16:34
EG 2007

Nicholas Negroponte: One Laptop per Child, two years on

ニコラス・ネグロポンテが語る「"子供に1人1台ラップトップ" 計画の2年の成果」

Filmed:

ニコラス・ネグロポンテが2年間続けてきた「子供に1人1台ラップトップ」計画の経過を報告します。初めてのXOラップトップが製造されているなか、EG会議でもう一度議論し直し、この壮大なプロジェクトの未来に思いを託します。

- Tech visionary
The founder of the MIT Media Lab, Nicholas Negroponte pushed the edge of the information revolution as an inventor, thinker and angel investor. He's the driving force behind One Laptop per Child, building computers for children in the developing world. Full bio

Most people don't know that when I went to high school in this country --
ほとんどの方は知らないでしょうが 高校生の頃
00:12
I applied for university at a time when I was convinced
大学に出願する時点では 将来は彫刻家になろうと
00:16
I was going to be an artist and be a sculptor.
心に決めていました
00:20
And I came from a very privileged background. I was very lucky.
かなり恵まれた環境に育ち とても幸運でした
00:22
My family was wealthy, and my father believed in one thing,
家庭は裕福で 父の教育方針は
00:25
and that was to give us all as much education as we wanted.
私の望む教育を 全て受けさせようというものでした
00:30
And I announced I wanted to be a sculptor in Paris.
パリに行き 彫刻家になると伝えたとき
00:33
And he was a clever man. He sort of said,
頭の切れる父はこう言いました
00:35
"Well, that's OK, but you've done very well in your math SATs."
「いいけど SAT試験の数学も優秀だったじゃないか」
00:37
In fact, I'd got an 800. And he thought I did very well -- and I did, too -- in the arts:
確かに 数学は800点満点でしたが 芸術も優秀でした
00:41
this was my passion.
大好きだったのです
00:46
And he said "If you go to MIT," to which I had been given early admission,
早期にMITの入学許可を得ていたので 父は言いました
00:49
"I will pay for every year you're at MIT,
「MITの学部や院に通う間は 毎年の授業料を払うから
00:52
in graduate or undergraduate -- as much as you want --
好きなだけ通えばいい
00:56
I will pay for an equal number of years for you to live in Paris."
そうすれば それと同じ年数 パリでの生活費を払うよ」
00:58
And I thought that was the best deal in town, so I accepted it immediately.
この上ない条件なので すぐに受け入れました
01:01
And I decided that if I was good in art, and I was good in mathematics,
そこで 芸術も 数学も得意なのだから
01:05
I'd study architecture, which was the blending of the two.
2つの組み合わさった建築を専攻しようと決めて
01:08
I went and told my headmaster that, at prep school.
高校の校長に報告しに行きました
01:11
And I said to him what I was doing, that I was going to go study architecture
芸術と数学の融合は建築だから
01:14
because it was art and mathematics put together.
大学で建築を学びたいと伝えると
01:19
He said to me something that just went completely over my head.
校長は理解できない事を言ってきました
01:23
He said, "You know, I like grey suits, and I like pin-striped suits,
「灰色のスーツも 細縞のスーツも好きだけど
01:27
but I don't like grey pin-striped suits."
灰色で細縞のスーツは嫌いだな」
01:32
And I thought, "What a turkey this guy is," and I went off to MIT.
「バカじゃないか」と思いつつ MITに進学しました
01:36
I studied architecture, then did a second degree in architecture,
建築を学んで2年が経つと すぐに
01:40
and then actually quickly realized that it wasn't architecture.
芸術と科学の融合が建築ではないことに気づきました
01:43
That really, the mixing of art and science was computers,
実は コンピューターだったのです これこそ
01:49
and that that really was the place to bring both, and enjoyed a career doing that.
まさに融合の場で 楽しみつつキャリアを積んできました
01:54
And probably, if I were to fill out Jim Citrin's scale,
ジム シトリンのスケールで考えれば
01:58
I'd put 100 percent on the side of the equation
他者が独創的でいられる環境を作るために
02:04
where you spend time making it possible for others to be creative.
100パーセントの時間を費やしたといえます
02:08
And after doing this for a long time, and the Media Lab passing the baton on,
これに長年打ち込んで メディアラボの所長職を譲ってから
02:13
I thought, "Well, maybe it's time for me to do a project.
こう考えました
02:18
Something that would be important, but also something
「この特権を生かして 何か重要なプロジェクトを
02:20
that would take advantage of all of these privileges that one had."
すべき時なのではないだろうか」
02:24
And in the case of the Media Lab, knowing a lot of people,
メディアラボでは いろいろな人と知り合い
02:28
knowing people who were either executives or wealthy,
重役や金持ちとも知り合いになりました
02:31
and also not having, in my own case, a career to worry about anymore.
私はもうキャリアのことを心配する必要はありません
02:36
My career, I mean, I'd done my career.
もう十分にキャリアをやり遂げました
02:41
Didn't have to worry about earning money.
お金の心配もありません
02:43
Didn't have to worry about what people thought about me.
他人にどう思われるか気にする必要もありませんから
02:45
And I said, "Boy, let's really do something that takes advantage of all these features,"
「この特権を生かして何か実践しよう」と決意しました
02:48
and thought that if we could address education, by leveraging the children,
子どもたちに力を貸し コンピューターを使う環境を作り
02:54
and bringing to the world the access of the computers,
教育に活用させることができるならば
02:58
that that was really the thing we should do.
それこそ私のやるべきことだと考えました
03:02
Never shown this picture before, and probably going to be sued for it.
これは初公開の写真ですから 訴えられるかもしれません
03:06
It's taken at three o'clock in the morning, without the permission of the company.
朝の3時に 会社の許可なしで撮りました
03:09
It's about two weeks old. There they are, folks.
出来上がって2週間たったところです それがこちら
03:11
(Applause)
(拍手)
03:15
If you look at the picture, you'll see they're stacked up.
写真で分かると思いますが 積み上げられていますね
03:16
Those are conveyor belts that go around.
ぐるっと周回するコンベアーベルトがあります
03:20
This is one of the conveyor belts with the thing going by,
こちらはパソコンが流れるコンベアーベルトの一部です
03:23
but then you'll see the ones up above.
上にもパソコンが流れていますね
03:26
What happens is, they burn into flash memory the software,
フラッシュメモリにソフトウエアを入れて
03:29
and then test them for a few hours.
数時間テストにかけているのですが
03:34
But you've got to have the thing moving on the assembly line, because it's constant.
止まらない製造ライン上を流しつづければいけません
03:37
So they go around in this loop, which is why you see them up there.
だから上にもパソコンが流れているのです
03:41
So this was great for us because it was a real turning point. But it goes back.
この実現は最高の転換点でした さて昔の話ですが
03:45
This picture was taken in 1982, just before the IBM PC was even announced.
これは1982年にIBMがPCを発表する直前の写真です
03:49
Seymour Papert and I were bringing computers to schools
シーモア パパートと私は学校や途上国に
03:54
and developing nations at a time when it was way ahead of itself.
まだ珍しかったコンピューターを持ち込みました
03:57
But one thing we learned was that these kids can absolutely jump into it
すると 子どもたちがすぐにコンピューターにのめり込む
04:00
just the same way as our kids do here.
ということが分かりました アメリカの子どもと同じです
04:06
And when people tell me, "Who's going to teach the teachers to teach the kids?"
「誰が先生を育成するんだ?」と尋ねてくる人がいると
04:09
I say to myself, "What planet do you come from?"
「コイツどの星から来たんだ?」と思わざるを得ません
04:12
Okay, there's not a person in this room -- I don't care how techie you are --
皆さんの知識がどれくらいか知りませんが
04:15
there's not a person in this room that doesn't give their laptop or cell phone to a kid
誰でも 若者にパソコンや携帯を渡して
04:18
to help them debug it. OK?
直してもらったりするでしょう
04:23
We all need help, even those of us who are very seasoned.
どんな年長者にも助けが必要です
04:25
This picture of Seymour -- 25 years ago. Seymour made a very simple
こちらは 25年前のシーモアです 彼は1968年に
04:30
observation in 1968, and then basically presented it in 1970 --
ある簡単な観察記録を取って 1970年に発表しました
04:35
April 11 to be precise -- called "Teaching Children Thinking."
4月11日 タイトルは 「考えることを子どもに教える」
04:40
What he observed was that kids who write computer programs
この観察記録によれば プログラムを書く子どもは
04:43
understand things differently, and when they debug the programs,
書かない子とは 違った考え方をします
04:47
they come the closest to learning about learning.
デバック時には 「学習」を学習するような経験をします
04:51
That was very important, and in some sense, we've lost that.
とても重要なのに最近では経験する機会がありません
04:54
Kids don't program enough and boy,
プログラミング経験が不足しています
04:58
if there's anything I hope this brings back, it's programming to kids.
ぜひ 子どもたちにプログラミングをしてほしいのです
05:00
It's really important. Using applications is OK,
とても重要です アプリケーションを使うのもいいですが
05:04
but programming is absolutely fundamental.
プログラミングを教えることこそ必要です
05:08
This is being launched with three languages in it: Squeak, Logo, and
まず 3つの言語から始めました スクイークと ロゴと
05:11
a third, that I've never even seen before.
3つ目は聞いたこともない言語です
05:15
The point being, this is going to be very, very intensive on the programming side.
プログラミング機能を ぐっと強化しているのが特徴です
05:17
This photograph is very important because it's much later.
こちらはずっと最近の 重要な意味のある写真です
05:20
This is in the early 2000s. My son, Dimitri -- who's here,
2000年から2003年頃で 息子のディミトリーもいます
05:24
many of you know Dimitri -- went to Cambodia, set up this school
カンボジアに建設した学校に ネットがつながった頃
05:29
that we had built, just as the school connected it to the Internet.
ご存知のように ディミトリーが学校運営を始めて
05:33
And these kids had their laptops. But it was really what spirited this,
子どもたちがラップトップを手にしたのです
05:36
plus the influence of Joe and others. We started One Laptop per Child.
夢見たこの光景や ジョーらの影響こそ「子供に1人1台ラップトップ」計画のきっかけでした
05:42
This is the same village in Cambodia, just a couple of months ago.
こちらはこの村の2か月ほど前の写真です
05:46
These kids are real pros. There were just 7,000 machines out there
子どもたちがプロ並みに 7000台をテストしています
05:51
being tested by kids. Being a nonprofit is absolutely fundamental.
非営利であることは間違いなく重要です
05:55
Everybody advised me not to be a nonprofit, but they were all wrong.
誰もが 非営利はダメと言ってきたのですが 間違いです
06:01
And the reason being a nonprofit is important is actually twofold.
非営利が重要だと考える本質的な理由は2つです
06:05
There are many reasons, but the two that merit the little bit of time is:
たくさんありますが重要なのは2つです
06:09
one, the clarity of purpose is there. The moral purpose is clear.
まず目的が明確なこと 道徳上の目的が明確なのです
06:12
I can see any head of state, any executive I want, at any time, because
あらゆる国の首脳や高官に いつでも会えるのは
06:17
I'm not selling laptops. OK? I have no shareholders.
ラップトップを売らないからです 株主もいませんから
06:21
Whether we sell, it doesn't make any difference whatsoever.
売ろうが売るまいが全く関係ありません
06:25
The clarity of purpose is absolutely critical. And the second is very counterintuitive --
目的の明確さは重要です 次の理由は直観に反しますが
06:28
you can get the best people in the world.
世界有数の人材が集まることです
06:34
If you look at our professional services, including search firms,
調査事業 通信事業 法務 銀行業といった
06:37
including communications, including legal services, including banking,
専門サービスを すべて無償で実現していますが
06:41
they're all pro bono. And it's not to save money.
お金を節約するためではありません
06:45
We've got money in the bank. It's because you get the best people.
銀行にお金はあります 優秀な人材がいるからです
06:49
You get the people who are doing it because they believe in the mission,
使命感をもって自ら適任と考えてこの仕事をする人材が
06:52
and they're the best people.
いるのです
06:55
We couldn't afford to hire a CFO. We put out a job description for a CFO at zero salary,
財務担当役員の給料は払えないので 無給で募集したら
06:57
and we had a queue of people.
応募者が殺到しました
07:02
It allows you to team up with people. The U.N.'s not going to be
非営利であれば協力が得やすくなります
07:05
our partner if we're profit making. So announcing this with Kofi Annan
営利目的なら国連も協力しようとは考えなかったでしょう
07:08
was very important, and the U.N. allowed us
アナン事務総長とこれを共同発表できたのは貴重でした
07:11
to basically reach all the countries. And this was the machine we were showing
国連のおかげで 概ねどんな国とも連絡がとれました
07:14
before I met Yves Behar.
デザイナーのイヴ べアールが手伝う前のデザインです
07:20
And while this machine in some sense is silly,
おかしなデザインにも見えますが 振り返ってみると
07:22
in retrospect, it actually served a very important purpose.
かなり貢献してくれました
07:26
That pencil-yellow crank was remembered by everybody.
細くて黄色いL字ハンドルを皆さん覚えているのです
07:28
Everybody remembered the pencil-yellow crank. It's different.
特徴的なので このハンドルを誰も忘れたりしません
07:33
It was getting its power in a different way. It's kind of childlike.
少し変わった電力供給手段です 子どもっぽいですね
07:36
Even though this wasn't the direction we went because the crank --
このハンドルが問題になって変えましたけど
07:39
it really is stupid to have it on board, by the way.
付いていたら確かにおかしいですね
07:43
In spite of what some people in the press don't get it, didn't understand it,
一部の報道陣には理解できないようでしたが
07:45
we didn't take it off because we didn't want to do --
方向性が気に入らなくて取り外したわけではありません
07:48
having it on the laptop itself is really not what you want.
ハンドルは ラップトップ本体に無いほうがいいのです
07:52
You want a separate thing, like the AC adaptor.
ACアダプターみたいに取り外せたほうがいいのです
07:55
I didn't bring one with me, but they really work much better off-board.
ここにはありませんが 本体から外すと使いやすいのです
07:58
And then, I could tell you lots about the laptop, but I decided on just four things.
言いたいことは山ほどあるのですが 四つに絞りましょう
08:02
Just keep in mind -- because there are other people, including Bill Gates,
心に留めておいてください 皆さん ビル ゲイツでさえ
08:07
who said, "Gee, you've got a real computer."
「すごいね まさに真のパソコンだ」と言うのですから
08:11
That computer is unlike anything you've had, and does things --
このパソコンは従来品とは全く違っています
08:14
there are four of them --
その中の四つの違いをあげましょう
08:17
that you don't come close to. And it's very important to be low power,
馴染みがないでしょう まず低消費電力が重要です
08:19
and I hope that's picked up more by the industry.
企業でも もっと取り組んでほしいですね
08:22
That the reason that you want to be below two watts is
「2ワット以下」にしたい理由は
08:25
that's roughly what you can generate with your upper body.
上半身で生み出せるのが そのぐらいの電力だからです
08:28
Dual-mode display -- that sunlight display's fantastic.
太陽光を利用する「2方式ディスプレー」も素晴らしい
08:31
We were using it at lunch today in the sunlight, and the more sunlight the better.
今日の昼に使ってみましたが 日差しは強いほどいいです
08:33
And that was really critical. The mesh network, it'll become commonplace.
いずれ普及する「メッシュネットワーク」は必須です
08:36
And of course, "rugged" goes without saying.
そして 「頑丈」なのは当然です
08:40
And the reason I think design matters isn't because I wanted to go to art school.
芸術志望だったからデザインを重要視するわけではなくて
08:43
And by the way, when I graduated from MIT,
ちなみにMIT卒業時には パリに6年住むなんて 最悪で
08:46
I thought the worst and silliest thing to do would be to go to Paris for six years. (Laughter)
ばかげた選択に思えたので
08:49
So, I didn't do that. But design matters for a number of reasons.
止めましたが いくつかの理由からデザインは重要です
08:52
The most important being that it is the best way to make an inexpensive product.
一番の理由は 製品を安く作るための最善策だからです
08:56
Most people make inexpensive products by taking cheap design,
たいてい 製造費を抑えようと デザイン料を安くして
09:00
cheap labor, cheap components, and making a cheap laptop.
安い労働力や部品を調達して 安いラップトップを作ります
09:04
And, in English, the word "cheap" has
英語では「安い」という言葉には
09:08
a double meaning, which is really appropriate,
裏の意味があって これがぴったり当てはまります
09:11
because it's cheap, in the pejorative sense, as well as inexpensive.
つまり安いだけでなく 安っぽいのです
09:14
But if you take a different approach, and you think of very large-scale integration,
ですが 見方を変えて 大規模な意味での統合を図って
09:18
very advanced materials, very advanced manufacturing --
最先端の材料や 最先端の製造設備を使うことにしたら
09:22
so you're pouring chemicals in one end, iPods are spewing out the other --
材料を投入すれば iPodが出てきます
09:25
and really cool design, that's what we wanted to do.
格好いい製品が手に入ります これをやりたかったのです
09:27
And I can race through these and save a lot of time because
このスライドは飛ばしましょう
09:31
Yves and I obviously didn't compare notes.
イヴと発表内容を突き合わせていなかったのですが
09:33
These are his slides, and so I don't have to talk about them.
彼が発表しますので 私が説明しなくてもいいでしょう
09:36
But it was really, to us, very important as a strategy.
いずれにしろデザインは戦略的にとても重要です
09:40
It wasn't just to kind of make it cute, because somebody --
単にかわいく見せたいからではなく
09:46
you know, good design is very important.
良いデザインが重要だからです
09:50
Yves showed one of the power-generating devices.
これは発電装置の一つです
09:52
The mesh network, the reason I -- and I won't go into it in great detail --
メッシュネットワークについて 簡単に説明しますと
09:57
but when we deliver laptops to kids in the remotest and poorest parts of the world,
世界一辺ぴな貧困地域で ラップトップ同士が通信します
10:02
they're connected. There's not just laptops.
ラップトップが複数おいてあるだけではないのです
10:05
And so, we have to drop in satellite dishes. We put in generators.
パラボラアンテナや発電機を設置する必要もありました
10:08
It's a lot of stuff that goes behind these. These can talk to each other.
舞台裏で稼働しているこれらは 相互に通信できます
10:11
If you're in a desert, they can talk to each other about two kilometers apart.
砂漠では 2キロ離れていても通信できますが
10:14
If you're in the jungle, it's about 500 meters. So if a kid bicycles home,
ジャングルでは約500メートルですから 子どもたちが
10:18
or walks a few miles, they're going to be off the grid, so to speak.
自転車で出かけたり数キロ歩くとメッシュから外れます
10:22
They're not going to be near another laptop,
つまり別のラップトップが近くに存在しないので
10:25
so you have to nail these onto a tree, and sort of, get it.
これを木に設置して中継させます
10:28
You don't call Verizon or Sprint. You build your own network.
ネットワークは 通信会社に依頼せず 自分で構築します
10:31
And that's very important, the user interface.
そして重要なのが ユーザーインターフェースです
10:35
We are launching with 18 keyboards. English is by far the minority.
キーボードは18言語を用意します 英語は少数派ですし
10:38
Latin is relatively rare, too. You just look at some of the languages.
ラテン語も比較的少数派なのです
10:42
I'm willing to suspect some of you hadn't even heard of them before.
中には皆さんの知らない言語もきっとあると思います
10:45
Is there anybody in the room, one person, unless you work with OLPC,
OLPCプロジェクトの関係者以外で どなたか
10:49
is there anybody in the room that can tell me what language
このキーボードの言語が分かりますか?
10:54
the keyboard is that's on the screen? There's only one hand -- so you get it.
一人だけのようですので どうぞ
10:57
Yes, you're right. He's right. It's Amharic,
その通り アムハラ語です エチオピアの言葉です
11:03
it's Ethiopian. In Ethiopia, there's never been a keyboard.
これまでエチオピアにはキーボードが存在しませんでした
11:07
There is no keyboard standard because there's no market.
市場がないので キーボードの規格もありませんでした
11:10
And this is the big difference.
ですからこれは大きな変化もたらします
11:13
Again, when you're a nonprofit, you look at children as a mission, not as a market.
非営利なので子どもは市場ではなく使命の対象となります
11:16
So we went to Ethiopia, and we helped them make a keyboard.
ですから エチオピアでキーボード製作を手伝ったのです
11:19
And this will become the standard Ethiopian keyboard.
これがエチオピアの標準的なキーボードになるはずです
11:23
So what I want to end with is sort of what we're doing to roll it out.
最後に プロジェクト拡大に向けて何をしているか話します
11:26
And we changed strategy completely. I decided at the beginning --
実は 当初と戦略が全く変わっています
11:29
it was a pretty good thing to decide in the beginning,
当初の決定としてはかなり良いものだったのですが
11:32
it's not what we're doing now -- is to go to six countries.
今とは違って 6か国を訪問していました
11:35
Big countries, one of them is not so big, but it's rich.
大きな国々です 一か国は大きくはないが裕福です
11:38
Here's the six. We went to the six,
この6か国です この国々を訪れると
11:41
and in each case the head of state said he would do it, he'd do a million.
どの首脳も協力的で 100万台買うと言ってくれました
11:44
In the case of Gaddafi, he'd do 1.2 million, and that they would launch it.
リビアのカダフィー大佐は120万台を約束してくれました
11:47
We thought, this is exactly the right strategy, get it out,
私たちはこれが正しい戦略だと考え これをやれば
11:51
and then the little countries could sort of piggyback on these big countries.
小国も追随すると思っていました
11:55
And so I went to each of those countries
ですから この6か国を最低6回は訪問して
11:57
at least six times, met with the head of state probably two or three times.
首脳たちにも2回か3回は会いました
12:00
In each case, got the ministers, went through a lot of the stuff.
いつも大臣に会って 検討もいろいろとしました
12:03
This was a period in my life where I was traveling 330 days per year.
この時は 1年の330日 世界を飛び回っていました
12:06
Not something you'd envy or want to do.
うらやましくもないでしょうし やってみたくもないでしょう
12:09
In the case of Libya, it was a lot of fun meeting Gaddafi in his tent.
カダフィー大佐とテントで話したときはとても楽しくて
12:12
The camel smells were unbelievable.
でも ラクダの臭いはきつかったですね
12:17
And it was 45 degrees C. I mean, this was not
摂氏45度でしたから 決してクールな経験とは言えません
12:20
what you'd call a cool experience. And former countries --
以前相手していた国々は いずれも
12:24
I say former, because none of them really came through this summer --
この夏が終わっても購入してもらえませんでした
12:28
there was a big difference between getting a head of state
首脳に会って写真を撮ることと 報道発表に至ることとは
12:30
to have a photo opportunity, make a press release.
大きく違うのです
12:34
So we went to smaller ones. Uruguay, bless their hearts.
そこで 小さい国々を回ることにました ウルグアイもそう
12:36
Small country, not so rich. President said he'd do it, and guess what?
小国でさほど裕福でないのに 大統領はやると言い
12:39
He did do it. The tender had nothing in it that related to us,
本当にやってくれました 太陽光の下で見えることや
12:42
nothing specific about sunlight-readable, mesh-network, low-power,
メッシュネットワークや 低消費電力の説明をしなくても
12:46
but just a vanilla laptop proposal.
単にラップトップについて提案しただけで
12:49
And guess what? We won it hands down.
あっさりと引き受けてくれたのです
12:52
When it was announced that they were going to do every child in Uruguay,
ウルグアイの子ども全員に支給すると発表して
12:54
the first 100,000, boom, went to OLPC.
いきなり10万個の注文がOLPCに来ました
12:58
The next day -- the next day, not even 24 hours had passed -- in Peru,
その翌日というか 24時間もたたないうちに ペルーから
13:00
the president of Peru said, "We'll do 250." And boom, a little domino effect.
大統領が「25万台」と言ってきました 連鎖反応です
13:03
The president of Rwanda stepped in and said he would do it.
ルワンダの大統領がやってきて やろうと言ってくれました
13:06
The president of Ethiopia said he would do it.
エチオピアの大統領もやろうと言ってくれました
13:09
And boom, boom, boom. The president of Mongolia.
どんどん拡大して モンゴルの大統領もそう
13:12
And so what happens is, these things start to happen with these countries --
これらの国々でそんなことが起き始めたのです
13:14
still not enough.
でもまだ不十分です
13:17
Add up all those countries, it didn't quite get to thing, so we said,
この成果を合わせても まだやり足りないと感じて
13:19
"Let's start a program in the United States." So, end of August, early September,
「アメリカで何か立ち上げよう」と思い こちらの計画を
13:24
we decide to do this. We announced it near the middle, end --
8月末から9月頭に決定し 9月中ばに発表しました
13:29
just when the Clinton Initiative was taking place.
ちょうどCGI総会が開催されていた時期だったので
13:32
We thought that was a good time to announce it.
発表にはうってつけでした
13:35
Launched it on the 12 of November.
11月12日から始まりました
13:37
We said it would be just for a short period until the 26. We've extended it until the 31.
26日までの短い予定でしたが 31日まで延長しています
13:40
And the "Give One, Get One" program is really important because
この「一つ贈って一つ得る」というイベントは
13:45
it got a lot of people absolutely interested.
かなり注目を浴びて いい成果を上げました
13:49
The first day it was just wild. And then we said,
初日はもう大盛況でした そこでこんな案がでました
13:54
"Well, let's get people to give many. Not just one, and get one,
「たくさん贈ってもらおう "一つ贈って一つ得る"のでなく
13:59
but maybe give 100, give 1,000." And that's where you come in.
100台や1000台贈ってもらおう」 これは重要です
14:03
And that's where I think it's very important. I don't want you all to go out and
皆さんには 400ドル出して買って欲しくはないのです
14:07
buy 400 dollars worth of laptops. Okay? Do it, but that's not going to help. Okay?
もちろんいいですけど 役には立ちません
14:10
If everybody in this room goes out tonight and orders one of these things for 400 dollars,
この会場の全員が一つずつ注文してもだめなのです
14:16
whatever it is, 300 people in the room doing it -- yeah, great.
300人だろうが役に立たないのです
14:19
I want you do something else.
みなさんには もっと違うことをやっていただきたい
14:23
And it's not to go out and buy 100 or 1,000, though,
100台や1000台買ってくれというのではありません
14:26
I invite you to do that, and 10,000 would be even better.
歓迎はしますが どうせなら1万台のほうがいいですね
14:29
Tell people about it! It's got to become viral, OK?
宣伝してください! ブームを起こす必要があるのです
14:32
Use your mailing lists. People in this room have extraordinary mailing lists.
みなさんの素晴らしいメーリングリストを活用しましょう
14:36
Get your friends to give one, get one.
「一つ贈って一つ得る」プロジェクトに招待しましょう
14:41
And if each one of you sends it to 300 or 400 people, that would be fantastic.
一人一人が300人や400人に知らせてくれたら最高です
14:44
I won't dwell on the pricing at all.
価格については こだわっていません
14:48
Just to say that when you do the "Give One, Get One,"
「一つ贈って一つ得る」をやっていると 多くの報道陣に
14:51
a lot of press is a bit about, "They didn't make it, it's 188 dollars, it's not 100."
「100ドルは無理だったな 188ドルか」と言われますが
14:54
It will be 100 in two years. It will go below 100.
2年後には100ドルになって さらに下がります
14:59
We've pledged not to add features, but to bring that price down.
機能を追加せずに 価格を下げていきますが
15:03
But it was the countries that wanted it to go up, and
いろいろと理由があって 購入する国々が
15:07
we let them push it up for all sorts of reasons. So what you can do --
高くなる方向を希望したので その通りにしました
15:10
I've just said it. Don't just give one, get one.
「一つ贈って一つ得る」だけに終わらせないでください
15:13
I just want to end with one last one. This one is not even
最後になりますが この写真は
15:16
24-hours old, or maybe it's 24-hours.
24時間もたたないか 24時間ぐらい前のものです
15:18
The first kids got their laptops. They got them by ship,
初めて子どもたちにラップトップが届きました 船便です
15:21
and I'm talking now about 7,000, 8,000 at a time went out this week.
今週は 7000台から8000台を一度に送りました
15:25
They went to Uruguay, Peru, Mexico.
ウルグアイや ペルーや メキシコに届けたのです
15:28
And it's been slow coming, and we're only making about 5,000 a week,
緩やかな幕開けで 一週間に5000台だけですが
15:33
but we hope, we hope, sometime in next year,
できれば 来年のいつか
15:37
maybe by the middle of the year,
半ばぐらいには
15:42
to hit a million a month. Now put that number,
月産100万台になるでしょう 今 そう宣言します
15:44
and a million isn't so much. It's not a big number.
100万は数字としてはさほど大きくありません
15:48
We're selling a billion cell phones worldwide this year.
今年の携帯電話の販売台数は 10億台ですからね
15:50
But a million a month in laptop-land is a big number.
でも ラップトップで月産100万台は 多いといえます
15:53
And the world production today, everybody combined, making laptops,
現在 全世界のラップトップ製造台数は 月産500万台です
15:56
is five million a month. So I'm standing here telling you that sometime next year,
今 ここで言っておきますが 来年のいつか
16:00
we're going to make 20 percent of the world production.
世界の20パーセントを生産するようになります
16:04
And if we do that, there are going to be a lot of lucky kids out there.
実現すれば子どもたちの笑顔が世界に広がるはずです
16:07
And we hope if you have EG two years from now,
2年後かどうかわかりませんが
16:11
or whenever you have it again,
このEGが開催されたら
16:15
I won't have bad breath, and I will be invited back,
まだ生きていて きっと招待されるでしょう それまでには
16:17
and will have, hopefully by then, maybe 100 million out there to children.
1億台のラップトップを子どもたちに届けたいものです
16:21
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
16:24
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:25
Translated by Tomoya Kusakari
Reviewed by Satoshi Tatsuhara

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About the Speaker:

Nicholas Negroponte - Tech visionary
The founder of the MIT Media Lab, Nicholas Negroponte pushed the edge of the information revolution as an inventor, thinker and angel investor. He's the driving force behind One Laptop per Child, building computers for children in the developing world.

Why you should listen

A pioneer in the field of computer-aided design, Negroponte founded (and was the first director of) MIT's Media Lab, which helped drive the multimedia revolution and now houses more than 500 researchers and staff across a broad range of disciplines. An original investor in Wired (and the magazine's "patron saint"), for five years he penned a column exploring the frontiers of technology -- ideas that he expanded into his 1995 best-selling book Being Digital. An angel investor extraordinaire, he's funded more than 40 startups, and served on the boards of companies such as Motorola and Ambient Devices.

But his latest effort, the One Laptop per Child project, may prove his most ambitious. The organization is designing, manufacturing and distributing low-cost, wireless Internet-enabled computers costing roughly $100 and aimed at children. Negroponte hopes to put millions of these devices in the hands of children in the developing world.

More profile about the speaker
Nicholas Negroponte | Speaker | TED.com