22:21
TEDGlobal 2007

Spencer Wells: A family tree for humanity

スペンサー・ウエルズ: 人類の家系図

Filmed:

全ての人類は、アフリカにいた人類の祖先から受け継がれてきたDNAに、ある共通点を持っています。多様性に富んだ人類が、実は真に1つにつながっている。ジェノグラフィック・プロジェクトを通して、このDNAの共通点をヒントにそれを解き明かす方法を、遺伝学者スペンサー・ウエルズが語ります。

- Genographer
Spencer Wells studies human diversity -- the process by which humanity, which springs from a single common source, has become so astonishingly diverse and widespread. Full bio

Jambo, bonjour, zdravstvujtye, dayo: these are a few of the languages
ジャンボ、ボンジュール、ズドラーストヴィチェ、ダヨ
いずれも「こんにちは」です
00:18
that I've spoken little bits of over the course of the last six weeks,
この6週間
これらの言葉を使ってきました
00:27
as I've been to 17 countries I think I'm up to, on this crazy tour I've been doing,
17カ国ほどを回る
思えばとてもクレイジーな旅でしたが
00:31
checking out various aspects of the project that we're doing.
私たちのプロジェクトの
様々な面を確認しました
00:36
And I'm going to tell you a little bit about later on.
そのことについては後ほど少しお話します
00:39
And visiting some pretty incredible places,
この旅では 大変面白い場所にも行きました
00:41
places like Mongolia, Cambodia, New Guinea, South Africa, Tanzania twice --
モンゴル、カンボジア、ニューギニア、南アフリカ
タンザニアは今回 2回目です
00:44
I was here a month ago.
1ヶ月前にも来ましたから
00:50
And the opportunity to make a whirlwind tour of the world like that
駆け足でこのような世界旅行が出来たことは
00:52
is utterly amazing, for lots of reasons.
多くの点で 実に素晴らしい経験でした
00:57
You see some incredible stuff.
目を見張るようなモノとの出会い
01:00
And you get to make these spot comparisons
また 世界中の人々のあいだに
01:02
between people all around the globe.
違いを見出すこともできました
01:04
And the thing that you really take away from that,
そこから分かること
01:06
the kind of surface thing that you take away from it,
一見して明らかなことは
01:08
is not that we're all one, although I'm going to tell you about that,
世界は1つではないということ
- 今からこの話をするのですが
01:11
but rather how different we are.
人々が いかに違っていることか
01:15
There is so much diversity around the globe.
世界は多様性に満ちています
01:17
6,000 different languages spoken by six and a half billion people,
650億人によって話されている
6,000もの言語があり
01:20
all different colors, shapes, sizes.
様々な色の肌 身体の特徴や大きさ
01:23
You walk down the street in any big city, you travel like that,
都会を歩いたり
世界旅行したりすると
01:26
and you are amazed at the diversity in the human species.
人類の多様性に驚きます
01:29
How do we explain that diversity?
どうやったら この多様性に説明がつくのか
01:33
Well, that's what I'm going to talk about today,
今日はそのためにここに来ました
01:36
is how we're using the tools of genetics,
どのように どれくらいの時間をかけて
01:38
population genetics in particular, to tell us how we generated this diversity,
このような多様性が生まれたのか
遺伝学 特に集団遺伝学を使って
01:40
and how long it took.
私が調べている方法を 紹介します
01:46
Now, the problem of human diversity,
人類の多様性の問題を
01:48
like all big scientific questions --
- どのように説明がつくか とか
01:50
how do you explain something like that --
そういう他の漠然とした疑問と同じく -
01:52
can be broken down into sub-questions.
具体的な問題に置き換えてみましょう
01:54
And you can ferret away at those little sub-questions.
小さな問題に分けて解いていくのです
01:56
First one is really a question of origins.
まず1つ目は 起源についての疑問
01:59
Do we all share a common origin, in fact?
私たちは全員
起源は同じなのでしょうか
02:01
And given that we do -- and that's the assumption
もしそうだとすると
おそらく
02:03
everybody, I think, in this room would make -- when was that?
ここにいる皆さんは思うでしょう
「起源っていつ?」
02:06
When did we originate as a species?
人類としての始まりはいつなのか
02:09
How long have we been divergent from each other?
いつから 見た目が
大きく違ってきたのか
02:11
And the second question is related, but slightly different.
2つ目の疑問は それと関連はありますが
少し違っています
02:13
If we do spring from a common source,
もし私たちが同じ1つの起源を持つなら
02:17
how did we come to occupy every corner of the globe,
どのようにして地球上に散らばったのか
02:19
and in the process generate all of this diversity,
世界中で このような多様性
02:21
the different ways of life, the different appearances,
生活様式や 見た目の違い
異なる言語を
02:23
the different languages around the world?
生み出しながら
どう拡散していったのか
02:26
Well, the question of origins, as with so many other questions in biology,
起源の問題は
他の多くの生物学の問題と同じく
02:28
seems to have been answered by Darwin over a century ago.
1世紀前に
ダーウィンが答えています
02:31
In "The Descent of Man," he wrote,
『人間の由来』の中で
02:33
"In each great region of the world, the living mammals
「世界各地で 生きている哺乳類は
02:35
are closely related to the extinct species of the same region.
同じ地域の絶滅種と
密接な関係がある
02:37
It's therefore probable that Africa was formerly inhabited by extinct apes
従って かつてアフリカに
ゴリラやチンパンジーと同類の
02:40
closely allied to the gorilla and chimpanzee,
絶滅した類人猿が
生息していた可能性があり
02:43
and as these two species are now man's nearest allies,
これら2つの種が人類に
最も近い種であることから
02:46
it's somewhat more probable that our early progenitors
初期の人類が
アフリカ大陸に居たという
02:49
lived on the African continent than elsewhere."
可能性は
他の地域よりも高いであろう」
02:51
So we're done, we can go home -- finished the origin question.
以上です 帰りましょう
起源の疑問は解けました
02:53
Well, not quite. Because Darwin was talking about our distant ancestry,
いや そうでもありませんね
ダーウィンのは遠い祖先の話です
02:57
our common ancestry with apes.
類人猿と共通の祖先
03:01
And it is quite clear that apes originated on the African continent.
もちろん類人猿は
アフリカ大陸で誕生しました
03:03
Around 23 million years ago, they appear in the fossil record.
2300万年前の化石が発見されています
03:07
Africa was actually disconnected from the other landmasses at that time,
当時アフリカ大陸は
他の大陸から分断されていました
03:10
due to the vagaries of plate tectonics, floating around the Indian Ocean.
プレートテクトニクスですね
インド洋を漂っていました
03:13
Bumped into Eurasia around 16 million years ago,
1600万年前 ユーラシア大陸にぶつかり
03:17
and then we had the first African exodus, as we call it.
そしていわゆる
最初の出アフリカが果たされました
03:19
The apes that left at that time ended up in Southeast Asia,
そのとき移動した類人猿は
東南アジアで
03:22
became the gibbons and the orangutans.
テナガザルとオランウータンになりました
03:24
And the ones that stayed on in Africa
アフリカに残ったものは
03:26
evolved into the gorillas, the chimpanzees and us.
ゴリラとチンパンジーと
人類へ進化しました
03:28
So, yes, if you're talking about our common ancestry with apes,
そうです
類人猿と共通の祖先のことは
03:30
it's very clear, by looking at the fossil record, we started off here.
化石を見ると明らかなのです
そこから始まったのです
03:33
But that's not really the question I'm asking.
でも 私の疑問はそんなことではなく
03:37
I'm asking about our human ancestry,
私が知りたいのは 人間の祖先
03:39
things that we would recognize as being like us
今この場にいても
違和感がない
03:41
if they were sitting here in the room.
私たちのような姿の祖先
03:44
If they were peering over your shoulder,
もしあなたの肩越しに覗いていても
03:46
you wouldn't leap back, like that. What about our human ancestry?
こんな風にのけぞったりしないで済む
私たちの先祖のことです
03:48
Because if we go far enough back,
ずっとずっと遠くの昔まで戻れば
03:51
we share a common ancestry with every living thing on Earth.
地球上全ての生物と共通の祖先がいます
03:53
DNA ties us all together, so we share ancestry with barracuda
私たちは皆DNAで1つにつながっていて
10億年前には
03:56
and bacteria and mushrooms, if you go far enough back -- over a billion years.
魚やバクテリアやキノコとも
共通の祖先がいるのです
03:59
What we're asking about though is human ancestry.
しかし知りたいのは
人類の祖先です
04:04
How do we study that?
どうやって確かめるのか
04:06
Well, historically, it has been studied using the science of paleoanthropology.
昔から一般的には
古人類学を用いて研究されてきました
04:08
Digging things up out of the ground,
発掘作業をして
04:12
and largely on the basis of morphology --
主に形態学に基づき
04:14
the way things are shaped, often skull shape -- saying,
モノの形 - たいてい頭蓋骨の形を見て
04:16
"This looks a little bit more like us than that, so this must be my ancestor.
「こっちの方が少し僕たちに似てるな
よし これが祖先に違いない
04:19
This must be who I'm directly descended from."
僕はこの人の子孫なんだな」
04:23
The field of paleoanthropology, I'll argue,
古人類学の分野は 人類の祖先について
04:26
gives us lots of fascinating possibilities about our ancestry,
夢のような可能性をたくさん示してくれますが
04:29
but it doesn't give us the probabilities that we really want as scientists.
科学者が望む
確実性の高い可能性は示してくれません
04:32
What do I mean by that?
それは -
04:35
You're looking at a great example here.
ここに良い例があります
04:37
These are three extinct species of hominids,
ヒト科の3つの絶滅種で
04:39
potential human ancestors.
人間の祖先かもしれません
04:41
All dug up just west of here in Olduvai Gorge, by the Leakey family.
リーキー夫妻が
タンザニアのオルドヴァイ峡谷で発見し
04:43
And they're all dating to roughly the same time.
どれも ほぼ同じ年代に生きていました
04:46
From left to right, we've got Homo erectus, Homo habilis,
左から
ホモ・エレクトス、ホモ・ハビリス
04:48
and Australopithecus -- now called Paranthropus boisei,
アウストラロピテクス -
今はパラントロプス・ボイセイ
04:50
the robust australopithecine. Three extinct species, same place, same time.
「頑丈なアウストラロピテクス」と呼びます
3つの絶滅種 同じ場所 同じ年代
04:53
That means that not all three could be my direct ancestor.
つまり この3人全てが
私の直接的な先祖ということはない
04:58
Which one of these guys am I actually related to?
では一体 この中の誰なんでしょうね?
05:01
Possibilities about our ancestry, but not the probabilities that we're really looking for.
人類の祖先についての可能性
でもそれは本当に探し求めている答えじゃない
05:04
Well, a different approach has been to look at morphology in humans
つい最近まで
人類の形態学の取り組み方といえば
05:10
using the only data that people really had at hand until quite recently --
実際に手にしたモノだけを
- 主に頭蓋骨を
05:14
again, largely skull shape.
データとすること
05:17
The first person to do this systematically was Linnaeus,
体系的な形態学を作ったのは
カール・リンネです
05:19
Carl von Linne, a Swedish botanist,
スウェーデンの植物学者です
05:23
who in the eighteenth century took it upon himself
18世紀に リンネは
05:25
to categorize every living organism on the planet.
地球上全ての生物の分類をしました
05:27
You think you've got a tough job?
皆さんのお仕事も大変でしょうが -
05:29
And he did a pretty good job.
彼は偉業を成し遂げました
05:31
He categorized about 12,000 species in "Systema Naturae."
著書『自然の体系』で
12,000種もの分類をし
05:33
He actually coined the term Homo sapiens -- it means wise man in Latin.
ラテン語で「賢い人」を意味する
ホモ・サピエンスという言葉を造り
05:37
But looking around the world at the diversity of humans, he said,
世界を見渡して 人類の多様性を目にし
言ったのは
05:40
"Well, you know, we seem to come in discreet sub-species or categories."
「我々人類も さらに小さな
亜種に分けられるようだ」
05:44
And he talked about Africans and Americans and Asians and Europeans,
ここでアフリカ人 アメリカ人 アジア人
ヨーロッパ人 その上で
05:48
and a blatantly racist category he termed "Monstrosus,"
露骨な人種差別的カテゴリー
「変人」について述べ
05:52
which basically included all the people he didn't like,
基本的にその中には
彼が嫌っていた人たちや
05:55
including imaginary folk like elves.
想像上の怪人や妖精などを入れました
05:58
It's easy to dismiss this as the perhaps well-intentioned
「善意」だったのかも知れませんが
実際のところ ダーウィンより前
06:02
but ultimately benighted musings of an eighteenth century scientist
18世紀の科学者が
知らないことが
06:07
working in the pre-Darwinian era.
あったということです
06:10
Except, if you had taken physical anthropology
しかし 今から2、30年前の
06:12
as recently as 20 or 30 years ago, in many cases you would have learned
形質人類学でも まだ
あらゆる場面で 基本的に
06:14
basically that same classification of humanity.
これと同じ分類を教えていました
06:18
Human races that according to physical anthropologists of 30, 40 years ago --
3、40年前まで 形質人類学では
人種は -
06:20
Carlton Coon is the best example --
ダーウィンの登場後にも関わらず -
06:25
had been diverging from each other -- this was in the post-Darwinian era --
100万年前 ホモ・エレクトスの時代に
分かれ始めた と
06:27
for over a million years, since the time of Homo erectus.
カールトン・クーンなどが言っていました
06:31
But based on what data?
どんなデータを元に?
06:34
Very little. Very little. Morphology and a lot of guesswork.
データなんてほとんどない
形態学と 大部分は推測です
06:36
Well, what I'm going to talk about today,
今日お話しすることは
06:40
what I'm going to talk about now is a new approach to this problem.
この問題に取り組む新しい方法です
06:42
Instead of going out and guessing about our ancestry,
外に出て 人類の祖先について推測する -
06:45
digging things up out of the ground, possible ancestors,
祖先かも知れない誰かを発掘し
06:48
and saying it on the basis of morphology --
形態学的に言うと・・・なんて
06:50
which we still don't completely understand,
形態学自体 よく分かっていないのに
06:52
we don't know the genetic causes underlying this morphological variation --
形状の変異を起こす
遺伝子的原因は掴めていないのです
06:54
what we need to do is turn the problem on its head.
そうではなく
全く新しい方法が必要です
06:58
Because what we're really asking is a genealogical problem,
何故なら 私たちが明らかにしたいのは
系統学的な問題
07:00
or a genealogical question.
系統学的な疑問なのです
07:04
What we're trying to do is construct a family tree for everybody alive today.
私たちが挑戦しているのは
今 生きている全ての人の家系図を作ること
07:06
And as any genealogist will tell you --
きっと 過去には
07:11
anybody have a member of the family, or maybe you
この中で 家系図を作ろうとした人
07:13
have tried to construct a family tree, trace back in time?
または家族でそういう人がいたと思います
07:15
You start in the present, with relationships you're certain about.
確実にわかる現在から始めて
07:18
You and your siblings, you have a parent in common.
あなたと兄弟には共通の親がいますね
07:20
You and your cousins share a grandparent in common.
従兄弟とは共通の祖父母がいる
07:22
You gradually trace further and further back into the past,
そうやってどんどん過去にさかのぼり
07:24
adding these ever more distant relationships.
遠い親戚も付け加えていきます
07:27
But eventually, no matter how good you are at digging up the church records,
しかしどれほど教会の記録などを
調べ尽くしても
07:29
and all that stuff, you hit what the genealogists call a brick wall.
壁にぶつかる時が来ます
07:33
A point beyond which you don't know anything else about your ancestors,
先祖を辿れなくなる段階に入ると
07:37
and you enter this dark and mysterious realm we call history
歴史と呼ばれる
暗くてミステリアスなこの領域では
07:40
that we have to feel our way through with whispered guidance.
ささやき声を頼りに
手探りで進まねばなりません
07:44
Who were these people who came before?
この人たちはどこから来たのか
07:47
We have no written record. Well, actually, we do.
記録がない
いや 実はあるのです
07:49
Written in our DNA, in our genetic code --
私たちの遺伝子 DNAに刻まれた記録 -
07:52
we have a historical document that takes us back in time
初期の人類まで辿ることが出来る
07:55
to the very earliest days of our species. And that's what we study.
そんな記録があるのです
それを調べるのです
07:57
Now, a quick primer on DNA.
DNAについて少し説明しましょう
08:01
I suspect that not everybody in the audience is a geneticist.
皆さんが 全員
遺伝学者ということはありませんね
08:03
It is a very long, linear molecule, a coded version
DNAはとても長い線状の分子で
08:06
of how to make another copy of you. It's your blueprint.
あなたを複製できる暗号 設計図です
構成しているのは
08:10
It's composed of four subunits: A, C, G and T, we call them.
4つの小さな要素で
A、C、G、Tと呼ばれています
08:13
And it's the sequence of those subunits that defines that blueprint.
その配列で設計図が描かれています
08:16
How long is it? Well, it's billions of these subunits in length.
長さは その要素の何十億個分にもなり
08:20
A haploid genome -- we actually have two copies of all of our chromosomes --
人間の染色体は同じもの2つで1対ですが
その半数体で
08:23
a haploid genome is around 3.2 billion nucleotides in length.
小さな要素から作られた最小分子
ヌクレオチドを 約32億個つなげた長さ
08:26
And the whole thing, if you add it all together,
1対の染色体では
08:30
is over six billion nucleotides long.
60億個以上のヌクレオチドの長さ
08:32
If you take all the DNA out of one cell in your body,
身体にある1つの細胞から
全てのDNAを取り出し
08:34
and stretch it end to end, it's around two meters long.
伸ばしてみたら
端から端まで約2メートル
08:37
If you take all the DNA out of every cell in your body,
身体の全ての細胞から
08:41
and you stretch it end to end, it would reach from here to the moon and back,
DNAを取り出して 全部つなげたら
ここから月まで何千回も
08:43
thousands of times. It's a lot of information.
往復するくらいの長さ
膨大な情報量ですね
08:47
And so when you're copying this DNA molecule to pass it on, it's a pretty tough job.
だからDNAをコピーするというのは
大変な作業になるのです
08:50
Imagine the longest book you can think of, "War and Peace."
思いつく限り長い本を想像して下さい
例えば『戦争と平和』
08:56
Now multiply it by 100.
それを100倍して
09:00
And imagine copying that by hand.
それを手で書き写す
09:02
And you're working away until late at night,
夜遅くまで作業します
09:04
and you're very, very careful, and you're drinking coffee
とても注意深く
コーヒを飲みながら
09:06
and you're paying attention, but, occasionally,
気をつけてはいるものの
でも
09:08
when you're copying this by hand,
手で書き写していると
09:10
you're going to make a little typo, a spelling mistake --
間違えることもあるでしょう
09:12
substitute an I for an E, or a C for a T.
e を i と書き間違えたり
T を C と書いたり
09:14
Same thing happens to our DNA as it's being passed on through the generations.
何世代も経る間に
同じことがDNAでも起こります
09:18
It doesn't happen very often. We have a proofreading mechanism built in.
頻繁ではありません
私たちに備わった修正機能がありますから
09:22
But when it does happen, and these changes get transmitted down
しかし書き間違えが起こり
09:25
through the generations, they become markers of descent.
それが次の世代に伝えられたら
マーカー、目印となります
09:27
If you share a marker with someone,
誰かと同じマーカーを持っていたら
09:30
it means you share an ancestor at some point in the past,
過去 そのDNAを書き間違えた
共通の先祖が
09:32
the person who first had that change in their DNA.
いるということになるのですから
09:35
And it's by looking at the pattern of genetic variation,
世界中の人が持つ
遺伝的変異のパターン
09:37
the pattern of these markers in people all over the world,
これらの遺伝子マーカーのパターンを見て
09:40
and assessing the relative ages when they occurred throughout our history,
歴史を通して
それが起こった年代を割り出すことで
09:43
that we've been able to construct a family tree for everybody alive today.
今 生きている全ての人たちの
家系図が出来ました
09:47
These are two pieces of DNA that we use quite widely in our work.
私たちが調査に用いるDNAは2種類
09:50
Mitochondrial DNA, tracing a purely maternal line of descent.
ミトコンドリアDNAでは
母方の血統を辿れます
09:53
You get your mtDNA from your mother, and your mother's mother,
母から 祖母から
女性から女性へ受け継がれるので
09:56
all the way back to the very first woman.
一番最初の女性まで辿れるのです
09:59
The Y chromosome, the piece of DNA that makes men men,
Y染色体は 男性にしかない遺伝子で
10:01
traces a purely paternal line of descent.
父方の血統を辿ることが出来ます
10:04
Everybody in this room, everybody in the world,
ここにいる誰もが
世界中の誰もが
10:07
falls into a lineage somewhere on these trees.
この系譜のどこかに当てはまります
10:11
Now, even though these are simplified versions of the real trees,
簡略化した系譜とはいえ
まだ複雑なので
10:15
they're still kind of complicated, so let's simplify them.
もっと簡素化してみましょう
10:18
Turn them on their sides, combine them so that they look like a tree
各々を横向きにし
先祖を下に
10:20
with the root at the bottom and the branches going up.
子孫を上にすると
木のようになります
10:22
What's the take-home message?
ここで重要なことはなんでしょうか
10:25
Well, the thing that jumps out at you first
まず真っ先に目を引くことは
10:27
is that the deepest lineages in our family trees
この系図で一番深い血統が
10:29
are found within Africa, among Africans.
アフリカにあるということです
アフリカ人がそれを持っているのです
10:32
That means that Africans have been accumulating
つまり この最初の変異は アフリカで
10:37
this mutational diversity for longer.
長期間 保持されてきたということです
10:40
And what that means is that we originated in Africa. It's written in our DNA.
人類の起源はアフリカにあるという証拠で
DNAに記されています
10:43
Every piece of DNA we look at has greater diversity within Africa than outside of Africa.
アフリカで DNAを比べると
世界の他の地域よりも 多くの多様性があります
10:47
And at some point in the past, a sub-group of Africans
過去のどこかの時点で
幾つかのグループが
10:52
left the African continent to go out and populate the rest of the world.
アフリカ大陸を出て
世界中に移り住んでいきました
10:55
Now, how recently do we share this ancestry?
共通の先祖は
何年前に生きていたのか?
10:59
Was it millions of years ago, which we might suspect
数百万年くらい前だと思いますか?
11:01
by looking at all this incredible variation around the world?
世界中には驚くべき多様性が
ありますからね
11:05
No, the DNA tells a story that's very clear.
DNAを調べると 明らかです
11:08
Within the last 200,000 years, we all share an ancestor, a single person --
わずか20万年さかのぼるだけで
たった1人の共通の先祖に辿り着きます
11:11
Mitochondrial Eve, you might have heard about her -- in Africa,
ミトコンドリア・イブ
聞いたことがあるでしょう アフリカ人女性です
11:16
an African woman who gave rise to all the mitochondrial diversity in the world today.
現代の全人類が持つ
ミトコンドリア変異を起こした人
11:20
But what's even more amazing
しかし更に驚くべきことに
11:23
is that if you look at the Y-chromosome side,
Y染色体の方を見ると
11:25
the male side of the story, the Y-chromosome Adam
男性側の話ですね
Y染色体アダムは
11:27
only lived around 60,000 years ago.
ほんの6万年前に生きていたのです
11:31
That's only about 2,000 human generations,
たった2000世代前です
11:33
the blink of an eye in an evolutionary sense.
進化という視点で言えば
瞬き1つの間ですね
11:36
That tells us we were all still living in Africa at that time.
ということは その時点では
全人類はまだアフリカに居て
11:40
This was an African man who gave rise
1人のアフリカ人男性が
現代の
11:43
to all the Y chromosome diversity around the world.
全男性が持つ
Y染色体変異を起こしました
11:45
It's only within the last 60,000 years
たった6万年の間に
11:47
that we have started to generate this incredible diversity we see around the world.
世界中で こんなにも素晴らしい
多様性が生まれてきたのです
11:49
Such an amazing story.
本当に驚きます
11:53
We're all effectively part of an extended African family.
私たちは事実上
アフリカの大家族の一員です
11:55
Now, that seems so recent. Why didn't we start to leave earlier?
さて なぜもっと早く
移住を始めなかったのでしょうか?
11:59
Why didn't Homo erectus evolve into separate species,
ホモ・エレクトスは なぜ人類の亜種へと
12:02
or sub-species rather, human races around the world?
進化しなかったのでしょうか?
12:06
Why was it that we seem to have come out of Africa so recently?
どうして近年になるまで
アフリカを出なかったのでしょうか?
12:08
Well, that's a big question. These "why" questions,
「なぜ」は 大いなる疑問です
12:12
particularly in genetics and the study of history in general, are always the big ones,
特に遺伝学と歴史の分野では
常に大きな疑問で
12:14
the ones that are tough to answer.
答えるのが非常に難しい
12:19
And so when all else fails, talk about the weather.
話に困ったら
天気の話題に移りましょうね
12:21
What was going on to the world's weather around 60,000 years ago?
6万年前の地球の天候は
どうだったのでしょうか?
12:24
Well, we were going into the worst part of the last ice age.
実は最終氷期の
最も厳しい段階でした
12:27
The last ice age started roughly 120,000 years ago.
最終氷河期はおよそ12万年前に始まり
12:30
It went up and down, and it really started to accelerate around 70,000 years ago.
最初はゆるやかでしたが
7万年前から急激に冷え始めました
12:33
Lots of evidence from sediment cores
堆積物コアや 花粉の種類
12:37
and the pollen types, oxygen isotopes and so on.
酸素同位元素などから
明らかになっています
12:39
We hit the last glacial maximum around 16,000 years ago,
1万6000年前にピークを迎えましたが
12:42
but basically, from 70,000 years on, things were getting really tough,
7万年前からすでに
状況は厳しいものでした
12:45
getting very cold. The Northern Hemisphere had massive growing ice sheets.
とても寒く 北半球には
巨大に発達した氷床がありました
12:49
New York City, Chicago, Seattle, all under a sheet of ice.
NYやシカゴ、シアトルなどは
氷床の下に埋もれていました
12:54
Most of Britain, all of Scandinavia, covered by ice several kilometers thick.
英国の大半とスカンジナビア半島全域は
数kmもの厚さの氷に覆われていました
12:58
Now, Africa is the most tropical continent on the planet --
現在アフリカは
地球上で最も暑い大陸です
13:03
about 85 percent of it lies between Cancer and Capricorn --
その85%が
北回帰線と南回帰線の間に位置し
13:06
and there aren't a lot of glaciers here,
東アフリカの高い山の上以外に
13:10
except on the high mountains here in East Africa.
氷河はありません
13:12
So what was going on here? We weren't covered in ice in Africa.
当時アフリカは
氷で覆われてはいなかった
13:14
Rather, Africa was drying out at that time.
その代わり とても乾燥していました
13:17
This is a paleo-climatological map
これは古代の気候の地図です
13:20
of what Africa looked like between 60,000 and 70,000 years ago,
先ほど述べた証拠を
つなぎあわせると
13:22
reconstructed from all these pieces of evidence that I mentioned before.
6、7万年前のアフリカが
どうだったかわかります
13:25
The reason for that is that ice actually sucks moisture out of the atmosphere.
氷が大気中から湿気を吸い取るので
乾燥していたのです
13:29
If you think about Antarctica, it's technically a desert, it gets so little precipitation.
南極を想像して下さい
降水量は少なく 実際は砂漠なのです
13:33
So the whole world was drying out.
世界中が乾燥していた
13:37
The sea levels were dropping. And Africa was turning to desert.
海面は下がり
アフリカは砂漠になった
13:39
The Sahara was much bigger then than it is now.
サハラ砂漠は
現在よりも遥かに大きかった
13:43
And the human habitat was reduced to just a few small pockets,
人類が住める場所は
現在と比べると
13:46
compared to what we have today.
ほんの数ヶ所になってしまった
13:49
The evidence from genetic data
遺伝子のデータによると
13:51
is that the human population around this time, roughly 70,000 years ago,
その当時 およそ7万年前の人口は
13:53
crashed to fewer than 2,000 individuals.
2,000人以下にまで減りました
13:56
We nearly went extinct. We were hanging on by our fingernails.
人類は絶滅寸前でしたが
首の皮一枚で持ちこたえました
13:59
And then something happened. A great illustration of it.
そしてここで
あることが起きたのです
14:03
Look at some stone tools.
この石器を見て下さい
14:06
The ones on the left are from Africa, from around a million years ago.
左のはアフリカで発見されたもの
100万年前のものです
14:08
The ones on the right were made by Neanderthals, our distant cousins,
右の石器はネアンデルタール人のもの
14:12
not our direct ancestors, living in Europe,
人類の直接の祖先ではなく遠い親戚で
14:15
and they date from around 50,000 or 60,000 years ago.
5、6万年前 ヨーロッパにいました
14:17
Now, at the risk of offending any paleoanthropologists
ここに古人類学者や
形質人類学者がいたら
14:21
or physical anthropologists in the audience,
反論されるかもしれませんが
14:24
basically there's not a lot of change between these two stone tool groups.
基本的にこの2種類の石器の間に
大きな違いはありません
14:27
The ones on the left are pretty similar to the ones on the right.
どちらも互いによく似ています
14:32
We are in a period of long cultural stasis from a million years ago
人類の文化は100万年前から
6、7万年前まで
14:35
until around 60,000 to 70,000 years ago.
長い停滞期にありました
14:39
The tool styles don't change that much.
道具の形に大きな変化がない -
14:41
The evidence is that the human way of life
つまりその間
人類の生活様式に
14:43
didn't change that much during that period.
大きな変化は無かったということです
14:45
But then 50, 60, 70 thousand years ago, somewhere in that region,
しかし5万年から7万年前
その地域のどこかで
14:47
all hell breaks loose. Art makes its appearance.
大変動が起きました
芸術が生まれたのです
14:52
The stone tools become much more finely crafted.
石器はもっと精巧に
作られるようになりました
14:55
The evidence is that humans begin to specialize in particular prey species,
特定の時期に
特定の獲物を
14:58
at particular times of the year.
狩るようになったということです
15:01
The population size started to expand.
人口は増え始めました
15:03
Probably, according to what many linguists believe,
多くの言語学者が言うには
恐らく
15:06
fully modern language, syntactic language -- subject, verb, object --
現代な言語のように
主語 動詞 目的語などとあって
15:08
that we use to convey complex ideas, like I'm doing now, appeared around that time.
複雑な概念を伝える系統的な言語は
この時期に出現したと思われます
15:12
We became much more social. The social networks expanded.
人類は社会的になりました
ソーシャルネットワークが広がったのです
15:16
This change in behavior allowed us to survive these worsening conditions in Africa,
生活様式の変化したので
悪化していくアフリカの環境でも生き残ることができ
15:20
and they allowed us to start to expand around the world.
世界中に移住していくことが出来たのです
15:25
We've been talking at this conference about African success stories.
アフリカでのサクセスストーリーですね
15:30
Well, you want the ultimate African success story?
その結末が何かわかりますか?
15:33
Look in the mirror. You're it. The reason you're alive today
あなたです
あなたが今日ここに存在すること
15:36
is because of those changes in our brains that took place in Africa --
人類の脳に起きたこれらの変化は
アフリカかも知れないし
15:39
probably somewhere in the region where we're sitting right now,
他の移住先かも知れませんが
15:43
around 60, 70 thousand years ago --
およそ6、7万年前に起きました
そのおかげで
15:46
allowing us not only to survive in Africa, but to expand out of Africa.
アフリカで生き残るだけでなく
外へ出て行くことが出来ました
15:49
An early coastal migration along the south coast of Asia,
アジア南部の沿岸ルートをたどる
初期の移住は
15:52
leaving Africa around 60,000 years ago,
6万年前にアフリカを出て
15:55
reaching Australia very rapidly, by 50,000 years ago.
すぐにオーストラリアに到達しました
5万年前です
15:57
A slightly later migration up into the Middle East.
その少し後に
中東に向けて出た移住者は
16:01
These would have been savannah hunters.
サバンナのハンターになりました
16:03
So those of you who are going on one of the post-conference tours,
後で現地視察ツアーに参加する方は
16:05
you'll get to see what a real savannah is like.
本物のサバンナの姿がわかりますよ
16:07
And it's basically a meat locker.
基本的に肉の宝庫です
16:09
People who would have specialized in killing the animals,
動物を殺す専門家になった人々は
16:11
hunting the animals on those meat locker savannahs, moving up,
野生動物の宝庫
サバンナで狩りをしながら
16:14
following the grasslands into the Middle East around 45,000 years ago,
草原に沿って
4万5000年前に中東に入りました
16:17
during one of the rare wet phases in the Sahara.
サハラ砂漠が緑に覆われていた頃です
16:21
Migrating eastward, following the grasslands,
草原が広がる方
東へと進みました
16:23
because that's what they were adapted to live on.
住むのに適していたからですね
16:26
And when they reached Central Asia,
中央アジアに到着すると
16:28
they reached what was effectively a steppe super-highway,
大草原が待ち受けていました
16:30
a grassland super-highway.
草原のスーパー・ハイウェイです
16:33
The grasslands at that time -- this was during the last ice age --
氷河期でしたが
この大草原は
16:35
stretched basically from Germany all the way over to Korea,
今のドイツから韓国まで
広がっていました
16:37
and the entire continent was open to them.
大陸全部が彼らのものだったのです
16:40
Entering Europe around 35,000 years ago,
ヨーロッパへは3万5000年前に到着し
16:42
and finally, a small group migrating up
そしてついに 小さなグループが
16:44
through the worst weather imaginable, Siberia,
最悪の環境だったであろう
シベリアに到達しました
16:46
inside the Arctic Circle, during the last ice age --
最終氷河期の北極圏内は
16:50
temperature was at -70, -80, even -100, perhaps --
氷点下50℃以下の極寒
マイナス70℃ということさえあったでしょう
16:52
migrating into the Americas, ultimately reaching that final frontier.
そこからアメリカに渡りました
最後の開拓地です
16:56
An amazing story, and it happened first in Africa.
この壮大な物語は
全てアフリカから始まったのです
17:00
The changes that allowed us to do that,
変化したおかげで -
17:04
the evolution of this highly adaptable brain that we all carry around with us,
適応できる脳へと進化したおかげで
17:06
allowing us to create novel cultures,
新しい文化を生み出し
17:09
allowing us to develop the diversity
駆け足で回った世界旅行で見られるような
17:11
that we see on a whirlwind trip like the one I've just been on.
人類の多様性が発展したのです
17:14
Now, that story I just told you is literally a whirlwind tour
今ここでお話したことも
駆け足の旅行です
17:18
of how we populated the world, the great Paleolithic wanderings of our species.
旧石器時代に世界中に広まった
人類の足跡を辿りました
17:22
And that's the story that I told a couple of years ago
数年前に出版した著書
17:27
in my book, "The Journey of Man," and a film that we made with the same title.
『アダムの旅』で書きましたし
同じタイトルの映画も作りました
17:29
And as we were finishing up that film --
その映画の撮影が終わる頃
17:33
it was co-produced with National Geographic --
- ナショナル・ジオグラフィックと
17:36
I started talking to the folks at NG about this work.
共同製作でしたが -
そのスタッフと話をしている時
17:38
And they got really excited about it. They liked the film, but they said,
彼らはとても興奮していました
映画も気に入っていて 言い出したのは
17:41
"You know, we really see this as kind of
「本当にこれは
17:45
the next wave in the study of human origins, where we all came from,
人類の起源を研究する新しい切り口だね
17:47
using the tools of DNA to map the migrations around the world.
我々はどこから来たのか
DNAを調べて祖先の移動マップを作る
17:51
You know, the study of human origins is kind of in our DNA,
DNAを研究することで人類の起源を知る
17:56
and we want to take it to the next level.
これをもう1つ上のレベルに
上げたいな
17:58
What do you want to do next?"
次に どうしたいんだい?」
18:00
Which is a great question to be asked by National Geographic.
大きな質問が投げかけられました
18:02
And I said, "Well, you know, what I've sketched out here is just that.
私は言いました
「今のところ ここまでしか出来ていない
18:04
It is a very coarse sketch of how we migrated around the planet.
どうやって人類が地球上に
広まっていったかという図だけなんだ
18:08
And it's based on a few thousand people we've sampled from,
サンプルを採ったのは数千人
18:12
you know, a handful of populations around the world.
世界の人口からしたら
ほんの少しだな
18:15
Studied a few genetic markers, and there are lots of gaps on this map.
2、3の遺伝子マーカーを調べたら
たくさんの変異が見つかった
18:17
We've just connected the dots. What we need to do
その点と点を結んでいっただけだ
18:21
is increase our sample size by an order of magnitude or more --
もっとサンプルを増やして -
1桁以上
18:23
hundreds of thousands of DNA samples from people all over the world."
世界中から何十万ものDNAサンプルを
集める必要がある」
18:27
And that was the genesis of the Genographic Project.
こうして ジェノグラフィック・プロジェクトが
誕生し
18:31
The project launched in April 2005.
2005年4月にスタートしました
18:34
It has three core components. Obviously, science is a big part of it.
プロジェクトには3つの柱があります
その中で もちろん科学が一番大きいですが
18:37
The field research that we're doing around the world with indigenous peoples.
世界中で
先住民と一緒に行う現地調査
18:41
People who have lived in the same location for a long period of time
同じ場所で長期間にわたり
生き続けてきた人々は
18:44
retain a connection to the place where they live
その土地との関係を保っています
18:47
that many of the rest of us have lost.
多くの人々は既に失ってしまいましたね
18:49
So my ancestors come from all over northern Europe.
私の祖先は北欧の出ですが
18:52
I live in the Eastern Seaboard of North America when I'm not traveling.
私は 旅行に出ていない時には
北米の東海岸に住んでいます
18:54
Where am I indigenous to? Nowhere really. My genes are all jumbled up.
どこの出身?どこでしょうね
ごた混ぜです
18:57
But there are people who retain that link to their ancestors
しかし 祖先とつながりを
保っている人々は
19:00
that allows us to contextualize the DNA results.
DNAの調査結果を解釈するのに
不可欠なのです
19:03
That's the focus of the field research,
現地調査の一番の目的です
19:06
the centers that we've set up all over the world --
世界中に10ヶ所
調査センターがあり
19:08
10 of them, top population geneticists.
世界最高レベルの
集団遺伝学者が研究しています
19:10
But, in addition, we wanted to open up this study to anybody around the world.
そしてまた 世界中の人々に
この研究に参加してもらいたい
19:13
How often do you get to participate in a big scientific project?
大規模な科学プロジェクトに
参加したいと思っても ヒトゲノム計画や
19:16
The Human Genome Project, or a Mars Rover mission.
火星探査計画に 参加できるでしょうか
19:20
In this case, you actually can.
この研究では参加できるのです
19:22
You can go onto our website, Nationalgeographic.com/genographic.
ジェノグラフィック・プロジェクトの
ウェブサイトへ行き
19:24
You can order a kit. You can test your own DNA.
DNS検査キットを購入するだけです
19:28
And you can actually submit those results to the database,
遺伝的背景に関するアンケートを添えて
自分のDNAの
19:31
and tell us a little about your genealogical background,
検査結果を データベースに送ると
19:34
have the data analyzed as part of the scientific effort.
あなたのDNAデータが
研究の一部として分析されるのです
19:36
Now, this is all a nonprofit enterprise, and so the money that we raise,
非営利事業として行っているので
集まったお金は
19:40
after we cover the cost of doing the testing and making the kit components,
キットの作成や検査にかかった分を
差し引いて
19:44
gets plowed back into the project.
計画に回されます
19:47
The majority going to something we call the Legacy Fund.
大部分はレガシー・ファンドへ -
19:49
It's a charitable entity, basically a grant-giving entity
基本的には助成金を提供する
慈善団体で
19:51
that gives money back to indigenous groups around the world
世界中の先住民グループに伝わる
19:55
for educational, cultural projects initiated by them.
教育的 文化的プロジェクトを
支援します
19:57
They apply to this fund in order to do various projects,
色々なプロジェクトがありますが
20:01
and I'll show you a couple of examples.
例をお見せしましょう
20:03
So how are we doing on the project? We've got about 25,000 samples
どういう流れかというと
今までに 25,000のサンプルが
20:05
collected from indigenous people around the world.
世界中の先住民から集められましたが
20:08
The most amazing thing has been the interest on the part of the public;
驚いたのは
一般市民の方々の関心です
20:10
210,000 people have ordered these participation kits
21万人分のDNA検査キットが
20:13
since we launched two years ago,
この2年間で販売されました
20:16
which has raised around five million dollars,
その500万ドルの売上の大半
20:18
the majority of which, at least half, is going back into the Legacy Fund.
少なくとも半分が
レガシー・ファンドに渡りました
20:21
We've just awarded the first Legacy Grants totaling around 500,000 dollars.
最近 最初の助成金として
50万ドル 承認されたところです
20:24
Projects around the world -- documenting oral poetry in Sierra Leone,
シェラレオネの口承詩を文書化したり
20:28
preserving traditional weaving patterns in Gaza,
ガザの伝統的な織物パターンを保存したり
20:31
language revitalization in Tajikistan, etc., etc.
タジキスタンの言語を復活させたり と
世界中で支援しています
20:34
So the project is going very, very well,
とても 本当にとても うまくいっています
20:37
and I urge you to check out the website and watch this space.
どうかサイトに行って
プロジェクトを見て下さい
20:40
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
20:44
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:46
Translated by Yuriko Hida

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Spencer Wells - Genographer
Spencer Wells studies human diversity -- the process by which humanity, which springs from a single common source, has become so astonishingly diverse and widespread.

Why you should listen

By analyzing DNA from people in all regions of the world, Spencer Wells has concluded that all humans alive today are descended
from a single man
who lived in Africa around 60,000 to 90,000 years ago. Now, Wells is working on the follow-up question: How did this man, sometimes called "Ychromosomal Adam," become the multicultural, globe-spanning body of life known as humanity?

Wells was recently named project director of the National Geographic Society's multiyear Genographic Project, which uses DNA samples to trace human migration out of Africa. In his 2002 book The Journey of Man: A Genetic Odyssey, he shows how genetic data can trace human migrations over the past 50,000 years, as our ancestors wandered out of Africa to fill up the continents of the globe.

More profile about the speaker
Spencer Wells | Speaker | TED.com