18:59
TED2003

Seth Godin: How to get your ideas to spread

セス・ゴーディン: "スライスしたパン"

Filmed:

選択肢に溢れているけれど、選ぶ時間が少ないこの世の中で、私たちは普通のものに見向きもしなくなっています。なぜ、退屈なアイディアよりも、ひどく奇想天外なアイディアの方が私たちの注目を集めやすいのか、マーケティングの権威、セス・ゴーディンが解説します。

- Marketer and author
Seth Godin is an entrepreneur and blogger who thinks about the marketing of ideas in the digital age. His newest interest: the tribes we lead. Full bio

00:25
I'm going to give you
four specific examples,
これから4つの具体例を話します。そして最後に、
00:28
I'm going to cover at the end
シルクという会社がどうやって売上を3倍にできたか、
00:30
about how a company called Silk
tripled their sales,
00:32
how an artist named Jeff Koons
went from being a nobody
ジェフ・クーンズという無名のアーティストが
どうやって大金持ちになって多くの人に
影響を与えられるようになったか、
00:36
to making a whole bunch of money
and having a lot of impact,
どうやってフランク・ゲーリーが 建築家である
意味を再定義したか、
00:39
to how Frank Gehry redefined
what it meant to be an architect.
00:42
And one of my biggest failures
as a marketer in the last few years,
そして、Sauce という名前の CD を出したレコード会社で、
マーケッターである私がしてしまった、最も大きな失敗は
何かについて話したいと思います。
00:46
a record label I started
that had a CD called "Sauce."
でもその前に、スライスパンとオットー・ローウェダー
という男について話させてください。
00:50
Before I can do that
I've got to tell you about sliced bread,
00:53
and a guy named Otto Rohwedder.
00:54
Now, before sliced bread
was invented in the 1910s
1910年代にスライスパンが発明される前、
みんな なんて言っていたのでしょう?
00:58
I wonder what they said?
これは電報に次ぐ世紀の発明だ...などでしょうか?
01:00
Like the greatest invention
since the telegraph or something.
それは良いとして、スライスパンというのは
オットー・ローウェダーという一人の男が発明しました。
01:03
But this guy named Otto Rohwedder
invented sliced bread,
そして他の発明家と同様に、
彼は特許や製造工程に着目していました。
01:06
and he focused, like most inventors did,
on the patent part and the making part.
01:11
And the thing about the invention
of sliced bread is this --
スライスしたパンの発明について言えることは、
01:14
that for the first 15 years
after sliced bread was available
発明されてから15年間、
01:18
no one bought it; no one knew about it;
誰も買わなかったし、誰も知らなかったし、
完全なる失敗だったということです。
01:21
it was a complete and total failure.
01:23
And the reason
is that until Wonder came along
なぜなら Wonderブランドのパンが現れて、
01:28
and figured out how to spread
the idea of sliced bread,
スライスしたパンというアイディアを広める方法
を思いつくまで、誰もほしがらなかったからです。
01:32
no one wanted it.
01:33
That the success of sliced bread,
このスライスパンの成功で大事なのは
01:35
like the success of almost everything
we've talked about at this conference,
ここで語られる、ほぼ全ての成功の話と同じように、
その特許内容がどうとか、工場がどうなどという事ではなく
01:39
is not always about what the patent
is like, or what the factory is like --
そのアイディアを 広めることが出来るかどうかです。
01:45
it's about can you get
your idea to spread, or not.
欲しい物を手に入れ、
01:49
And I think that the way
you're going to get what you want,
起こしたい変化を起こすためには、
01:52
or cause the change that you want
to change, to happen,
アイディアを広める方法を考えつかなければいけません。
01:55
is to figure out a way
to get your ideas to spread.
コーヒーショップを経営していようが
01:57
And it doesn't matter to me
whether you're running a coffee shop
知識人であろうが、ビジネスを経営していようが、
気球を操縦していようが関係ありません。
02:01
or you're an intellectual,
or you're in business,
02:03
or you're flying hot air balloons.
何をしていようとも、みんなに
当てはまるものだと思います。
02:06
I think that all this stuff applies
to everybody regardless of what we do.
私たちはアイディアの拡散という世紀に生きているのです。
02:12
That what we are living in
is a century of idea diffusion.
そのアイディアがなんであれ、それを広めた人が勝者です。
02:17
That people who can spread ideas,
regardless of what those ideas are, win.
02:21
When I talk about it
I usually pick business,
このテーマについて私が話す際、
よくビジネスを取り上げます。
02:23
because they make the best pictures
that you can put in your presentation,
それはプレゼンテーションの見栄えば良い
ということもありますし、
優劣をつけて数字で比べることが簡単だからという
理由もあります。
02:27
and because it's the easiest
sort of way to keep score.
ビジネスばかりを取り上げてすみませんが、
02:30
But I want you to forgive me
when I use these examples
このテーマは 時間を投資すること全てに
あてはまるのです。
02:32
because I'm talking about anything
that you decide to spend your time to do.
アイディア拡散の核となるのは
テレビや、テレビに類似したものです。
02:36
At the heart of spreading ideas
is TV and stuff like TV.
テレビやマスメディアは アイディアを広めるということを
ある方法でとても簡単にしました。
02:41
TV and mass media made it really easy
to spread ideas in a certain way.
02:47
I call it the "TV-industrial complex."
私はそれを「テレビ・産業複合体」と名づけました。
テレビ・産業複合体の仕組みは、宣伝を打つことから
始まります。
02:50
The way the TV-industrial complex works,
is you buy some ads,
そして人の生活に入り込み、販売網を獲得します。
02:53
interrupt some people,
that gets you distribution.
販売網を増やせば、より多くの製品が売れます。
02:56
You use the distribution you get
to sell more products.
増えた利益を使ってより多くの宣伝を打ちます。
03:00
You take the profit
from that to buy more ads.
03:03
And it goes around and around and around,
そしてこのプロセスが繰り返されるわけです。
03:05
the same way that the military-industrial
complex worked a long time ago.
かつて軍産複合体が機能したのと同じように。
昨日も聞いたようなモデルでは、
03:09
That model of,
and we heard it yesterday --
どうにかしてGoogleのホームページにのりさえすれば
03:11
if we could only get
onto the homepage of Google,
どうにかしてそこで販促をする方法を見いだせさえすれば、
03:13
if we could only figure out
how to get promoted there,
どうにかして誰かの首根っこをつかむ
方法がわかりさえすれば、
03:16
or grab that person by the throat,
そして私たちが伝えたいことを伝えることができれば。
03:18
and tell them about what we want to do.
03:20
If we did that then everyone would pay
attention, and we would win.
もしそれができれば 注目を集められるだろうし、
成功することができる。
03:24
Well, this TV-industrial complex informed
my entire childhood and probably yours.
このテレビ・産業複合体は、私と恐らくあなたの幼少期の
主な情報源だったことでしょう。
ここにある商品がすべて成功したのは、
みなさんの知らないうちに
03:30
I mean, all of these products succeeded
because someone figured out
意識の中に入り込んでいく方法を誰かが見つけたからです。
03:35
how to touch people in a way
they weren't expecting,
それは必ずしも人々が喜ぶ方法では無いけれど。
03:38
in a way they didn't
necessarily want, with an ad,
商品を買うまで繰り返し繰り返し
宣伝をするという方法です。
03:40
over and over again until they bought it.
そして今起こっていることは、もうテレビ・産業複合体
というものが無くなっているということです。
03:42
And the thing that's happened is,
they canceled the TV-industrial complex.
過去数年間にわたって、
03:47
That just over the last few years,
何かを市場に出そうとした人なら誰でも
03:49
what anybody who markets
anything has discovered
昔のようなやり方では通用しないと気づいたからです。
03:52
is that it's not working
the way that it used to.
03:54
This picture is really fuzzy, I apologize;
I had a bad cold when I took it.
この写真はとてもぼんやりしていて、すみません。
写真を撮った時にひどい風邪をひいていまして。
棚の中央にある青い箱が 私がよく取り上げる悪例です。
03:58
(Laughter)
04:00
But the product in the blue box
in the center is my poster child.
私は風邪をひいていて、お店に行く。薬を買う必要がある。
04:03
I go to the deli; I'm sick;
I need to buy some medicine.
あの青い箱のブランドマネージャーは
1億ドルものお金をかけて
04:07
The brand manager for that blue product
spent 100 million dollars
1年間、私の注目を集めようとしていたんです。
04:10
trying to interrupt me in one year.
そのために1億ドルをテレビCMや雑誌広告、スパム、
04:12
100 million dollars interrupting me
with TV commercials
04:15
and magazine ads and Spam
クーポンやら棚の配置、特別報奨金などに費やしたのです。
04:17
and coupons and shelving
allowances and spiff --
結局、私は全てのメッセージを無視するだけなのに。
04:20
all so I could ignore
every single message.
そう、無視するんです。
鎮痛剤が必要になるような病気を患っていないからです。
04:23
And I ignored every message
04:25
because I don't have
a pain reliever problem.
私はいつものように黄色い箱の薬を買うだけなんです。
04:27
I buy the stuff in the yellow box
because I always have.
そのブランドマネージャーのために、
私の貴重な時間を1分たりとも使うなんてことはしません。
04:29
And I'm not going to invest a minute
of my time to solve her problem,
だって全然関係ないのですから。
04:34
because I don't care.
これはハイドレイトという名前の雑誌です。
水についてだけで180ページあります。
04:36
Here's a magazine called "Hydrate."
It's 180 pages about water.
(笑)
04:41
(Laughter)
すごいですよね。水に関する記事や、水に関する広告。
04:42
Articles about water, ads about water.
40年前の世界がどんな風だったか想像してみてください、
04:45
Imagine what the world
was like 40 years ago,
サタデー・イブニング・ポスト誌やタイム誌、
ニュースウィーク誌しかなかったような時代です。
04:48
with just the Saturday Evening Post
and Time and Newsweek.
今や、水に関する雑誌まで存在しています。
04:51
Now there are magazines about water.
コカ・コーラジャパンからの新商品です。
ウォーターサラダ。
04:53
New product from Coke Japan: water salad.
(笑)
04:56
(Laughter)
04:57
Coke Japan comes out
with a new product every three weeks,
コカ・コーラジャパンは新商品を
3週間おきに発売しています。
何がヒットするか、しないのかが
全くわからないからです。
05:02
because they have no idea
what's going to work and what's not.
ちなみにこれは4日前に出たものです。
私でもこれ以上のものは書けなかったでしょう。
05:05
I couldn't have written
this better myself.
05:07
It came out four days ago --
見えるように大切な箇所は丸で囲っておきました。
05:09
I circled the important parts
so you can see them here.
アービーズは8500万ドルを費やして
この鍋つかみキャラを広めようとしています。
05:13
They've come out...
05:14
Arby's is going to spend
85 million dollars promoting an oven mitt
トム・アーノルドの声で。
05:18
with the voice of Tom Arnold,
それを見てみんながアービーズに行って、
ローストビーフサンドを買うことを期待して。
05:21
hoping that that will get people to go
to Arby's and buy a roast beef sandwich.
(笑)
05:26
(Laughter)
いったい誰が トム・アーノルドの声のアニメ付き
テレビCM を見て
05:27
Now, I had tried to imagine what could
possibly be in an animated TV commercial
わざわざ車に乗り込み
05:32
featuring Tom Arnold,
that would get you to get in your car,
街へ行き、ローストビーフサンドを
買うのか、想像もつきません。
05:36
drive across town
and buy a roast beef sandwich.
(笑)
05:39
(Laughter)
05:40
Now, this is Copernicus, and he was right,
これはコペルニクスです。彼は正しかった。
誰かに自分のアイディアを伝えようと思うと
05:44
when he was talking to anyone
who needs to hear your idea.
05:46
"The world revolves around me."
世界は自分を中心に回ってしまいがちです。
自分、自分、自分、自分、一番大好きな人は -- 自分。
05:48
Me, me, me, me. My favorite person -- me.
Eメールなんていらない、MEメールが欲しい。
05:51
I don't want to get email
from anybody; I want to get "memail."
05:54
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:56
So consumers, and I don't just mean
people who buy stuff at the Safeway;
消費者にとって、セーフウェイなどのスーパーで
買い物をする人にかぎらず、
何かを買う必要のある国防省の誰かでも、
06:02
I mean people at the Defense Department
who might buy something,
あなたの記事を掲載するかもしれない
ザ・ニューヨーカー誌で働いている人でも同じです。
06:05
or people at, you know, the New Yorker
who might print your article.
消費者はあなたのことなんて興味がないのです。
全然関心が無いのです。
06:08
Consumers don't care about you
at all; they just don't care.
理由のひとつは、消費者には以前よりも
はるかに多くの選択肢があり
06:13
Part of the reason is -- they've got
way more choices than they used to,
そして はるかに少ない時間しかないからです。
06:17
and way less time.
選択肢が溢れすぎて、
06:19
And in a world where we have
too many choices and too little time,
時間が足りなさすぎる世界では、
人々は簡単に無視をするようになります。
06:23
the obvious thing to do
is just ignore stuff.
06:27
And my parable here
is you're driving down the road
例え話として、あなたは車を運転しているとします
そして牛を見つける、でも運転し続ける
06:31
and you see a cow, and you keep driving
because you've seen cows before.
だって牛なんか何度も見たことがあるから。
牛は目に入らない、牛はつまらない。
06:35
Cows are invisible. Cows are boring.
誰が、車をとめて「あ!見て!牛だ」なんて言うますか?
そんな人いません。
06:38
Who's going to stop and pull over
and say -- "Oh, look, a cow."
06:41
Nobody.
06:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:44
But if the cow was purple --
isn't that a great special effect?
でももし牛が紫色だったら --
今の特殊映像かっこよかったですね
もう一回やりましょうか
06:48
I could do that again if you want.
06:49
If the cow was purple,
you'd notice it for a while.
もし牛が紫色だったら、あなたは気づくはずです。
06:54
I mean, if all cows were purple
you'd get bored with those, too.
もし牛が全て紫色だったら、
またつまらないと感じてしまうとは思いますが。
06:57
The thing that's going to decide
what gets talked about,
何が口コミで広まっていくのか、
何がなされ、何が変わるのか、
07:01
what gets done, what gets changed,
何が買われ、何が建設されるか を決める要素は、
07:03
what gets purchased, what gets built,
それが注目に値する(remarkable)どうかです。
07:05
is: "Is it remarkable?"
“remarkable” という言葉はとてもクールな言葉です。
カッコいいという意味だけではなく、
07:08
And "remarkable" is a really cool word,
07:10
because we think it just means "neat,"
07:12
but it also means
"worth making a remark about."
誰かに伝えたくなる(remark する)
価値がある、という意味があるからです。
07:16
And that is the essence
of where idea diffusion is going.
これがアイディアの拡散が向かっていく本質なのです。
アメリカで最も人気のある2つの車は、
5万5000ドルの巨大な車と
07:21
That two of the hottest cars
in the United States
07:24
is a 55,000-dollar giant car,
その車のトランクに乗っけることができるほど小さな
ミニクーパーです。
07:27
big enough to hold a Mini in its trunk.
人々は両方に定価を払いますが、
この2つの車で共通していることは
07:30
People are paying full price for both,
07:32
and the only thing they have in common
何も共通点が無いということです。
07:35
is that they don't have
anything in common.
(笑)
07:38
(Laughter)
07:39
Every week, the number one
best-selling DVD in America changes.
アメリカで売上 No.1 となるDVDは毎週変わっていきます。
「ゴッドファーザー」でもなく「市民ケーン」でもない
07:45
It's never "The Godfather,"
it's never "Citizen Kane,"
それはいつも二流のスターが演じる三流の映画です。
07:48
it's always some third-rate movie
with some second-rate star.
07:51
But the reason it's number one
is because that's the week it came out.
ではなぜ No.1 になるかというと、
その週に発売されたからです。
07:56
Because it's new, because it's fresh.
新しく、新鮮だからです。
07:58
People saw it and said
"I didn't know that was there"
人々はそれを見て、「こんなのあったの
知らなかった」って言うんです。
そして広まっていく。
08:01
and they noticed it.
08:02
Two of the big success stories
of the last 20 years in retail --
過去 20 年間、小売業で最も成功を収めたもののふたつは
商品を青い箱に入れ、とても高く売るか、
08:05
one sells things that are
super-expensive in a blue box,
できるだけ安く作り、安く売るかのどちらかです。
08:08
and one sells things that are
as cheap as they can make them.
08:11
The only thing they have in common
is that they're different.
ふたつに共通しているのは、
他とは全く異なるということだけです。
08:14
We're now in the fashion business,
no matter what we do for a living,
次にファッションについて、
私たちが生活のために何をしようと
私たちはファッションの世界にいます。
08:18
we're in the fashion business.
08:19
And people in the fashion business
ファッション業界にいる人々は
08:21
know what it's like to be in the fashion
business -- they're used to it.
その業界がどういうものか知っていて、慣れています。
他の人達はどうやって彼らのように考えるのかを
学ばなくてはいけません。
08:24
The rest of us have to figure out
how to think that way.
大きなページ全体にわたる広告で誰かの邪魔をしたり
08:27
How to understand
08:28
that it's not about interrupting
people with big full-page ads,
人々と会うことを強く求めるではなく、
08:32
or insisting on meetings with people.
アイディアが広まる、広まらないというのは全く異なる
08:34
But it's a totally different
sort of process
08:37
that determines which ideas spread,
and which ones don't.
プロセスなのです。
08:40
They sold a billion dollars'
worth of Aeron chairs
このアーロンチェア、10億ドル分も売れたんです。
それはイスを売るということを再定義したことで
可能になりました。
08:44
by reinventing
what it meant to sell a chair.
08:47
They turned a chair from something
the purchasing department bought,
イスというのは、どこかの購買部が買うものではなくて、
仕事でのステータスを表すものだ、
という認識に変えたんです。
08:51
to something that was a status symbol
about where you sat at work.
この男性、ライオネル・ポワラーヌはこの世で
最も有名なパン職人です。
08:55
This guy, Lionel Poilâne,
the most famous baker in the world --
08:58
he died two and a half months ago,
彼は2ヶ月半前にこの世をさりました。
私にとって偉人であり親愛ある友人でもありました。
09:01
and he was a hero of mine
and a dear friend.
彼はパリに住んでいて、昨年1千万ドル分の
フランスパンを売りました。
09:03
He lived in Paris.
09:04
Last year, he sold 10 million dollars'
worth of French bread.
09:08
Every loaf baked in a bakery he owned,
全てのパンはひとつずつ、
薪窯オーブンで焼かれていました。
09:11
by one baker at a time,
in a wood-fired oven.
ライオネルがベーカリーを始めた時、
フランス人はバカにしてたんです。
09:14
And when Lionel started his bakery,
the French pooh-pooh-ed it.
いわゆるフランスパンには見えなかったから、
彼らは買いたがらなかったんです。
09:18
They didn't want to buy his bread.
09:19
It didn't look like "French bread."
それはみんなが期待していたものではありませんでした。
09:21
It wasn't what they expected.
09:22
It was neat; it was remarkable;
でも素晴らしいものだったし、目立っていました。
だから一人、また一人と広まっていったんです。
09:25
and slowly, it spread
from one person to another person
そしてようやく、パリにあるいくつもの
三ツ星レストラン御用達のパンになったのです。
09:29
until finally, it became the official
bread of three-star restaurants in Paris.
09:33
Now he's in London, and he ships
by FedEx all around the world.
そしていま彼の会社はロンドンにあり、世界中に
FedEx でパンを出荷しています。
09:36
What marketers used to do is make
average products for average people.
かつてマーケッターが行うことと言えば、
平均的な人々に平均的な製品を作ることでした。
それがマス・マーケティングというものです。
09:42
That's what mass marketing is.
09:43
Smooth out the edges; go for the center;
that's the big market.
端を取り除き、中央に焦点を当てる。
中央こそが大きなマーケットですから。
変わり者を無視していたし、
09:48
They would ignore the geeks,
and God forbid, the laggards.
活気の無い人たちも当然のように視野の外。
09:52
It was all about going for the center.
全てはいかに中央に焦点を当てるかということでした。
09:54
But in a world where
the TV-industrial complex is broken,
でも、このテレビ・産業複合体が崩れ去った今、
このマーケティング戦略は有効ではありません。
09:58
I don't think that's a strategy
we want to use any more.
10:00
I think the strategy we want to use
is to not market to these people
無視するのがとても上手なこの人たちを --
10:04
because they're really good
at ignoring you.
ターゲットにするのではなく
10:06
But market to these
people because they care.
代わりに、この人たちにフォーカスする必要があります。
関心度が高いからです。
10:10
These are the people
who are obsessed with something.
何かに熱狂的になっている人たちだからです。
10:14
And when you talk to them, they'll listen,
そしてあなたが語りかければ、彼らは聞いてくれます。
10:16
because they like listening --
it's about them.
だって彼らは聞くことが好きだから。
彼ら自身のことだからです。
もし運が良ければ、曲線上の他の部分にいる友だちに --
10:19
And if you're lucky, they'll tell
their friends on the rest of the curve,
伝えてくれるでしょう。
そしてドンドン広がっていくのです。
10:23
and it'll spread.
全曲線に広がっていくでしょう。
10:24
It'll spread to the entire curve.
彼らは「オタク」という存在です。
これはとてもステキな日本の言葉です。
10:26
They have something I call "otaku" --
it's a great Japanese word.
この言葉は熱狂的な欲望を持った人という意味です。
10:30
It describes the desire
of someone who's obsessed to say,
例えば、車で東京を巡って新しいラーメン屋に行くこと。
10:33
drive across Tokyo to try
a new ramen noodle place,
10:35
because that's what they do:
they get obsessed with it.
彼らこだわりがあるから、こういう行動をするのです。
10:38
To make a product, to market an idea,
製品を制作したり、アイディアを売りだしたり、
解決したい問題を考えだしたりするときに、
10:41
to come up with any problem
you want to solve
それがオタクの支持を得ないものであれば、
10:43
that doesn't have
a constituency with an otaku,
成功することは まずないでしょう。
10:46
is almost impossible.
逆に、あなたが言うことを必死に耳を傾けてくれるような
10:48
Instead, you have to find
a group that really, desperately cares
グループを見つけなければならないのです。
10:51
about what it is you have to say.
そして、彼らが友だちに伝えやすいように、
伝えてあげることです。
10:53
Talk to them and make it easy
for them to tell their friends.
10:56
There's a hot sauce otaku,
but there's no mustard otaku.
辛口ソースのオタクはいるけれど、
マスタードのオタクはいません。
11:00
That's why there's lots and lots
of kinds of hot sauces,
だから 辛口ソースの種類は わんさかあるのに、
マスタードはそれほど多くの種類がありません。
11:03
and not so many kinds of mustard.
面白いマスタードを作るのが難しいというのが
理由ではありませんよ
11:05
Not because it's hard
to make interesting mustard --
面白いマスタードは作れますが、
11:07
you could make interesting mustard --
誰も作らないのです。なぜなら
マスタードに熱狂的な人が どこにもいないからです。
11:09
but people don't,
because no one's obsessed with it,
なので 友だちに伝えるようなこともしません。
11:12
and thus no one tells their friends.
クリスピークリームはこのことに気づきました。
11:13
Krispy Kreme has figured
this whole thing out.
彼らの戦略とは
11:16
It has a strategy, and what they do is,
街に行き、オタクに話しかけることです。
11:18
they enter a city, they talk
to the people, with the otaku,
すると彼らが街中に広めてくれます。
11:20
and then they spread through the city
通りを渡った人にでさえ。
11:22
to the people who've just
crossed the street.
このヨーヨーは 112 ドルもしますが、
12分も停止してられます。
11:25
This yoyo right here cost 112 dollars,
but it sleeps for 12 minutes.
みんながコレを欲しいわけではないですが
でもそんなことは気にしません。
11:29
Not everybody wants it
but they don't care.
興味のある人とやりとりして
それによって広がるかもしれないのです。
11:31
They want to talk to the people
who do, and maybe it'll spread.
この人達は世界で一番うるさいカーステレオを作ります。
11:35
These guys make the loudest
car stereo in the world.
11:38
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:40
It's as loud as a 747 jet.
これは 747 ジェット機と同じくらいうるさいんです。
車に入れられないんです。
11:42
You can't get in,
the car's got bulletproof glass,
窓ガラスは防弾仕様にしないといけません
11:45
because it'll blow out
the windshield otherwise.
そうしないと吹き飛んでしまいますから。
11:47
But the fact remains
でも実際、誰かが
11:49
that when someone wants to put
a couple of speakers in their car,
スピーカーを車に入れたいと思い、
オタクの感覚を持っていたり、
11:52
if they've got the otaku
or they've heard from someone who does,
もしくは知り合いにスピーカーオタクがいれば
このスピーカーを選ぶことでしょう。
11:55
they go ahead and they pick this.
とてもシンプルです。
興味を示す人たちに対して売る
11:57
It's really simple -- you sell
to the people who are listening,
そしてもしかしたら、この人たちが
友だちに伝えてくれるかもしれない。
12:00
and just maybe,
those people tell their friends.
だからスティーブ・ジョブズが5万人に向けて
プレゼンをしたとき、
12:02
So when Steve Jobs talks
to 50,000 people at his keynote,
12:05
who are all tuned in from 130 countries
130カ国にいる人達は
2時間もの間、彼のコマーシャルを見ているんです。
12:08
watching his two-hour commercial --
12:10
that's the only thing keeping
his company in business --
それこそが彼のビジネスを継続させているものです。
この5万人が熱狂的に
12:13
it's that those 50,000 people
care desperately enough
12:15
to watch a two-hour commercial,
and then tell their friends.
彼の2時間ものコマーシャルを見て、友だちに伝える。
パール・ジャムは過去2年間で 96枚もの
アルバムを出しました。
12:18
Pearl Jam, 96 albums released
in the last two years.
その全てが利益を上げた。どうやって?
12:21
Every one made a profit. How?
12:23
They only sell them on their website.
彼らはウェブサイトを通してのみ販売します。
12:25
Those people who buy them have the otaku,
ウェブサイトでこのアルバムを買う人たちはオタクです。
12:27
and then they tell their friends,
and it spreads and it spreads.
そして友だちに伝え、それが広がって、
もっと広がっていくんです。
12:30
This hospital crib cost 10,000 dollars,
10 times the standard.
この病院のベビーベッドは1万ドルもします。
通常の10倍です。
でも病院では他のモデルよりも好んでこれを買うんです。
12:35
But hospitals are buying it
faster than any other model.
12:37
Hard Candy nail polish,
doesn't appeal to everybody,
ハードキャンディのマニュキュアは
みんなが欲しがるものではありません。
12:40
but to the people who love it,
they talk about it like crazy.
でも好きな人は、ものすごく語るんです。
ここにあるこの塗料はダッチボーイという
塗料会社を救ったんです。
12:44
This paint can right here saved
the Dutch Boy paint company,
普通の塗料よりも 35% も高いのに、
大きな利益をあげました。
12:49
making them a fortune.
12:50
It costs 35 percent more
than regular paint
それはダッチボーイが常識破りな容器を作ったからです。
12:53
because Dutch Boy made a can that people
talk about, because it's remarkable.
ただ新しい広告を放り投げるのではなく、
12:57
They didn't just slap
a new ad on the product;
塗料製品を作るという意味を変えたのです。
12:59
they changed what it meant
to build a paint product.
13:01
AmIhotornot.com -- everyday
250,000 people go to this site,
Amlhotornot.comは、毎日 25 万人が訪れるサイトです。
13:06
run by two volunteers, and I can
tell you they are hard graders --
2人のボランティアによって運営されています。正直なところ彼らはとても厳しい目をもっていますが・・・
13:10
(Laughter)
(笑)
彼らが成功したのはたくさん広告をしたからではありません
13:14
They didn't get this way
by advertising a lot.
目立つことによって成功しました。
13:17
They got this way by being remarkable,
時々、少し目立ち過ぎるくらいに。
13:20
sometimes a little too remarkable.
13:21
And this picture frame
has a cord going out the back,
このフォトフレームは裏にコードが出ています。
13:26
and you plug it into the wall.
これを壁につなぎます。
13:27
My father has this on his desk,
私の父親はこれを机の上に置いています。
13:29
and he sees his grandchildren
everyday, changing constantly.
そこには毎日、孫の写真が入れ替わり映しだされます。
彼のオフィスに足を踏み入れる人は誰であれ、
13:34
And every single person
who walks into his office
13:36
hears the whole story
of how this thing ended up on his desk.
このフォトフレームについて話を聞かされます。
13:39
And one person at a time,
the idea spreads.
そしてひとりずつ、このことが広まっていくのです。
13:42
These are not diamonds, not really.
これらは本物のダイヤモンドじゃありません。
13:45
They're made from "cremains."
遺骨からできているんです。
13:47
After you're cremated you can
have yourself made into a gem.
火葬されたあとに、あなた自身が宝石となるのです。
13:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:51
Oh, you like my ring? It's my grandmother.
あら、私の指輪いいでしょ?これおばあちゃんなの。
(笑)
13:54
(Laughter)
13:59
Fastest-growing business
in the whole mortuary industry.
葬儀市場で最も成長しているビジネスです。
べつにオジー・オズボーンである必要はありません。
14:03
But you don't have to be Ozzie Osborne --
これを行うのに常軌を逸する必要は無いんです。
14:05
you don't have to be
super-outrageous to do this.
14:07
What you have to do
ただ、人々が何を望むか理解して、
それを叶えればいいのです。
14:08
is figure out what people
really want and give it to them.
いくつかの法則をまとめましょう。
14:11
A couple of quick rules to wrap up.
1番目。規模を拡大できればデザインは無料です。
14:13
The first one is: Design
is free when you get to scale.
注目に値するものを思いつく人たちは大抵、
14:17
The people who come up
with stuff that's remarkable
うまく機能してくれるデザインを思いつきます。
14:19
more often than not figure out
how to put design to work for them.
14:22
Number two: The riskiest thing
you can do now is be safe.
2番目。最も危険なことは安全を選ぶことです。
14:27
Proctor and Gamble knows this, right?
プロクター・アンド・ギャンブルは知ってます。
14:29
The whole model of being
Proctor and Gamble
プロクター・アンド・ギャンブルのモデルは
14:31
is always about average products
for average people.
常に平均的な人に向けた平均的な製品を出すことです。
それはリスクが高いのです。今、安全なのは、端をとり --
14:34
That's risky.
14:35
The safe thing to do now
is to be at the fringes,
目立つことです。
14:38
be remarkable.
とても優秀というのは最も悪いことのひとつです。
14:40
And being very good is one
of the worst things you can possibly do.
優秀というのはつまらないからです。
優秀というのは普通だからです。
14:44
Very good is boring. Very good is average.
音楽のアルバムを作っていようが、
14:47
It doesn't matter whether
you're making a record album,
建築家であろうが、社会学をやっていようが、
関係ありません。
14:49
or you're an architect,
or you have a tract on sociology.
もしそれがとても優秀なら、成功しません。
だって誰も気づかないから。
14:52
If it's very good, it's not going to work,
because no one's going to notice it.
次に、私自信の3つの話です。
14:56
So my three stories.
14:57
Silk put a product that does not need
to be in the refrigerated section
シルク。冷蔵セクションに置く必要も無いものをあえて --
冷蔵庫の牛乳の隣に置きました。
15:02
next to the milk
in the refrigerated section.
売上が3倍になりました。なぜ?
15:04
Sales tripled. Why?
牛乳、牛乳、牛乳、牛乳、牛乳、 -- 牛乳じゃない。
15:06
Milk, milk, milk, milk, milk -- not milk.
15:09
For the people who were there
and looking at that section,
そのセクションを見ている人たちにとっては
15:12
it was remarkable.
それが目立ったんです。
15:13
They didn't triple their sales
with advertising;
広告によって売上を3倍にしたわけではありません。
何か目立つことをして売上を3倍にしたんです。
15:16
they tripled it by doing
something remarkable.
これはとても注目に値する芸術作品です。
好きになる必要はありません。
15:18
That is a remarkable piece of art.
15:20
You don't have to like it,
15:21
but a 40-foot tall dog made out of bushes
in the middle of New York City
でも草木でできた40フィートの大きな犬が
ニューヨーク市の真ん中にあれば、注目を集めます。
15:26
is remarkable.
15:27
(Laughter)
フランク・ゲーリーは、ただ美術館を
変えただけではありません。
15:28
Frank Gehry didn't just change a museum;
彼は、街全体の経済を変えたのです。
15:30
he changed an entire city's economy
世界中から人々が集まって見に来るような、
建物をデザインすることによってです。
15:33
by designing one building that people
from all over the world went to see.
15:37
Now, at countless meetings at, you know,
今や、無数にあるミーティングにおいて、
15:39
the Portland City Council,
or who knows where,
ポートランド市議会は
15:42
they said, we need an architect --
can we get Frank Gehry?
建築家が必要だと言いました。
フランク・ゲーリーを呼ぶことはできないかって。
15:45
Because he did something
that was at the fringes.
彼は端っこにあることを行ったから。
15:48
And my big failure?
I came out with an entire --
そして私の大失敗は?
私は --
15:50
(Music)
(音楽)
15:53
A record album and hopefully
a whole bunch of record albums
音楽アルバム、願わくばとても多くの --
素晴らしいフォーマット、
SACDフォーマットのアルバムを売ろうとしました。
15:56
in SACD, this remarkable new format --
15:58
and I marketed it straight to people
with 20,000-dollar stereos.
私は2万ドル級のステレオを持った人たちに向けて
市場に出しました。
でも2万ドルのステレオを持つ人たちは
新しい音楽なんて好きじゃないんです。
16:02
People with 20,000-dollar stereos
don't like new music.
16:07
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:11
So what you need to do
is figure out who does care.
大事なのは、
誰が一番興味を持っているかを知ることです。
だれが手を挙げて、
16:17
Who is going to raise their hand and say,
「あなたが次に何をするのか知りたい」と言うか。
16:19
"I want to hear what you're doing next,"
そして彼らに何かを売るんです。
16:21
and sell something to them.
16:22
The last example I want to give you.
最後の例です。
これはワシントン州にある ソープレイクの地図です。
16:24
This is a map of Soap Lake, Washington.
16:26
As you can see, if that's nowhere,
it's in the middle of it.
見てわかるように、何も無いという場所があれば、
この場所こそがそれです。
16:30
(Laughter)
(笑)
でも湖はあります。
16:36
But they do have a lake.
16:38
And people used to come from miles
around to swim in the lake.
みんな 昔は遠くからこの湖に泳ぎにきていました。
もう誰もきません。そこで創立者が言いました。
「使えるお金はある --
16:41
They don't anymore.
16:42
So the founding fathers said,
"We've got some money to spend.
ここに何を作ればいいだろう?」
そして他の多くの委員会と同じように
16:45
What can we build here?"
16:46
And like most committees,
彼らは何かとても無難なものを作ろうとしていました。
16:48
they were going to build
something pretty safe.
そこである芸術家がやって来ました。
これは真の芸術家の作画です。
16:50
And then an artist came to them --
this is a true artist's rendering --
彼は55 フィートのラバライトを
街のど真ん中に作りたがったのです。
16:54
he wants to build a 55-foot tall
lava lamp in the center of town.
16:59
That's a purple cow;
that's something worth noticing.
それこそ紫の牛です。注目に値するものです。
17:02
I don't know about you,
みなさんがどうかは知りませんが、
もしそれが作られたら、間違いなく私はそこに行きます。
17:04
but if they build it,
that's where I'm going to go.
17:06
Thank you very much for your attention.
ご清聴ありがとうございました。
Translated by Masahiko Kosa
Reviewed by Shuichi Sakai

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Seth Godin - Marketer and author
Seth Godin is an entrepreneur and blogger who thinks about the marketing of ideas in the digital age. His newest interest: the tribes we lead.

Why you should listen

"Seth Godin may be the ultimate entrepreneur for the Information Age," Mary Kuntz wrote in Business Week nearly a decade ago. "Instead of widgets or car parts, he specializes in ideas -- usually, but not always, his own." In fact, he's as focused on spreading ideas as he is on the ideas themselves.

After working as a software brand manager in the mid-1980s, Godin started Yoyodyne, one of the first Internet-based direct-marketing firms, with the notion that companies needed to rethink how they reached customers. His efforts caught the attention of Yahoo!, which bought the company in 1998 and kept Godin on as a vice president of permission marketing. Godin has produced several critically acclaimed and attention-grabbing books, including Permission MarketingAll Marketers Are Liars, and Purple Cow (which was distributed in a milk carton). In 2005, Godin founded Squidoo.com, a Web site where users can share links and information about an idea or topic important to them.

More profile about the speaker
Seth Godin | Speaker | TED.com