23:43
TED2004

Martin Seligman: The new era of positive psychology

マーティン・セリグマンのポジティブ心理学

Filmed:

マーティン・セリグマンが心理学(学問としての、患者とセラピストの1対1の関係においての)について話します。病気を越えたことに注目が移ってきた今、現代の心理学は私たちにどのように役立つのでしょうか?

- Psychologist
Martin Seligman is the founder of positive psychology, a field of study that examines healthy states, such as happiness, strength of character and optimism. Full bio

When I was president of the American Psychological Association,
私がアメリカ心理学会の会長だった時に
00:12
they tried to media-train me,
テレビで話すことになりました
00:15
and an encounter I had with CNN
このエピソードはこれからお話しすることを端的に表しています
00:17
summarizes what I'm going to be talking about today,
オプティミスト (楽観主義者) となるべき 11 番目の理由についての
00:21
which is the eleventh reason to be optimistic.
CNNの番組でした
00:24
The editor of Discover told us 10 of them,
ディスカバー誌の編集長が10番目まで話し
00:28
I'm going to give you the eleventh.
私が11番目を説明することになっていました
00:34
So they came to me -- CNN -- and they said, "Professor Seligman,
CNNのスタッフが来て私に訊きました 「セリグマン教授
00:36
would you tell us about the state of psychology today?
心理学の現状についてお話いただけますでしょうか?
00:40
We'd like to interview you about that." And I said, "Great."
インタビューします」私は答えます「喜んで」
00:45
And she said, "But this is CNN, so you only get a sound bite."
スタッフが言いました 「でもCNNですから 数秒間で話していただきます」
00:48
So I said, "Well, how many words do I get?"
「どれくらい喋れますか?」
00:53
And she said, "Well, one."
「1語ですね」
00:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:58
And cameras rolled, and she said, "Professor Seligman,
撮影が始まりました 「セリグマン教授
00:59
what is the state of psychology today?"
心理学の現状はいかがでしょうか?」
01:03
"Good."
「グッド」
01:07
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:09
"Cut. Cut. That won't do.
「カット カット それではわかりませんね
01:11
We'd really better give you a longer sound bite."
それではもう少し長くしましょう」
01:14
"Well, how many words do I get this time?" "I think, well, you get two.
「では 今度はどれくらい喋れますか?」「ええと 2語ですかね
01:18
Doctor Seligman, what is the state of psychology today?"
セリグマン教授 心理学の現状はいかがでしょうか?」
01:22
"Not good."
「ノット グッド」
01:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:30
"Look, Doctor Seligman,
「あの セリグマン教授
01:39
we can see you're really not comfortable in this medium.
どうもこれではやりづらいようですので
01:41
We'd better give you a real sound bite.
もう少しちゃんとした長さの時間を割り当てます
01:44
This time you can have three words.
次は3語 喋って結構です
01:47
Professor Seligman, what is the state of psychology today?"
セリグマン教授 心理学の現状はいかがでしょうか?」
01:50
"Not good enough." And that's what I'm going to be talking about.
「ノット グッド イナフ(十分に良いとは言えません)」それがここでお話ししたいことです
01:55
I want to say why psychology was good, why it was not good
心理学が良かったのはなぜか 良くなかったのはなぜか
02:00
and how it may become, in the next 10 years, good enough.
そして次の10年間にどのようにもっと良くなるか
02:04
And by parallel summary, I want to say the same thing about technology,
並行してテクノロジーとエンターテインメントとデザインについても
02:08
about entertainment and design, because I think the issues are very similar.
同じことをお話しします どれも問題はすごく似ているからです
02:13
So, why was psychology good?
今の心理学の良いところは何でしょうか?
02:17
Well, for more than 60 years, psychology worked within the disease model.
60年以上にわたり 心理学は病理モデルを基本としてきました
02:20
Ten years ago, when I was on an airplane
10年前 飛行機に乗ったとき
02:25
and I introduced myself to my seatmate, and told them what I did,
隣の席の人に自己紹介をして どういう仕事をしているのか話したら
02:27
they'd move away from me.
みんな私から距離を置きがちになっていました
02:31
And because, quite rightly, they were saying
心理学は人の問題を見つける 狂ってる人を特定するものだ
02:33
psychology is about finding what's wrong with you. Spot the loony.
と彼らは思っていたのでしょう
02:36
And now, when I tell people what I do, they move toward me.
しかし今 私が何をしているのか話すと誰もが乗り出して興味を持ちます
02:40
And what was good about psychology,
これまでの心理学にも良かった点はあります
02:45
about the 30 billion dollar investment NIMH made,
300億ドルの投資がされた国立精神衛生研究所により
02:48
about working in the disease model,
また病理モデルに基づいた研究により
02:52
about what you mean by psychology,
これまでの典型的な心理学ができるようになったことがあります
02:54
is that, 60 years ago, none of the disorders were treatable --
60年前にはどのような疾患も手当てできませんでした
02:56
it was entirely smoke and mirrors.
単なるまやかしに過ぎませんでした
03:01
And now, 14 of the disorders are treatable,
今では14もの疾患を手当てできて
03:03
two of them actually curable.
そのうちの2つは実際に治せます
03:05
And the other thing that happened is that a science developed,
それに加えて精神疾患についての
03:07
a science of mental illness.
科学的手法も発展しました
03:12
That we found out that we could take fuzzy concepts -- like depression, alcoholism --
うつやアルコール中毒などの曖昧な事例に対して
03:14
and measure them with rigor.
精密な検査ができることに気づきました
03:22
That we could create a classification of the mental illnesses.
精神疾患の分類も作ることができましたし
03:24
That we could understand the causality of the mental illnesses.
その因果関係を理解することもできました
03:28
We could look across time at the same people --
例えば 遺伝的に統合失調症になりやすい人を
03:33
people, for example, who were genetically vulnerable to schizophrenia --
長い期間観察し続けることで
03:37
and ask what the contribution of mothering, of genetics are,
育児と遺伝の寄与を調べたり
03:41
and we could isolate third variables
精神疾患を扱った実験をして
03:45
by doing experiments on the mental illnesses.
関係ない要因を分離することができました
03:48
And best of all, we were able, in the last 50 years,
とりわけ 過去50年の間に
03:51
to invent drug treatments and psychological treatments.
薬物治療や心理学的治療を開発して
03:55
And then we were able to test them rigorously,
無作為割り付け盲検法で
03:59
in random assignment, placebo controlled designs,
厳密に検証して 効果のない治療は止め
04:03
throw out the things that didn't work, keep the things that actively did.
有効な治療だけを残すことができました
04:06
And the conclusion of that is that psychology and psychiatry, over the last 60 years,
過去60年の心理学と精神医学の結論として言えるのは
04:10
can actually claim that we can make miserable people less miserable.
苦しんでいる人の苦しみを和らげることができると確かに主張できることです
04:17
And I think that's terrific. I'm proud of it.
これはすごいことです 誇りに思います
04:23
But what was not good, the consequences of that were three things.
しかしこれらの結果として3つ良くないことが発生しました
04:30
The first was moral,
1つ目は行動規範についてです
04:35
that psychologists and psychiatrists became victimologists, pathologizers,
心理学者と精神科医は被害者学者や病気を探す人になってしまい
04:37
that our view of human nature was that if you were in trouble, bricks fell on you.
困難は外的なもので どうにもできないのだと捉えてしまいました
04:41
And we forgot that people made choices and decisions.
人が選択と決定をすることを忘れ
04:46
We forgot responsibility. That was the first cost.
責任ということを忘れたわけです
04:49
The second cost was that we forgot about you people.
2つ目の代償は普通の人々について考えなくなってしまったことです
04:53
We forgot about improving normal lives.
普通の人生をさらに良くすることを忘れてしまいました
04:57
We forgot about a mission to make relatively untroubled people happier,
あまり困っていない人々をより幸せで より充実して より生産的にすることを忘れ
05:01
more fulfilled, more productive. And "genius," "high-talent," became a dirty word.
天賦の才や才能などは禁句になってしまいました
05:07
No one works on that.
誰もそれを扱っていません
05:13
And the third problem about the disease model is,
そして病理モデルの第3の問題は
05:15
in our rush to do something about people in trouble,
困難にある人々に対して何かをしようという衝動
05:19
in our rush to do something about repairing damage,
回復のために何かをしようという衝動です
05:22
it never occurred to us to develop interventions
私たちがそういう姿勢だったので
05:27
to make people happier, positive interventions.
人々をより幸せにするポジティブな介入は発展しませんでした
05:30
So that was not good.
これらが良くなかった点です
05:34
And so, that's what led people like Nancy Etcoff, Dan Gilbert,
これが エトコフやギルバートやチクセントミハイや私が
05:36
Mike Csikszentmihalyi and myself to work in something I call positive psychology,
ポジティブ心理学と呼ばれる分野の研究をするようになった理由です
05:41
which has three aims.
ポジティブ心理学には3つの目標があります
05:45
The first is that psychology should be just as concerned
まず心理学は短所と同じように長所にも
05:47
with human strength as it is with weakness.
関心を向けるべきであるということ
05:52
It should be just as concerned with building strength as with repairing damage.
傷を回復することと同じように 長所を伸ばすことにも関心を向けるべきです
05:56
It should be interested in the best things in life.
人生で最も素晴らしいことに対して
06:03
And it should be just as concerned with making the lives of normal people fulfilling,
そして普通の人々の人生をより充実させることと
06:05
and with genius, with nurturing high talent.
天賦の才や高い才能の養育にも関心を持つべきです
06:11
So in the last 10 years and the hope for the future,
こうして この10年の間に
06:16
we've seen the beginnings of a science of positive psychology,
人生の生きがいについての科学である
06:20
a science of what makes life worth living.
ポジティブ心理学が幕を開けました 今後もさらに続いていくことでしょう
06:24
It turns out that we can measure different forms of happiness.
異なった種類の幸せを測定できることが発見されました
06:27
And any of you, for free, can go to that website
どなたでもこのウェブサイトにアクセスして
06:31
and take the entire panoply of tests of happiness.
幸せのテストを一通り受けることができます
06:35
You can ask, how do you stack up for positive emotion, for meaning,
あなたが どうやってポジティブな感情や意味 フローに達するのか
06:38
for flow, against literally tens of thousands of other people?
文字通り数万人と比較することができます
06:43
We created the opposite of the diagnostic manual of the insanities:
精神障害とは正反対の診断表を作りました
06:47
a classification of the strengths and virtues that looks at the sex ratio,
強みと長所の分類表です
06:53
how they're defined, how to diagnose them,
性別ごとの割合 どのようにその項目が定義されているか どのように診断するか
06:58
what builds them and what gets in their way.
何がそれを伸ばし 何がそれを阻害するか がわかります
07:00
We found that we could discover the causation of the positive states,
ポジティブな状態が起こる原因—
07:05
the relationship between left hemispheric activity
脳の左半球と右半球の活動がどのように幸せに影響するのか
07:09
and right hemispheric activity as a cause of happiness.
解き明かせると気づきました
07:13
I've spent my life working on extremely miserable people,
大変苦しんでいる人々を相手に仕事をしてきて
07:20
and I've asked the question,
この苦しんでいる人たちと普通の人たちとは何が違うのか
07:23
how do extremely miserable people differ from the rest of you?
疑問に思いました
07:25
And starting about six years ago, we asked about extremely happy people.
6年前からは非常に幸せな人々に対して
07:28
And how do they differ from the rest of us?
彼らは他の人々と何が違うのだろうか?と問いかけ始めました
07:33
And it turns out there's one way.
そうしてある理由が判明しました
07:35
They're not more religious, they're not in better shape,
彼らは特に信仰心が強いわけでもなく 体型が良いわけでもなく
07:39
they don't have more money, they're not better looking,
お金がたくさんあるわけでも 見た目が良いわけでも
07:41
they don't have more good events and fewer bad events.
良い出来事が多いわけでも 悪い出来事が少ないわけでもありませんでした
07:44
The one way in which they differ: they're extremely social.
違うことはただ1つです 彼らはものすごく社交的です
07:47
They don't sit in seminars on Saturday morning.
土曜の朝にセミナーに出席したりしません
07:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:55
They don't spend time alone.
1人で時間を過ごすことはありません
07:59
Each of them is in a romantic relationship
良い恋愛関係を持っていて
08:01
and each has a rich repertoire of friends.
いろんなタイプの友人がいます
08:03
But watch out here. This is merely correlational data, not causal,
ただ注意してください これは単に相関があるだけで原因を示しているのではないです
08:06
and it's about happiness in the first Hollywood sense I'm going to talk about:
また私がお話しするのはハリウッド映画みたいな分かりやすい幸せです
08:11
happiness of ebullience and giggling and good cheer.
はしゃいだり 笑ったり 歓声を上げたりするような幸せのことです
08:16
And I'm going to suggest to you that's not nearly enough, in just a moment.
そういった幸せだけでは十分でないと 今から示します
08:20
We found we could begin to look at interventions over the centuries,
ブッダからトニー ロビンズまでの何世紀にもわたる
08:24
from the Buddha to Tony Robbins.
介入手法を検討することから始めました
08:29
About 120 interventions have been proposed
人々を幸せにするという
08:31
that allegedly make people happy.
介入手法は 120 ほども示されています
08:34
And we find that we've been able to manualize many of them,
そのうちの多くはマニュアル化ができましたし
08:37
and we actually carry out random assignment
無作為割り付けをして効果や有効性を
08:42
efficacy and effectiveness studies.
検証できました
08:45
That is, which ones actually make people lastingly happier?
つまり「どれが本当に人を永続的に幸せにするのか?」
08:47
In a couple of minutes, I'll tell you about some of those results.
これからその結果をご紹介します
08:51
But the upshot of this is that the mission I want psychology to have,
この話の要点は精神疾患の治療という使命と
08:54
in addition to its mission of curing the mentally ill,
苦しんでいる人の苦しみを和らげるという使命に加えて
09:01
and in addition to its mission of making miserable people less miserable,
私が心理学に持って欲しいと願う使命であり
09:05
is can psychology actually make people happier?
「心理学は本当に人々を幸せにすることができるのか」ということです
09:09
And to ask that question -- happy is not a word I use very much --
そのことを問うためには、私があまり使わない言葉である 「幸せ」を
09:13
we've had to break it down into what I think is askable about happy.
分解して議論できる形にしなければなりません
09:17
And I believe there are three different --
3 つの異なった幸せがあると考えています
09:21
and I call them different because different interventions build them,
区別する理由は
09:24
it's possible to have one rather than the other --
3 つは異なったレシピで形成され
09:28
three different happy lives.
この中で特定の1つの幸せを目ざせるからです
09:31
The first happy life is the pleasant life.
1つ目の幸せな生き方は快楽の人生です
09:33
This is a life in which you have as much positive emotion as you possibly can,
これは可能な限り多くのポジティブ感情を持ち
09:36
and the skills to amplify it.
それを強めて人生を過ごすことです
09:41
The second is a life of engagement --
2つ目は夢中を追求する人生です
09:43
a life in your work, your parenting, your love, your leisure, time stops for you.
あなたの仕事 子育て 愛 余暇活動のために時間が止まります
09:45
That's what Aristotle was talking about.
これはアリストテレスが言っていたことです
09:53
And third, the meaningful life.
3つ目は意味のある人生です
09:55
So I want to say a little bit about each of those lives
これらの3つの生き方のそれぞれについて
09:57
and what we know about them.
わかっていることをお話します
10:00
The first life is the pleasant life and it's simply, as best we can find it,
1つ目の快楽の人生は 単純に快楽を手に入れるように最善を尽くす生き方です
10:02
it's having as many of the pleasures as you can,
できる限り多くの快楽と
10:07
as much positive emotion as you can,
できる限り多くのポジティブ感情を持って
10:09
and learning the skills -- savoring, mindfulness -- that amplify them,
味わったり意識を充実させるなど それらをより強くする技術を習得して
10:12
that stretch them over time and space.
快楽と感情を時間と空間を越えたものにする人生です
10:18
But the pleasant life has three drawbacks,
しかし快楽の人生には3つの欠点があります
10:21
and it's why positive psychology is not happy-ology and why it doesn't end here.
ポジティブ心理学が幸福学ではなく 講演がここで終わらない理由がそこにあります
10:25
The first drawback is that it turns out the pleasant life,
快楽の人生の欠点の1つは
10:31
your experience of positive emotion, is heritable,
ポジティブ感情は遺伝性であるということです
10:34
about 50 percent heritable, and, in fact, not very modifiable.
50パーセント程度が遺伝的で たいして変えることができません
10:39
So the different tricks that Matthieu [Ricard] and I and others know
人生の中でポジティブ感情を増やすことについて
10:45
about increasing the amount of positive emotion in your life
マシューや私やその他の何人かが知っている異なったやり方は
10:49
are 15 to 20 percent tricks, getting more of it.
15から20 パーセントほど 多めにポジティブ感情を獲得することに役立つでしょう
10:53
Second is that positive emotion habituates. It habituates rapidly, indeed.
2つ目は ポジティブ感情には慣れが生じることです 実に急速に慣れてしまいます
10:57
It's all like French vanilla ice cream, the first taste is a 100 percent;
私はフレンチバニラアイスクリームが好きです 最初の味は100パーセントです
11:05
by the time you're down to the sixth taste, it's gone.
しかし6口目を食べるときにはそうではない
11:10
And, as I said, it's not particularly malleable.
そして申し上げたように 引き伸ばすことはとても難しい
11:15
And this leads to the second life.
ここで2つ目の幸せな生き方が出てきます
11:19
And I have to tell you about my friend, Len,
なぜポジティブ心理学がポジティブ感情と
11:22
to talk about why positive psychology is more than positive emotion,
喜びを積み上げることに留まらないのかを説明するために
11:24
more than building pleasure.
レンのことを話しましょう
11:30
In two of the three great arenas of life, by the time Len was 30,
30歳の頃には人生の3つのステージのうちの2つで
11:32
Len was enormously successful. The first arena was work.
レンはとても成功していました 最初のステージは仕事です
11:36
By the time he was 20, he was an options trader.
20歳になる頃にはオプション取引をしていました
11:42
By the time he was 25, he was a multimillionaire
25歳の時には億万長者になっていて
11:44
and the head of an options trading company.
オプション取引会社の社長になっていました
11:47
Second, in play -- he's a national champion bridge player.
第2のステージは遊びです 彼はブリッジの国内チャンピオンでした
11:50
But in the third great arena of life, love, Len is an abysmal failure.
しかし第3のステージである恋愛については レンは底知れぬ失敗者でした
11:56
And the reason he was, was that Len is a cold fish.
レンは無感情そのものだったからです
12:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:08
Len is an introvert.
レンは内向的でした
12:10
American women said to Len, when he dated them,
アメリカの女性がレンとデートした時に言いました
12:14
"You're no fun. You don't have positive emotion. Get lost."
あなたって全く楽しくなくて ポジティブな気持ちも持ってない さっさとどこかへ行って
12:18
And Len was wealthy enough to be able to afford a Park Avenue psychoanalyst,
レンはとても裕福だったのでパーク・アべニューの精神分析家のところへ診察に行き
12:22
who for five years tried to find the sexual trauma
精神分析家は5年かけてレンの中にポジティブ感情を閉じ込めた
12:28
that had somehow locked positive emotion inside of him.
性的トラウマを見つけようとしました
12:32
But it turned out there wasn't any sexual trauma.
しかし性的トラウマは全くありませんでした
12:35
It turned out that -- Len grew up in Long Island
わかったことは レンはロングアイランドで育ち
12:39
and he played football and watched football, and played bridge --
フットボールで遊び フットボールを観戦し ブリッジをしていたことだけです
12:43
Len is in the bottom five percent of what we call positive affectivities.
レンはポジティブ感情の軸で並べたら下位 5パーセントに入ります
12:49
The question is, is Len unhappy? And I want to say not.
レンは不幸なのでしょうか?私は違うと思います
12:54
Contrary to what psychology told us about the bottom 50 percent
ポジティブ情動性の下位50パーセントの人間について
12:58
of the human race in positive affectivity,
心理学が説明することとは裏腹に
13:02
I think Len is one of the happiest people I know.
レンは私が知っている最も幸福な人のうちの1人でしょう
13:05
He's not consigned to the hell of unhappiness
彼は不幸に捕らわれたりしません
13:08
and that's because Len, like most of you, is enormously capable of flow.
また みなさんと同じように非常にうまくフローを活用できます
13:11
When he walks onto the floor of the American Exchange at 9:30 in the morning,
朝9時30分にレンがアメリカ証券取引所に入ると
13:17
time stops for him. And it stops till the closing bell.
彼の時間は止まります それは終了の合図まで続きます
13:22
When the first card is played,
最初のカードが切られると
13:25
until 10 days later, the tournament is over, time stops for Len.
10日後にトーナメントが終わるまでレンの時間は止まります
13:27
And this is indeed what Mike Csikszentmihalyi has been talking about,
これはまさしくミハイ チクセントミハイがフローについて話していたことで
13:31
about flow. And it's distinct from pleasure in a very important way.
またフローと快楽の違いは非常に重要です
13:35
Pleasure has raw feels: you know it's happening. It's thought and feeling.
快楽にはその場で起こっているという生の感じが伴います 思考と感覚があります
13:40
But what Mike told you yesterday -- during flow, you can't feel anything.
しかしミハイが昨日話したように フローが起こっている間には何も感じません
13:45
You're one with the music. Time stops.
音楽と一体になり 時間が止まるというわけです
13:54
You have intense concentration.
強烈な集中状態です
13:58
And this is indeed the characteristic of what we think of as the good life.
これは確かに良い人生の特徴です
14:00
And we think there's a recipe for it,
そして最も高い強みを知るという
14:05
and it's knowing what your highest strengths are.
良い人生を作るためのレシピがあります
14:08
And again, there's a valid test
繰り返しとなりますが あなたの最も高い—
14:10
of what your five highest strengths are.
5つの強みを知るための有効なテストがあります
14:12
And then re-crafting your life to use them as much as you possibly can.
その長所をできるだけ活かせるように人生を修正しましょう
14:15
Re-crafting your work, your love,
仕事も愛情関係も
14:21
your play, your friendship, your parenting.
趣味も友人関係も子育ても
14:24
Just one example. One person I worked with was a bagger at Genuardi's.
一例として食品スーパーのレジ係の話をしましょう
14:27
Hated the job.
彼女は自分の仕事を嫌っていました
14:32
She's working her way through college.
大学に通う間ずっと働いていました
14:34
Her highest strength was social intelligence,
一番の強みは社会的知性だったので
14:37
so she re-crafted bagging to make the encounter with her
その日で一番の社会的体験をお客さんに提供できるように
14:40
the social highlight of every customer's day.
仕事のやり方を変えようとしました
14:45
Now obviously she failed.
そううまくいくものではありません
14:47
But what she did was to take her highest strengths,
しかし彼女は一番の強みを見つけ
14:50
and re-craft work to use them as much as possible.
仕事でそれを最大限に活用するようにしました
14:53
What you get out of that is not smiley-ness.
常にニコニコしていればいい というわけではありません
14:57
You don't look like Debbie Reynolds.
デビー レイノルズみたいにならなくていいんです
14:59
You don't giggle a lot. What you get is more absorption.
そんなに笑ったりしないでしょう 大事なのはもっと没頭することだったのです
15:01
So, that's the second path. The first path, positive emotion.
これが2つ目の方法です 1つ目の方法はポジティブ感情
15:06
The second path is eudaimonian flow.
2つ目の方法はエウダイモニア(幸福)のフロー状態
15:10
And the third path is meaning.
3つ目は意味です
15:14
This is the most venerable of the happinesses, traditionally.
これは伝統的にも 幸せの中で最も尊敬されるものです
15:16
And meaning, in this view, consists of -- very parallel to eudaimonia --
前の項目 エウダイモニアと並行して
15:20
it consists of knowing what your highest strengths are, and using them
自分より大きな何かに捧げるために
15:26
to belong to and in the service of something larger than you are.
自分の最も高い強みを知ること それを使うことから成り立ちます
15:32
I mentioned that for all three kinds of lives, the pleasant life,
快楽の人生 充実の人生 意味のある人生の3つの生き方を紹介しましたが
15:39
the good life, the meaningful life, people are now hard at work on the question,
ここで誰もが気になってくるでしょう
15:44
are there things that lastingly change those lives?
永続的にこれらの生き方をするための方法があるのだろうか?
15:49
And the answer seems to be yes. And I'll just give you some samples of it.
その答えはイエスと思われます 例をお話ししましょう
15:53
It's being done in a rigorous manner.
これらは厳密な方法で
15:59
It's being done in the same way that we test drugs to see what really works.
本当に効き目がある薬を検証するのと同じ方法で確かめられてきました
16:01
So we do random assignment, placebo controlled,
異なった介入に対して 無作為割り付け盲検法の
16:06
long-term studies of different interventions.
長期研究を私たちは行っています
16:11
And just to sample the kind of interventions that we find have an effect,
効果があると判った介入をいくつか示します
16:14
when we teach people about the pleasant life,
快楽の人生について教えるときに
16:18
how to have more pleasure in your life,
人生の快楽を増やすための習得課題として
16:22
one of your assignments is to take the mindfulness skills, the savoring skills,
集中する技術や満喫する技術を身につけさせます
16:24
and you're assigned to design a beautiful day.
素晴らしい一日を作り上げることを宿題にします
16:30
Next Saturday, set a day aside, design yourself a beautiful day,
次の土曜日には いつも気にしていることは脇に置いて良い一日を過ごしてください
16:34
and use savoring and mindfulness to enhance those pleasures.
満喫して精神を充実させて快楽を高めてください
16:39
And we can show in that way that the pleasant life is enhanced.
そうすることで快楽の人生の質は高められていきます
16:43
Gratitude visit. I want you all to do this with me now, if you would.
感謝の訪問について話しましょう 皆さんもイメージしてください
16:50
Close your eyes.
目を閉じて
16:56
I'd like you to remember someone who did something enormously important
あなたの人生を良い方向に変えた非常に重要なことをしてくれた
16:58
that changed your life in a good direction,
にもかかわらずこれまでにちゃんと感謝を伝えられなかった
17:06
and who you never properly thanked.
誰かを思い浮かべてください
17:10
The person has to be alive. OK.
今も生きている人に限ります よろしいでしょうか
17:13
Now, OK, you can open your eyes.
では 目を開けてください
17:16
I hope all of you have such a person.
ぴったりな人が見つかったかと思います
17:18
Your assignment, when you're learning the gratitude visit,
感謝の訪問をする時にあなたがすることは
17:20
is to write a 300-word testimonial to that person,
その人に300語の感謝状を書いて
17:24
call them on the phone in Phoenix,
フェニックスに電話をかけて
17:28
ask if you can visit, don't tell them why, show up at their door,
なぜかは言わずに訪ねてよいか聞きます 訪ねていって
17:31
you read the testimonial -- everyone weeps when this happens.
感謝状を読んでください 誰もがこの時に涙を流します
17:36
And what happens is when we test people one week later, a month later,
1週間後 1ヶ月後 3ヶ月後にテストしてみると
17:42
three months later, they're both happier and less depressed.
より幸せであり また うつ状態にもなりにくくなっています
17:46
Another example is a strength date, in which we get couples
他の例として強みのデートがあります
17:52
to identify their highest strengths on the strengths test,
カップルのそれぞれに一番の強みをテストで調べて
17:56
and then to design an evening in which they both use their strengths,
2人の強みを活かせる一晩を計画してもらいます
17:59
and we find this is a strengthener of relationships.
これはお互いの関係の強化につながります
18:05
And fun versus philanthropy.
楽しみと慈善活動の対比について
18:08
But it's so heartening to be in a group like this,
慈善活動に打ち込む人が多く集うこのような場に
18:10
in which so many of you have turned your lives to philanthropy.
加われたことは実に元気づけられることです
18:13
Well, my undergraduates and the people I work with haven't discovered this,
さて 私の学生も共同研究者もこれを解明できていなかったので
18:17
so we actually have people do something altruistic
実際に人々に利他的なことや楽しいことをしてもらって
18:20
and do something fun, and to contrast it.
その2つを比較しています
18:24
And what you find is when you do something fun,
わかったことは 楽しいことをした時にはその気持ちは
18:27
it has a square wave walk set.
方形波みたいにしばらくしたら元通りになります
18:30
When you do something philanthropic to help another person, it lasts and it lasts.
他人を助ける慈善的なことをすると その効用は長く長く持続します
18:32
So those are examples of positive interventions.
これらはポジティブな介入の例です
18:38
So, the next to last thing I want to say is
最後の1つ前に話したいことは
18:42
we're interested in how much life satisfaction people have.
人々がどれほどの満足を一生の中で得られるかについてです
18:47
And this is really what you're about. And that's our target variable.
これが本当に大切なことで これこそが目標とする変数です
18:50
And we ask the question as a function of the three different lives,
3つの異なった生き方の関数として
18:54
how much life satisfaction do you get?
人生でどれほどの満足が得られるのかを問いかけました
18:58
So we ask -- and we've done this in 15 replications involving thousands of people --
15通りの条件を数千人の人々を対象にして検証しました
19:00
to what extent does the pursuit of pleasure,
快楽とポジティブ感情を
19:06
the pursuit of positive emotion, the pleasant life,
追求する快楽の人生—
19:08
the pursuit of engagement, time stopping for you,
時間が停止する 夢中の体験を追求する人生—
19:12
and the pursuit of meaning contribute to life satisfaction?
意味の追求の人生—それぞれがどのように人生の満足に影響しているのか?
19:15
And our results surprised us, but they were backward of what we thought.
結果は驚くべきもので 予想とは反対でした
19:19
It turns out the pursuit of pleasure has almost no contribution to life satisfaction.
快楽の追求は人生の満足にほとんど関係がありませんでした
19:23
The pursuit of meaning is the strongest.
意味の追求が最も強力なものでした
19:28
The pursuit of engagement is also very strong.
夢中の追求にも強い関係がありました
19:31
Where pleasure matters is if you have both engagement
快楽は夢中になることと意味を持ってこそ役に立ち
19:35
and you have meaning, then pleasure's the whipped cream and the cherry.
そのとき 喜びはホイップクリームやチェリーのように彩りを添えます
19:39
Which is to say, the full life -- the sum is greater than the parts, if you've got all three.
つまり3つが全てそろった生き方は 3つの総和よりも大きく
19:43
Conversely, if you have none of the three,
逆に3つのどの生き方もない空っぽの人生は
19:51
the empty life, the sum is less than the parts.
それぞれの生き方よりも小さなものになってしまう
19:54
And what we're asking now is
そして現在追究している疑問は
19:56
does the very same relationship, physical health, morbidity,
身体の健康 病的状態 寿命 生産性は
19:58
how long you live and productivity, follow the same relationship?
先ほどの話と同じ関係なのかということです
20:02
That is, in a corporation,
つまり 会社においては
20:07
is productivity a function of positive emotion, engagement and meaning?
生産性はポジティブ感情と夢中になることと意味に関係があるのか?
20:09
Is health a function of positive engagement,
健康は夢中になること 快楽
20:16
of pleasure, and of meaning in life?
人生の意味に関係があるのか?
20:19
And there is reason to think the answer to both of those may well be yes.
どちらの答えも「関係あり」と考える理由があります
20:21
So, Chris said that the last speaker had a chance to try to integrate what he heard,
クリスによると最後の講演者は全ての講演を総括する機会がもらえるそうです
20:28
and so this was amazing for me. I've never been in a gathering like this.
それを聞いた時は驚きました これほど多様な人が集まる講演会に出たことはないですから
20:35
I've never seen speakers stretch beyond themselves so much,
こんなにも自分の可能性を広げる講演者を見たのは初めてで
20:41
which was one of the remarkable things.
実に素晴らしいことです
20:44
But I found that the problems of psychology seemed to be parallel
しかし心理学の問題はテクノロジーとエンターテインメントとデザインの問題に
20:47
to the problems of technology, entertainment and design in the following way.
似ていることに気づきました
20:51
We all know that technology, entertainment and design
テクノロジーとエンターテインメントとデザインは破壊的な目的のために
20:56
have been and can be used for destructive purposes.
扱われてきていて これからもそうかも知れません
21:00
We also know that technology, entertainment and design
それと同時にこれらは
21:06
can be used to relieve misery.
苦難や不幸を取り除くためにも使うことができます
21:10
And by the way, the distinction between relieving misery
ところで苦難や不幸を取り除くことと
21:13
and building happiness is extremely important.
幸せを築くことの区別は非常に大切です
21:17
I thought, when I first became a therapist 30 years ago,
私が30年前に初めてセラピストになった時には
21:20
that if I was good enough to make someone not depressed,
患者を落ち込ませず 心配をなくし 怒りを和らげれば
21:23
not anxious, not angry, that I'd make them happy.
幸せにできると思っていました
21:29
And I never found that. I found the best you could ever do was to get to zero.
でもそうなったことはありません できたことは人をゼロに持ってくることでした
21:35
But they were empty.
しかし彼らは空っぽのままでした
21:40
And it turns out the skills of happiness, the skills of the pleasant life,
そうして幸せになる技術 快楽の人生を生きる技術
21:42
the skills of engagement, the skills of meaning,
夢中の人生を生きる技術 意味の人生を生きる技術は
21:47
are different from the skills of relieving misery.
苦難と不幸を取り除く技術とは違っていることに気づきました
21:50
And so, the parallel thing holds
同じことがテクノロジー エンターテインメント デザインにも
21:54
with technology, entertainment and design, I believe.
当てはまると考えています
21:57
That is, it is possible for these three drivers of our world
つまり世界の推進力であるこれら3つは
22:01
to increase happiness, to increase positive emotion,
幸せとポジティブ感情を増やすことが可能で
22:08
and that's typically how they've been used.
一般的にもそのように使われてきました
22:14
But once you fractionate happiness the way I do --
しかし私が話したように幸せを分解してみると
22:16
not just positive emotion, that's not nearly enough --
ポジティブ感情だけでは不十分で
22:19
there's flow in life, and there's meaning in life.
人生の中にはフローと意味も欠かせないことがわかるでしょう
22:22
As Laura Lee told us,
ローラリーが話したように
22:25
design, and, I believe, entertainment and technology,
デザインに加えて エンターテインメントとテクノロジーは
22:27
can be used to increase meaning engagement in life as well.
人生の中に意味のある夢中を増やすことができます
22:31
So in conclusion, the eleventh reason for optimism,
まとめます オプティミストになるべき 11 番目の理由とは
22:35
in addition to the space elevator,
宇宙エレベータに加えて
22:39
is that I think with technology, entertainment and design,
テクノロジーとエンターテイメントとデザインによって
22:43
we can actually increase the amount of tonnage
私たちはこの星に生きる人類の幸せの
22:48
of human happiness on the planet.
総量を実際に増やすことが可能なことです
22:52
And if technology can, in the next decade or two, increase the pleasant life,
テクノロジーが次の10年 20年に快楽の人生と
22:54
the good life and the meaningful life, it will be good enough.
充実の人生と意味のある人生を増やすことができたら非常に素晴らしいです
23:00
If entertainment can be diverted to also increase positive emotion,
エンターテインメントがポジティブ感情と
23:04
meaning, eudaimonia, it will be good enough.
意味とエウダイモニアを増やすことに転用できたら非常に素晴らしいです
23:10
And if design can increase positive emotion,
デザインがポジティブ感情
23:14
eudaimonia, and flow and meaning,
エウダイモニアとフロー そして意味を増やせたら—
23:20
what we're all doing together will become good enough. Thank you.
私たちが1つになれたら非常に素晴らしいです ありがとうございます
23:23
(Applause)
(拍手)
23:28
Translated by Keisuke Kusunoki
Reviewed by Natsuhiko Mizutani

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Martin Seligman - Psychologist
Martin Seligman is the founder of positive psychology, a field of study that examines healthy states, such as happiness, strength of character and optimism.

Why you should listen

Martin Seligman founded the field of positive psychology in 2000, and has devoted his career since then to furthering the study of positive emotion, positive character traits, and positive institutions. It's a fascinating field of study that had few empirical, scientific measures -- traditional clinical psychology focusing more on the repair of unhappy states than the propagation and nurturing of happy ones. In his pioneering work, Seligman directs the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania, developing clinical tools and training the next generation of positive psychologists.

His earlier work focused on perhaps the opposite state: learned helplessness, in which a person feels he or she is powerless to change a situation that is, in fact, changeable. Seligman is an often-cited authority in this field as well -- in fact, his is the 13th most likely name to pop up in a general psych textbook. He was the leading consultant on a Consumer Reports study on long-term psychotherapy, and has developed several common pre-employment tests, including the Seligman Attributional Style Questionnaire (SASQ).

 

More profile about the speaker
Martin Seligman | Speaker | TED.com