20:39
TED2003

Freeman Dyson: Let's look for life in the outer solar system

フリーマン・ダイソン「太陽系の外れに生命を探そう」

Filmed:

木星の衛星や、海王星より遠いカイパーベルトやオールトの雲に生命を探し始めることを物理学者フリーマン・ダイソンは提案しています。どのような生命が存在し、どうすれば見つけられるか語ります。

- Physicist
With Freeman Dyson's astonishing forecasts for the future, it's hard to tell where science ends and science fiction begins. But far from being a wild-eyed visionary, Dyson is a clear and sober thinker -- and one not afraid of controversy or heresy. Full bio

How will we be remembered in 200 years?
200年後 どのように私たちを思い返すでしょう?
00:18
I happen to live in a little town, Princeton, in New Jersey,
私の住むニュージャージー州のプリンストンという小さな町では
00:21
which every year celebrates the great event in Princeton history:
毎年 プリンストン史上とても重要といわれる --
00:24
the Battle of Princeton, which was, in fact, a very important battle.
プリンストンの戦いを祝います 実に重要で
00:29
It was the first battle that George Washington won, in fact,
ジョージ ワシントンが初めて勝った --
00:33
and was pretty much of a turning point in the war of independence.
まさに独立戦争の転換点といえる戦いでした
00:36
It happened 225 years ago.
225年前に起きた戦いで
00:41
It was actually a terrible disaster for Princeton.
プリンストンにとっては大惨事となって
00:44
The town was burned down; it was in the middle of winter,
町は全焼しました 季節は真冬です
00:48
and it was a very, very severe winter.
しかも非常に厳しい冬だったので
00:52
And about a quarter of all the people in Princeton died that winter
プリンストン市民の25%ほどの人が その冬に
00:55
from hunger and cold, but nobody remembers that.
飢えと寒さで亡くなりました でも誰も覚えていません
00:59
What they remember is, of course, the great triumph,
覚えているのは 大勝利を収めて
01:04
that the Brits were beaten, and we won, and that the country was born.
イギリス人を打ち負かし 我々が勝ち 国が生まれたことです
01:06
And so I agree very emphatically that the pain of childbirth is not remembered.
出産の痛みはすぐに忘れ 生まれた子だけが記憶に残るということが
01:14
It's the child that's remembered.
私には痛いほどわかるのです
01:21
And that's what we're going through at this time.
今 私たちは同じような経験をしています
01:23
I wanted to just talk for one minute about the future of biotechnology,
バイオテクノロジーの未来について少しお話したいのですが
01:27
because I think I know very little about that -- I'm not a biologist --
生命科学者ではありませんから この分野には疎くて
01:35
so everything I know about it can be said in one minute.
知識を全て披露しても 1分足らずです
01:38
(Laughter)
(笑い)
01:41
What I'm saying is that we should follow the model
電子産業を成功に導いた手法を
01:44
that has been so successful with the electronic industry,
見倣ったほうがいいと思うのです
01:47
that what really turned computers into a great success, in the world
コンピューターを世界的な大成功へと導いたのは
01:51
as a whole, is toys. As soon as computers became toys,
おもちゃです コンピューターがおもちゃになって 子どもたちが
01:56
when kids could come home and play with them,
家に帰ってコンピューターで遊べるようになるとすぐ
02:01
then the industry really took off. And that has to happen with biotech.
電子産業は成長を始めました バイオテクノロジーも見倣うべきです
02:04
There's a huge --
非常にたくさん --
02:09
(Laughter)
(笑い)
02:10
(Applause)
(拍手)
02:12
-- there's a huge community of people in the world
世界には幅広い分野に生命科学を実践している人がいます
02:15
who are practical biologists, who are dog breeders,
犬のブリーダーや
02:18
pigeon breeders, orchid breeders, rose breeders,
鳩のブリーダー ランのブリーダー バラのブリーダーなどが
02:21
people who handle biology with their hands,
自らの手で生命科学を扱って
02:28
and who are dedicated to producing beautiful things, beautiful creatures,
植物 動物 ペットなどの美しい生物を熱心に作り出しています
02:31
plants, animals, pets. These people will be empowered with biotech,
彼らがバイオテクノロジーを手にすれば かなり役立つはずです
02:38
and that will be an enormous positive step
そうすれば バイオテクノロジーを認知してもらうという点では
02:45
to acceptance of biotechnology.
大きく前進することとなり
02:51
That will blow away a lot of the opposition.
反対意見をかなり吹き払うことができるはずです
02:55
When people have this technology in their hands,
この技術が普及すれば
03:00
you have a do-it-yourself biotech kit, grow your own --
バイオテクノロジーを利用した自作キットが出回ります
03:02
grow your dog, grow your own cat.
独自の犬や猫を作ろうというものです
03:10
(Laughter)
(笑い)
03:12
(Applause)
(拍手)
03:14
Just buy the software, you design it. I won't say anymore,
ソフトウェアを買って自分でデザインするのです 後は言わなくても --
03:18
you can take it on from there. It's going to happen, and
想像できると思います 実現に向かっていますし
03:24
I think it has to happen before the technology becomes natural,
バイオテクノロジーが当たり前になり 治療の一環として利用されたり
03:30
becomes part of the human condition,
慣れ親しんで 広く受け入れられるようになる前に
03:38
something that everybody's familiar with and everybody accepts.
こうした段階を踏むべきです
03:41
So, let's leave that aside.
では次の話題に移りましょう
03:44
I want to talk about something quite different,
話はずいぶん変わりますが
03:47
which is what I know about, and that is astronomy.
私の良く知っている天文学の話をしたいと思います
03:50
And I'm interested in searching for life in the universe.
宇宙に生命を探すことに興味を持っているのですが
03:54
And it's open to us to introduce a new way of doing that,
これを実行するための新たな方法が見つかったのです
03:58
and that's what I'll talk about for 10 minutes,
それについて10分ほど
04:03
or whatever the time remains.
時間の許す限りお話します
04:05
The important fact is, that most of the real estate
重要な事実があります 私たちの手が届く土地の多くは --
04:12
that's accessible to us -- I'm not talking about the stars,
ここで言う土地は 夜空の星のことではなく
04:15
I'm talking about the solar system, the stuff that's within reach
太陽系の話です 宇宙船でたどり着ける距離にあって
04:18
for spacecraft and within reach of our earthbound telescopes --
地球から望遠鏡で見える距離にある土地の話です
04:22
most of the real estate is very cold and very far from the Sun.
宇宙にある土地の大半は とても寒く 太陽から遠く離れています
04:28
If you look at the solar system, as we know it today,
今知り得る太陽系を見てみると
04:34
it has a few planets close to the Sun. That's where we live.
太陽の近くには惑星がいくつかあって 私たちはそこに暮らしています
04:38
It has a fairly substantial number of asteroids between
さらに 地球の軌道と 木星の軌道の間には
04:43
the orbit of the Earth out through -- to the orbit of Jupiter.
かなり多くの小惑星が存在しています
04:49
The asteroids are a substantial amount of real estate,
小惑星も 宇宙にある膨大な土地ではありますが
04:54
but not very large. And it's not very promising for life,
それほど大きくはなく あまり生活できそうもありません
04:57
since most of it consists of rock and metal, mostly rock.
ほとんどが岩や金属で 特に岩が多いからです
05:02
It's not only cold, but very dry.
また 寒いだけでなく乾燥もしていますので
05:06
So the asteroids we don't have much hope for.
小惑星にはあまり期待していません
05:11
There stand some interesting places a little further out:
しかし もう少し遠くを見ると興味深い場所がいくつかあります
05:17
the moons of Jupiter and Saturn.
木星の衛星や 土星の衛星です
05:22
Particularly, there's a place called Europa, which is --
特に興味深いのがユーロパという --
05:24
Europa is one of the moons of Jupiter,
木星の衛星の一つです
05:26
where we see a very level ice surface,
表面は非常に滑らかな氷で覆われており
05:29
which looks as if it's floating on top of an ocean.
海に浮いているように見えますので
05:34
So, we believe that on Europa there is, in fact, a deep ocean.
ユーロパには深い海があると信じられています
05:37
And that makes it extraordinarily interesting as a place to explore.
だからこそ探査するには極めて興味深い場所なのです
05:41
Ocean -- probably the most likely place for life to originate,
海というのは おそらく生命誕生の確率が最も高い場所です
05:45
just as it originated on the Earth. So we would love to explore Europa,
地球と同じことです だからユーロパの氷の下を
05:52
to go down through the ice,
ぜひ探査したいのです
05:59
find out who is swimming around in the ocean,
海で何が泳ぎまわっているのか見てみたいですし
06:01
whether there are fish or seaweed or sea monsters --
魚や 海草や 海の怪獣がいるのか見てみたいのです
06:04
whatever there may be that's exciting --- or cephalopods.
何がいても興奮します イカやタコなどの頭足動物でもいいです
06:09
But that's hard to do. Unfortunately, the ice is thick.
しかし実現は困難です 残念ながら氷が厚すぎるのです
06:15
We don't know just how thick it is, probably miles thick,
厚さは不明ですが おそらく何キロにも及ぶので
06:21
so it's very expensive and very difficult to go down there --
潜水艦などを氷の下に潜らせて探査するのは
06:24
send down your submarine or whatever it is -- and explore.
非常に高価で 極めて難しいのです
06:28
That's something we don't yet know how to do.
このような技術はまだありません
06:32
There are plans to do it, but it's hard.
計画は持ち上がっても 実行は難しいのです
06:35
Go out a bit further, you'll find that beyond the orbit of Neptune,
もう少し遠く 海王星の軌道よりも遠く
06:40
way out, far from the Sun, that's where the real estate really begins.
太陽からはるか遠くに行けば 真の土地が見つかります
06:43
You'll find millions or trillions or billions of objects which,
何百万 何十億 あるいは何兆もの天体がある --
06:49
in what we call the Kuiper Belt or the Oort Cloud --
カイパーベルトや オールトの雲と呼ばれる場所です
06:54
these are clouds of small objects which appear as comets
太陽に向かってくるときに 彗星として観測されるような --
06:57
when they fall close to the Sun. Mostly, they just live out there
小さな天体からなる雲です
07:03
in the cold of the outer solar system,
大半が太陽系の外れにある寒い空間に存在していますが
07:07
but they are biologically very interesting indeed,
生物学的には非常に興味深い天体です
07:10
because they consist primarily of ice with other minerals,
無機物を含んだ氷が主成分だからです
07:14
which are just the right ones for developing life.
つまり 生命誕生に適した構成なのです
07:18
So if life could be established out there,
生命がそこに定着できるのであれば
07:21
it would have all the essentials -- chemistry and sunlight --
必須の要素はそろっています 化学的条件や太陽光といった --
07:24
everything that's needed.
すべてが整っているのです
07:30
So, what I'm proposing
わたしが提案しているのは
07:33
is that there is where we should be looking for life, rather than on Mars,
火星ではなく そこで生命を探したほうがいいということです
07:36
although Mars is, of course, also a very promising and interesting place.
火星も もちろん非常に期待の持てる興味深い場所なのですが
07:40
But we can look outside, very cheaply and in a simple fashion.
太陽系の外れを 安く簡単に探査することができるのです
07:44
And that's what I'm going to talk about.
それについて少しお話します
07:49
There is a -- imagine that life originated on Europa,
ユーロパに生命が誕生して --
07:53
and it was sitting in the ocean for billions of years.
何十億年も海の中にいたとすれば
07:58
It's quite likely that it would move out of the ocean onto the surface,
生命が海を抜け出し 表面に出てくる可能性は十分にあります
08:02
just as it did on the Earth.
地球で起きたのと同じです
08:06
Staying in the ocean and evolving in the ocean for 2 billion years,
20億年間 海の中で生活し 進化して --
08:08
finally came out onto the land. And then of course it had great --
やっと陸上にでてきた後には もちろん
08:11
much greater freedom, and a much greater variety of creatures
前よりもはるかに自由になって
08:15
developed on the land than had ever been possible in the ocean.
海の中なら考えられなかったほど 多様な生き物に進化しました
08:19
And the step from the ocean to the land was not easy, but it happened.
海中から陸上への進化は簡単ではありませんが実現しました
08:23
Now, if life had originated on Europa in the ocean,
ユーロパの海に生命が誕生しているなら
08:29
it could also have moved out onto the surface.
表面に出ている可能性もあります
08:33
There wouldn't have been any air there -- it's a vacuum.
表面は真空なので空気はありません
08:35
It is out in the cold, but it still could have come.
外は寒い世界ですが 出てくる可能性があります
08:38
You can imagine that the plants growing up like kelp
氷の割れ目を通って伸びてきて 表面でさらに成長する --
08:44
through cracks in the ice, growing on the surface.
海草のような植物が考えられます
08:48
What would they need in order to grow on the surface?
表面で成長するには何が必要か?
08:52
They'd need, first of all, to have a thick skin to protect themselves
まず最初に必要になるのが厚い皮です
08:54
from losing water through the skin.
表面から体内の水分が抜けるのを防ぐためです
09:00
So they would have to have something like a reptilian skin.
爬虫類のような皮が必要です
09:06
But better -- what is more important
しかし それより重要なのは
09:11
is that they would have to concentrate sunlight.
太陽光を集めなければいけないことです
09:13
The sunlight in Jupiter, on the satellites of Jupiter,
木星や その衛星を照らす太陽光は
09:16
is 25 times fainter than it is here,
地球を照らす光より25倍も弱いのですが それは木星が --
09:20
since Jupiter is five times as far from the Sun.
地球より5倍も太陽から遠いからです
09:24
So they would have to have -- these creatures, which I call sunflowers,
私はヒマワリと呼んでいるのですが
09:26
which I imagine living on the surface of Europa, would have to have
太陽光を集めるレンズや鏡を持った生物が
09:30
either lenses or mirrors to concentrate sunlight,
ユーロパの表面にいるはずです
09:36
so they could keep themselves warm on the surface.
そのおかげで表面でも暖かく過ごせるのです
09:40
Otherwise, they would be at a temperature of minus 150,
そうでもしなければ マイナス150度という環境は
09:44
which is certainly not favorable for developing life,
生命の発達には適さないのです 少なくとも --
09:48
at least of the kind we know.
私たちの知る生命には適しません
09:51
But if they just simply could grow, like leaves,
しかし 太陽光を集める小さなレンズや鏡が
09:53
little lenses and mirrors to concentrate sunlight,
そのまま葉っぱのように生えれば
09:56
then they could keep warm on the surface.
表面でも暖かく生活でき
09:59
They could enjoy all the benefits of the sunlight
太陽光の恩恵を享受できるのです
10:02
and have roots going down into the ocean;
根っこは海まで延びて
10:07
life then could flourish much more.
生命はどんどん繁殖できます
10:11
So, why not look? Of course, it's not very likely
探査しましょう もちろん ユーロパの表面に --
10:13
that there's life on the surface of Europa.
生命が存在する可能性は低いですし
10:16
None of these things is likely, but my,
今述べた生物がいる可能性は低いのですが
10:18
my philosophy is, look for what's detectable, not for what's probable.
私の理念は 確実なものではなく発見可能なものを探すことです
10:21
There's a long history in astronomy of unlikely things
なさそうなものが実はあったということが
10:27
turning out to be there. And I mean,
天文学の長い歴史ではよくありました
10:31
the finest example of that was radio astronomy as a whole.
電波天文学が 一番いい例です
10:33
This was -- originally, when radio astronomy began,
電波天文学が始まったとき
10:36
Mr. Jansky, at the Bell labs, detected radio waves coming from the sky.
ベル研究所のジャンスキー氏は 空から飛来する電波を検出しましたが
10:41
And the regular astronomers were scornful about this.
一般の天文学者は この報告をこう言ってばかにしました
10:51
They said, "It's all right, you can detect radio waves from the Sun,
「太陽から来る電波なら検出できる
10:55
but the Sun is the only object in the universe that's close enough
現実的には検出できるほど十分に近くて明るい天体なんて
11:01
and bright enough actually to be detectable. You can easily calculate
この宇宙で 太陽だけだ
11:04
that radio waves from the Sun are fairly faint,
簡単な計算で分かるけど 太陽の電波でさえとても弱い
11:09
and everything else in the universe is millions of times further away,
ほかの天体は太陽よりも何百万倍も遠いのだから
11:13
so it certainly will not be detectable.
検出なんて無理だ
11:19
So there's no point in looking."
だから 調べる意味など無い」
11:21
And that, of course, that set back the progress of radio astronomy
そのせいで 電波天文学の発展は
11:23
by about 20 years.
20年ほど後退しました
11:28
Since there was nothing there, you might as well not look.
何もないのに調べる必要などありません
11:33
Well, of course, as soon as anybody did look,
ところが 誰かが実際に調べてみると --
11:36
which was after about 20 years,
20年ほど後でしたが --
11:38
when radio astronomy really took off. Because it turned out
すぐ電波天文学が本格始動しました
11:41
the universe is absolutely full of all kinds of wonderful things
宇宙には 太陽からよりもはるかに強く放射された --
11:43
radiating in the radio spectrum, much brighter than the Sun.
電波という とてつもなくすばらしいものがあふれているからです
11:47
So, the same thing could be true for this kind of life,
先ほど話した寒い天体の生命についても
11:53
which I'm talking about, on cold objects: that it could in fact
同じことが言えると思います
11:58
be very abundant all over the universe, and it's not been detected
実は こんな生命が宇宙にあふれているのではないでしょうか
12:02
just because we haven't taken the trouble to look.
調べようとしなかったから発見されていないだけではないでしょうか
12:06
So, the last thing I want to talk about is how to detect it.
最後に どうやって発見するかお話します
12:10
There is something called pit lamping.
ピット ランピングという手法があります
12:15
That's the phrase which I learned from my son George,
息子のジョージに聞いた言葉です
12:17
who is there in the audience.
彼もここに来ています
12:19
You take -- that's a Canadian expression.
カナダで使われる表現なのですが
12:21
If you happen to want to hunt animals at night,
夜中に動物を狩るときは
12:28
you take a miner's lamp, which is a pit lamp.
炭坑作業用ランプを持って行きます これがピット ランプです
12:30
You strap it onto your forehead, so you can see
このランプをおでこに取り付ければ
12:34
the reflection in the eyes of the animal. So, if you go out at night,
動物の目で反射した光を見ることができます
12:37
you shine a flashlight, the animals are bright.
夜中に外に出て懐中電灯をつけると 動物が照らされて
12:41
You see the red glow in their eyes,
動物の目が赤く光るのが見えます
12:48
which is the reflection of the flashlight.
それは懐中電灯の反射なのです
12:51
And then, if you're one of these unsporting characters,
スポーツマン精神に欠ける人は そうやって
12:53
you shoot the animals and take them home.
動物を射ち殺し 家に持って帰ります
12:58
And of course, that spoils the game
日中に狩りをする人の楽しみを
13:01
for the other hunters who hunt in the daytime,
台無しにする行為ですから
13:03
so in Canada that's illegal. In New Zealand, it's legal,
カナダでは違法です ところが ニュージーランドでは合法です
13:05
because the New Zealand farmers use this as a way of getting rid of rabbits,
ニュージーランドの農民は この方法でウサギを駆除するからです
13:10
because the rabbits compete with the sheep in New Zealand.
ニュージーランドではウサギが羊のじゃまになるからです
13:15
So, the farmers go out at night
農民は夜中に
13:18
with heavily armed jeeps, and shine the headlights,
重武装したジープで外に出て ヘッドライトをつけて
13:20
and anything that doesn't look like a sheep, you shoot.
羊に見えなければ何だって撃つのです
13:25
(Laughter)
(笑い)
13:29
So I have proposed to apply the same trick
宇宙で生命を探すときも 同じような手法をとればいいと
13:31
to looking for life in the universe.
提案してきました
13:34
That if these creatures who are living on cold surfaces --
寒い表面に生息するこういった生物は --
13:36
either on Europa, or further out, anywhere where you can live
ユーロパでも もっと遠い天体でも 寒い表面に生息可能などんな天体でも
13:39
on a cold surface -- those creatures must be provided with reflectors.
このような生物は 反射体を必要とします
13:43
In order to concentrate sunlight, they have to have lenses and mirrors --
太陽光を集めるレンズや鏡を備えて
13:49
in order to keep themselves warm.
体温を保っているはずです
13:52
And then, when you shine sunlight at them,
太陽光でこの生物たちを照らすと
13:54
the sunlight will be reflected back,
動物の目と同じように
13:58
just as it is in the eyes of an animal.
光を反射して
14:01
So these creatures will be bright against the cold surroundings.
寒い環境の中に 生物が明るく浮かび上がります
14:06
And the further out you go in this, away from the Sun,
太陽から離れるほど
14:10
the more powerful this reflection will be. So actually,
反射が強くなりますので
14:14
this method of hunting for life gets stronger and stronger
この方法を使うなら 遠くに行くほど
14:18
as you go further away,
生命を発見しやすくなります
14:21
because the optical reflectors have to be more powerful so the reflected light
光反射体がより強力でなければならないので
14:23
shines out even more in contrast against the dark background.
暗闇の中で 反射光がいっそう映えるからです
14:28
So as you go further away from the Sun,
太陽から離れるほど
14:34
this becomes more and more powerful.
反射光は強力になります つまり --
14:36
So, in fact, you can look for these creatures with telescopes from the Earth.
天体望遠鏡を使って地球からこれらの生物を見れるのです
14:40
Why aren't we doing it? Simply because nobody thought of it yet.
なぜやらないのか?単に誰も思いつかなかっただけです
14:46
But I hope that we shall look, and with any --
しかし これを機にぜひ見ていただきたいのです
14:50
we probably won't find anything,
おそらく何も見つからないでしょう
14:55
none of these speculations may have any basis in fact.
これらの推測には実際には何の根拠もありません
14:57
But still, it's a good chance. And of course, if it happens,
でも良い機会です 生物が発見されれば
15:01
it will transform our view of life altogether.
生命に対する考え方が 根本から変わるはずです
15:04
Because it means that -- the way life can live out there,
遠くの天体に生命がいるとすれば 惑星よりその天体の方が --
15:07
it has enormous advantages as compared with living on a planet.
はるかに生息しやすいということを意味するからです
15:12
It's extremely hard to move from one planet to another.
惑星から惑星に移り住むことは非常に難しいことです
15:15
We're having great difficulties at the moment
今 そのようなことは極めて困難ですし
15:19
and any creatures that live on a planet are pretty well stuck.
ある惑星に生息する生物は なかなか離れられません
15:23
Especially if you breathe air,
特に呼吸をするなら
15:27
it's very hard to get from planet A to planet B,
惑星Aから惑星Bに移るのは困難です
15:29
because there's no air in between. But if you breathe air --
惑星間に空気がないからです 息をしたら --
15:32
(Laughter)
(笑い)
15:38
-- you're dead --
死にます
15:43
(Laughter)
(笑い)
15:44
-- as soon as you're off the planet, unless you have a spaceship.
宇宙船に乗らない限り 惑星を離れた瞬間に死にます
15:46
But if you live in a vacuum, if you live on the surface
ところが 最初から真空中に住んでいれば --
15:50
of one of these objects, say, in the Kuiper Belt,
例えばカイパーベルトにある天体の表面とか
15:53
this -- an object like Pluto, or one of the
冥王星とか
15:56
smaller objects in the neighborhood of Pluto,
冥王星の周りにある小さな天体などの表面に
15:59
and you happened -- if you're living on the surface there,
たまたま住んでいて
16:03
and you get knocked off the surface by a collision,
衝突で表面からたたき落とされても
16:05
then it doesn't change anything all that much.
大して何も変わりません
16:08
You still are on a piece of ice, you can still have sunlight
氷のかけらに乗ったまま太陽光を浴び続けることができて
16:11
and you can still survive while you're traveling from one place to another.
惑星から惑星に移動する間も生きられます
16:15
And then if you run into another object, you can stay there
そして 別の天体に遭遇すると そこに生息して
16:19
and colonize the other object. So life will spread, then,
繁殖することができます このように天体から天体へと
16:23
from one object to another. So if it exists at all in the Kuiper Belt,
生命が広がるのです つまり カイパーベルトに生命が存在するなら
16:26
it's likely to be very widespread. And you will have then
広範囲に存在している可能性が高いのです そうすると --
16:30
a great competition amongst species -- Darwinian evolution --
生物間の競争が激化し ダーウィンの進化が起きて
16:33
so there'll be a huge advantage to the species
衝突なしに天体から天体へと --
16:38
which is able to jump from one place to another
移住できるような生物は
16:41
without having to wait for a collision. And there'll be advantages
非常に有利になりますし
16:45
for spreading out long, sort of kelp-like forest of vegetation.
海草のように長くのびる植物の植生を広める上でも 利点になります
16:49
I call these creatures sunflowers.
このような植物をヒマワリと呼んでいます
16:56
They look like, maybe like sunflowers.
ヒマワリに似ていると思うからです
16:58
They have to be all the time pointing toward the Sun,
常に太陽の方を向いている必要があります
17:01
and they will be able to spread out in space,
このような天体の重力は弱いので
17:04
because gravity on these objects is weak.
宇宙のあちこちに広がることができるはずです
17:07
So they can collect sunlight from a big area.
この植物は大面積で太陽光を集めますから
17:11
So they will, in fact, be quite easy for us to detect.
発見するのは簡単です
17:14
So, I hope in the next 10 years, we'll find these creatures,
今後10年以内にこのような生物を発見できればと願っています
17:18
and then, of course, our whole view of life in the universe will change.
そうすれば もちろん 宇宙生命に対する考え方が変わります
17:21
If we don't find them, then we can create them ourselves.
発見できなくても 作ることができます
17:26
(Laughter)
(笑い)
17:30
That's another wonderful opportunity that's opening.
そのような素晴らしい機会が開けてきています
17:33
We can -- as soon as we have a little bit more understanding
遺伝子工学に対する理解が深まれば
17:40
of genetic engineering, one of the things you can do with your
一つの選択肢として
17:43
take-it-home, do-it-yourself genetic engineering kit --
家庭用の自作遺伝子工学キットを使って
17:48
(Laughter) --
(笑い)
17:51
is to design a creature that can live on a cold satellite,
ユーロパのような寒い衛星に生息できる生物をデザインできます
17:53
a place like Europa, so we could colonize Europa with our own creatures.
そうやって作り出した生物で ユーロパをいっぱいにするのです
17:56
That would be a fun thing to do.
これは おもしろそうですね
18:01
(Laughter)
(笑い)
18:05
In the long run, of course,
しかし 長い目で見ると
18:08
it would also make it possible for us to move out there.
そうすることで 私たちも宇宙に移住できるようになります
18:11
What's going to happen in the end,
最終的には
18:16
it's not going to be just humans colonizing space,
人間の居住地が宇宙に広がるだけではなく
18:18
it's going to be life moving out from the Earth,
生命が地球から出ていって
18:21
moving it into its kingdom. And the kingdom of life,
生命の王国へと移動するようになるのです
18:25
of course, is going to be the universe. And if life is already there,
王国とは もちろん宇宙のことです
18:28
it makes it much more exciting, in the short run.
短期的には すでに宇宙に生命がいれば かなりの驚きですが
18:33
But in the long run, if there's no life there, we create it ourselves.
長期的に考えると 生命がいなければ自分たちで作ることになります
18:36
We transform the universe into something much more rich and beautiful
宇宙を 今よりも豊かで美しいものに
18:42
than it is today.
変えるのです
18:46
So again, we have a big and wonderful future to look forward.
私たちが迎える未来は 盛大で素敵な世界なのです
18:48
Thank you.
ありがとう
18:53
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:54
Translated by Mariko Edwards
Reviewed by Satoshi Tatsuhara

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Freeman Dyson - Physicist
With Freeman Dyson's astonishing forecasts for the future, it's hard to tell where science ends and science fiction begins. But far from being a wild-eyed visionary, Dyson is a clear and sober thinker -- and one not afraid of controversy or heresy.

Why you should listen

From inventing Dyson Spheres, a sci-fi conceit postulating habitable shells around Sol-like stars, to "space chickens" and trees that grow in comets, Freeman Dyson is not afraid to go out on a cosmic limb. It would be wrong, however, to categorize him as a publicity-hungry peddler of headline-grabbing ideas. In his 60-year career as one of planet Earth's most distinguished scientists, several things characterize Dyson more than anything else: compassion, caution and overwhelming humanism.

In addition to his work as a scientist, Dyson is a renowned and best-selling author.  His most recent book, A Many-Colored Glass, tackles nothing less than biotechnology, religion and the role of life in the universe. He does not shy away from controversy: His recent critiques of the politics of the global warming debate have raised the hackles of some environmentalists. But far from wielding his conclusions like a bludgeon, Dyson wants younger generations of scientists to take away one thing from his work -- the necessity to create heresies of their own.

More profile about the speaker
Freeman Dyson | Speaker | TED.com