15:21
TED2017

Garry Kasparov: Don't fear intelligent machines. Work with them

ガルリ・カスパロフ: 知性を持つ機械を恐れるな、協働せよ

Filmed:

テクノロジーを最大限に活かしたいなら、私たちは自己の恐怖心と向き合わなければならないし、人間性の最善の部分を引き出したいなら、私たちは向き合った恐怖心を克服しなければならない、とガルリ・カスパロフは言います。史上最高のチェス・プレーヤーの1人であるカスカロフは、1997年、IBMのスーパーコンピュータであるディープ・ブルーとの記念すべき対局に破れました。今回、カスパロフは、知的なマシンが私たちの大いなる夢を実現していく助けとなる未来を展望します。

- Grandmaster, analyst
Garry Kasparov is esteemed by many as the greatest chess player of all time. Now he’s engaged in a game with far higher stakes: the preservation of democracy. Full bio

This story begins in 1985,
この物語が始まるのは1985年です
00:12
when at age 22,
私は22歳にして
00:15
I became the World Chess Champion
チェスの世界チャンピオンになりました
00:17
after beating Anatoly Karpov.
破った相手は
アナトリー・カルポフです
00:20
Earlier that year,
その年 それに先だって
00:24
I played what is called
simultaneous exhibition
私は 公開同時対局というのをやって
00:25
against 32 of the world's
best chess-playing machines
世界最強のチェスコンピュータ
32台と戦いました
00:29
in Hamburg, Germany.
ドイツのハンブルグでのことです
00:33
I won all the games,
私は全対局に勝利しましたが
00:36
and then it was not considered
much of a surprise
当時は 32台のコンピュータを相手に
同時対局して勝っても
00:38
that I could beat 32 computers
at the same time.
それほど驚くに当たらないとされました
00:41
To me, that was the golden age.
私にとって黄金時代でした
00:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:49
Machines were weak,
コンピュータは弱く
00:51
and my hair was strong.
私の髪にも勢いがありました
00:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:55
Just 12 years later,
そのほんの12年後
00:58
I was fighting for my life
against just one computer
私はたった1台の
コンピュータ相手に
01:00
in a match
自分のすべてを賭けて
対戦していました
01:05
called by the cover of "Newsweek"
『Newsweek』の表紙タイトルは
01:07
"The Brain's Last Stand."
「人間の頭脳の最後の抵抗」です
01:09
No pressure.
プレッシャーかける気は
ないそうですが
01:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:12
From mythology to science fiction,
神話からSFまで
01:15
human versus machine
人間対マシンの戦いは
01:17
has been often portrayed
as a matter of life and death.
生死を分ける問題として
しばしば描かれてきました
01:20
John Henry,
ジョン・ヘンリーは
01:23
called the steel-driving man
「ハンマー使い」と呼ばれる
01:25
in the 19th century
African American folk legend,
19世紀アフリカ系アメリカ人の
庶民的英雄ですが
01:27
was pitted in a race
蒸気ハンマーを相手に
01:31
against a steam-powered hammer
岩山にトンネルを通す
01:32
bashing a tunnel through mountain rock.
競争に挑みました
01:35
John Henry's legend
is a part of a long historical narrative
ジョン・ヘンリーの伝説は
人類とテクノロジーの対決という
01:38
pitting humanity versus technology.
長い歴史的な物語の一部です
01:43
And this competitive rhetoric
is standard now.
この競争のレトリックは
今やありふれています
01:48
We are in a race against the machines,
戦いであれ 戦争であれ
01:51
in a fight or even in a war.
人類は機械と競争しています
01:54
Jobs are being killed off.
人間の仕事は奪われ
01:57
People are being replaced
as if they had vanished from the Earth.
人類は 地上から消えたかのように
機械に取って代わられています
01:59
It's enough to think that the movies
like "The Terminator" or "The Matrix"
『ターミネーター』や『マトリックス』
みたいな映画が
02:04
are nonfiction.
ノンフィクションに思えるほどです
02:07
There are very few instances of an arena
人間が肉体的・精神的に
02:11
where the human body and mind
can compete on equal terms
コンピュータやロボットと
対等に競える領域というのは
02:17
with a computer or a robot.
ごくわずかです
02:21
Actually, I wish there were a few more.
もう少しあれば
いいのにと思います
02:24
Instead,
しかし私にとって
02:27
it was my blessing and my curse
祝福でもあり
災いでもあったのは
02:29
to literally become the proverbial man
今でも皆が語り草にする
02:34
in the man versus machine competition
人間対機械の競争における
02:37
that everybody is still talking about.
文字通り伝説的な人間になったことです
02:40
In the most famous human-machine
competition since John Henry,
ジョン・ヘンリー以降
最も有名な人間対機械の競争で
02:45
I played two matches
私は 2度
02:50
against the IBM supercomputer, Deep Blue.
IBMのスーパーコンピュータ
「ディープ・ブルー」と対戦しました
02:52
Nobody remembers
that I won the first match --
誰も覚えていませんが
私は初戦に勝ったんです
02:59
(Laughter)
(笑)(拍手)
03:01
(Applause)
フィラディルフィアで —
03:03
In Philadelphia, before losing the rematch
the following year in New York.
負けたのは 翌年の
ニューヨークでの2戦目です
03:07
But I guess that's fair.
でも不平を言うつもりはありません
03:12
There is no day in history,
special calendar entry
エドモンド・ヒラリー卿と
テンジン・ノルゲイが
03:16
for all the people
who failed to climb Mt. Everest
エベレストを初制覇する以前に
03:21
before Sir Edmund Hillary
and Tenzing Norgay
登頂に挑んだ人たちだって
03:24
made it to the top.
歴史のカレンダーに刻まれては
いないのですから
03:27
And in 1997, I was still
the world champion
そして1997年には
私はまだ世界チャンピオンでした
03:29
when chess computers finally came of age.
その年にコンピュータのチェスが
ついに成熟期に達し
03:36
I was Mt. Everest,
私というエベレストの山頂に
03:41
and Deep Blue reached the summit.
ディープ・ブルーが
たどり着いたのです
03:43
I should say of course,
not that Deep Blue did it,
もちろん成し遂げたのは
ディープ・ブルーではなく
03:46
but its human creators --
その生みの親たちです
03:50
Anantharaman, Campbell, Hoane, Hsu.
アナンサラマン、キャンベル
ホーン、 スー
03:52
Hats off to them.
彼らに脱帽です
03:56
As always, machine's triumph
was a human triumph,
いつものことながら
機械の勝利は人類の勝利なのです
03:58
something we tend to forget when humans
are surpassed by our own creations.
人間が作ったものが人間を超えると
どうもそのことを忘れがちです
04:03
Deep Blue was victorious,
ディープ・ブルーは勝者ですが
04:10
but was it intelligent?
知的だったのでしょうか?
04:13
No, no it wasn't,
いいえ そうではありません
04:15
at least not in the way Alan Turing
and other founders of computer science
少なくとも アラン・チューリングら
コンピュータ科学の開拓者たちが
04:18
had hoped.
望んだような知的さでは
ありませんでした
04:23
It turned out that chess
could be crunched by brute force,
チェスは力技で組み伏せることが
できると分かったんです
04:25
once hardware got fast enough
ハードウェアが十分に速く
04:30
and algorithms got smart enough.
アルゴリズムが十分
洗練されていれば
04:34
Although by the definition of the output,
出力で見る限り
04:38
grandmaster-level chess,
グランドマスターレベルの
チェスをする点で
04:42
Deep Blue was intelligent.
ディープ・ブルーは知的でしょう
04:45
But even at the incredible speed,
でも その信じられないくらいのスピード
04:49
200 million positions per second,
毎秒2億手計算できても
04:52
Deep Blue's method
ディープ・ブルーの方式では
04:57
provided little of the dreamed-of insight
into the mysteries of human intelligence.
人間の知性の謎を洞察するなんて
夢のまた夢だったのです
04:59
Soon,
すぐに
05:08
machines will be taxi drivers
機械がタクシーを運転し
05:10
and doctors and professors,
医者や教授に取って代わるでしょう
05:13
but will they be "intelligent?"
でも それは「知的」と言えるのか?
05:15
I would rather leave these definitions
この言葉の定義は
05:19
to the philosophers and to the dictionary.
哲学者や辞書に
委ねたいと思います
05:22
What really matters is how we humans
本当に大切なことは
私たち人類が
05:27
feel about living and working
with these machines.
そういう機械と共存し協働することについて
どう感じるかです
05:32
When I first met Deep Blue
in 1996 in February,
1996年2月に 初めて
ディープ・ブルーと出会った時
05:38
I had been the world champion
for more than 10 years,
私は10年以上
世界チャンピオンを防衛していました
05:43
and I had played 182
world championship games
世界チャンピオンを賭けた対戦に
182勝し
05:48
and hundreds of games against
other top players in other competitions.
それ以外のトッププレイヤー相手の
様々な対戦で何百勝もしました
05:52
I knew what to expect from my opponents
私には 相手のことや
自分のことが
05:57
and what to expect from myself.
予想できました
06:02
I was used to measure their moves
相手の身振りを観察し
目を覗き込むことで
06:04
and to gauge their emotional state
対戦相手の動きを推し量り
06:09
by watching their body language
and looking into their eyes.
心理状態を見極めたものです
06:13
And then I sat across
the chessboard from Deep Blue.
それから ディープ・ブルーと
チェス盤を挟むことになりました
06:17
I immediately sensed something new,
すぐに これまでとは
違うものを感じました
06:24
something unsettling.
落ち着かない何かでした
06:27
You might experience a similar feeling
自動運転車に初めて乗るときや
06:31
the first time you ride
in a driverless car
コンピュータの上司から
初めて仕事の指示を受けるときに
06:35
or the first time your new computer
manager issues an order at work.
似た感覚を経験するかもしれません
06:37
But when I sat at that first game,
でも初対局に挑んだ時 私には
06:45
I couldn't be sure
ディープ・ブルーに何ができるのか
06:50
what is this thing capable of.
はっきりしませんでした
06:52
Technology can advance in leaps,
and IBM had invested heavily.
技術は飛躍的に進化しうるし
IBMは相当投資していました
06:56
I lost that game.
私はその対局に敗れました
07:00
And I couldn't help wondering,
ディープ・ブルーは無敵かも知れないと
07:04
might it be invincible?
思わずにいられませんでした
07:06
Was my beloved game of chess over?
私の大好きなゲームは
終わってしまったのか?
07:08
These were human doubts, human fears,
こういった思いは 人間の持つ
猜疑心であり恐怖心ですが
07:12
and the only thing I knew for sure
ただ一つ確実に分かっていたのは
07:16
was that my opponent Deep Blue
had no such worries at all.
対戦者のディープ・ブルーの方は
そんな心配と無縁ということでした
07:19
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:22
I fought back
初対局での
07:25
after this devastating blow
大打撃のあと
07:28
to win the first match,
私は反撃に出ましたが
07:31
but the writing was on the wall.
不吉な予感がしていました
07:32
I eventually lost to the machine
結局 私は機械に負けましたが
07:36
but I didn't suffer the fate of John Henry
ジョン・ヘンリーのように
勝負に勝ちながら
07:38
who won but died
with his hammer in his hand.
ハンマーを手にしたまま命を落とす
羽目にはなりませんでした
07:41
It turned out that the world of chess
明らかになったのは チェス界が
07:49
still wanted to have
a human chess champion.
なおも生身の人間のチャンピオンを
求めていたことでした
07:52
And even today,
そして今日でさえも —
07:56
when a free chess app
on the latest mobile phone
最新スマホ用の
無料チェスアプリが
08:00
is stronger than Deep Blue,
ディープ・ブルーを凌ぐ今でさえも
08:03
people are still playing chess,
人々は以前にもまして
08:05
even more than ever before.
チェスをし続けているのです
08:08
Doomsayers predicted
that nobody would touch the game
悲観論者は
機械に征服されたゲームなど
08:11
that could be conquered by the machine,
誰も手に取らないだろうと
予言しましたが
08:15
and they were wrong, proven wrong,
それは間違いだと示されました
08:17
but doomsaying has always been
a popular pastime
もっともテクノロジーに関する限り
08:19
when it comes to technology.
悲観的予言はいつも
人気の娯楽なんです
08:23
What I learned from my own experience
私が自分の経験から学んだことは
08:26
is that we must face our fears
テクノロジーから最高の恩恵を享受したいなら
08:29
if we want to get the most
out of our technology,
恐怖心と向き合わなければ
ならないということ
08:33
and we must conquer those fears
そして 人間性から
最高の恩恵を享受したいなら
08:38
if we want to get the best
out of our humanity.
こういった恐怖心を克服しなければ
ならないということです
08:40
While licking my wounds,
自分の傷を舐めて癒す一方で
08:48
I got a lot of inspiration
ディープ・ブルーとの対戦から
08:49
from my battles against Deep Blue.
多くのインスピレーションを得ました
08:53
As the old Russian saying goes,
if you can't beat them, join them.
ロシアの古い諺に「勝てなければ仲間になれ
(長いものには巻かれろ)」とあります
08:55
Then I thought,
そこで考えました
09:00
what if I could play with a computer --
コンピュータと一緒に戦うなら —
09:02
together with a computer at my side,
combining our strengths,
コンピュータを味方にして
力を合わせることができたとしたら?
09:04
human intuition
plus machine's calculation,
人間の直感力と
コンピュータの計算能力
09:09
human strategy, machine tactics,
人間の戦略と
コンピュータの戦術
09:12
human experience, machine's memory.
人間の経験と
コンピュータの記憶力
09:15
Could it be the perfect game ever played?
そうすれば かつてない
最高のゲームができるのでは?
09:18
My idea came to life
私のアイデアが実現し
09:22
in 1998 under the name of Advanced Chess
1998年 「アドバンスト・チェス」の名の下
09:24
when I played this human-plus-machine
competition against another elite player.
私は 他のチェスの名手を相手に
人間とマシンのタグマッチをしました
09:28
But in this first experiment,
この最初の試みでは
09:35
we both failed to combine
human and machine skills effectively.
両者とも 人間とマシンのスキルを
効果的に結びつけるのに失敗しましたが
09:37
Advanced Chess found
its home on the internet,
アドバンスト・チェスは
ネットで盛んに行われるようになり
09:46
and in 2005, a so-called
freestyle chess tournament
2005年の チェスのいわゆる
フリースタイル・トーナメントで
09:50
produced a revelation.
明らかになったことがあります
09:55
A team of grandmasters
and top machines participated,
グランドマスターや 最速のマシンが
チームとして出場しましたが
09:59
but the winners were not grandmasters,
勝者は グランドマスターではなく
10:02
not a supercomputer.
スーパーコンピュタでもありませんでした
10:05
The winners were a pair
of amateur American chess players
勝ったのは アメリカ人の
アマチュアプレイヤー2人が
10:07
operating three ordinary PCs
at the same time.
普通のPC3台を同時に操作した
チームでした
10:12
Their skill of coaching their machines
効果的にコンピュータをコーチする
彼らのスキルが
10:17
effectively counteracted
the superior chess knowledge
対戦相手のグランドマスターの
より深いチェスの知識や
10:20
of their grandmaster opponents
圧倒的に格上のコンピュータの
計算能力に
10:26
and much greater
computational power of others.
勝ったのです
10:28
And I reached this formulation.
そこで到達した公式はこうです
10:33
A weak human player plus a machine
弱い人間プレイヤー
+ コンピュータ
10:36
plus a better process is superior
+ 優れたプロセスは
10:39
to a very powerful machine alone,
単体の非常に強力なマシンに
勝りますが
10:43
but more remarkably,
is superior to a strong human player
さらに すごいのは それが
10:45
plus machine
人間の名人 + コンピュータ
+ 劣ったプロセスにも
10:49
and an inferior process.
勝るということです
10:53
This convinced me that we would need
そこで私が確信したのは
10:58
better interfaces
to help us coach our machines
コンピュータに有用な知性を
与えるためには
11:02
towards more useful intelligence.
コンピュータをコーチするための
良いインターフェースが必要だということです
11:06
Human plus machine isn't the future,
人間+コンピュータというのは
未来ではなく
11:10
it's the present.
現在です
11:13
Everybody that's used online translation
外国語の新聞記事の骨子を知るために
11:14
to get the gist of a news article
from a foreign newspaper,
オンライン翻訳を使う人は誰でも
11:19
knowing its far from perfect.
機械翻訳が 完璧から
ほど遠いと分かっています
11:23
Then we use our human experience
そして 人としての経験を駆使して
11:25
to make sense out of that,
機械翻訳から意味を取ろうとします
11:27
and then the machine
learns from our corrections.
そして 機械は
人間による修正から学習します
11:29
This model is spreading and investing
in medical diagnosis, security analysis.
このモデルは 投資や 医学診断
セキュリティ分析の分野で広まっています
11:32
The machine crunches data,
コンピュータがデータを処理し
11:38
calculates probabilities,
確率を計算し
11:41
gets 80 percent of the way, 90 percent,
精度が80%とか90%になれば
11:43
making it easier for analysis
人間による分析や意思決定が
11:46
and decision-making of the human party.
容易になります
11:51
But you are not going to send your kids
でも自動運転車の場合は
11:54
to school in a self-driving car
with 90 percent accuracy,
精度が90%や 99%であっても
12:00
even with 99 percent.
自分の子供の通学に使う
親はいないでしょう
12:04
So we need a leap forward
そこで私たちに必要なのは
12:07
to add a few more crucial decimal places.
小数点以下の桁数を
もっと追加することです
12:10
Twenty years after
my match with Deep Blue,
ディープ・ブルーとの
2度目の対局から
12:19
second match,
20年たった今
12:24
this sensational
"The Brain's Last Stand" headline
『人間の頭脳の最後の抵抗』という
センセーショナルな見出しは
12:25
has become commonplace
知的なマシンが
12:32
as intelligent machines
毎日のように
12:33
move
様々な領域に進出する中で
12:36
in every sector, seemingly every day.
ありふれたものになっています
12:38
But unlike in the past,
でも昔のような
12:42
when machines replaced
機械が家畜や手作業の労働に
12:45
farm animals, manual labor,
取って代わっていった時代とは異なり
12:48
now they are coming
after people with college degrees
今では 機械が
学位や政治的影響力のある人間の
12:50
and political influence.
後釜を狙う時代になっています
12:53
And as someone
who fought machines and lost,
マシンと戦って負けた人間として
12:56
I am here to tell you
this is excellent, excellent news.
これは素晴らしいニュースなんだと
お知らせしたい
12:58
Eventually, every profession
いつかは どんな職業も
13:03
will have to feel these pressures
同じようなプレッシャーを
経験する運命にあり
13:05
or else it will mean humanity
has ceased to make progress.
そうでなければ 人類が
進歩をやめたことを意味します
13:07
We don't
技術的な進歩を
13:14
get to choose
いつ・どこでやめるか
という選択は
13:17
when and where
technological progress stops.
私たちにはありません
13:20
We cannot
進歩の速度を
13:25
slow down.
遅らせることは
できません
13:27
In fact,
実際
13:29
we have to speed up.
私たちは速度を
上げなければなりません
13:31
Our technology excels at removing
私たちのテクノロジーが得意なのは
13:36
difficulties and uncertainties
from our lives,
生活の中から困難や不安定さを
取り去ることです
13:41
and so we must seek out
だからこそ私たちは
13:47
ever more difficult,
より困難で不確かな課題を
13:49
ever more uncertain challenges.
追求せねばならないのです
13:51
Machines have
マシンには
14:00
calculations.
計算能力があります
14:03
We have understanding.
私たちには理解力があります
14:05
Machines have instructions.
マシンにはインストラクションがあります
14:07
We have purpose.
私たちには目的があります
14:10
Machines have
マシンには
14:12
objectivity.
客観性があります
14:17
We have passion.
私たちには情熱があります
14:18
We should not worry
about what our machines can do today.
現在マシンが何をできるかについて
私たちは懸念すべきではありません
14:20
Instead, we should worry
about what they still cannot do today,
懸念すべきは
現在マシンに何ができないかです
14:26
because we will need the help
of the new, intelligent machines
なぜなら 私たちには
大いなる夢を実現していくために
14:31
to turn our grandest dreams into reality.
新しい知的なマシンの力を
借りねばならない日が来るからです
14:36
And if we fail,
そしてその夢に破れたら
14:42
if we fail, it's not because our machines
are too intelligent,
破れるとしたら それは
マシンの知能が高すぎたからでも
14:44
or not intelligent enough.
低すぎたからでもありません
14:48
If we fail, it's because
we grew complacent
夢の実現に破れる理由があるとしたら
私たちが現状に甘んじて
14:51
and limited our ambitions.
野心に制限をかけてしまったからです
14:55
Our humanity is not defined by any skill,
人間性は ハンマーを振るうとか
チェスを指すというような
14:58
like swinging a hammer
or even playing chess.
特定のスキルで
定義できるものではありません
15:03
There's one thing only a human can do.
人間にしかできないことが1つあります
15:06
That's dream.
それは夢を見ることです
15:09
So let us dream big.
だから 大きな夢を見ましょう
15:12
Thank you.
ありがとう
15:14
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:15
Translated by Hiroko Kawano
Reviewed by Yasushi Aoki

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Garry Kasparov - Grandmaster, analyst
Garry Kasparov is esteemed by many as the greatest chess player of all time. Now he’s engaged in a game with far higher stakes: the preservation of democracy.

Why you should listen

When 22-year-old Garry Kasparov became the world’s youngest chess Grand Champion, few could predict his turbulent career in chess or as a dissident. His chessboard wizardry was already the stuff of legend when, in 1997, he made headlines when he lost a rematch to IBM’s Deep Blue supercomputer, ushering AI into the public sphere.

Kasparov’s book Winter Is Coming details the rise of Putin’s Russia as well as Kasparov’s persecution and self-exile, and it serves chilling warnings of reactionary forces gathering in the West. He is the chair of the Human Rights Foundation, succeeding his predecessor Vaclav Havel.

More profile about the speaker
Garry Kasparov | Speaker | TED.com