11:04
TEDxSanQuentin

Curtis "Wall Street" Carroll: How I learned to read -- and trade stocks -- in prison

カーティス・'ウォールストリート’・キャロル: 私が刑務所で学んだこと―読むことと株の取り引き

Filmed:

「ファイナンスの知識はスキルではなく、ライフスタイルです。」刑務所に収監された経歴のあるキャロルはお金の価値を理解しています。服役中に、文字を読むこと、そして株の取り引きを独学で学んだ彼は「自分のお金のことをもっと理解すべきだ」というシンプルで影響力のあるメッセージを伝えます。

- Financial literacy advocate
Curtis “Wall Street” Carroll overcame poverty, illiteracy, incarceration and a lack of outside support to become a stock investor, creator and teacher of his own financial literacy philosophy. Full bio

14才の時
00:12
I was 14 years old
ボーリング場にある
00:15
inside of a bowling alley,
ゲーム機から金を強奪し
00:16
burglarizing an arcade game,
ビルから出ようとしたら
00:19
and upon exiting the building
警備員に自分の腕をつかまれ
逃走しました
00:21
a security guard grabbed my arm, so I ran.
通りを走り
フェンスの上へとジャンプし
00:23
I ran down the street,
and I jumped on top of a fence.
上に立ったと思ったら
00:26
And when I got to the top,
かばんに入っていた
3千枚の25セント硬貨の重みで
00:28
the weight of 3,000 quarters
in my book bag
自分は地面に落下しました
00:30
pulled me back down to the ground.
すると 警備員が
覆いかぶさってきて こう言いました
00:32
So when I came to, the security guard
was standing on top of me,
「おい悪ガキ 次に盗みを働くときは
自分で持てる分だけにするんだな」
00:35
and he said, "Next time you little punks
steal something you can carry."
(笑)
00:39
(Laughter)
自分は少年拘置所に
連れていかれましたが
00:41
I was taken to juvenile hall
母の保護の元 釈放されたときに
00:43
and when I was released
into the custody of my mother,
おじが最初に口にした言葉は
「何で捕まったんだ?」
00:47
the first words my uncle said was,
"How'd you get caught?"
「かばんが重くなりすぎてね」
00:50
I said, "Man, the book bag was too heavy."
「25セント硬貨を
全部持ち帰ろうとするからだ」
00:52
He said, "Man, you weren't supposed
to take all the quarters."
「だって小さなコインだよ
どうすればいいんだ?」
00:55
I said, "Man, they were small.
What am I supposed to do?"
おじは10分後に別のゲーム機の
硬貨を盗みに自分を連れて行きました
00:58
And 10 minutes later, he took me
to burglarize another arcade game.
ガス代の支払いがあったからです
01:03
We needed gas money to get home.
そんな生活を送っていました
01:05
That was my life.
自分はカリフォルニア州の
オークランドで
01:07
I grew up in Oakland, California,
母とコカインを常用する
近縁の親戚の下で
01:09
with my mother and members
of my immediate family
育てられました
01:11
addicted to crack cocaine.
自分の周りには 一緒に住む家族
友人それに
01:13
My environment consisted
of living with family, friends,
ホームレスのための宿泊所がありました
01:18
and homeless shelters.
夕食は貧窮者への施しである
パンやスープということもよくありました
01:21
Oftentimes, dinner was served
in breadlines and soup kitchens.
大親友はこう言っていました
01:25
The big homie told me this:
「金が世を支配する
01:27
money rules the world
全ての価値は金にあるんだ
01:29
and everything in it.
この街区では 金こそ帝王だ
01:30
And in these streets, money is king.
金についていけば
01:33
And if you follow the money,
悪い奴 もしかするといい奴にも
出会えるかもしれない」
01:34
it'll lead you to the bad guy
or the good guy.
その後すぐに
最初の犯罪を犯し
01:38
Soon after, I committed my first crime,
その時 初めて
自分に可能性があると言われ
01:40
and it was the first time
that I was told that I had potential
自分を信じてくれる人の存在を
感じました
01:43
and felt like somebody believed in me.
誰も自分が弁護士や
医者や技術者になるなんて
01:46
Nobody ever told me
that I could be a lawyer,
言ってくれたことはありませんでした
01:48
doctor or engineer.
読み書きも綴りも知らない
一体何になれるっていうのでしょう?
01:50
I mean, how was I supposed to do that?
I couldn't read, write or spell.
無学なんだから
01:53
I was illiterate.
だから 自分には犯罪しかないと
いつも思っていました
01:54
So I always thought
crime was my way to go.
そんなある日のこと
01:59
And then one day
仲間と話していると
02:01
I was talking to somebody
自分たちにやれそうな強盗の話になり
02:02
and he was telling me
about this robbery that we could do.
それで 一緒に犯行に及びました
02:06
And we did it.
現実はというと
02:09
The reality was that I was growing up
自分は経済的に世界で最強の国
02:10
in the strongest
financial nation in the world,
アメリカで育っていたものの
02:13
the United States of America,
母親が血液バンクの行列に
並ぶのを目にするという現実もありました
02:15
while I watched my mother
stand in line at a blood bank
子供たちの食事を買う40ドルを
稼ぐために血液を売っていたのです
02:20
to sell her blood for 40 dollars
just to try to feed her kids.
今でもその証拠に 母の腕には
注射の跡が残っています
02:25
She still has the needle marks
on her arms to day to show for that.
地域社会なんて
どうでも良いことでした
02:29
So I never cared about my community.
私のことなど気にしない人たちです
02:31
They didn't care about my life.
必要な物を得るための
やむにやまれぬ行動で精いっぱいの人たちです
02:32
Everybody there was doing what they
were doing to take what they wanted,
麻薬のディーラー
強盗、血液バンク
02:36
the drug dealers,
the robbers, the blood bank.
誰でも血液を売って
金を得ていました
02:38
Everybody was taking blood money.
自分も必要になったら
そうするしかありませんでした
02:40
So I got mine by any means necessary.
02:41
I got mine.
ファイナンスの知識が
世の中を支配していて
02:43
Financial literacy
really did rule the world,
自分はその世界の児童奴隷として
02:46
and I was a child slave to it
悪人に従っていました
02:48
following the bad guy.
17歳の時 自分が強盗と
殺人で逮捕されると
02:52
At 17 years old, I was arrested
for robbery and murder
刑務所の中では 街の中以上に
金が支配的だとすぐに学ぶことになり
02:55
and I soon learned that finances in prison
rule more than they did on the streets,
この世界に
足を踏み入れたいと思いました
02:59
so I wanted in.
ある日 新聞のスポーツ欄を
急いでつかみ
03:01
One day, I rushed to grab
the sports page of the newspaper
刑務所の仲間に読み上げてもらいました
03:04
so my celly could read it to me,
そして偶然に 経済面を開いたら
03:06
and I accidentally
picked up the business section.
「おい若造 株でもやるのか?」
とその老人がいうので
03:08
And this old man said,
"Hey youngster, you pick stocks?"
「何だって?」と答えると
03:12
And I said, "What's that?"
「ここはな 白人がお金を預ける場所だ」
と言うのです
03:13
He said, "That's the place
where white folks keep all their money."
(笑)
03:16
(Laughter)
その時初めて
希望が、将来が
03:17
And it was the first time
that I saw a glimpse of hope,
ちらっと見えたんです
03:21
a future.
彼は株とは何か
簡単に説明してくれましたが
03:23
He gave me this brief description
of what stocks were,
わずかな望みがあっただけでした
03:26
but it was just a glimpse.
では どうしたら
いいかといっても
03:30
I mean, how was I supposed to do it?
自分は読み書きも綴りもダメ
03:32
I couldn't read, write or spell.
自分が磨いてきたスキルとえいえば
それを隠すことだけ
03:34
The skills that I had developed
to hide my illiteracy
それもここでは通用しませんでした
03:37
no longer worked in this environment.
自分は手にしたことのない
自由を求めて戦おうにも
03:39
I was trapped in a cage,
prey among predators,
略奪者の餌食となる
囚われの身でした
03:42
fighting for freedom I never had.
自分を見失い 疲れてしまいました
03:44
I was lost, tired,
何ら選択肢は無かったのです
03:46
and I was out of options.
そして20才を迎えたとき
03:49
So at 20 years old,
自分の人生で
最も難しいことに挑戦しました
03:50
I did the hardest thing
I'd ever done in my life.
本を手に取ったのです
03:54
I picked up a book,
読むことを学ぼうとしていた時
それは―
03:57
and it was the most agonizing
time of my life,
人生で最も苦痛を感じた時でした
04:01
trying to learn how to read,
家族や親友から
仲間外れにされる感じだったからです
04:03
the ostracizing from my family,
04:05
the homies.
それは 大変だったし
04:08
It was rough, man.
苦労しましたね
04:09
It was a struggle.
夢にも思わなかった能力を
04:11
But little did I know
受け取っている最中だとは
気づいていませんでした
04:12
I was receiving the greatest gifts
I had ever dreamed of:
自尊心
04:16
self-worth,
知識、自制心といったことです
04:18
knowledge, discipline.
次から次へと目に入るものを
興奮しながら読んでいきました
04:21
I was so excited to be reading that I read
everything I could get my hands on:
キャンディの包装 服のロゴ
街角の標識まで何でもです
04:24
candy wrappers, clothing logos,
street signs, everything.
ひたすら読み続けました
04:28
I was just reading stuff!
(笑)
04:29
(Applause)
読み続けました
04:30
Just reading stuff.
読み方と綴りを知って
興奮しました
04:33
I was so excited to know how to read
and know how to spell.
親友が
「お前 何を食べているんだ」と尋ねると
04:36
The homie came up, said,
"Man, what you eating?"
「C-A-N-D-Y キャンディ」
と答えました
04:39
I said, "C-A-N-D-Y, candy."
04:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
「俺にもくれよ」と言われても
「N-O ダメ」って言いました
04:43
He said, "Let me get some."
I said, "N-O. No."
04:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
素晴らしいことでした
04:46
It was awesome.
人生で初めて読めるように
なったんですから
04:48
I mean, I can actually now
for the first time in my life read.
その時の気持ちと言ったら
最高でした
04:51
The feeling that I got
from it was amazing.
22才になって
自意識が芽生え
04:55
And then at 22, feeling myself,
自信が出てきたときのことです
04:58
feeling confident,
あの老人が言っていた言葉を思い出し
05:00
I remembered what the OG told me.
新聞の経済面を開きました
05:03
So I picked up the business section
of the newspaper.
こいつら白人富豪を
見つけ出したいと思ったんです
05:07
I wanted to find these rich white folks.
05:09
(Laughter)
(笑)
あのわずかな望みを
追い求めめたのです
05:12
So I looked for that glimpse.
さらに経験を積み重ね
05:15
As I furthered my career
お金と投資についての
ファイナンスを教えるようになりました
05:17
in teaching others how to
financially manage money and invest,
そして自分がやってきたことに対する
責任を取るべきだと気づきました
05:21
I soon learned that I had to take
responsibility for my own actions.
実際 自分はとてもやっかいな環境で
育ってきましたが
05:24
True, I grew up
in a very complex environment,
犯罪は 自分の選択の結果です
05:27
but I chose to commit crimes,
それは自分の責任であり
05:29
and I had to own up to that.
それに対する責任を取るべきだと思い
実行に移しました
05:31
I had to take responsibility
for that, and I did.
囚人たちに 刑務の中で得たお金の
使い方を教えるコースの
05:33
I was building a curriculum
that could teach incarcerated men
カリキュラムを作成しました
05:36
how to manage money
through prison employments.
ライフスタイルの適切な管理手法は
刑務所外に持ち出せる知識で
05:40
Properly managing our lifestyle
would provide transferrable tools
囚人たちが社会復帰した時に
それを活用して
05:43
that we can use to manage money
when we reenter society,
罪のない人たちの多くと同じように
お金を管理できるはずです
05:47
like the majority of people did
who didn't commit crimes.
私も後に知ったことですが
05:50
Then I discovered
MarketWatch 誌によれば
05:52
that according to MarketWatch,
60%以上のアメリカ人は
05:54
over 60 percent of the American population
1千ドル以下の蓄えしかもっていないし
05:57
has under 1,000 dollars in savings.
Sports Illustrated 誌によると
NBAとNFLの選手の
06:00
Sports Illustrated said that
over 60 percent of NBA players
60%以上は破産していています
06:03
and NFL players go broke.
離婚問題の40%は
金の問題から始まっています
06:05
40 percent of marital problems
derive from financial issues.
ひどいですね~
06:09
What the hell?
(笑)
06:10
(Laughter)
人々は 一生働き続け
車、服、家やいろんな物を買い
06:12
You mean to tell me
that people worked their whole lives,
06:15
buying cars, clothes,
homes and material stuff
貯金する余裕は無いだって?
06:17
but were living check to check?
社会を構成する人々が
社会復帰する前科者を
06:20
How in the world were members of society
going to help incarcerated individuals
支援できるんだろうか
06:24
back into society
彼らがお金を管理できないなら
我々はどうする?
06:25
if they couldn't manage they own stuff?
だから奪い取ったんです
06:28
We screwed.
(笑)
06:29
(Laughter)
もっといい計画が必要でした
06:31
I needed a better plan.
そんなやり方
上手く行きそうになかったから
06:34
This is not going to work out too well.
そこで…
06:37
So ...
考えました
06:39
I thought.
自分には 社会復帰の道のりで
両者を上手く融合させ
06:43
I now had an obligation
to meet those on the path
支援する義務がある
06:48
and help,
気は確かかと思うけど
自分が地域社会をケアするんだから
06:49
and it was crazy because
I now cared about my community.
自分が地域社会をケアするなんて
思いもよりませんでした
06:52
Wow, imagine that.
I cared about my community.
ファイナンスの知識がないことは
社会の病気で
06:56
Financial illiteracy is a disease
何世代にもわたり 社会のマイノリティや
低所得者層から
06:58
that has crippled minorities
and the lower class in our society
自由を奪ってきたのだから
07:02
for generations and generations,
我々はそれに対して
怒るべきなんです
07:04
and we should be furious about that.
考えてみてください
07:06
Ask yourselves this:
経済的繁栄が原動力の国なのに
50%ものアメリカ人に
07:08
How can 50 percent
of the American population
ファイナンスの知識がないとは
どういうことでしょう
07:11
be financially illiterate in a nation
driven by financial prosperity?
公平な扱いを受け 社会的な地位を得
まともな生活ができて
07:17
Our access to justice, our social status,
移動手段もあり
食にありつけるという全てのことは
07:19
living conditions, transportation and food
お金に依存しているのに
多くの人がそれを管理できていません
07:22
are all dependent on money
that most people can't manage.
おかしいですね!
07:26
It's crazy!
病気の蔓延です
07:27
It's an epidemic
他の何事よりも 公共の安全に対する
危険は増しています
07:29
and a bigger danger to public safety
than any other issue.
カリフォルニア州矯正局によれば
07:33
According to the California
Department of Corrections,
囚人の70%以上は
07:36
over 70 percent of those incarcerated
お金に関する犯罪を犯して
訴えられています
07:38
have committed or have been charged
with money-related crimes:
強盗、侵入盗、詐欺、窃盗、恐喝
07:42
robberies, burglaries,
fraud, larceny, distortion --
まだまだ他にもあります
07:47
and the list goes on.
調べてみましょう
07:49
Check this out:
典型的な囚人は
07:51
a typical incarcerated person
カリフォルニアの監獄制度に従い
07:54
would enter the California prison system
お金の使い方について学ぶことなく
07:56
with no financial education,
時給30セントを支給され
07:58
earn 30 cents an hour,
年間で800ドル以上の給与を得ますが
08:00
over 800 dollars a year,
実質的な出費もないのに
貯金もありません
08:03
with no real expenses and save no money.
仮釈放の時には200ドルを与えられ
こう言われます
08:06
Upon his parole, he will be given
200 dollars gate money and told,
「幸運を祈る 問題を起こすなよ
刑務所に戻ってくるんじゃないぞ」
08:11
"Hey, good luck, stay out of trouble.
Don't come back to prison."
まともな準備もしていないし
長い目でみたお金の使い方も考えていません
08:14
With no meaningful preparation
or long-term financial plan,
それで彼は何をするんでしょう?
08:18
what does he do ... ?
60才になったら?
08:20
At 60?
いい職を得るか
08:23
Get a good job,
さもなければ 犯罪を犯すようになって
また監獄に後戻りです
08:24
or go back to the very criminal behavior
that led him to prison in the first place?
納税者の皆さん 皆さんの選択です
08:29
You taxpayers, you choose.
いや 彼が受けてきた教育で
決まっているかもしれません
08:31
Well, his education
already chose for him, probably.
この社会の病をどうやって
治すのでしょう?
08:35
So how do we cure this disease?
自分は共同創設者として
08:38
I cofounded a program
「感情のコントロールによる
金銭感覚の適正化プログラム」
08:40
that we call Financial Empowerment
Emotional Literacy.
FEELを立ち上げました
08:44
We call it FEEL,
そこでは
お金の使い方を決める時に
08:46
and it teaches how do you separate
your emotional decisions
感情に左右されないようにすることと
08:49
from your financial decisions,
個人ファイナンスの
4つの不変のルールを教えています
08:51
and the four timeless rules
to personal finance:
正しい貯金の仕方
08:54
the proper way to save,
生活費の適切なコントロール
08:57
control your cost of living,
効果的な借金
09:00
borrow money effectively
金に追い立てられるのではなく
金が自分のためになるような
09:02
and diversify your finances
by allowing your money to work for you
ファイナンスの多様化です
09:05
instead of you working for it.
囚人たちは社会復帰前にこういった
生活のためのスキルを必要としています
09:07
Incarcerated people need these life skills
before we reenter society.
こういった生活のスキルがなければ
完全なリハビリなんてあり得ません
09:13
You can't have full rehabilitation
without these life skills.
プロでなければ
投資や金の管理ができないなんて
09:17
This idea that only professionals
can invest and manage money
全くばかげた話しです
09:21
is absolutely ridiculous,
誰がそんなこと言っても
それはウソです
09:23
and whoever told you that is lying.
(拍手)
09:25
(Applause)
プロというのは 自分の職業について
09:30
A professional is a person
誰よりも良く知っている人間のことです
09:32
who knows his craft better than most,
あなたが必要な資金、所持金、目標額について
一番分かっているのはあなた自身です
09:35
and nobody knows how much money
you need, have or want better than you,
だからあなたがプロです
09:40
which means you are the professional.
金の使い方を知ることは
スキルではなく 皆さん―
09:42
Financial literacy is not a skill,
ladies and gentlemen.
それはライフスタイルなんです
09:47
It's a lifestyle.
経済的安定は
正しいライフスタイルの副産物に過ぎず
09:49
Financial stability is a byproduct
of a proper lifestyle.
経済的に健全な囚人は
納税できる市民になれるし
09:54
A financially sound incarcerated person
can become a taxpaying citizen,
経済的に健全な納税者は
そうあり続けられます
09:58
and a financially sound
taxpaying citizen can remain one.
そうなれば 我々と関係のある人たち
家族、友人やその子供たちと
10:02
This allows us to create a bridge
between those people who we influence:
ちゃんとした繋がりが出来ます
10:06
family, friends and those young people
彼らは今でも 犯罪とお金は
関係していると信じています
10:09
who still believe
that crime and money are related.
お金にまつわる様々な用語や
10:13
So let's lose the fear and anxiety
巷で聞こえてくる
10:16
of all the big financial words
その他の耳障りなことによる
恐れや心配を忘れてしまいましょう
10:18
and all that other nonsense
that you've been out there hearing.
社会をダメにする問題の核心を理解し
10:21
And let's get to the heart
of what's been crippling our society
より良い生活を管理できるよう
自分自身に責任を持ちましょう
10:25
from taking care of your responsibility
to be better life managers.
そうしたら 「感情のコントロールによる
金銭感覚の適正化 (FEEL)」の
10:31
And let's provide a simple
and easy to use curriculum
核心に触れるような
10:34
that gets to the heart, the heart
シンプルで簡単なコースを
開催してみようではありませんか
10:36
of what financial empowerment
and emotional literacy really is.
もし 皆さんがそのコースに参加して
10:40
Now, if you're sitting out here
in the audience and you said,
「うーん 自分には合わない
同意できないな」と思ったら
10:43
"Oh yeah, well, that ain't me
and I don't buy it,"
私の講義を受けてください
10:45
then come take my class --
(笑)
10:47
(Laughter)
そうしたら 感情的になるたびに
どれほどお金を失うのかお教えしましょう
10:49
so I can show you how much money
it costs you every time you get emotional.
(拍手)
10:53
(Applause)
どうも有難うございました
10:59
Thank you very much. Thank you.
(拍手)
11:01
(Applause)
Translated by Tomoyuki Suzuki
Reviewed by Masako Kigami

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Curtis "Wall Street" Carroll - Financial literacy advocate
Curtis “Wall Street” Carroll overcame poverty, illiteracy, incarceration and a lack of outside support to become a stock investor, creator and teacher of his own financial literacy philosophy.

Why you should listen

The media calls Curtis "Wall Street" Carroll the "Oracle of San Quentin" for his stock picking prowess and ability to translate financial information into simple language for his students.

Carroll grew up in Oakland, California surrounded by poverty. In 1996, at 17 years old, he committed a robbery where a man was killed. He turned himself in and ended up an illiterate teenager in prison with a 54-to-life sentence. While in prison, the stock market captured his attention, but due to his illiteracy he couldn't learn more about it. Motivating by the lure of financial gaining, he taught himself how to read at 20-21 years old, and then he started studying the stock market. Carroll's role models changed from drug dealers and sports figures to Bill Gates and Warren Buffet. He wanted others to learn this new way of making money.

When Carroll arrived at San Quentin in 2012, he met Troy Williams, who helped him start the Financial Literacy Program. Together they created the philosophy F.E.E.L (Financial Empowerment Emotional Literacy) that teaches people to recognize how their emotions affect their financial decision, and how to separate the two.

More profile about the speaker
Curtis "Wall Street" Carroll | Speaker | TED.com