10:49
TEDMED 2016

Carolyn Jones: A tribute to nurses

カロリン・ジョーンズ: 看護師への贈り物

Filmed:

カロリン・ジョーンズは5年という歳月をかけて、アメリカ中の看護師にインタビューし、写真や動画を撮り、アメリカ国内の大きな公衆衛生の問題に関わるいくつかの場所を旅しました。彼女は医療の最前線で働く身近な英雄達を賞賛する中で、彼らの不屈の献身について個人的な物語を語ります。

- Photographic ethnographer
Carolyn Jones creates projects that point our attention towards issues of global concern. Full bio

患者というものは
00:12
As patients,
自分の主治医を
覚えているものですが
00:13
we usually remember
the names of our doctors,
看護師の名前は
忘れてしまいがちです
00:17
but often we forget
the names of our nurses.
私は 1人覚えています
00:21
I remember one.
数年前に乳癌にかかり
00:23
I had breast cancer a few years ago,
どうにかこうにか
手術を終え
00:25
and somehow I managed
to get through the surgeries
治療の初期段階を巧く
切り抜けました
00:29
and the beginning
of the treatment just fine.
何が起こっているかを隠し通し
00:31
I could hide what was going on.
周囲は何も
知るはずがありませんでした
00:34
Everybody didn't really have to know.
娘と学校まで歩いて通う事も
00:36
I could walk my daughter to school,
夫とディナーに行く事も出来
00:38
I could go out to dinner with my husband;
私は皆をだます事が出来ました
00:40
I could fool people.
しかしその後
化学療法の計画が始まり
00:42
But then my chemo was scheduled to begin
怖くなってきました
00:45
and that terrified me
私の受ける化学療法は
体中の毛が抜けてしまうものだと
00:46
because I knew that I was going to lose
every single hair on my body
知っていたからです
00:51
because of the kind of chemo
that I was going to have.
何もなかったふりは
00:54
I wasn't going to be able
to pretend anymore
もう出来なくなります
00:56
as though everything was normal.
怖かったです
00:59
I was scared.
皆に腫れ物に触るように扱われるのが
どんなものか 分かっていましたし
01:00
I knew what it felt like to have
everybody treating me with kid gloves,
ただ 自分は正常だと
感じていたかったのです
01:04
and I just wanted to feel normal.
胸にポートを取り付けられ
01:06
I had a port installed in my chest.
化学療法の初日を迎えました
01:08
I went to my first day of chemotherapy,
精神的には ボロボロでした
01:11
and I was an emotional wreck.
担当の看護師ジョアンが
ドアから入って来ると
01:14
My nurse, Joanne, walked in the door,
私は椅子から立ち上がって
逃げ出したくてたまらず
01:17
and every bone in my body was telling
me to get up out of that chair
体中がうずいていました
01:21
and take for the hills.
しかし ジョアンは 私を見て
旧友のように話しかけました
01:22
But Joanne looked at me and talked
to me like we were old friends.
そして 私に尋ねました
01:27
And then she asked me,
「そのハイライト どこで入れたの?」
01:28
"Where'd you get your highlights done?"
(笑)
01:30
(Laughter)
冗談でしょう?
01:31
And I was like, are you kidding me?
今にも髪の毛がなくなろうとする時に
そんな話をするだなんて
01:33
You're going to talk to me about my hair
when I'm on the verge of losing it?
私はちょっと 怒って言いました
01:38
I was kind of angry,
「何ですって? 髪の毛が抜けるのよ」
01:40
and I said, "Really? Hair?"
彼女は肩をすくめて言いました
01:43
And with a shrug
of her shoulders she said,
「また生えてくるわよ」
01:46
"It's gonna grow back."
その時 私が見過ごしてきた
1つの事を 彼女は言ったのです
01:48
And in that moment she said
the one thing I had overlooked,
つまり 時が来れば
私の人生は通常に戻るのだと―
01:51
and that was that at some point,
my life would get back to normal.
彼女は本当に
それを信じていました
01:55
She really believed that.
だから 私も信じたのです
01:57
And so I believed it, too.
そもそも 癌と戦っている時に
髪の毛の事を心配するなんて
01:59
Now, worrying about losing your hair
when you're fighting cancer
馬鹿げた事に
思えるかもしれません
02:04
may seem silly at first,
しかしそれは 自分がどう見えるか
心配しているだけではないのです
02:05
but it's not just that you're worried
about how you're going to look.
皆が気遣ってくれる事を
気に病んでもいるのです
02:10
It's that you're worried that everybody's
going to treat you so carefully.
彼女のお陰で6ヶ月ぶりに
自分は正常だという気持ちになれました
02:14
Joanne made me feel normal
for the first time in six months.
私達は彼女のボーイフレンドの事
02:18
We talked about her boyfriends,
ニューヨーク市内でアパートを
探している事
02:20
we talked about looking
for apartments in New York City,
化学療法への私の反応について等
02:22
and we talked about my reaction
to the chemotherapy --
色々な事を話しました
02:25
all kind of mixed in together.
そしてどうやって彼女が
02:28
And I always wondered,
私の気持ちを見抜いているのだろうかと
いつも思っていました
02:30
how did she so instinctively
know just how to talk to me?
ジョアン・スタハと
彼女に対する賞賛を機に
02:35
Joanne Staha and my admiration for her
私の看護師の世界への旅が
始まったのです
02:38
marked the beginning of my journey
into the world of nurses.
数年後 看護師の行う仕事を
称え広めるプロジェクトを
02:43
A few years later,
I was asked to do a project
02:45
that would celebrate
the work that nurses do.
立ち上げるよう頼まれました
私はジョアンと共に活動を始め
02:49
I started with Joanne,
アメリカ中の100名以上の
看護師と会いました
02:50
and I met over 100 nurses
across the country.
5年の歳月をかけて 看護師に
インタビューをし 彼等の写真や動画を撮り
02:54
I spent five years interviewing,
photographing and filming nurses
本やドキュメンタリーフィルムを
制作しました
02:59
for a book and a documentary film.
チームと共に
03:02
With my team,
アメリカ中にある この国最大の
03:03
we mapped a trip across America
that would take us to places
公衆衛生上の問題に関わる場所を
訪ねる事にしました
03:07
dealing with some of the biggest
public health issues facing our nation --
この国が直面する問題とは
高齢化、戦争、貧困、刑務所です
03:12
aging, war, poverty, prisons.
そして これらの問題に関係する患者が
最も集まる場所に赴いたのです
03:16
And then we went places
03:18
where we would find
the largest concentration of patients
03:22
dealing with those issues.
病院や施設にお願いして そこを代表する
最高の看護師を推薦してくれるよう
03:24
Then we asked hospitals and facilities
to nominate nurses
頼みました
03:28
who would best represent them.
私が最初に出会った看護師の1人は
ブリジット・カンベラでした
03:30
One of the first nurses I met
was Bridget Kumbella.
彼女はカメルーンで生まれた
03:34
Bridget was born in Cameroon,
4人きょうだいの長子でした
03:35
the oldest of four children.
父親は仕事中4階から転落して
03:38
Her father was at work
when he had fallen from the fourth floor
背中に酷い怪我を負いました
03:42
and really hurt his back.
父親は 床に臥して
必要なケアを受けられないのが
03:44
And he talked a lot about what it was like
to be flat on your back
どんな体験なのかを
話してくれました
03:48
and not get the kind
of care that you need.
その事が ブリジットを
看護師の仕事へと駆り立てたのです
03:51
And that propelled Bridget
to go into the profession of nursing.
現在 ブロンクスで看護師として
03:56
Now, as a nurse in the Bronx,
様々な職業、地位、宗教を持つ
多様な患者グループの
03:57
she has a really diverse group
of patients that she cares for,
ケアを行なっています
04:01
from all walks of life,
04:03
and from all different religions.
彼女は私達の文化的差異が
健康に及ぼす影響について
04:05
And she's devoted her career
to understanding the impact
理解を広める事に
自分の仕事人生を捧げています
04:09
of our cultural differences
when it comes to our health.
こんな患者の話をしてくれました
04:14
She spoke of a patient --
04:15
a Native American patient that she had --
彼はネイティヴアメリカンで
集中治療室に
羽を1束
持ち込む事を望みました
04:18
that wanted to bring
a bunch of feathers into the ICU.
そうする事で 魂の安らぎを
見いだしていたのです
04:23
That's how he found spiritual comfort.
彼女は彼への支持を表明し
04:26
And she spoke of advocating for him
さまざまな宗教を持つ患者がいて
04:28
and said that patients come
from all different religions
多様な物を お守りとして
使うものだと言いました
04:31
and use all different kinds
of objects for comfort;
それが聖なるロザリオであろうと
象徴的な羽根であろうと
04:35
whether it's a holy rosary
or a symbolic feather,
平等に支持する必要があるのです
04:38
it all needs to be supported.
こちらはジェイソン・ショートです
04:41
This is Jason Short.
アパラチア山脈で
在宅看護に従事するジェイソンは
04:43
Jason is a home health nurse
in the Appalachian mountains,
ガソリンスタンドと自動車修理店を営む
父親の許で育ちました
04:46
and his dad had a gas station
and a repair shop when he was growing up.
それで彼は以前 地元で車を扱っていましたが
今はそこで看護師として働いています
04:50
So he worked on cars in the community
that he now serves as a nurse.
彼が大学生の頃
04:55
When he was in college,
男性が看護師になるという風潮は
全くありませんでした
04:56
it was just not macho at all
to become a nurse,
そこで 何年も避けていたのです
05:00
so he avoided it for years.
少しの間トラックの
運転をしていましたが
05:02
He drove trucks for a little while,
彼の人生は常に
看護師の道へと引き戻されました
05:04
but his life path was always
pulling him back to nursing.
アパラチア山脈に住む
看護師として
05:10
As a nurse in the Appalachian mountains,
ジェイソンは 救急車が
辿り着くことも出来ない場所へ行きます
05:12
Jason goes places
that an ambulance can't even get to.
この写真で 彼が立っているのは
かつて道だった場所です
05:16
In this photograph,
he's standing in what used to be a road.
山頂にある鉱山のため
道は水で溢れ返り
05:20
Top of the mountain mining
flooded that road,
今では あの家に住む
黒肺塵症の患者を
05:22
and now the only way
for Jason to get to the patient
ジェイソンが訪問する
唯一の方法は
05:26
living in that house
with black lung disease
その小川のような流れの中を
SUVで走っていく事です
05:29
is to drive his SUV
against the current up that creek.
私が一緒にいた日は
車の前タイヤの泥除けが外れました
05:34
The day I was with him,
we ripped the front fender off the car.
翌朝 彼は起きると
車をリフトに載せ
05:38
The next morning he got up,
put the car on the lift,
その泥除けを修理してから
05:41
fixed the fender,
次の患者の訪問に向かったのです
05:42
and then headed out
to meet his next patient.
ジェイソンがこの紳士を
大いなる思いやりで包み込むように
05:45
I witnessed Jason
caring for this gentleman
介護をしている所を目撃しました
05:48
with such enormous compassion,
看護の仕事とは 如何に心を通わす
仕事なのかと 再び心が震えました
05:51
and I was struck again by how intimate
the work of nursing really is.
ブライアン・マクミランと
出会った時 彼はまだ新人でした
05:58
When I met Brian McMillion, he was raw.
派遣先から戻ったばかりで
06:01
He had just come back from a deployment
サンデイエゴでの生活に まだ十分には
落ち着きを取り戻していませんでした
06:03
and he hadn't really settled back in
to life in San Diego yet.
彼はドイツで看護師をしていた経験を
話してくれました
06:08
He talked about his experience
of being a nurse in Germany
戦場から戻って来たばかりの
兵士の手当てをしていたのです
06:11
and taking care of the soldiers
coming right off the battlefield.
多くの兵士達にとって
病院で目を覚ました時
06:15
Very often, he would be
the first person they would see
初めて見る人は 彼でした
06:19
when they opened
their eyes in the hospital.
患者達は手足を失って
横たわり
06:22
And they would look at him
as they were lying there,
ブライアンを見て
06:25
missing limbs,
初めて発する言葉は こうでした
06:26
and the first thing they would say is,
「いつ戻れるんだ?
むこうにまだ仲間がいるんだ」
06:29
"When can I go back?
I left my brothers out there."
ブライアンは
言わねばなりませんでした
06:34
And Brian would have to say,
06:35
"You're not going anywhere.
「どこにも行かないんだよ」
「もう十分頑張ったんだ」
06:37
You've already given enough, brother."
ブライアンは戦闘を体験してきた
兵士であり 看護師でもあります
06:40
Brian is both a nurse and a soldier
who's seen combat.
それで彼は傷ついた退役軍人の
06:45
So that puts him in a unique position
気持ちが分かった上でケアを行うという
彼ならではの職に就いています
06:47
to be able to relate to and help heal
the veterans in his care.
こちらはシスター・スティーブンです
06:53
This is Sister Stephen,
06:55
and she runs a nursing home
in Wisconsin called Villa Loretto.
ウィスコンシンでヴィラ・ロレット
という老人ホームを経営しています
そのホームでは
全ライフサイクルが見られます
06:59
And the entire circle of life
can be found under her roof.
彼女は農場暮らしを望みながら
育ちました
07:03
She grew up wishing they lived on a farm,
それで地元の家畜を
引き取る機会を与えられると
07:06
so given the opportunity
to adopt local farm animals,
熱心に動物を育てました
07:11
she enthusiastically brings them in.
春になると 動物達は
赤ん坊を産み
07:14
And in the springtime,
those animals have babies.
シスター・スティーブンは
赤ちゃんアヒルやヤギ、子羊を使って
07:17
And Sister Stephen uses
those baby ducks, goats and lambs
ヴィラ・ロレットの入居者達に
アニマルセラピーを施していますが
07:22
as animal therapy
for the residents at Villa Loretto
時折 自分の名前すら
思い出す事の出来ない老人達も
07:27
who sometimes can't
remember their own name,
赤ちゃん羊を抱きしめて
心底喜んでいます
07:30
but they do rejoice
in the holding of a baby lamb.
私がシスター・スティーブンと
一緒にいた日
07:35
The day I was with Sister Stephen,
07:37
I needed to take her away
from Villa Loretto
彼女の物語の一部を
フィルムに収めるため
ヴィラ・ロレットから
連れ出す必要がありました
07:39
to film part of her story.
07:41
And before we left,
私達がホームを出る前に
彼女は瀕死の患者の部屋に入り
07:42
she went into the room of a dying patient.
患者の耳元で こう言いました
07:46
And she leaned over and she said,
「今日は出かけなきゃならないけど
07:48
"I have to go away for the day,
イエス様がお呼びになったら
07:51
but if Jesus calls you,
行くのよ
07:53
you go.
イエス様の家に まっすぐに行くのよ」
07:54
You go straight home to Jesus."
私はそれを見て思いました
07:57
I was standing there and thinking
それは生涯で初めての体験でした
07:59
it was the first time in my life
天に赴かせる事で
人々に愛情を示す姿を
08:01
I witnessed that you could show
someone you love them completely
見たのです
08:06
by letting go.
無理に引きとめる必要はないのです
08:08
We don't have to hold on so tightly.
ヴィラ・ロレットでは
これまでの私の人生の中で
08:11
I saw more life rolled up at Villa Loretto
遭遇出来なかった
多くの人生と出会いました
08:15
than I have ever seen at any other time
at any other place in my life.
医療に関して言えば
私達は困難な時代を迎えています
08:21
We live in a complicated time
when it comes to our health care.
「命の長さ」だけではなく
「生活の質」の必要性を
08:25
It's easy to lose sight
of the need for quality of life,
見失う事になりがちです
08:29
not just quantity of life.
新たな救命の技術が
生み出されるにつれ
08:32
As new life-saving
technologies are created,
私達の下す決断は本当に
複雑なものになります
08:35
we're going to have really
complicated decisions to make.
技術は確かに
生命を救いますが
08:39
These technologies often save lives,
痛みや死のプロセスも
長引かせてしまうのです
08:42
but they can also prolong pain
and the dying process.
一体こういった苦境をどのように
切り抜けるべきなのでしょう?
08:47
How in the world are we supposed
to navigate these waters?
私達にはどのような助けも
必要なのです
08:50
We're going to need
all the help we can get.
病人の枕元で過ごす時間があるため
看護師は 患者の家族と
08:53
Nurses have a really unique
relationship with us
実に独特な関係を持つ事になります
08:57
because of the time spent at bedside.
枕元にいる間
09:00
During that time,
打ち解けた感情といったものが
生まれるのです
09:02
a kind of emotional intimacy develops.
この夏の8月9日の事でした
09:06
This past summer, on August 9,
父が心臓発作で亡くなりました
09:09
my father died of a heart attack.
母は打ちひしがれました
09:12
My mother was devastated,
父が存在しない世界なんて
想像すら出来なかったのです
09:14
and she couldn't imagine
her world without him in it.
4日後に母は倒れ
09:19
Four days later she fell,
腰骨を折り
09:21
she broke her hip,
手術が必要になりました
09:23
she needed surgery
気がつくと 母は命懸けで
戦っていました
09:24
and she found herself
fighting for her own life.
もう一度 私は看護師のケアを
09:28
Once again I found myself
受ける側になりました
09:30
on the receiving end
of the care of nurses --
今回は母のためでした
09:33
this time for my mom.
母は集中治療室に入り
それから更に3日間
09:36
My brother and my sister and I
stayed by her side
きょうだいと私は
母の枕元にいました
09:38
for the next three days in the ICU.
私達がとうとう
母の意思を尊重する事にした時
09:41
And as we tried
to make the right decisions
09:45
and follow my mother's wishes,
自分達が 看護師達の言う事に
頼っている事に気づきました
09:47
we found that we were depending
upon the guidance of nurses.
そして看護師達はここでも
09:52
And once again,
私達を失望させる事は
ありませんでした
09:53
they didn't let us down.
母が亡くなるまでの最後の4日間
彼等のケアのやり方は
09:56
They had an amazing insight
in terms of how to care for my mom
素晴らしい気遣いに
満ちていました
10:01
in the last four days of her life.
彼等は母に慰めをもたらし
痛みを和らげたのです
10:03
They brought her comfort
and relief from pain.
私と姉は 母の体に綺麗なガウンを
着せるようにと言われました
10:08
They knew to encourage my sister and I
to put a pretty nightgown on my mom,
それは母にとって その後
重要な事になりましたが
10:13
long after it mattered to her,
10:15
but it sure meant a lot to us.
私達にとっても
多くの意味がありました
彼等は母の最期に間に合うよう
私の許に来て 起こしてくれました
10:19
And they knew to come and wake me up
just in time for my mom's last breath.
母が逝った後 いつまで私を
病室でそっとしておくべきか
10:25
And then they knew
how long to leave me in the room
10:28
with my mother after she died.
彼等には ちゃんと分かっていました
なぜ分かるのかは 知りませんが
10:30
I have no idea how they know these things,
もう一度 彼等が私達を導いてくれた事に
生涯に渡る感謝の気持ちを
10:34
but I do know that I am eternally grateful
心から感じているのです
10:37
that they've guided me once again.
どうもありがとうございました
10:40
Thank you so very much.
(拍手)
10:42
(Applause)
Translated by Shoko Takaki
Reviewed by Misaki Sato

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About the Speaker:

Carolyn Jones - Photographic ethnographer
Carolyn Jones creates projects that point our attention towards issues of global concern.

Why you should listen

Best known for her socially proactive photographs and documentary films, Carolyn Jones creates projects that point our attention towards issues of global concern. From people "living positively" with AIDS to women artisans supporting entire communities and nurses on the front lines of our health care system, Carolyn Jones has devoted her career to celebrating invisible populations and breaking down barriers.

Jones has spent the past five years interviewing more than 150 nurses from every corner of the US in an effort to better understand the role of nurses in this country's healthcare system. She published the critically-acclaimed book The American Nurse: Photographs and Interviews by Carolyn Jones, for which she was interviewed on PBS NewsHour and featured in the New York Times, the Washington Post and USA Today. She directed and executive-produced the follow-up documentary film The American Nurse: Healing America, which was released in theaters nationwide and was an official selection of the 2015 American Film Showcase, a cultural diplomacy program of the US Department of State.

Jones has spent her career focused on telling personal stories, and her first introduction to nursing was through a very personal experience of her own, when it was a nurse who helped her get through breast cancer. That experience stuck with her, so when she started working on the American Nurse Project in 2011, she was determined to paint a rich and dynamic portrait of the profession. The goal was to cover as much territory as possible, with the hope that along the way she would capture stories touching on the kinds of issues that nurses are dealing with in every corner of the country. The project explores the American experiences of health care, poverty, childbirth, war, imprisonment and the end of life through the lens of nursing.

Prior to The American Nurse, her most widely acclaimed book, Living Proof: Courage in the Face of AIDS, was published by Abbeville Press and was accompanied by shows in Tokyo, Berlin, the USA, and at the United Nations World AIDS Conference. In addition to her multiple exhibitions, book and magazine publications, Jones has collaborated on projects with Oxygen Media, PBS and the Girl Scouts of the USA. She founded the non-profit 100 People Foundation for which she travels the world telling stories that celebrate our global neighbors. As a lecturer, Jones has spoken at conferences, universities and events around the globe. In 2012 she was honored as one of 50 "Everyday Heroes" in the book of that title for her work with the 100 People Foundation.

Jones' career was punctuated by two brushes with death: first, running out of gas in the Sahara as a racecar driver, and second, a breast cancer diagnosis. Her newest project, the forthcoming documentary Defining Hope, is the culmination of a journey investigating how we can make better end-of-life choices. 

More profile about the speaker
Carolyn Jones | Speaker | TED.com