18:39
TED2017

David Miliband: The refugee crisis is a test of our character

デイヴィッド・ミリバンド: 難民危機で試される我々の人間性

Filmed:

2016年には6,500万人が紛争や災難のため住む場所を追われました。これは単に危機というだけでなく、我々が何者であり、何を信条とするのかが問われる試金石だとデイヴィッド・ミリバンド は言います。そして我々ひとりひとりに問題解決に手を貸す個人的な責任があるのだと。この必見の講演でミリバンドは、難民を助け、思いやりと利他性を行動に移すための具体的で実現可能な方法を示します。

- Refugee advocate
As president of the International Rescue Committee, David Miliband enlists his expert statesmanship in the fight against the greatest global refugee crisis since World War II. Full bio

I'm going to speak to you
about the global refugee crisis
世界的な難民危機について
お話しします
00:12
and my aim is to show you that this crisis
私の狙いは この危機が
解決不能ではなく
00:16
is manageable, not unsolvable,
対処可能だと示すことですが
00:20
but also show you that this is
as much about us and who we are
同時に これは最前線にいる
難民達にとっての試練というだけでなく
00:23
as it is a trial of the refugees
on the front line.
我々はいったい何者なのかという問題
でもあることを示したいと思います
00:29
For me, this is not
just a professional obligation,
世界中の難民や住む場所を失った人々を支援する
NGOを運営する私にとって
00:33
because I run an NGO supporting refugees
and displaced people around the world.
これは職務上の責務である一方
00:36
It's personal.
個人的な話でもあります
00:41
I love this picture.
これは私の好きな写真です
00:43
That really handsome guy on the right,
右のすごい二枚目は
00:45
that's not me.
私じゃありません
00:48
That's my dad, Ralph, in London, in 1940
私の父ラルフが
1940年のロンドンで
00:49
with his father Samuel.
父親のサミュエルと
一緒にいるところです
00:53
They were Jewish refugees from Belgium.
2人はベルギーからの
ユダヤ難民でした
00:55
They fled the day the Nazis invaded.
ナチスが侵攻した日に
脱出したのです
00:58
And I love this picture, too.
これも好きな写真です
01:02
It's a group of refugee children
1946年にポーランドから
逃れてきた難民の子供の一団が
01:04
arriving in England in 1946 from Poland.
イギリスに到着した時の一枚です
01:07
And in the middle is my mother, Marion.
中央にいるのが
私の母マリオンです
01:11
She was sent to start a new life
新しい国での新生活を
01:14
in a new country
自分一人で始めるようにと
01:17
on her own
送られてきたのです
01:19
at the age of 12.
まだ12歳でした
01:20
I know this:
1つはっきりしているのは
01:22
if Britain had not admitted refugees
もしイギリスが
01:24
in the 1940s,
1940年代に難民を
受け入れていなかったら
01:27
I certainly would not be here today.
私はここには
いなかったということです
01:29
Yet 70 years on,
the wheel has come full circle.
それが70年たって
事態は一巡しました
01:34
The sound is of walls being built,
壁を築く音が響き
01:38
vengeful political rhetoric,
政治的言辞は
憎しみに満ち
01:41
humanitarian values and principles on fire
人道的な価値や道義は
燃え落ちようとしています
01:44
in the very countries
that 70 years ago said never again
戦争の被害者が国や希望を
失うようなことには二度としないと
01:48
to statelessness and hopelessness
for the victims of war.
70年前に言っていた
まさにその国々においてです
01:52
Last year, every minute,
去年 紛争や暴力や迫害のために
01:58
24 more people were displaced
from their homes
1分ごとに 24人が新たに
02:02
by conflict, violence and persecution:
住む場所を追われました
02:05
another chemical weapon attack in Syria,
シリアでは化学兵器が
再び使用され
02:09
the Taliban on the rampage in Afghanistan,
アフガニスタンでは
タリバンが荒れ狂い
02:11
girls driven from their school
in northeast Nigeria by Boko Haram.
北東ナイジェリアではボコ・ハラムにより
女生徒達が学校から拉致されています
02:15
These are not people
moving to another country
難民達は
より良い生活を求めて
02:21
to get a better life.
よその国にやって来る
わけではありません
02:25
They're fleeing for their lives.
生き延びようと
逃れてきたのです
02:27
It's a real tragedy
世界で最も有名な難民が
02:31
that the world's most famous refugee
can't come to speak to you here today.
今日この場に話しに来れなかったのは
本当に残念なことです
02:33
Many of you will know this picture.
多くの人は この写真を
見たことがあるでしょう
02:39
It shows the lifeless body
2015年に地中海で
命を落とした—
02:41
of five-year-old Alan Kurdi,
3歳のシリア難民
アラン・クルディの
02:44
a Syrian refugee who died
in the Mediterranean in 2015.
亡きがらが写っています
02:46
He died alongside 3,700 others
trying to get to Europe.
ヨーロッパにたどり着こうとした
他の3,700人とともに死んだのです
02:51
The next year, 2016,
翌年の2016年には
02:56
5,000 people died.
5,000人が死にました
02:58
It's too late for them,
彼らはもう手遅れですが
03:02
but it's not too late
for millions of others.
でも まだ間に合う人が
何百万人もいます
03:05
It's not too late
for people like Frederick.
たとえばフレデリック
03:08
I met him in the Nyarugusu
refugee camp in Tanzania.
タンザニアの
ニャルグス難民キャンプにいる
03:10
He's from Burundi.
ブルンジ難民です
03:14
He wanted to know
where could he complete his studies.
いったいどこで教育を修了できるのか
知りたがっていました
03:15
He'd done 11 years of schooling.
He wanted a 12th year.
11年間学校に通ったのだから
最後までやりたいと
03:18
He said to me, "I pray
that my days do not end here
「死ぬまでこの難民キャンプで
過ごすことにならないよう
03:21
in this refugee camp."
祈っています」
と言っていました
03:26
And it's not too late for Halud.
ハルードだって間に合います
03:28
Her parents were Palestinian refugees
彼女の両親は
03:31
living in the Yarmouk refugee camp
outside Damascus.
ダマスカスのヤルムーク難民キャンプに住む
パレスチナ難民です
03:34
She was born to refugee parents,
難民の両親の元に生まれ
03:37
and now she's a refugee
herself in Lebanon.
今は彼女自身
レバノンに住む難民です
03:39
She's working for the International
Rescue Committee to help other refugees,
彼女は他の難民達を助けるため
国際救援委員会で働いていますが
03:42
but she has no certainty at all
自分の未来はどこにあり
03:46
about her future,
何が待っているのか
03:49
where it is or what it holds.
先行きがまったく見えません
03:52
This talk is about Frederick, about Halud
これはフレデリックや
ハルードのような
03:54
and about millions like them:
何百万という人々の話です
03:58
why they're displaced,
なぜ彼らは住む場所を追われ
どう生き抜き
04:00
how they survive, what help they need
and what our responsibilities are.
どのような支援を必要とし
我々の責務は何なのか
04:02
I truly believe this,
私は確信を持っていますが
04:07
that the biggest question
in the 21st century
21世紀における
最大の問いが何かと言えば
04:10
concerns our duty to strangers.
それは「他人に対する我々の責務は何か」
ということです
04:13
The future "you" is about your duties
未来の自分を考えるとき
04:17
to strangers.
他人に対する責務を
考えないわけにはいきません
04:20
You know better than anyone,
皆さんは
よくお分かりでしょうが
04:22
the world is more connected
than ever before,
世界は 未だかつてないくらい
繋がり合っています
04:23
yet the great danger
しかし 人々の心が
分断によって支配されてしまうという
04:28
is that we're consumed by our divisions.
大きな危険があります
04:30
And there is no better test of that
そして「難民をどう扱うか」
ということ以上に
04:34
than how we treat refugees.
それをよく示すものは
ないでしょう
04:36
Here are the facts: 65 million people
事実を挙げると
04:38
displaced from their homes
by violence and persecution last year.
去年 暴力や迫害によって住む場所を
追われた人は 6,500万人いました
04:41
If it was a country,
それが1つの国だとしたら
04:45
that would be the 21st
largest country in the world.
世界で21番目に
大きな国になります
04:46
Most of those people, about 40 million,
stay within their own home country,
過半数の4,000万人は
母国に留まっていますが
04:50
but 25 million are refugees.
2,500万人は難民で
04:55
That means they cross a border
into a neighboring state.
国境を越えて近隣の国に
逃れています
04:57
Most of them are living in poor countries,
その多くは
比較的貧しい国や
05:01
relatively poor or lower-middle-income
countries, like Lebanon,
下位中所得の国で
暮らしています
05:05
where Halud is living.
ハルードの住む
レバノンなどがそうです
05:08
In Lebanon, one
in four people is a refugee,
レバノンでは
4人に1人が難民です
05:10
a quarter of the whole population.
難民が人口の4分の1を
占めているんです
05:15
And refugees stay for a long time.
そして難民状態は
長く続きます
05:18
The average length of displacement
避難生活の長さは
05:20
is 10 years.
平均で10年に及びます
05:23
I went to what was the world's
largest refugee camp, in eastern Kenya.
私は東ケニアにある
ダダーブという
05:25
It's called Dadaab.
世界でも最大級の
難民キャンプを訪れました
05:30
It was built in 1991-92
1991年から1992年に
ソマリア内戦を逃れた人々のための
05:31
as a "temporary camp"
for Somalis fleeing the civil war.
「一時的なキャンプ」として
設けられました
05:33
I met Silo.
そこでサイロに会いました
05:37
And naïvely I said to Silo,
私は何の考えもなしに
こう尋ねました
05:39
"Do you think you'll ever
go home to Somalia?"
「ソマリアの故郷には
いつか戻れると思う?」
05:42
And she said, "What do you mean, go home?
すると彼女は
05:45
I was born here."
「故郷に戻るって どういう意味ですか?
私はここで生まれたんですよ」と言います
05:48
And then when I asked the camp management
それでキャンプの管理者に
聞いてみました
05:50
how many of the 330,000 people
in that camp were born there,
33万人のキャンプ住人のうち
05:52
they gave me the answer:
そこで生まれた人は
どれくらいいるのか
05:56
100,000.
10万人がそうだ
という答えでした
05:59
That's what long-term displacement means.
「長い避難生活」が意味するのは
そういうことです
06:01
Now, the causes of this are deep:
その原因は根深いものです
06:05
weak states that can't
support their own people,
力のない国々は
国民を支えることができず
06:07
an international political system
国際的な政治システムは
06:10
weaker than at any time since 1945
1945年以降で
最も弱くなっており
06:13
and differences over theology, governance,
engagement with the outside world
イスラム国家の間には
06:16
in significant parts of the Muslim world.
宗教・統治・外国との関わりのあり方に
大きな違いがあります
06:20
Now, those are long-term,
generational challenges.
これは何世代にも渡る
長期的な問題です
06:24
That's why I say that this refugee crisis
is a trend and not a blip.
難民危機は時代の潮流であって
一時的なものではないのです
06:27
And it's complex, and when you have
big, large, long-term, complex problems,
しかも 問題は複雑です
06:32
people think nothing can be done.
人は長期的で難しい大きな問題があるとき
どうにもならないと思いがちです
06:36
When Pope Francis went to Lampedusa,
教皇フランシスコは
06:40
off the coast of Italy, in 2014,
2014年にイタリア沖の
ランペドゥーザ島を訪れたとき
06:43
he accused all of us
and the global population
我々みんなのことを指して
06:44
of what he called
"the globalization of indifference."
「無関心の世界的拡大」
と言って非難しました
06:48
It's a haunting phrase.
痛烈な言葉ですね
06:52
It means that our hearts
have turned to stone.
みんなの心が石のように
なっているのだと
06:54
Now, I don't know, you tell me.
教えて欲しいんですが
06:58
Are you allowed to argue with the Pope,
even at a TED conference?
教皇に反論するなどというのは
TEDの場であっても 許されるものなのか
07:00
But I think it's not right.
でも私は正しくないと思います
07:04
I think people do want
to make a difference,
みんな現状を変えたいとは
思っているけれど
07:06
but they just don't know whether
there are any solutions to this crisis.
難民危機に解決法があるのか
分からないだけなんです
07:08
And what I want to tell you today
私が申し上げたいのは
07:12
is that though the problems are real,
the solutions are real, too.
問題は紛れもないものですが
解決法だって紛れもなく存在することです
07:14
Solution one:
解決策1
07:17
these refugees need to get into work
in the countries where they're living,
難民達は住んでいる国で
仕事を必要としており
07:19
and the countries where they're living
need massive economic support.
彼らが住んでいる国も
大きな経済的支援が必要だということ
07:22
In Uganda in 2014, they did a study:
ウガンダで2014年に
行われた調査で
07:26
80 percent of refugees
in the capital city Kampala
首都カンパラに住む難民の8割は
仕事を持っていて
07:28
needed no humanitarian aid
because they were working.
人道的支援を必要として
いないことが分かりました
07:31
They were supported into work.
仕事で生活を
支えていたんです
07:34
Solution number two:
解決策2
07:36
education for kids
is a lifeline, not a luxury,
避難がこのように
長期に及ぶ場合
07:38
when you're displaced for so long.
子供の教育は 贅沢ではなく
生命線だということ
07:42
Kids can bounce back when they're given
the proper social, emotional support
読み書きや計算の力と
適切な社会的・精神的な支援が与えられれば
07:45
alongside literacy and numeracy.
子供は立ち直れるんです
07:49
I've seen it for myself.
私自身 自分の目で見てきました
07:51
But half of the world's refugee children
of primary school age
しかし難民の子供の場合
07:54
get no education at all,
初等教育年齢の子の半数が
教育を受けておらず
07:58
and three quarters of secondary school age
get no education at all.
中等教育年齢の子の4分の3が
教育を受けていません
08:00
That's crazy.
ひどい話です
08:03
Solution number three:
解決策3
08:05
most refugees are in urban areas,
in cities, not in camps.
難民の多くは難民キャンプではなく
都市域に住んでいること
08:08
What would you or I want
if we were a refugee in a city?
自分が都市に住む難民だったら
何を欲しいと思いますか?
08:11
We would want money
to pay rent or buy clothes.
家賃を払ったり
服を買ったりするお金でしょう
08:14
That is the future
of the humanitarian system,
未来の人道的支援システムは
08:18
or a significant part of it:
少なくとも大部分が
そうあるべきです
08:20
give people cash so that
you boost the power of refugees
現金を与えることで
難民を力づけることができ
08:22
and you'll help the local economy.
地元の経済を
助けることにもなります
08:24
And there's a fourth solution, too,
4番目の解決策もまた
賛否あるでしょうが
08:26
that's controversial
but needs to be talked about.
議論する必要のあることです
08:28
The most vulnerable refugees
need to be given a new start
立場の弱い難民は
新しいスタート 新しい生活を
08:31
and a new life in a new country,
新しい国で与えられる
必要があり
08:35
including in the West.
それには西欧諸国も
含まれるということ
08:38
The numbers are relatively small,
hundreds of thousands, not millions,
数は数十万人と比較的少なく
何百万ではないとしても
08:40
but the symbolism is huge.
その象徴的な意味は
大きなものです
08:44
Now is not the time
to be banning refugees,
トランプ政権が
やっているみたいに
08:47
as the Trump administration proposes.
難民を閉め出している
時ではありません
08:50
It's a time to be embracing people
who are victims of terror.
恐ろしい体験の被害者である人々を
迎え入れる時です
08:52
And remember --
覚えておいて欲しいのは—
08:56
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:57
Remember, anyone who asks you,
"Are they properly vetted?"
もし誰かに「その難民達はちゃんと
審査されているのか?」と聞かれたら
09:04
that's a really sensible
and good question to ask.
それは もっともな
良い質問だと思いますが
09:08
The truth is, refugees
arriving for resettlement
真実はと言えば 再定住化のために
やって来る難民というのは
09:12
are more vetted than any other population
arriving in our countries.
我々の国にやって来る他のどんな人達よりも
厳しく審査されているんです
09:16
So while it's reasonable
to ask the question,
だからその質問は
当を得たものですが
09:20
it's not reasonable to say that refugee
is another word for terrorist.
「難民はテロリストの別名だ」
などというのは見当外れです
09:22
Now, what happens --
考えてください —
09:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:28
What happens when refugees can't get work,
難民が仕事を得られず
09:31
they can't get their kids into school,
子供を学校にやることができず
金が手に入らず
09:34
they can't get cash,
they can't get a legal route to hope?
希望をつかむ合法的な道が
なかったらどうなるか?
09:36
What happens is they take risky journeys.
彼らが危険な旅路を
選ばざるを得ないとしたら?
09:39
I went to Lesbos, this beautiful
Greek island, two years ago.
私は2年前にギリシャの美しい島
レスボス島に行きました
09:42
It's a home to 90,000 people.
住民9万人の島ですが
09:47
In one year, 500,000 refugees
went across the island.
1年で 50万の難民が
この島を越えていきました
09:49
And I want to show you what I saw
この島の北に
車で行ったときに
09:53
when I drove across
to the north of the island:
目にしたものを
お見せしましょう
09:55
a pile of life jackets
of those who had made it to shore.
岸にたどり着いた人々が残した
救命胴衣の山です
09:58
And when I looked closer,
近づいてみると
10:02
there were small
life jackets for children,
子供用の小さな
救命胴衣がありました
10:04
yellow ones.
黄色いやつです
10:06
And I took this picture.
写真に撮りました
10:08
You probably can't see the writing,
but I want to read it for you.
何と書いてあるか見えないでしょうから
読んであげましょう
10:10
"Warning: will not
protect against drowning."
「警告 溺れ防止にはなりません」
10:13
So in the 21st century,
この21世紀において
10:17
children are being given life jackets
子供達が 安全を求め
10:20
to reach safety in Europe
ヨーロッパに渡ろうとして
10:22
even though those jackets
will not save their lives
ボートから落ちたとき
役にも立たない救命胴衣を
10:24
if they fall out of the boat
that is taking them there.
与えられているんです
10:28
This is not just a crisis, it's a test.
これは単なる危機ではなく試練です
10:32
It's a test that civilizations
have faced down the ages.
文明が昔から直面してきた試練です
10:37
It's a test of our humanity.
我々の人間性を試し
10:41
It's a test of us in the Western world
我々西欧諸国の人間に対し
10:44
of who we are and what we stand for.
自分が何者であり
何を信条とするのかを問う試金石です
10:46
It's a test of our character,
not just our policies.
政策だけでなく
我々の人格を問う試金石です
10:51
And refugees are a hard case.
難民というのは扱いが
難しいものです
10:54
They do come from faraway
parts of the world.
世界の遠く離れた所から
やってきます
10:57
They have been through trauma.
心に深い傷を負っています
11:00
They're often of a different religion.
往々にして
異なる宗教を持っています
11:02
Those are precisely the reasons
we should be helping refugees,
でもそれは まさに難民達を
助けるべき理由なんです
11:04
not a reason not to help them.
助けない理由ではなく
11:07
And it's a reason to help them
because of what it says about us.
我々が何者かを示すために
彼らを助けるべきです
11:09
It's revealing of our values.
我々の価値観が
問われているのです
11:14
Empathy and altruism are two
of the foundations of civilization.
思いやりと利他性は
文明の2つの土台です
11:17
Turn that empathy and altruism into action
その思いやりと利他性を
行動に変えることで
11:23
and we live out a basic moral credo.
基本的な道徳的信条を
満たす生き方ができます
11:25
And in the modern world,
we have no excuse.
現代の世界において
言い訳はできません
11:28
We can't say we don't know
what's happening in Juba, South Sudan,
南スーダンのジュバやシリアのアレッポで
何が起きているのか
11:31
or Aleppo, Syria.
知らなかったと言うわけにはいきません
11:35
It's there, in our smartphone
手のひらのスマートフォンに
11:36
in our hand.
ニュースが出ています
11:39
Ignorance is no excuse at all.
無知はまったく
言い訳になりません
11:41
Fail to help, and we show
we have no moral compass at all.
助けないとしたら 我々に道徳的指針など
ないと示すことになります
11:43
It's also revealing about
whether we know our own history.
それはまた我々が自分たちの歴史を
知っているかを明かすことにもなります
11:49
The reason that refugees
have rights around the world
難民達が世界中で
権利を持っているのは
11:52
is because of extraordinary
Western leadership
西欧諸国の卓越した
リーダーシップが
11:55
by statesmen and women
after the Second World War
第二次大戦後に
発揮され
11:58
that became universal rights.
普遍的権利が
確立されたからです
12:00
Trash the protections of refugees,
and we trash our own history.
難民の保護を捨てるのは
我々の歴史を捨てることになるのです
12:03
This is --
これは —
12:08
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:09
This is also revealing
about the power of democracy
独裁制からの避難場所となる
12:11
as a refuge from dictatorship.
民主主義の力を
示すことにもなります
12:15
How many politicians have you heard say,
政治家が言うのを
聞いたことがあるでしょう
12:17
"We believe in the power of our example,
not the example of our power."
「我々の力の誇示よりも
我々の模範の力を信じている」
12:20
What they mean is what we stand for
is more important than the bombs we drop.
我々の寄って立つものは
我々の落とす爆弾よりも強いという意味です
12:25
Refugees seeking sanctuary
避難先を求める難民は
12:30
have seen the West as a source
of hope and a place of haven.
西欧を希望の源
夢の地として見ています
12:32
Russians, Iranians,
ロシア人 イラン人
12:38
Chinese, Eritreans, Cubans,
中国人 エリトリア人 キューバ人は
12:41
they've come to the West for safety.
身の安全のために
西欧諸国にやって来るんです
12:43
We throw that away at our peril.
彼らを見捨てるなら
相応の覚悟を持ってすることです
12:47
And there's one other thing
it reveals about us:
我々について露呈することが
もう1つあります
12:50
whether we have any humility
for our own mistakes.
自分の間違いに対して
謙虚な気持ちを持っているかということです
12:52
I'm not one of these people
私は別に よくいるような
12:55
who believes that all the problems
in the world are caused by the West.
西欧が諸悪の根源だと
信じている人間ではありません
12:57
They're not.
そんなわけないですから
13:00
But when we make mistakes,
we should recognize it.
しかし間違いを犯したときには
そう認識すべきです
13:01
It's not an accident
that the country which has taken
他の国より多くの難民を
受け入れてきた米国が
13:04
more refugees than any other,
the United States,
他の国より多くのベトナム難民を
受け入れてきたのは
13:07
has taken more refugees from Vietnam
than any other country.
偶然ではありません
13:09
It speaks to the history.
それは歴史を物語っています
13:13
But there's more recent history,
in Iraq and Afghanistan.
もっと最近の歴史では
イラクやアフガニスタンがあります
13:16
You can't make up
for foreign policy errors
人道的な行動によって
13:19
by humanitarian action,
外交上の過ちを
帳消しにはできませんが
13:23
but when you break something,
you have a duty to try to help repair it,
何かを壊してしまったときには
修復する手助けをする義務があります
13:24
and that's our duty now.
それが今の我々の義務です
13:28
Do you remember
at the beginning of the talk,
話のはじめに
13:33
I said I wanted to explain
that the refugee crisis
難民危機は解決不能ではなく
対処可能だと言ったのを
13:35
was manageable, not insoluble?
覚えていますか?
13:38
That's true. I want you
to think in a new way,
本当のことです
13:41
but I also want you to do things.
新しい考え方をして欲しいのですが
同時に行動をして欲しいのです
13:43
If you're an employer,
雇用者だという人は
13:47
hire refugees.
難民を雇用してください
13:49
If you're persuaded by the arguments,
私の話に納得してくれたなら
13:52
take on the myths
家族や友人や
同僚の考え違いを
13:55
when family or friends
or workmates repeat them.
正してください
13:56
If you've got money, give it to charities
お金があるなら
14:00
that make a difference
for refugees around the world.
世界中の難民のために
寄付をしてください
14:02
If you're a citizen,
選挙権があるなら
14:05
vote for politicians
私が話した解決策を
実施してくれる政治家に
14:08
who will put into practice
the solutions that I've talked about.
投票してください
14:10
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:14
The duty to strangers
他人への責務は
14:18
shows itself
小さな形や大きな形
14:20
in small ways and big,
平凡な形や英雄的な形で
14:22
prosaic and heroic.
現れるものです
14:25
In 1942,
1942年に
14:27
my aunt and my grandmother
were living in Brussels
私の叔母と祖母は
14:30
under German occupation.
ドイツ占領下のブリュッセルで
暮らしていました
14:33
They received a summons
2人はナチスから
14:36
from the Nazi authorities
to go to Brussels Railway Station.
ブリュッセル駅に来るようにとの
招集を受けました
14:38
My grandmother immediately thought
something was amiss.
祖母はすぐに
何かおかしいと思いました
14:44
She pleaded with her relatives
親戚のみんなに懇願し
14:48
not to go to Brussels Railway Station.
ブリュッセル駅には
行かないようにと言いましたが
14:51
Her relatives said to her,
誰も耳を貸しません
14:54
"If we don't go,
if we don't do what we're told,
「言われた通りにしなかったら
14:57
then we're going to be in trouble."
面倒なことになる」と
15:00
You can guess what happened
ブリュッセル駅に行った人達が
どうなったか
15:02
to the relatives who went
to Brussels Railway Station.
想像がつくでしょう
15:04
They were never seen again.
彼らの姿を見ることは
二度とありませんでした
15:08
But my grandmother and my aunt,
祖母と叔母は
15:10
they went to a small village
ブリュッセルの南にある
15:12
south of Brussels
小さな村に行きました
15:15
where they'd been on holiday
in the decade before,
十年前に休日を
過ごした場所でした
15:17
and they presented themselves
at the house of the local farmer,
そこで農家の戸を叩きました
15:21
a Catholic farmer called Monsieur Maurice,
出てきたモリースさんという
カトリックの人に
15:24
and they asked him to take them in.
かくまって欲しいと頼むと
15:27
And he did,
助けてもらえました
15:30
and by the end of the war,
戦争の終わる頃には
15:32
17 Jews, I was told,
were living in that village.
17人のユダヤ人が
その村に住んでいたそうです
15:34
And when I was teenager, I asked my aunt,
10代の時 この叔母さんに
15:40
"Can you take me to meet
Monsieur Maurice?"
「そのモリースさんに
会ってみたい」と言うと
15:42
And she said, "Yeah, I can.
He's still alive. Let's go and see him."
「まだ生きているはずだから
会いに行きましょう」という話になり
15:45
And so, it must have been '83, '84,
1983年か84年のこと
だったと思いますが
15:48
we went to see him.
会いに行きました
15:51
And I suppose, like only a teenager could,
10代だからできたこと
かもしれませんが
15:52
when I met him,
その人に会って
15:55
he was this white-haired gentleman,
白髪の紳士でしたが
15:56
I said to him,
私は尋ねました
16:00
"Why did you do it?
「なんでかくまったりしたんですか?
16:03
Why did you take that risk?"
危険だったでしょうに」
16:05
And he looked at me and he shrugged,
彼は私を見つめて
肩をすくめると
16:09
and he said, in French,
フランス語で言いました
16:11
"On doit."
On doit.
16:13
"One must."
しなきゃいけないだろうと
16:14
It was innate in him.
まったく当たり前のことのように
16:16
It was natural.
自然に言いました
16:19
And my point to you is it should be
natural and innate in us, too.
これは私達にとっても当たり前で
自然なことであるべきではないでしょうか
16:20
Tell yourself,
皆さんに言って欲しいのです
16:24
this refugee crisis is manageable,
この難民危機は
解決不能ではなく
16:27
not unsolvable,
対処可能であり
16:29
and each one of us
我々ひとりひとりに
16:31
has a personal responsibility
to help make it so.
解決に手を貸す
個人的な責任があるのだと
16:33
Because this is about the rescue
of us and our values
これは難民達とその命を
救うと同時に
16:37
as well as the rescue
of refugees and their lives.
我々自身とその価値を
救うことでもあるからです
16:41
Thank you very much indeed.
どうもありがとうございました
16:44
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:45
Bruno Giussani: David, thank you.
David Miliband: Thank you.
(ブルーノ・ジュッサーニ) デイヴィッド ありがとう
(デイヴィッド・ミリバンド) こちらこそ
16:57
BG: Those are strong suggestions
(ブルーノ) 力強い提案で
17:00
and your call for individual
responsibility is very strong as well,
個人的な責任だという点も
力強いものだけど
17:01
but I'm troubled
by one thought, and it's this:
1つ引っかかることがあります
17:04
you mentioned, and these are your words,
"extraordinary Western leadership"
お話の中で
「西欧諸国の卓越したリーダーシップ」が
17:07
which led 60-something years ago
60数年前の
17:11
to the whole discussion
about human rights,
人権や難民の扱い
その他についての
17:12
to the conventions on refugees, etc. etc.
議論に繋がった
ということですが
17:15
That leadership
happened after a big trauma
そのリーダーシップは
大きな傷跡をかかえ
17:19
and happened in
a consensual political space,
みんなが合意する政治的空間に
生まれたものです
17:21
and now we are
in a divisive political space.
一方で 現代の政治的空間は
分断されており
17:25
Actually, refugees have become
one of the divisive issues.
難民は 実際
その分断の原因の1つです
17:27
So where will leadership come from today?
今日のリーダーシップは
いったいどこからくるのでしょう?
17:30
DM: Well, I think that you're right to say
(デイヴィッド) 言われる通り
17:33
that the leadership forged in war
戦争におけるリーダーシップと
平和時のリーダーシップとでは
17:35
has a different temper
and a different tempo
性格もスピード感も
17:38
and a different outlook
考え方も違うというのは
17:41
than leadership forged in peace.
その通りだと思います
17:42
And so my answer would be
the leadership has got to come from below,
私の答えは
リーダーシップは上からではなく
17:45
not from above.
下から現れなければ
ならないということです
17:49
I mean, a recurring theme
of the conference this week
このカンファレンスで
繰り返し現れたテーマは
17:50
has been about
the democratization of power.
「権力の民主化」です
17:54
And we've got to preserve
our own democracies,
民主主義は
守らなければなりませんが
17:58
but we've got to also activate
our own democracies.
民主主義を
活性化する必要もあります
18:00
And when people say to me,
あと 私の場合
18:02
"There's a backlash against refugees,"
「難民に対する反発がある」
と言う人には
18:04
what I say to them is,
こう答えています
18:06
"No, there's a polarization,
「いや あるのは二極化で
18:07
and at the moment,
今は 誇り高い人々よりも
18:09
those who are fearful
are making more noise
怯えた人々のほうが
18:11
than those who are proud."
声が大きいだけだ」と
18:13
And so my answer to your question
is that we will sponsor and encourage
ご質問に対する
私の答えは
18:14
and give confidence to leadership
我々が力を結集すれば
リーダーシップに対して
18:18
when we mobilize ourselves.
支持と激励と自信を
与えられるということです
18:20
And I think that when you are
in a position of looking for leadership,
そしてリーダーシップを
探している立場の人は
18:22
you have to look inside
自分のコミュニティの中を見て
内部の力を結集し
18:25
and mobilize in your own community
異なった形の
解決のための条件を
18:26
to try to create conditions
for a different kind of settlement.
作ろうとすべきでしょう
18:28
BG: Thank you, David.
Thanks for coming to TED.
(ブルーノ) デイヴィッド
TEDに来てくれてありがとう
18:31
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:34
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Riaki Poništ

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

David Miliband - Refugee advocate
As president of the International Rescue Committee, David Miliband enlists his expert statesmanship in the fight against the greatest global refugee crisis since World War II.

Why you should listen

As the son of refugees, David Miliband has first-hand experience with those fleeing conflict and disaster. In 2013, he abandoned a long political career to take the helm of the International Rescue Committee, an NGO committed to emergency and long-term assistance to refugees (and founded at the call of Albert Einstein in 1933).

As a former UK Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, Miliband is no stranger to cross-border politics. He is a leading voice against recent anti-refugee and immigration measures in the US, where the IRC currently runs resettlement programs in 29 cities.

More profile about the speaker
David Miliband | Speaker | TED.com