17:49
TEDGlobal 2007

Kwabena Boahen: A computer that works like the brain

クァベナ ボーヘン 脳のように機能するコンピュータ

Filmed:

研究者 クァベナ ボーヘンは脳の卓越した計算処理能力をシリコン上に再現する方法を模索しています。脳内の複雑で冗長なプロセスこそが、小さく軽く高速なコンピュータの作成に役立つからです。

- Bioengineer
Kwabena Boahen wants to understand how brains work -- and to build a computer that works like the brain by reverse-engineering the nervous system. His group at Stanford is developing Neurogrid, a hardware platform that will emulate the cortex’s inner workings. Full bio

I got my first computer when I was a teenager growing up in Accra,
私が始めてコンピュータを手に入れたのは、アクラで育った10代のころでした。
00:18
and it was a really cool device.
それは本当にクールな機械でした。
00:23
You could play games with it. You could program it in BASIC.
ゲームで遊べ、BASIC言語でのプログラムもできる。
00:26
And I was fascinated.
その魅力のとりこになった私は
00:31
So I went into the library to figure out how did this thing work.
図書館でコンピュータの仕組みを調べるようになりました。
00:33
I read about how the CPU is constantly shuffling data back and forth
CPUがメモリー(RAM)と演算回路(ALU)との間で
00:39
between the memory, the RAM and the ALU,
常にデータを出し入れしているということを
00:44
the arithmetic and logic unit.
理解しました。
00:48
And I thought to myself, this CPU really has to work like crazy
そして、データの移動を継続する、ただそれだけのために
00:50
just to keep all this data moving through the system.
CPUが異常なほど稼動しなければいけないことに気づきました。
00:54
But nobody was really worried about this.
このことを気にかけるのは、誰もいませんでした。
00:58
When computers were first introduced,
コンピュータがはじめて世に出たとき
01:01
they were said to be a million times faster than neurons.
神経細胞より100万倍速い、といわれていました。
01:03
People were really excited. They thought they would soon outstrip
人々は興奮し、コンピュータはすぐに人間の脳の限界を
01:06
the capacity of the brain.
超えるだろう、と考えていました。
01:11
This is a quote, actually, from Alan Turing:
アラン チューリングの言葉を引用します。
01:14
"In 30 years, it will be as easy to ask a computer a question
「今後30年のうちに、コンピュータは人間と同じくらい簡単に
01:17
as to ask a person."
質問に答えられるようになるでしょう」
01:21
This was in 1946. And now, in 2007, it's still not true.
1946年の言葉ですが、今、2007年時点では実現していません。
01:23
And so, the question is, why aren't we really seeing
脳が持つこの種の力を
01:30
this kind of power in computers that we see in the brain?
コンピュータに見出せないのは、なぜでしょうか。
01:34
What people didn't realize, and I'm just beginning to realize right now,
あまり認識されてはいませんが、私が気づき始めていることがあります。
01:38
is that we pay a huge price for the speed
それは、我々が速度に非常に大きな対価を払っている、ということです。
01:42
that we claim is a big advantage of these computers.
コンピュータの大きな利点であるという、速度、に対してです。
01:44
Let's take a look at some numbers.
いくつかの数字を見てみましょう。
01:48
This is Blue Gene, the fastest computer in the world.
これは世界最速のコンピュータであるブルー ジーンです。
01:50
It's got 120,000 processors; they can basically process
12万個のプロセッサーを搭載しており、
01:54
10 quadrillion bits of information per second.
1秒間に10の16乗ビットの情報を処理することができます。
01:59
That's 10 to the sixteenth. And they consume one and a half megawatts of power.
消費する電力は1.5メガワットになります。
02:02
So that would be really great, if you could add that
それだけの電力をタンザニアの工業生産に加えられたら
02:09
to the production capacity in Tanzania.
どんなにすばらしいことでしょう。
02:12
It would really boost the economy.
きっと経済の起爆剤となるでしょうね。
02:14
Just to go back to the States,
話をアメリカに戻しましょう。
02:16
if you translate the amount of power or electricity
このコンピュータの消費する電力を
02:20
this computer uses to the amount of households in the States,
アメリカの家庭の消費電力に換算すると
02:22
you get 1,200 households in the U.S.
1200家庭分の消費電力となります。
02:25
That's how much power this computer uses.
このコンピュータがどれほどの電量を使うか、お分かりになったと思います。
02:29
Now, let's compare this with the brain.
さて、脳と比べてみましょう。
02:31
This is a picture of, actually Rory Sayres' girlfriend's brain.
これはロイ サイアズのガールフレンドの脳の写真です。
02:34
Rory is a graduate student at Stanford.
ロイはスタンフォードの大学院生で、
02:39
He studies the brain using MRI, and he claims that
MRIを使い、脳の研究をしています。
02:41
this is the most beautiful brain that he has ever scanned.
彼が言うには、これまでスキャンした中でもっとも美しい脳だ、ということです。
02:45
(Laughter)
(笑い)
02:48
So that's true love, right there.
真実の愛とはまさにこのことですね。
02:50
Now, how much computation does the brain do?
さて、脳はどれくらいの計算をおこなうのでしょうか。
02:53
I estimate 10 to the 16 bits per second,
1秒間に10の16乗ビット程度と試算されています。
02:56
which is actually about very similar to what Blue Gene does.
ブルー ジーンとほぼ同じ数値です。
02:58
So that's the question. The question is, how much --
ここで問題です。
03:02
they are doing a similar amount of processing, similar amount of data --
脳とブルー・ジーンは同程度のデータを処理します。
03:04
the question is how much energy or electricity does the brain use?
脳はどれほどの電力を消費するでしょうか。
03:07
And it's actually as much as your laptop computer:
1台のラップトップコンピュータと同じくらいです。
03:12
it's just 10 watts.
たった10ワットです。
03:15
So what we are doing right now with computers
1200家庭分ものエネルギーを費やし、コンピュータでやっていることは
03:17
with the energy consumed by 1,200 houses,
脳を使えば
03:20
the brain is doing with the energy consumed by your laptop.
ラップトップコンピュータを動かす程度のエネルギーでできるのです。
03:23
So the question is, how is the brain able to achieve this kind of efficiency?
では、脳はどうやって、この効率性を達成するのでしょうか。
03:28
And let me just summarize. So the bottom line:
まとめます。帰結はこうなります。
03:31
the brain processes information using 100,000 times less energy
最先端のコンピュータの10万分の1のエネルギー消費で
03:33
than we do right now with this computer technology that we have.
脳は情報を処理することができる。
03:37
How is the brain able to do this?
なぜ、脳はこういうことができるのでしょうか。
03:41
Let's just take a look about how the brain works,
実際に脳の働きを見て、
03:43
and then I'll compare that with how computers work.
コンピュータの動きと比較してみようと思います。
03:46
So, this clip is from the PBS series, "The Secret Life of the Brain."
これはPBSシリーズ「脳の秘密」からの抜粋です。
03:50
It shows you these cells that process information.
情報を処理する細胞群が見えます。
03:54
They are called neurons.
神経細胞です。
03:57
They send little pulses of electricity down their processes to each other,
神経細胞はお互いに微弱の電気信号を送りあいます。
03:58
and where they contact each other, those little pulses
一方のもつ電気信号は、対向しているもう一方に
04:04
of electricity can jump from one neuron to the other.
飛び移ることができます。
04:06
That process is called a synapse.
このプロセスをシナプス、と呼びます。
04:08
You've got this huge network of cells interacting with each other --
互いに働きあう細胞は1億個あり、
04:11
about 100 million of them,
毎秒10の16乗個の信号をやり取りしながら
04:13
sending about 10 quadrillion of these pulses around every second.
巨大なネットワークを形成しています。
04:15
And that's basically what's going on in your brain right now as you're watching this.
以上が、脳で行われている基本的なことです。
04:19
How does that compare with the way computers work?
コンピュータと比べるとどうでしょう。
04:25
In the computer, you have all the data
コンピュータの場合、すべてのデータは
04:27
going through the central processing unit,
中央演算装置を通過します。
04:29
and any piece of data basically has to go through that bottleneck,
どのデータもここを通過するので、ボトルネックとなります。
04:31
whereas in the brain, what you have is these neurons,
それに比べ、脳には神経細胞があるため、
04:34
and the data just really flows through a network of connections
データは、その相互接続ネットワーク上を流るだけです。
04:38
among the neurons. There's no bottleneck here.
そこにボトルネックはありません。
04:42
It's really a network in the literal sense of the word.
文字通り、ネットワークです。
04:44
The net is doing the work in the brain.
脳ではネットワークが機能しているのです。
04:48
If you just look at these two pictures,
これら2枚の絵を見てください。
04:52
these kind of words pop into your mind.
こんなことが思い浮かびます。
04:54
This is serial and it's rigid -- it's like cars on a freeway,
こちらは順序どおりで融通が利きません。
04:56
everything has to happen in lockstep --
高速道路上の車のようです。
05:00
whereas this is parallel and it's fluid.
一方、こちらは同時進行で流動的です。
05:03
Information processing is very dynamic and adaptive.
情報は動的かつ即応的に処理されます。
05:05
So I'm not the first to figure this out. This is a quote from Brian Eno:
過去にも同じ指摘はありました。ブライアン イーノの言葉を借りれば
05:08
"the problem with computers is that there is not enough Africa in them."
「コンピュータが抱える問題、それはコンピュータのなかには十分なアフリカがないことである」
05:12
(Laughter)
(笑い)
05:16
Brian actually said this in 1995.
ブライアンがこう言ったのは1995年のことでした。
05:22
And nobody was listening then,
当時は誰も聞く耳を持ちませんでしたが、
05:25
but now people are beginning to listen
今、人々は耳を傾け始めています。
05:28
because there's a pressing, technological problem that we face.
日々圧力を増す、技術的な問題に直面しているからです。
05:30
And I'll just take you through that a little bit in the next few slides.
いくつかのスライドを見てみましょう。
05:35
This is -- it's actually really this remarkable convergence
これは、コンピュータで計算に使われる仕組みと
05:40
between the devices that we use to compute in computers,
脳が計算に使う仕組みとの
05:44
and the devices that our brains use to compute.
特筆すべき相似点です。
05:49
The devices that computers use are what's called a transistor.
コンピュータが使う装置は、いわゆるトランジスタです。
05:53
This electrode here, called the gate, controls the flow of current
この電極は、ゲート電極といいます。
05:57
from the source to the drain -- these two electrodes.
ソースとドレイン2つの電極間の電流を制御します。
06:01
And that current, electrical current,
電流は
06:04
is carried by electrons, just like in your house and so on.
電子によって運ばれます。
06:06
And what you have here is, when you actually turn on the gate,
実際にゲート電極に電圧をかけると、流れる電流が増え、
06:12
you get an increase in the amount of current, and you get a steady flow of current.
安定した電流を得ることができます。
06:17
And when you turn off the gate, there's no current flowing through the device.
ゲート電極に電圧をかけるのをやめると、電流の流れは止まります。
06:21
Your computer uses this presence of current to represent a one,
コンピュータでは、電流が流れていれば"1"を
06:25
and the absence of current to represent a zero.
電流が流れていなければ、"0"を利用します。
06:30
Now, what's happening is that as transistors are getting smaller and smaller and smaller,
では、トランジスタがより小さく、小さく、さらに小さくなっていくとどんなことが起こるでしょうか。
06:34
they no longer behave like this.
トランジスタの動きが変わります。
06:40
In fact, they are starting to behave like the device that neurons use to compute,
神経細胞が計算するときに利用する物質である
06:42
which is called an ion channel.
イオンチャンネルのように振舞いはじめます。
06:47
And this is a little protein molecule.
イオンチャンネルは小さなタンパク質分子です。
06:49
I mean, neurons have thousands of these.
神経細胞には数千のイオンチャンネルがあります。
06:51
And it sits in the membrane of the cell and it's got a pore in it.
イオンチャンネルは細胞膜に存在し、その中に小さな穴を持っています。
06:55
And these are individual potassium ions
これらはその小さな穴を通じて流れる
06:59
that are flowing through that pore.
カリウムイオンです。
07:02
Now, this pore can open and close.
イオンチャンネルの穴は開いたり閉じたりします。
07:04
But, when it's open, because these ions have to line up
開いているとき、イオンは一つづつ流れてきます。
07:06
and flow through, one at a time, you get a kind of sporadic, not steady --
そのため、散発の、安定してない
07:11
it's a sporadic flow of current.
電流を得ることになります。
07:16
And even when you close the pore -- which neurons can do,
神経細胞は電気を発生させるために穴を開閉することができますが、
07:19
they can open and close these pores to generate electrical activity --
穴が閉じたときでさえ
07:22
even when it's closed, because these ions are so small,
イオンはとても小さいので、そこをすり抜けることができます
07:27
they can actually sneak through, a few can sneak through at a time.
2~3個のイオンは一度にすり抜けることができるのです。
07:30
So, what you have is that when the pore is open,
穴が開いているときと同じで
07:33
you get some current sometimes.
時折、いくばくかの電流を得ることができます。
07:36
These are your ones, but you've got a few zeros thrown in.
いくつか"0"が追加されます
07:38
And when it's closed, you have a zero,
閉じているときは"0"一つになります。
07:41
but you have a few ones thrown in.
しかしながら、いくつかの"1"も追加されます。
07:45
Now, this is starting to happen in transistors.
これがトランジスタで起こり始めていることです。
07:48
And the reason why that's happening is that, right now, in 2007 --
そして、このことが起こる理由は、
07:51
the technology that we are using -- a transistor is big enough
我々が利用している技術、トランジスタが小さくなり、
07:56
that several electrons can flow through the channel simultaneously, side by side.
複数の電子が同時並行にチャンネルを流れることができるようになったためです。
08:00
In fact, there's about 12 electrons can all be flowing this way.
実際、約12個の電子がこのように流れることができます。
08:05
And that means that a transistor corresponds
このことはトランジスタが
08:09
to about 12 ion channels in parallel.
並列した約12個のイオンチャンネルに相当することを意味します。
08:11
Now, in a few years time, by 2015, we will shrink transistors so much.
2015年ころまでにはトランジスタは今よりももっと小さくなっているでしょう。
08:14
This is what Intel does to keep adding more cores onto the chip.
これはインテルがチップにより多くのコアを追加し続けている理由であり、
08:19
Or your memory sticks that you have now can carry one gigabyte
あなた方が持ち歩くメモリースティックの容量が以前の256メガバイトから
08:24
of stuff on them -- before, it was 256.
現在の1ギガバイトになった理由でもあります。
08:27
Transistors are getting smaller to allow this to happen,
トランジスタの小型化がこのことを実現可能にしており、
08:29
and technology has really benefitted from that.
テクノロジーはそのことから本当に恩恵を受けています。
08:32
But what's happening now is that in 2015, the transistor is going to become so small,
今起こっていることは、トランジスタがとても小型化している2015年には
08:35
that it corresponds to only one electron at a time
一度に一つの電子がチャンネルを通過するのと
08:40
can flow through that channel,
同等になります。
08:43
and that corresponds to a single ion channel.
イオンチャンネル一つと同じです。
08:45
And you start having the same kind of traffic jams that you have in the ion channel.
イオンチャンネルで起こるのと同じような交通渋滞が発生し始め、
08:47
The current will turn on and off at random,
電流は流れたり、流れなくなったりするでしょう。
08:51
even when it's supposed to be on.
常に流れていることが想定されるときでもです。
08:54
And that means your computer is going to get
このことはコンピュータが
08:56
its ones and zeros mixed up, and that's going to crash your machine.
"1"と"0"を混乱することにつながり、マシンをクラッシュしてしまうことになります。
08:58
So, we are at the stage where we
我々はこのような粗悪デバイスを利用した計算処理の方法を
09:02
don't really know how to compute with these kinds of devices.
よく知らない、という段階にいます。
09:06
And the only kind of thing -- the only thing we know right now
我々が今知っているのは、
09:09
that can compute with these kinds of devices are the brain.
これらのデバイスで計算処理を行えるのは脳である、ということだけです。
09:12
OK, so a computer picks a specific item of data from memory,
コンピュータはメモリーからあるデータを取り出し、
09:15
it sends it into the processor or the ALU,
プロセッサーかALUに送ります。
09:19
and then it puts the result back into memory.
そして、結果をメモリーに戻し入れます。
09:22
That's the red path that's highlighted.
赤の経路です。
09:24
The way brains work, I told you all, you have got all these neurons.
こちらは脳の働きです。神経細胞が存在します。
09:26
And the way they represent information is
情報をあらわすのに、
09:30
they break up that data into little pieces
データを断片化します。
09:32
that are represented by pulses and different neurons.
データの断片は違う神経細胞とパルスによって提示されます。
09:34
So you have all these pieces of data
これらのデータの断片すべては
09:37
distributed throughout the network.
ネットワークを通じて配布されます。
09:39
And then the way that you process that data to get a result
結果を得るためにデータを処理する方法は
09:41
is that you translate this pattern of activity into a new pattern of activity,
この活動パターンを新たな活動パターンに変換することです。
09:44
just by it flowing through the network.
ただネットワークを流れることによって実現されます。
09:48
So you set up these connections
これらの接続を準備すれば
09:51
such that the input pattern just flows
入力されたパターンは単に流れ
09:53
and generates the output pattern.
出力パターンになります。
09:56
What you see here is that there's these redundant connections.
これをみれば、冗長された接続がることがわかります。
09:58
So if this piece of data or this piece of the data gets clobbered,
データのこの断片、あるいはこちらの断片が壊れたとしても、
10:02
it doesn't show up over here, these two pieces can activate the missing part
ここには現れませんが、、これらの2つの断片はもう一方を
10:06
with these redundant connections.
これらの冗長の接続を通じて活性化することができます。
10:11
So even when you go to these crappy devices
"1"が欲しいのに"0"を得るような
10:13
where sometimes you want a one and you get a zero, and it doesn't show up,
粗悪なデバイスの上でも
10:15
there's redundancy in the network
ネットワークには冗長性があり、
10:18
that can actually recover the missing information.
紛失した情報を復旧することができます。
10:20
It makes the brain inherently robust.
これが脳を本質的に堅牢なものにしています。
10:23
What you have here is a system where you store data locally.
データを一か所ににためるシステムは、もろいです。
10:26
And it's brittle, because each of these steps has to be flawless,
それぞれの段階が完璧でないとデータを紛失してしまいます。
10:29
otherwise you lose that data, whereas in the brain, you have a system
一方、脳は
10:33
that stores data in a distributed way, and it's robust.
分散したやり方でデータを保存し、堅牢です。
10:36
What I want to basically talk about is my dream,
このような脳のように働くことのできるコンピュータを作ることが
10:40
which is to build a computer that works like the brain.
私の夢です。
10:44
This is something that we've been working on for the last couple of years.
このことにここ数年取り組んでいます。
10:47
And I'm going to show you a system that we designed
では、我々が設計したシステムをお見せします。
10:51
to model the retina,
網膜をモデル化するために設計しました。
10:54
which is a piece of brain that lines the inside of your eyeball.
網膜は眼球の内側を覆う脳の一部です。
10:57
We didn't do this by actually writing code, like you do in a computer.
我々はコンピュータでやるようにコードを書くことでは実装しませんでした。
11:02
In fact, the processing that happens
現実には、脳の小さな部分で起こる処理は
11:08
in that little piece of brain is very similar
コンピュータがインターネット上で
11:11
to the kind of processing that computers
ビデオストリームを流すときに行う
11:13
do when they stream video over the Internet.
処理ととても似ています。
11:14
They want to compress the information --
コンピュータは情報を圧縮しようとします。
11:18
they just want to send the changes, what's new in the image, and so on --
画像におこった新たな変化を送信したいのです。
11:19
and that is how your eyeball
そして、このやりかたで、眼球は視神経を通じ
11:23
is able to squeeze all that information down to your optic nerve,
すべての情報を抽出することができます。
11:26
to send to the rest of the brain.
それらは、脳のほかの部分に送られます。
11:29
Instead of doing this in software, or doing those kinds of algorithms,
これをソフトウェアやアルゴリズムで実装する代わりに、
11:31
we went and talked to neurobiologists
我々は神経生物学者と話をしました。
11:34
who have actually reverse engineered that piece of brain that's called the retina.
彼らは網膜の働きをリバースエンジニアリングしています。
11:37
And they figured out all the different cells,
彼らが発見していた
11:41
and they figured out the network, and we just took that network
すべての細胞とそのネットワークを
11:43
and we used it as the blueprint for the design of a silicon chip.
シリコンチップの設計をするための青写真として利用しました。
11:46
So now the neurons are represented by little nodes or circuits on the chip,
いま、神経細胞はチップ上の小さなノードや回路によって表現されています。
11:50
and the connections among the neurons are represented, actually modeled by transistors.
また、神経細胞のつながりは、トランジスタによってモデル化されています。
11:56
And these transistors are behaving essentially
これらのトランジスタの振る舞いは
12:01
just like ion channels behave in the brain.
脳でイオンチャンネルが振舞うのと似ています。
12:03
It will give you the same kind of robust architecture that I described.
私がこれまで説明したのと同じような堅牢な構造を得ることになるでしょう。
12:06
Here is actually what our artificial eye looks like.
実際に我々が作成した人工の眼がこれです。
12:11
The retina chip that we designed sits behind this lens here.
我々の設計した網膜チップがこのレンズの背後に設置されています。
12:15
And the chip -- I'm going to show you a video
今からビデオでお見せするのは、
12:20
that the silicon retina put out of its output
このシリコン製網膜チップが何かを生み出すところです。
12:22
when it was looking at Kareem Zaghloul,
人工の眼でカリーム ザフロルを見てみます。
12:25
who's the student who designed this chip.
カリームはこのチップを設計した学生です。
12:28
Let me explain what you're going to see, OK,
では説明させてください。
12:30
because it's putting out different kinds of information,
異なる種類の情報が出力されます。
12:32
it's not as straightforward as a camera.
カメラのようにそのまま映し出されるのではありません。
12:35
The retina chip extracts four different kinds of information.
網膜チップは4つの異なる種類の情報を出力します。
12:37
It extracts regions with dark contrast,
暗い部分の出力、
12:40
which will show up on the video as red.
これは赤く映し出されてきます。
12:43
And it extracts regions with white or light contrast,
そして白あるいは明るい部分、
12:46
which will show up on the video as green.
これは緑で映し出されます。
12:50
This is Kareem's dark eyes
これはカリームの瞳の部分です。
12:52
and that's the white background that you see here.
眼の白い部分はここになります。
12:54
And then it also extracts movement.
さらに、動き、についても出力します。
12:57
When Kareem moves his head to the right,
カリームが頭を右へ動かすと、
12:59
you will see this blue activity there;
ここに青の動きが見られます。
13:01
it represents regions where the contrast is increasing in the image,
画像の中でコントラストが増幅しているところがあります。
13:03
that's where it's going from dark to light.
それは明るくなってくる部分です。
13:06
And you also see this yellow activity,
黄色の動きもあります。
13:09
which represents regions where contrast is decreasing;
コントラストが減少している部分であり、
13:11
it's going from light to dark.
暗くなっていく部分をあらわします。
13:15
And these four types of information --
これら4つの情報は
13:17
your optic nerve has about a million fibers in it,
100万本ほどある視神経のうち
13:20
and 900,000 of those fibers
90万本を通じて
13:24
send these four types of information.
送り出されます。
13:27
So we are really duplicating the kind of signals that you have on the optic nerve.
我々は視神経に流れるのと同じような信号を複製しています。
13:29
What you notice here is that these snapshots
これらは網膜チップからの出力のスナップショットですが、
13:33
taken from the output of the retina chip are very sparse, right?
色がとてもまばらです。
13:36
It doesn't light up green everywhere in the background,
背景のどこでも緑というわけではありません、
13:40
only on the edges, and then in the hair, and so on.
端などに限られています。
13:42
And this is the same thing you see
このことは人々がビデオ画像を伝送する際、圧縮するのと同じです。
13:45
when people compress video to send: they want to make it very sparse,
ファイルを小さくするために、なるべく情報を詰め込みません。
13:46
because that file is smaller. And this is what the retina is doing,
これが網膜が神経回路を通じて行っていることで、
13:50
and it's doing it just with the circuitry, and how this network of neurons
神経細胞のネットワークが相互に伝達するやり方を
13:53
that are interacting in there, which we've captured on the chip.
網膜チップ上で再現しました。
13:57
But the point that I want to make -- I'll show you up here.
しかし、私が強調したいこと、それをお見せします。
14:00
So this image here is going to look like these ones,
この画像はこれらに似ています
14:03
but here I'll show you that we can reconstruct the image,
しかし、イメージを再構築できることを示します。
14:06
so, you know, you can almost recognize Kareem in that top part there.
上部におおよそカリームを認識することができます。
14:08
And so, here you go.
ではいきましょう。
14:13
Yes, so that's the idea.
そうです、これがアイデアです。
14:24
When you stand still, you just see the light and dark contrasts.
そのままでいるとき、明暗のコントラストを見るだけです。
14:27
But when it's moving back and forth,
しかし、前後に動くとき、
14:29
the retina picks up these changes.
網膜は変化した部分について取り出します。
14:31
And that's why, you know, when you're sitting here
ここに座っていて
14:34
and something happens in your background,
背後で何かが起こったとき
14:35
you merely move your eyes to it.
ほとんど眼を動かさないのは、そのためです。
14:37
There are these cells that detect change
変化を検知する細胞があり、
14:39
and you move your attention to it.
そこに注意を払うのです。
14:41
So those are very important for catching somebody
誰かがあなたにこっそり近づこうとしているのに気づくことは
14:43
who's trying to sneak up on you.
とても重要です。
14:45
Let me just end by saying that this is what happens
最後に言わせてください。
14:47
when you put Africa in a piano, OK.
ピアノにアフリカを加えれば、
14:50
This is a steel drum here that has been modified,
鉄のドラムになります。
14:53
and that's what happens when you put Africa in a piano.
ピアノにアフリカを加えれば、これが起こります。
14:56
And what I would like us to do is put Africa in the computer,
私がやりたいのは、コンピュータにアフリカを加えることです。
14:59
and come up with a new kind of computer
自ら思想し、想像し、創造するような
15:03
that will generate thought, imagination, be creative and things like that.
新しい種類のコンピュータになるはずです。
15:05
Thank you.
ありがとうございました。
15:08
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:10
Chris Anderson: Question for you, Kwabena.
クリス・アンダーソン: クァベナ、質問があります。
15:12
Do you put together in your mind the work you're doing,
あなたの取り組み、アフリカの将来、このカンファレンス、
15:14
the future of Africa, this conference --
あなたの中では一つになっているのでしょうか。
15:18
what connections can we make, if any, between them?
我々はそれらをどう結びつけることができるでしょう。
15:21
Kwabena Boahen: Yes, like I said at the beginning,
クァベナ・ボアヘン: はい、最初に言ったように
15:24
I got my first computer when I was a teenager, growing up in Accra.
私が始めてコンピュータを持ったのは、アクラで10代のころでした。
15:26
And I had this gut reaction that this was the wrong way to do it.
コンピュータの仕組みが間違っていると、本当に感じました。
15:30
It was very brute force; it was very inelegant.
とても力ずくで、洗練されていませんでした。
15:34
I don't think that I would've had that reaction,
このようは反応をしていたとは思います。仮に
15:37
if I'd grown up reading all this science fiction,
サイエンスフィクションを読み、
15:39
hearing about RD2D2, whatever it was called, and just -- you know,
RD2D2について聞き、
15:42
buying into this hype about computers.
コンピュータについての誇大表現を鵜呑みをして育ったとしても。
15:46
I was coming at it from a different perspective,
私は違った見方でら近づいていったのです。
15:47
where I was bringing that different perspective
この問題とかかわるのに
15:49
to bear on the problem.
異なる見方をしたのです。
15:51
And I think a lot of people in Africa have this different perspective,
アフリカの多くの人々はこの違った見方を持っていると思います。
15:53
and I think that's going to impact technology.
そして、それがテクノロジーにインパクトを与えるはずだと。
15:56
And that's going to impact how it's going to evolve.
進化の過程にインパクトを与えるでしょう。
15:58
And I think you're going to be able to see, use that infusion,
これらが与えられることで、
16:00
to come up with new things,
新しいことに出会えるでしょう。
16:02
because you're coming from a different perspective.
違った見方で近寄ってくるのですから。
16:04
I think we can contribute. We can dream like everybody else.
我々は貢献でき、皆と同じように夢を見ることができると思います。
16:07
CA: Thanks Kwabena, that was really interesting.
クリス・アンダーソン: クァベナ、ありがとうございます。とても興味深かったです。
16:11
Thank you.
ありがとうございます。
16:13
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:14
Translated by Keio Oyama
Reviewed by Lace Nguyen

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Kwabena Boahen - Bioengineer
Kwabena Boahen wants to understand how brains work -- and to build a computer that works like the brain by reverse-engineering the nervous system. His group at Stanford is developing Neurogrid, a hardware platform that will emulate the cortex’s inner workings.

Why you should listen

Kwabena Boahen is the principal investigator at the Brains in Silicon lab at Stanford. He writes of himself:

Being a scientist at heart, I want to understand how cognition arises from neuronal properties. Being an engineer by training, I am using silicon integrated circuits to emulate the way neurons compute, linking the seemingly disparate fields of electronics and computer science with neurobiology and medicine.

My group's contributions to the field of neuromorphic engineering include a silicon retina that could be used to give the blind sight and a self-organizing chip that emulates the way the developing brain wires itself up. Our work is widely recognized, with over sixty publications, including a cover story in the May 2005 issue of Scientific American.

My current research interest is building a simulation platform that will enable the cortex's inner workings to be modeled in detail. While progress has been made linking neuronal properties to brain rhythms, the task of scaling up these models to link neuronal properties to cognition still remains. Making the supercomputer-performance required affordable is the goal of our Neurogrid project. It is at the vanguard of a profound shift in computing, away from the sequential, step-by-step Von Neumann machine towards a parallel, interconnected architecture more like the brain.

More profile about the speaker
Kwabena Boahen | Speaker | TED.com