sponsored links
TED2003

George Dyson: The birth of the computer

ジョージ ダイソンが語るコンピューター誕生の物語

March 3, 2003

歴史家であるジョージ ダイソンが、現代のコンピューター誕生にまつわる話を、その16世紀の起源から、初期のコンピューター技術者による可笑しな日誌まで紹介します。

George Dyson - Historian of science
In telling stories of technologies and the individuals who created them, George Dyson takes a clear-eyed view of our scientific past -- while illuminating what lies ahead. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Last year, I told you the story, in seven minutes, of Project Orion,
昨年はオリオン計画について7分でお話ししました
00:12
which was this very implausible technology
かなり信じがたい技術でしたが
00:16
that technically could have worked,
技術的には実現可能で
00:18
but it had this one-year political window where it could have happened.
この1年間政治的に実現できる可能性があったのですが
00:22
So it didn't happen. It was a dream that did not happen.
結局実現せずにかなわぬ夢となりました
00:26
This year I'm going to tell you the story of the birth of digital computing.
今年はデジタル計算技術誕生の物語をお話しします
00:28
This was a perfect introduction.
それは理想的な始まりでした
00:33
And it's a story that did work. It did happen,
うまく行った話で、実際に起きたことです
00:35
and the machines are all around us.
このマシンは今やどこにでもあり
00:37
And it was a technology that was inevitable.
必然的に生まれた技術です
00:39
If the people I'm going to tell you the story about,
これから紹介する人たちがやらなくても
00:43
if they hadn't done it, somebody else would have.
おそらく別の人が実現したでしょう
00:45
So, it was sort of the right idea at the right time.
つまり、しかるべき時に、しかるべく生まれたアイデアだったのです
00:47
This is Barricelli's universe. This is the universe we live in now.
これはバリチェリの世界で、私達が今いる世界でもあります
00:51
It's the universe in which these machines
マシンがあらゆることをやり
00:54
are now doing all these things, including changing biology.
生物学さえ変えています
00:56
I'm starting the story with the first atomic bomb at Trinity,
トリニティと呼ばれる最初の原子爆弾の話から始めます
01:02
which was the Manhattan Project. It was a little bit like TED:
マンハッタン計画でのことですが
01:07
it brought a whole lot of very smart people together.
それはTEDに似て、優秀な人材を多数集めていました
01:09
And three of the smartest people were
中でも際立っていた3人が
01:12
Stan Ulam, Richard Feynman and John von Neumann.
スタニスワフ ウラム、リチャード ファインマン、ジョン フォン ノイマンです
01:14
And it was Von Neumann who said, after the bomb,
原子爆弾の実験後にノイマンは
01:18
he was working on something much more important than bombs:
「私は爆弾よりもずっと重要なことについて考えている
01:20
he's thinking about computers.
コンピューターだ」と書いています
01:24
So, he wasn't only thinking about them; he built one. This is the machine he built.
そして考えただけではなく、作ったのです これが彼の作ったマシンです
01:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:30
He built this machine,
彼はこのマシンを作り
01:34
and we had a beautiful demonstration of how this thing really works,
このアイデアが実現できることを見事に実証したのです
01:36
with these little bits. And it's an idea that goes way back.
コンピューターのアイデアは、遙か昔に遡ります
01:39
The first person to really explain that
最初に記述したのは
01:42
was Thomas Hobbes, who, in 1651,
トマス ホッブズで、1651年に
01:45
explained how arithmetic and logic are the same thing,
算術と論理が実質的に同じであることを示し
01:48
and if you want to do artificial thinking and artificial logic,
人工的な思考や論理を実現したければ
01:51
you can do it all with arithmetic.
算術のみで行え
01:54
He said you needed addition and subtraction.
必要なのは加算と減算であると言っています
01:56
Leibniz, who came a little bit later -- this is 1679 --
ライプニッツが、少し後の1679年に
02:00
showed that you didn't even need subtraction.
減算も不要なことを示しました
02:04
You could do the whole thing with addition.
全て加算で実現できるのです
02:06
Here, we have all the binary arithmetic and logic
ここには 後のコンピューター革命へと繋がる
02:08
that drove the computer revolution.
2進演算と論理について書かれています
02:11
And Leibniz was the first person to really talk about building such a machine.
コンピューターの構築について書いたのもライプニッツが最初で
02:13
He talked about doing it with marbles,
ビー玉とゲートで説明していますが
02:17
having gates and what we now call shift registers,
これはシフトレジスタに相当するもので
02:19
where you shift the gates, drop the marbles down the tracks.
ゲートを開けてビー玉を下の経路に落とします
02:21
And that's what all these machines are doing,
ビー玉が電子に変わったのを別にすれば
02:24
except, instead of doing it with marbles,
これはあらゆる計算機が行っているのと
02:26
they're doing it with electrons.
同じことです
02:28
And then we jump to Von Neumann, 1945,
時代は移り、フォン ノイマンが1945年に
02:30
when he sort of reinvents the whole same thing.
全く同じものを再発明しました
02:34
And 1945, after the war, the electronics existed
1945年に戦争が終わった後も、電子工学は続き
02:36
to actually try and build such a machine.
そのようなマシンの構築に取り組んだのです
02:39
So June 1945 -- actually, the bomb hasn't even been dropped yet --
1945年の6月、原子爆弾がまだ投下される前に
02:42
and Von Neumann is putting together all the theory to actually build this thing,
フォン ノイマンはコンピューター構築に必要な理論をまとめ上げました
02:46
which also goes back to Turing,
理論に関しては
02:50
who, before that, gave the idea that you could do all this
前の時代にチューリングが
02:52
with a very brainless, little, finite state machine,
テープを読み書きする能なしの小さな有限状態機械によって
02:55
just reading a tape in and reading a tape out.
あらゆる計算が可能であることを示しています
02:59
The other sort of genesis of what Von Neumann did
フォン ノイマンがしたことの動機となったもう1つのことに
03:02
was the difficulty of how you would predict the weather.
天気予報の難しさがあります
03:05
Lewis Richardson saw how you could do this with a cellular array of people,
ルイス リチャードソンは、たくさんの人を整然と並べ
03:09
giving them each a little chunk, and putting it together.
小分けした仕事を各人に与えて、集計する手法を考えました
03:13
Here, we have an electrical model illustrating a mind having a will,
こちらは意志を持った心の電気的モデルです
03:16
but capable of only two ideas.
ただし2種類の考えしかありません
03:19
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:21
And that's really the simplest computer.
これはまさに最も単純なコンピューターで
03:22
It's basically why you need the qubit,
量子ビットが必要なわけです
03:25
because it only has two ideas.
2つの考えしかないのですから
03:27
And you put lots of those together,
これをたくさん集積することにより
03:29
you get the essentials of the modern computer:
現代のコンピューターの基本構成を実現できます
03:31
the arithmetic unit, the central control, the memory,
算術演算装置、中央制御装置、メモリー
03:34
the recording medium, the input and the output.
記録媒体、入出力装置です
03:37
But, there's one catch. This is the fatal -- you know,
ただし大きな落とし穴が1つあります
03:40
we saw it in starting these programs up.
プログラムを作ろうとすると分かったのですが
03:44
The instructions which govern this operation
演算を制御する命令は
03:47
must be given in absolutely exhaustive detail.
微細なところまで指定する必要があるのです
03:49
So, the programming has to be perfect, or it won't work.
プログラムは完璧でなければ動作しません
03:51
If you look at the origins of this,
コンピューターの起源を見てみると
03:54
the classic history sort of takes it all back to the ENIAC here.
典型的な歴史文献ではENIACがすべての元になっていますが
03:56
But actually, the machine I'm going to tell you about,
これからお話しするマシン、つまり
04:00
the Institute for Advanced Study machine, which is way up there,
上の方に書かれているIASマシンが
04:02
really should be down there. So, I'm trying to revise history,
本当は大元に書かれるべきなのです
04:05
and give some of these guys more credit than they've had.
歴史を覆して、彼らにしかるべき名誉を与えたいと思います
04:07
Such a computer would open up universes,
このようなコンピューターが
04:10
which are, at the present, outside the range of any instruments.
あらゆる装置を超えて広がる全く新しい世界を開きました
04:12
So it opens up a whole new world, and these people saw it.
それは彼らが夢見た世界です
04:16
The guy who was supposed to build this machine
そのマシンを作るはずだったのが
04:19
was the guy in the middle, Vladimir Zworykin, from RCA.
写真の真ん中にいる、RCAのウラジミール ツヴォルキンです
04:21
RCA, in probably one of the lousiest business decisions
RCAはおそらく史上最悪の経営判断により
04:24
of all time, decided not to go into computers.
コンピューター事業に参入しないと決めました
04:27
But the first meetings, November 1945, were at RCA's offices.
最初の会議は1945年11月にRCAで行われました
04:30
RCA started this whole thing off, and said, you know,
RCAはこの全計画に着手したものの、将来を担うのは
04:35
televisions are the future, not computers.
コンピューターでなくテレビだと判断しました
04:39
The essentials were all there --
マシンを作り上げ動かすのに
04:42
all the things that make these machines run.
必要なものは全て揃っていました
04:44
Von Neumann, and a logician, and a mathematician from the army
フォン ノイマンに、論理学者に、軍の数学者たちが集まりました
04:48
put this together. Then, they needed a place to build it.
組み立て場所が必要でしたが
04:51
When RCA said no, that's when they decided to build it in Princeton,
RCAに断られたので、プリンストンで作ることにしました
04:53
where Freeman works at the Institute.
フリーマン ダイソンが働いていた研究所で
04:57
That's where I grew up as a kid.
私も幼少期をそこで過ごしました
04:59
That's me, that's my sister Esther, who's talked to you before,
私と、先に講演した姉のエスターです
05:01
so we both go back to the birth of this thing.
2人ともコンピューターの誕生に立ち会ったわけです
05:05
That's Freeman, a long time ago,
こちらは大昔のフリーマンです
05:08
and that was me.
私もいます
05:10
And this is Von Neumann and Morgenstern,
フォン ノイマンとモルゲンシュテルンです
05:11
who wrote the "Theory of Games."
ゲーム理論を作った人たちです
05:14
All these forces came together there, in Princeton.
この蒼々たる人材がプリンストンに集まっていました
05:16
Oppenheimer, who had built the bomb.
原子爆弾を開発したオッペンハイマーです
05:20
The machine was actually used mainly for doing bomb calculations.
実際このマシンは主に爆弾のための計算に使われたのです
05:22
And Julian Bigelow, who took
ジュリアン ビゲローは
05:26
Zworkykin's place as the engineer, to actually figure out, using electronics,
技術者として採用され、電子工学を使って実際にマシンを構築する方法を考案しました
05:28
how you would build this thing. The whole gang of people who came to work on this,
この仕事のために集まった人たちです
05:32
and women in front, who actually did most of the coding, were the first programmers.
前の女性たちは大半のコーディングを行った、いわば最初のプログラマーです
05:35
These were the prototype geeks, the nerds.
彼らはギークの原型で
05:40
They didn't fit in at the Institute.
組織には馴染みませんでした
05:44
This is a letter from the director, concerned about --
こちらは所長から送られた手紙で
05:46
"especially unfair on the matter of sugar."
「砂糖の問題が不公平な状況にある」と難じています
05:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:52
You can read the text.
文面が読めますね
05:53
(Laughter)
「…そちらのスタッフの砂糖消費量は他部門の数倍に及び…午後5時にこちらで適正な監視下でお茶を飲むよう提案する…」
05:54
This is hackers getting in trouble for the first time.
ハッカーがトラブルを起こした最初の例です
06:00
(Laughter).
(笑)
06:04
These were not theoretical physicists.
彼らは理論物理学者ではなく
06:09
They were real soldering-gun type guys, and they actually built this thing.
半田ごてを手に実際のモノを作る人たちです
06:11
And we take it for granted now, that each of these machines
何十億というトランジスタを持つコンピューターが
06:16
has billions of transistors, doing billions of cycles per second without failing.
毎秒何十億という演算を間違いなく行うのを、私達は当然のように思っていますが
06:18
They were using vacuum tubes, very narrow, sloppy techniques
彼らが使っていたのはラジオ用の真空管で
06:23
to get actually binary behavior out of these radio vacuum tubes.
それを心許ない細工によって2値動作するようにしていました
06:27
They actually used 6J6, the common radio tube,
一般的なラジオ用真空管の6J6を使ったのは
06:32
because they found they were more reliable than the more expensive tubes.
その方が高価な真空管より信頼性が高かったからです
06:35
And what they did at the Institute was publish every step of the way.
彼らは研究所でした開発の全過程を公開しました
06:39
Reports were issued, so that this machine was cloned
報告書が発行されて
06:43
at 15 other places around the world.
世界15か所で複製マシンが作られました
06:46
And it really was. It was the original microprocessor.
これはまさにマイクロプロセッサーの原型となったのです
06:49
All the computers now are copies of that machine.
現代のあらゆるコンピューターがこのマシンの複製です
06:53
The memory was in cathode ray tubes --
メモリーはブラウン管で作りました
06:55
a whole bunch of spots on the face of the tube --
ブラウン管表面のたくさんの点を使っており
06:58
very, very sensitive to electromagnetic disturbances.
電磁波の影響を受けやすい不安定なものでした
07:01
So, there's 40 of these tubes,
このようなブラウン管を40個並べ
07:04
like a V-40 engine running the memory.
V-40エンジンみたいにメモリーが動作します
07:06
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:09
The input and the output was by teletype tape at first.
入出力には最初テレタイプテープを使っていました
07:10
This is a wire drive, using bicycle wheels.
こちらにあるのは
07:15
This is the archetype of the hard disk that's in your machine now.
自転車の車輪を利用したワイヤードライブで、ハードディスクの元型です
07:17
Then they switched to a magnetic drum.
この後、磁気ドラムに置き換わります
07:22
This is modifying IBM equipment,
こちらは改良されたIBMの装置で
07:24
which is the origins of the whole data-processing industry, later at IBM.
後にIBMに引き継がれ、データ処理産業を生み出すことになります
07:26
And this is the beginning of computer graphics.
こちらはコンピューターグラフィックスの起源です
07:30
The "Graph'g-Beam Turn On." This next slide,
「グラフィング ビーム ターンオン」です
07:33
that's the -- as far as I know -- the first digital bitmap display, 1954.
これは私の知る限り最初のデジタル ビットマップ ディスプレイで、1954年のものです
07:36
So, Von Neumann was already off in a theoretical cloud,
フォン ノイマンは既に理論の世界へと離れ
07:43
doing abstract sorts of studies of how you could build
信頼性の低い部品からいかに信頼性の高いマシンを作れるかという
07:46
reliable machines out of unreliable components.
抽象的な研究をしていました
07:49
Those guys drinking all the tea with sugar in it
これは多量に砂糖を使う―
07:52
were writing in their logbooks, trying to get this thing to work, with all
あの連中が マシンを稼働させようと格闘する中で書いた記録です
07:54
these 2,600 vacuum tubes that failed half the time.
しょっちゅう動かなくなる真空管を2千6百本使っていたのです
07:58
And that's what I've been doing, this last six months, is going through the logs.
私はこの6か月間、日誌をじっくりと調べてきました
08:01
"Running time: two minutes. Input, output: 90 minutes."
「実行時間:2分、入出力:90分」
08:06
This includes a large amount of human error.
ここには人的エラーもたくさん含まれています
08:09
So they are always trying to figure out, what's machine error? What's human error?
だから彼らはいつも、マシンのエラーか人のエラーか見極めようとしていました
08:12
What's code, what's hardware?
どれがソフトエラーで、どれがハードエラーか
08:15
That's an engineer gazing at tube number 36,
「36番ブラウン管を見つめる技術者」
08:17
trying to figure out why the memory's not in focus.
メモリーの焦点が合わない原因を見つけようとしています
08:19
He had to focus the memory -- seems OK.
メモリーの焦点を合わせなければならないのです 「問題なさげ」
08:21
So, he had to focus each tube just to get the memory up and running,
メモリーを動作させるには、各ブラウン管の焦点を合わせなければなりませんでした
08:24
let alone having, you know, software problems.
問題が出るのはソフトだけではないのです
08:28
"No use, went home." (Laughter)
「全然だめ こわれた」(笑)
08:30
"Impossible to follow the damn thing, where's a directory?"
「やり方が分からない 指示書はどこにあるんだ?」
08:32
So, already, they're complaining about the manuals:
すでにマニュアルに不満を持っていたようです
08:35
"before closing down in disgust ... "
「うんざりして停止する前に」と書いてありますね
08:37
"The General Arithmetic: Operating Logs."
「汎用演算―運用日誌」
08:41
Burning lots of midnight oil.
文字通り油を燃やして、夜遅くまで働きました
08:43
"MANIAC," which became the acronym for the machine,
MANIAC(数学的数値的積分器兼演算器)は
08:46
Mathematical and Numerical Integrator and Calculator, "lost its memory."
このマシンの略称です 「メモリーの中身が消えたぞ」
08:48
"MANIAC regained its memory, when the power went off." "Machine or human?"
「MANIACは電源を落とすとメモリー内容が回復する」「マシンか人か?」
08:51
"Aha!" So, they figured out it's a code problem.
「そうか!」ついにコードに問題があることが分かりました
08:57
"Found trouble in code, I hope."
「コードに問題があった そう願うよ」
09:00
"Code error, machine not guilty."
「コードエラーにつき、マシンは無罪」
09:02
"Damn it, I can be just as stubborn as this thing."
「クソッ、俺もこいつと同じくらい頭が硬いかも」
09:05
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:08
"And the dawn came." So they ran all night.
「そして夜が明けた」 一晩中やっていたんですね
09:13
Twenty-four hours a day, this thing was running, mainly running bomb calculations.
マシンは1日24時間稼働し、主に爆弾に関する計算をしていました
09:15
"Everything up to this point is wasted time." "What's the use? Good night."
「ここまでやったことは全部時間の無駄だった」「何にもならん お休み」
09:19
"Master control off. The hell with it. Way off." (Laughter)
「主電源オフ クソッタレ 大間違いだ!!」(笑)
09:24
"Something's wrong with the air conditioner --
「エアコンの調子が悪い
09:28
smell of burning V-belts in the air."
Vベルトの焦げる臭いが充満している」
09:30
"A short -- do not turn the machine on."
「ショートした オペレータ抜きで電源を入れるな!」
09:33
"IBM machine putting a tar-like substance on the cards. The tar is from the roof."
「IBMマシンのカードのところにタールみたいなのが付いている 天井からだ」
09:35
So they really were working under tough conditions.
すごく過酷な環境で作業していたわけです
09:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:42
Here, "A mouse has climbed into the blower
「送風機にネズミが潜り込んだ
09:43
behind the regulator rack, set blower to vibrating. Result: no more mouse."
調節器の台の後ろ 送風機を動かす 結果: ノー モア マウス、二度とくるな」
09:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:49
"Here lies mouse. Born: ?. Died: 4:50 a.m., May 1953."
「ネズミここに眠る 誕生-不明 死亡-1953年5月19日 午前4:50」
09:54
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:01
There's an inside joke someone has penciled in:
内輪ネタが書き込まれています
10:02
"Here lies Marston Mouse."
「マーストン マウス ここに眠る」
10:04
If you're a mathematician, you get that,
数学者の方はご存じでしょう
10:06
because Marston was a mathematician who
マーストン モースは数学者で
10:08
objected to the computer being there.
このコンピューターに反対していた人です
10:09
"Picked a lightning bug off the drum." "Running at two kilocycles."
「ドラムから蛍を取り除いた」「2キロサイクルで稼働」
10:12
That's two thousand cycles per second --
クロック周波数が2000ということです
10:16
"yes, I'm chicken" -- so two kilocycles was slow speed.
「俺は臆病者さ」―2キロサイクルは低速でした
10:18
The high speed was 16 kilocycles.
高速時は16キロサイクルでした
10:21
I don't know if you remember a Mac that was 16 Megahertz,
Macintosh IIでも16メガヘルツでした
10:24
that's slow speed.
これは低速のイラストです
10:27
"I have now duplicated both results.
「答えが2つ出てきたけど どっちが正しいんだ?
10:29
How will I know which is right, assuming one result is correct?
どっちかが正しいとしての話だが」
10:32
This now is the third different output.
「3つめも違う答えだ
10:35
I know when I'm licked."
わけが分かんないことは分かった」
10:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:39
"We've duplicated errors before."
「前はエラーが再現した」
10:41
"Machine run, fine. Code isn't."
「マシンは正常動作、コードはダメ」
10:43
"Only happens when the machine is running."
「マシンが動いているときだけ発生する」
10:46
And sometimes things are okay.
うまく行くこともあります
10:48
"Machine a thing of beauty, and a joy forever." "Perfect running."
「おおマシンよ 美しきもの 永遠の喜び」「☆完璧に稼働☆」
10:52
"Parting thought: when there's bigger and better errors, we'll have them."
「最後に一言: より大きなエラーが起きうるとき、そのエラーは起きる」
10:56
So, nobody was supposed to know they were actually designing bombs.
爆弾開発に利用されていることは知らされていませんでしたが
11:00
They're designing hydrogen bombs. But someone in the logbook,
水爆開発に使われていました しかしある夜更けに
11:03
late one night, finally drew a bomb.
ついに日誌に爆弾の絵が現われました
11:05
So, that was the result. It was Mike,
その結果がこのマイクと呼ばれるもので
11:07
the first thermonuclear bomb, in 1952.
1952年に投下された最初の熱核爆弾です
11:09
That was designed on that machine,
これはあのマシンを使って
11:12
in the woods behind the Institute.
研究所の裏の森で開発されました
11:14
So Von Neumann invited a whole gang of weirdos
フォン ノイマンは様々な問題に取り組むため
11:16
from all over the world to work on all these problems.
世界中から変わり者を集めていました
11:20
Barricelli, he came to do what we now call, really, artificial life,
バリチェリは今でいう人工生命に取り組むためにやってきて
11:23
trying to see if, in this artificial universe --
この人工的な世界の中で取り組んでいました
11:27
he was a viral-geneticist, way, way, way ahead of his time.
彼は元々ウィルス遺伝学者ですが、時代の遙か先を行っていました
11:30
He's still ahead of some of the stuff that's being done now.
彼はある部分では現在よりも先を行っていました
11:33
Trying to start an artificial genetic system running in the computer.
コンピューターで動作する人工遺伝子システムに着手し始めました
11:36
Began -- his universe started March 3, '53.
彼の世界が生まれたのは1953年3月3日です
11:41
So it's almost exactly -- it's 50 years ago next Tuesday, I guess.
次の火曜日でちょうど50年になります
11:44
And he saw everything in terms of --
彼はすべてコードを通して見ていました…
11:49
he could read the binary code straight off the machine.
マシン出力のバイナリコードをそのまま読め
11:51
He had a wonderful rapport.
マシンを実にうまく使いこなしました
11:53
Other people couldn't get the machine running. It always worked for him.
他の人がダメでも彼なら動かせました
11:55
Even errors were duplicated.
エラーさえよく再現されました
11:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:00
"Dr. Barricelli claims machine is wrong, code is right."
「バリチェリ博士、マシンが間違っており、コードは正しいと主張」
12:01
So he designed this universe, and ran it.
そうして彼は世界をデザインし、動かしていたのです
12:04
When the bomb people went home, he was allowed in there.
コンピューターは爆弾の開発者たちが帰った後に使えたので
12:07
He would run that thing all night long, running these things,
一晩中マシンでこのようなものを動かしていました
12:10
if anybody remembers Stephen Wolfram,
スティーブン ウルフラムをご存じかもしれませんが
12:13
who reinvented this stuff.
彼はこれを再発明した人です
12:15
And he published it. It wasn't locked up and disappeared.
バリチェリは研究を隠さずに公開しました
12:17
It was published in the literature.
文献として残されています
12:19
"If it's that easy to create living organisms, why not create a few yourself?"
「生命が簡単に創造できるというなら、いくつか作ってみたらどうか?」
12:21
So, he decided to give it a try,
そして彼は試してみることにし
12:24
to start this artificial biology going in the machines.
マシンの中で生きる人工生命学に手をつけました
12:26
And he found all these, sort of --
そして彼は見出していったのです…
12:30
it was like a naturalist coming in
博物学者のように
12:32
and looking at this tiny, 5,000-byte universe,
この小さな5000バイトの世界を覗き込み
12:34
and seeing all these things happening
そこで外の生物の世界で起こるのと同じ
12:37
that we see in the outside world, in biology.
あらゆることが起きるのを観察したのです
12:39
This is some of the generations of his universe.
これは彼が作った世界の数々です
12:42
But they're just going to stay numbers;
ただし、数字に過ぎず
12:48
they're not going to become organisms.
有機体にはなりません
12:50
They have to have something.
何かが必要でした
12:52
You have a genotype and you have to have a phenotype.
遺伝子型があるなら表現型もなければなりません
12:53
They have to go out and do something. And he started doing that,
外に出て何かをする必要があります
12:55
started giving these little numerical organisms things they could play with --
彼は数字でできた小さな生命に遊び道具を与え始め
12:58
playing chess with other machines and so on.
他のマシンとチェスをさせたりしました
13:01
And they did start to evolve.
そして人工生命は進化を始めました
13:03
And he went around the country after that.
その後、彼は世界各地をまわり
13:05
Every time there was a new, fast machine, he started using it,
新しい速いマシンを見つけては動かし
13:07
and saw exactly what's happening now.
今あるようなものを見たのです
13:11
That the programs, instead of being turned off -- when you quit the program,
動き続けるプログラムです 終わったら電源を切ってしまうのではなく
13:13
you'd keep running
動かし続けるのです
13:19
and, basically, all the sorts of things like Windows is doing,
Windowsのように、あらゆることを
13:21
running as a multi-cellular organism on many machines,
たくさんのマシン上にまたがる多細胞生物として動かし
13:25
he envisioned all that happening.
あらゆることが起きるのを見たのです
13:27
And he saw that evolution itself was an intelligent process.
そして進化自体が知的プロセスなのだと捉えました
13:28
It wasn't any sort of creator intelligence,
創造主的な知性ではなく
13:31
but the thing itself was a giant parallel computation
それ自体がある種の知性を持った
13:34
that would have some intelligence.
大規模な並列計算過程だと考えたのです
13:37
And he went out of his way to say
彼はそれが
13:39
that he was not saying this was lifelike,
生命のようだとも
13:41
or a new kind of life.
新種の生命だとも言わず
13:44
It just was another version of the same thing happening.
ただ同じことが別な形で起きているのだと言いました
13:46
And there's really no difference between what he was doing in the computer
彼がコンピューターで実行したことと
13:49
and what nature did billions of years ago.
自然界が数十億年前に実行したことに実質的な違いはありません
13:52
And could you do it again now?
今もう一度やったらどうだろう?
13:55
So, when I went into these archives looking at this stuff, lo and behold,
これを調べようと資料の保管所へ行くと
13:57
the archivist came up one day, saying,
ある時、資料係の人がやってきて、こう言ったのです
14:01
"I think we found another box that had been thrown out."
「放って置かれていた箱があったんですが、ご覧になりますか」
14:03
And it was his universe on punch cards.
それはパンチカードに記録された彼の世界でした
14:06
So there it is, 50 years later, sitting there -- sort of suspended animation.
まるで冬眠するかのように、50年間そこに取り残されていたのです
14:08
That's the instructions for running --
これは実行指示であり…
14:14
this is actually the source code
彼の作った世界の
14:16
for one of those universes,
ソースコードなのです
14:18
with a note from the engineers
何か問題があるという技術者のメモが
14:20
saying they're having some problems.
挟まっていました
14:22
"There must be something about this code that you haven't explained yet."
「このコードには、あなたが説明していない何かがあります」
14:23
And I think that's really the truth. We still don't understand
それは真実だと思います 我々もまだ、この単純な指示から
14:28
how these very simple instructions can lead to increasing complexity.
どうやって高度な複雑さが生み出されるのか理解していないのです
14:31
What's the dividing line between
生命に似ていることと
14:35
when that is lifelike and when it really is alive?
実際に生きていることの、境界線はどこなのでしょう?
14:37
These cards, now, thanks to me showing up, are being saved.
このカードは、私がたまたま行き会わせたことで救われました
14:41
And the question is, should we run them or not?
疑問なのですが、これを実行するべきでしょうか?
14:45
You know, could we get them running?
実行していいのでしょうか?
14:47
Do you want to let it loose on the Internet?
インターネットで公開すべきでしょうか?
14:49
These machines would think they --
そのマシンたちが思うだろうことは…
14:50
these organisms, if they came back to life now --
死んで天国にいたこの生命体が
14:52
whether they've died and gone to heaven, there's a universe.
今息を吹き返し目にする世界は…
14:55
My laptop is 10 thousand million times
私のノートPCの世界は、バリチェリがプロジェクトをやめた時点と比べ
14:57
the size of the universe that they lived in when Barricelli quit the project.
100億倍もの大きさになっているのです
15:02
He was thinking far ahead, to
彼は時代に遙か先駆けて
15:07
how this would really grow into a new kind of life.
新しい種類の生命へと育てることを考えていました
15:09
And that's what's happening!
そしてこれは今起きていることなのです!
15:12
When Juan Enriquez told us about
ファン エンリケスが私に言ったのですが
15:14
these 12 trillion bits being transferred back and forth,
プロテオミクス研究所では12兆ビットのゲノムデータが
15:16
of all this genomics data going to the proteomics lab,
やり取りされているそうです
15:20
that's what Barricelli imagined:
まさにバリチェリが夢想したことです
15:24
that this digital code in these machines
マシンの中のデジタルコードは
15:26
is actually starting to code --
もう既に実際の塩基配列を
15:29
it already is coding from nucleic acids.
コーディングするようになっています
15:31
We've been doing that since, you know, since we started PCR
PCR法を行い、小さなDNAの断片を
15:34
and synthesizing small strings of DNA.
合成するようになったときから、我々は既にそうしているのです
15:37
And real soon, we're actually going to be synthesizing the proteins,
近いうちに実際にタンパク質を合成するようになるでしょう
15:43
and, like Steve showed us, that just opens an entirely new world.
スティーブが示したように、ここから全く新しい世界が開かれるのです
15:46
It's a world that Von Neumann himself envisioned.
それはフォン ノイマンが思い描いた世界です
15:51
This was published after he died: his sort of unfinished notes
こちらは彼の死後に発表された
15:54
on self-reproducing machines,
自己複製機械の未完成論文です
15:57
what it takes to get the machines sort of jump-started
マシンが自己複製し始めるためには
15:59
to where they begin to reproduce.
何が必要か議論しています
16:02
It took really three people:
これには3人の力が必要でした
16:04
Barricelli had the concept of the code as a living thing;
コードを生物としてとらえたバリチェリ
16:06
Von Neumann saw how you could build the machines --
マシンの構築法を示したフォン ノイマン
16:09
that now, last count, four million
最新の集計によれば、今では毎日400万台の
16:12
of these Von Neumann machines is built every 24 hours;
フォン ノイマン型マシンが作られています
16:15
and Julian Bigelow, who died 10 days ago --
ジュリアン ビゲローは10日前に亡くなりました
16:18
this is John Markoff's obituary for him --
これはジョン マーコフによる死亡記事です
16:22
he was the important missing link,
ビゲローは重要なミッシングリンクでした
16:25
the engineer who came in
技術者としてメンバーに加わった彼は
16:27
and knew how to put those vacuum tubes together and make it work.
真空管を並べて動作させる術を知っていました
16:29
And all our computers have, inside them,
現在のあらゆるコンピューターの中には
16:32
the copies of the architecture that he had to just design
彼がある時に紙と鉛筆で設計することになった
16:34
one day, sort of on pencil and paper.
アーキテクチャの複製があるのです
16:38
And we owe a tremendous credit to that.
その恩恵は計り知れません
16:41
And he explained, in a very generous way,
40年代に高等研究所でこのプロジェクトに取り組んだ
16:43
the spirit that brought all these different people to
様々な人々が
16:47
the Institute for Advanced Study in the '40s to do this project,
特許も制約も知的所有権の議論もなしに
16:49
and make it freely available with no patents, no restrictions,
成果を世界に公開した寛大な精神を
16:52
no intellectual property disputes to the rest of the world.
彼は説明しています
16:55
That's the last entry in the logbook
こちらは日誌の最後のページです
16:58
when the machine was shut down, July 1958.
マシンが稼働を止めた1958年7月に
17:01
And it's Julian Bigelow who was running it until midnight
深夜まで稼働させた後、ジュリアン ビゲローが
17:04
when the machine was officially turned off.
マシンを公式に停止したときの記録です
17:07
And that's the end.
以上で終わりです
17:09
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
17:11
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:13
Translator:Satoshi Tatsuhara
Reviewer:Yasushi Aoki

sponsored links

George Dyson - Historian of science
In telling stories of technologies and the individuals who created them, George Dyson takes a clear-eyed view of our scientific past -- while illuminating what lies ahead.

Why you should listen

The development of the Aleutian kayak, its adaptation by Russians in the 18th and 19th centuries, and his own redevelopment of the craft in the 1970s was chronicled in George Dyson’s Baidarka: The Kayak of 1986. His 1997 Darwin Among the Machines: The Evolution of Global Intelligence (“the last book about the Internet written without the Internet”) explored the history and prehistory of digital computing and telecommunications as a manifestation of the convergent destiny of organisms and machines.

Project Orion: The True Story of the Atomic Spaceship, published in 2002, assembled first-person interviews and recently declassified documents to tell the story of a path not taken into space: a nuclear-powered spaceship whose objective was to land a party of 100 people on Mars four years before we landed two people on the Moon. Turing's Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe, published in 2012, illuminated the transition from numbers that mean things to numbers that do things in the aftermath of World War II.

Dyson’s current project, Analogia, is a semi-autobiographical reflection on how analog computation is re-establishing control over the digital world.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.