So I thought, well, maybe that is the thing
これは最底辺10億人の
10:10
which has transformed governance in the bottom billion.
統治を変化させたかもしれません
10:12
Maybe we can be more optimistic because of the spread of democracy.
民主主義が広がれば より楽観的になれるかと
10:14
So, I looked. Democracy does have significant effects --
調べると 民主主義の影響は確かに大きく
10:18
and unfortunately, they're adverse.
残念なことに 逆作用です
10:23
Democracies make even more of a mess of these resource booms than autocracies.
民主主義は独裁国家よりも これらの資源ブームの混乱を招きます
10:26
At that stage I just wanted to abandon the research, but --
この段階で 私は研究を止めようかと思ったのですが-
10:32
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:35
-- it turns out that democracy is a little bit more complicated than that.
民主主義はそれよりももっと複雑だと判明しました
10:37
Because there are two distinct aspects of democracy:
民主主義には二つの異なる面があり
10:40
there's electoral competition, which determines how you acquire power,
どれだけの権力の得るかを決定する選挙戦と
10:44
and there are checks and balances, which determine how you use power.
権力の使い方を決定する抑制と均衡があるのです
10:49
It turns out that electoral competition is the thing
選挙競争は民主主義に
10:55
that's doing the damage with democracy,
ダメージを与え
10:57
whereas strong checks and balances make resource booms good.
厳正な抑制と均衡は資源ブームにとって良いことが判りました
10:59
And so, what the countries of the bottom billion need
ですから最底辺10億人の国に必要なのは
11:04
is very strong checks and balances.
厳しい抑制と均衡です
11:07
They haven't got them.
それが彼らにはありません
11:09
They got instant democracy in the 1990s:
彼らは 1990年代に即席民主主義となりました
11:11
elections without checks and balances.
抑制と均衡のない選挙です
11:14
How can we help improve governance and introduce checks and balances?
統治を改善し 抑制と均衡を導入するために我々に何ができるか?
11:17
In all the societies of the bottom billion,
最底辺10億人の
11:23
there are intense struggles to do just that.
すべての社会で それをするだけでも激しい葛藤があります
11:25
The simple proposal is that we should have some international standards,
単純な提案として これらの資源収益を
11:30
which will be voluntary, but which would spell out the key decision points
利用するために必要な
11:35
that need to be taken in order
主要な決定点を書き出した
11:40
to harness these resource revenues.
任意の国際基準を設けること
11:43
We know these international standards work
国際基準は効果があります
11:46
because we've already got one.
すでに一つあります
11:48
It's called the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative.
採取産業透明性イニシアティブ(EITI)です
11:50
That is the very simple idea that governments should report
これは 政府の収益高を市民に報告することを
11:53
to their citizens what revenues they have.
義務付ける非常に単純な考えです
11:58
No sooner was it proposed
提案されるや否や
12:01
than reformers in Nigeria adopted it, pushed it and published the revenues in the paper.
ナイジェリアの改革派がそれを採用し 押し通し 収益を新聞で発表し
12:03
Nigerian newspapers circulations spiked.
ナイジェリア新聞の発行部数は急増しました
12:10
People wanted to know what their government was getting
人々は政府の収益がどれくらいか
12:12
in terms of revenue.
知りたがっていたのです
12:15
So, we know it works. What would the content be of these international standards?
効き目はあります 国際標準の内容は何でしょう?
12:18
I can't go through all of them, but I'll give you an example.
すべてを挙げることは出来ませんが 例を挙げましょう
12:25
The first is how to take the resources out of the ground --
最初に 地中から資源をとる方法です-
12:30
the economic processes, taking the resources out of the ground
地中から資源を取り出し
12:34
and putting assets on top of the ground.
地上に資産を築く経済プロセスです
12:37
And the first step in that is selling the rights to resource extraction.
その第一歩は 資源抽出の権利を売ること
12:40
You know how rights to resource extraction are being sold at the moment,
資源抽出の権利が 現在 そして過去40年にわたって
12:44
how they've been sold over the last 40 years?
どのように売られているかご存知ですか?
12:48
A company flies in, does a deal with a minister.
外国企業がやってきて大臣と取引し
12:50
And that's great for the company,
会社に取っては素晴らしい取引で
12:54
and it's quite often great for the minister --
大臣のためにも良い取引の場合が多い-
12:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:58
-- and it's not great for their country.
でも国に取ってはよくありません
12:59
There's a very simple institutional technology
それは単純な組織の技術で
13:02
which can transform that,
変えることができ
13:04
and it's called verified auctions.
それは立証競売と呼ばれます
13:06
The public agency with the greatest expertise on Earth
地球上で最も大きな専門知識をもつ公共機関は
13:11
is of course the treasury -- that is, the British Treasury.
もちろん財務省です-つまり英国財務省
13:17
And the British Treasury decided that it would sell the rights
そして英国財務省は 権利の価値を計算し
13:20
to third-generation mobile phones
第3世代携帯電話の
13:23
by working out what those rights were worth.
権利を売ることを決定しました
13:25
They worked out they were worth two billion pounds.
その価値は20億ポンドと算出されました
13:28
Just in time, a set of economists got there and said,
売られる前に経済学者の一団が言いました
13:31
"Why not try an auction? It'll reveal the value."
「競売にかけたら?価値がはっきりするだろう」
13:34
It went for 20 billion pounds through auction.
競売では200億ポンドまで競りあがりました
13:37
If the British Treasury can be out by a factor of 10,
英国財務省が10倍もはずすなら
13:41
think what the ministry of finance in Sierra Leone is going to be like.
シエラ レオネの財務省がどんなものか想像してください
13:44
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:47
When I put that to the President of Sierra Leone,
シエラ レオネの大統領に
13:48
the next day he asked the World Bank to send him a team
それを言ったら 彼は翌日には世界銀行に連絡し
13:50
to give expertise on how to conduct auctions.
競売の専門知識のあるチームを送るよう頼みました
13:53
There are five such decision points;
決定点は五つあります
13:58
each one needs an international standard.
それぞれに国際基準が必要です
14:00
If we could do it, we would change the world.
それができれば世界が変わります
14:04
We would be helping the reformers in these societies,
変革へと奮闘するこれらの社会改革派を
14:08
who are struggling for change.
助けることになります
14:12
That's our modest role. We cannot change these societies,
それが我々にできることです
14:15
but we can help the people in these societies
これらの社会を変えることは出来ませんが
14:19
who are struggling and usually failing,
積み重なる不利な条件のため変革しようともがきながらも
14:22
because the odds are so stacked against them.
通常失敗しているこれらの社会の人を助けることができます
14:25
And yet, we've not got these rules.
これらの規則はいまだにありません
14:31
If you think about it, the cost of promulgating international rules
考えてみると 国際的な規則を広めるためのコストは
14:34
is zilch -- nothing.
ゼロです ― 何もない
14:38
Why on Earth are they not there?
じゃあ いったいなぜ規則がないか?
14:41
I realized that the reason they're not there
私はこう思います
14:45
is that until we have a critical mass of informed citizens in our own societies,
我々自身の社会にその情報に通じた市民がある程度いない限り
14:49
politicians will get away with gestures.
政治家は行動に移しません
14:55
That unless we have an informed society,
我々に情報に通じた社会がない限り
14:58
what politicians do, especially in relation to Africa, is gestures:
政治家がすることは 特にアフリカに関しては体裁的な処置のみです
15:03
things that look good, but don't work.
見た目はいいけど 効果はない
15:09
And so I realized we had to go through the business
だから 私達は情報通の社会を
15:12
of building an informed citizenry.
築くことから始めなければいけない
15:15
That's why I broke all the professional rules of conduct for an economist,
というわけで 私は経済学者における専門的な原則をすべて破って
15:19
and I wrote an economics book that you could read on a beach.
ビーチで読めるような経済学の本を書きました
15:24
(Laughter).
(笑)
15:27
However, I have to say, the process of communication
しかし コミュニケーションのプロセスは
15:32
does not come naturally to me.
私にとっては容易ではなかったと言わざるを得ません
15:36
This is why I'm on this stage, but it's alarming.
だから私はこのステージにいるのですが これは憂慮すべきです
15:38
I grew up in a culture of self-effacement.
私は 表面に顔をださない性分です
15:42
My wife showed me a blog comment on one of my last talks,
私の先回の講演を話題にしたブログを妻が見せてくれました
15:50
and the blog comment said, "Collier is not charismatic --
そのコメントには こう書かれていました 「コリアーにはカリスマがない-
15:54
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:00
-- but his arguments are compelling."
しかし 彼の議論は非常に説得力に富む」
16:03
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:06
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:10
If you agree with that sentiment,
この感覚に同意するなら
16:17
and if you agree that we need a critical mass of informed citizenry,
そして必要限の情報通の市民が必要だと同意するなら
16:20
you will realize that I need you.
私があなたを必要としていることが解るでしょう
16:26
Please, become ambassadors.
大使になってください
16:30
Thank you.
ありがとう
16:32
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:34
Translator:Kayo Mizutani
Reviewer:Takako Sato

sponsored links

Paul Collier - Economist
Paul Collier’s book The Bottom Billion shows what is happening to the poorest people in the world, and offers ideas for opening up opportunities to all.

Why you should listen

Paul Collier studies the political and economic problems of the very poorest countries: 50 societies, many in sub-Saharan Africa, that are stagnating or in decline, and taking a billion people down with them. His book The Bottom Billion identifies the four traps that keep such countries mired in poverty, and outlines ways to help them escape, with a mix of direct aid and external support for internal change.

From 1998 to 2003, Collier was the director of the World Bank's Development Research Group; he now directs the Centre for the Study of African Economies at Oxford, where he continues to advise policymakers.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.