16:25
TED2008

Paul Rothemund: DNA folding, in detail

ポール・ロスマンドが語るDNAの折り方

Filmed:

2007年、ポール・ロスマンドはTEDで彼の専門分野であるDNA折り紙について短いトークをしました。今回のトークでは自己組織化する最小規模の機械を作るという、今後有望なこの分野について、豊富な事例を交えながら展望します。

- DNA origamist
Paul Rothemund folds DNA into shapes and patterns. Which is a simple enough thing to say, but the process he has developed has vast implications for computing and manufacturing -- allowing us to create things we can now only dream of. Full bio

So, people argue vigorously about the definition of life.
我々は生命の定義付けをしたがります
00:12
They ask if it should have reproduction in it, or metabolism, or evolution.
生命とは生殖 代謝 進化でしょうか
00:15
And I don't know the answer to that, so I'm not going to tell you.
私には答えがないので話せません
00:20
I will say that life involves computation.
生命には計算が付き物だとは言えます
00:22
So this is a computer program.
これがコンピューター・プログラムです
00:25
Booted up in a cell, the program would execute,
細胞内でプログラムは起動し実行します
00:27
and it could result in this person;
その結果この人になります
00:30
or with a small change, it could result in this person;
少し変われば この人になります
00:33
or another small change, this person;
もう少し変われば この人になります
00:36
or with a larger change, this dog,
さらに大きく変われば犬や
00:38
or this tree, or this whale.
木 クジラ になります
00:41
So now, if you take this metaphor
ゲノムをプログラムに
00:43
[of] genome as program seriously,
例えれば
00:45
you have to consider that Chris Anderson
クリス・アンダーセン
ジム・ワトソン
00:47
is a computer-fabricated artifact, as is Jim Watson,
クレイグ・ヴェンダーや
私たちは皆
00:49
Craig Venter, as are all of us.
コンピューターが作った既製品と言えます
00:52
And in convincing yourself that this metaphor is true,
この例えのとおり
00:55
there are lots of similarities between genetic programs
遺伝子プログラムと
コンピュータープログラムには
00:57
and computer programs that could help to convince you.
多くの類似性があります
00:59
But one, to me, that's most compelling
特に説得力があるのは
01:02
is the peculiar sensitivity to small changes
小さな変化が生物学的発達の過程で
01:04
that can make large changes in biological development -- the output.
大きな違いを生みだすことです
01:07
A small mutation can take a two-wing fly
小さな突然変異が2枚翅のハエを
4枚翅にします
01:10
and make it a four-wing fly.
小さな突然変異が2枚翅のハエを
4枚翅にします
01:12
Or it could take a fly and put legs where its antennae should be.
触覚が生えるべき所に足が生えたりします
01:13
Or if you're familiar with "The Princess Bride,"
”プリンセス・ブライド” みたいに
01:17
it could create a six-fingered man.
6本指を持つ人が現れます
01:19
Now, a hallmark of computer programs
このコンピュータープログラムの特徴は
01:21
is just this kind of sensitivity to small changes.
小さな変化にも敏感なことです
01:23
If your bank account's one dollar, and you flip a single bit,
銀行口座の1ビットを変えるだけで
01:26
you could end up with a thousand dollars.
1ドル を千ドルに変えられます
01:28
So these small changes are things that I think
これら小さな違いは発達中に
01:30
that -- they indicate to us that a complicated computation
複雑な計算が行われるために
01:33
in development is underlying these amplified, large changes.
増幅され大きな違いに結びつくと考えられます
01:35
So now, all of this indicates that there are molecular programs underlying biology,
生物学でも基盤となる分子プログラムが存在し
01:39
and it shows the power of molecular programs -- biology does.
そのプログラムの威力が発揮されています
01:45
And what I want to do is write molecular programs,
私は分子プログラムを書く
テクノロジーを確立しようと思っています
01:49
potentially to build technology.
私は分子プログラムを書く
テクノロジーを確立しようと思っています
01:51
And there are a lot of people doing this,
多くの科学者が参加しており その多くは
クレイグ・ヴェンターなど合成生物学者です
01:53
a lot of synthetic biologists doing this, like Craig Venter.
多くの科学者が参加しており その多くは
クレイグ・ヴェンターなど合成生物学者です
01:54
And they concentrate on using cells.
彼らは細胞を用いることに注目しています
01:57
They're cell-oriented.
彼らは細胞重視派です
01:59
So my friends, molecular programmers, and I
友人の分子プログラマーと私は
02:01
have a sort of biomolecule-centric approach.
生体分子に注目しています
02:03
We're interested in using DNA, RNA and protein,
私たちは DNA RNA そして蛋白質に着目して
02:05
and building new languages for building things from the bottom up,
生体分子を用いた新しい言語を
02:08
using biomolecules,
一から作り上げようとしています
生物学とは無関係かもしれません
02:11
potentially having nothing to do with biology.
一から作り上げようとしています
生物学とは無関係かもしれません
02:12
So, these are all the machines in a cell.
これらは細胞内の機械です
02:15
There's a camera.
カメラがあります
02:19
There's the solar panels of the cell,
細胞のソーラーパネル
02:21
some switches that turn your genes on and off,
遺伝子のオン・オフを担うスイッチ
02:22
the girders of the cell, motors that move your muscles.
細胞の桁や 筋肉の動力部
02:24
My little group of molecular programmers
私の分子プログラマー班は
02:27
are trying to refashion all of these parts from DNA.
DNAからこれら全てのパーツを作り直そうとしています
02:29
We're not DNA zealots, but DNA is the cheapest,
私たちはDNA狂信者ではありませんが
02:33
easiest to understand and easy to program material to do this.
DNAは安価で最も分かりやすく
かつプログラムが容易です
02:35
And as other things become easier to use --
蛋白質等の他の物質も
02:38
maybe protein -- we'll work with those.
たやすく利用できるようになれば使うでしょう
02:40
If we succeed, what will molecular programming look like?
分子プログラミングが成功するとこうなります
02:43
You're going to sit in front of your computer.
コンピューターの前に座り
02:45
You're going to design something like a cell phone,
携帯でもデザインします
02:47
and in a high-level language, you'll describe that cell phone.
高級言語で携帯を定義します
02:49
Then you're going to have a compiler
そしてその定義を理解する
02:51
that's going to take that description
コンパイラを使い
02:53
and it's going to turn it into actual molecules
実際の分子に変換し
02:54
that can be sent to a synthesizer
合成装置に送り
02:56
and that synthesizer will pack those molecules into a seed.
合成装置が分子を紡いで種を作ります
02:58
And what happens if you water and feed that seed appropriately,
その種に適切な水と肥料を与えると
03:01
is it will do a developmental computation,
種が発育過程を分子計算し
03:04
a molecular computation, and it'll build an electronic computer.
電子コンピューターを作り始めます
03:06
And if I haven't revealed my prejudices already,
私の偏見によれば
03:09
I think that life has been about molecular computers
生命とは分子コンピューターが
03:12
building electrochemical computers,
電気生化学的コンピューターを作り
03:14
building electronic computers,
電気生化学的コンピューターと共に
03:16
which together with electrochemical computers
電子コンピューターを作り
03:18
will build new molecular computers,
新しい分子コンピューターを作り
03:20
which will build new electronic computers, and so forth.
さらに新たな電子コンピューターが作られるのです
03:22
And if you buy all of this,
この理論を信じれば
03:25
and you think life is about computation, as I do,
皆さんも生命は計算だと思うでしょう
03:26
then you look at big questions through the eyes of a computer scientist.
そしてコンピューター科学者の目で
大いなる問題に着目するでしょう
03:28
So one big question is, how does a baby know when to stop growing?
赤ん坊はいつ成長を止めるべきか
いかに知っているのか?
03:31
And for molecular programming,
分子プログラミングの問題は携帯が
03:35
the question is how does your cell phone know when to stop growing?
いつ成長を止めるべきか
いかに知るのでしょう?
03:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:39
Or how does a computer program know when to stop running?
コンピューター・プログラムはいつ実行を
止めるべきか いかに知るのでしょう?
03:40
Or more to the point, how do you know if a program will ever stop?
さらに言うと プログラムがやがて
停止すると どうして分りますか?
03:43
There are other questions like this, too.
このような疑問はまだあります
03:46
One of them is Craig Venter's question.
クレイグ・ヴェンターが発した疑問は
03:48
Turns out I think he's actually a computer scientist.
彼がコンピューター科学者の証です
03:50
He asked, how big is the minimal genome
彼は微生物を機能的に構成する
03:52
that will give me a functioning microorganism?
最小のゲノムの大きさを問いかけました
03:55
How few genes can I use?
必要最小限のゲノムとは?
03:57
This is exactly analogous to the question,
マイクロソフト・ワードのように機能する
03:59
what's the smallest program I can write
最小限のプログラムを書くという
04:01
that will act exactly like Microsoft Word?
課題にそっくりです
04:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:04
And just as he's writing, you know, bacteria that will be smaller,
まるでとても小さな微生物用に
04:05
he's writing genomes that will work,
機能するゲノムを書くように
04:09
we could write smaller programs
マイクロソフト・ワードのように動く
04:10
that would do what Microsoft Word does.
小さなプログラムを書くのです
04:12
But for molecular programming, our question is,
分子プログラミングでの問題は
04:14
how many molecules do we need to put in that seed to get a cell phone?
携帯になる種に詰め込む分子の数はいくつか?
04:16
What's the smallest number we can get away with?
最低数は何でしょう?
04:20
Now, these are big questions in computer science.
これはコンピューター科学にも共通する問題です
04:22
These are all complexity questions,
複雑性の問題です
04:24
and computer science tells us that these are very hard questions.
しかもかなり困難な問題です
04:26
Almost -- many of them are impossible.
全てを解決するのは不可能です
04:28
But for some tasks, we can start to answer them.
しかし幾つかは答えができつつあります
04:30
So, I'm going to start asking those questions
次にお話しするDNA構造で この問題に
取り組んでみたいと思います
04:33
for the DNA structures I'm going to talk about next.
次にお話しするDNA構造で この問題に
取り組んでみたいと思います
04:34
So, this is normal DNA, what you think of as normal DNA.
さてこれは ご存知の普通のDNAです
04:37
It's double-stranded, it's a double helix,
二本鎖で二重らせん構造をしています
04:40
has the As, Ts, Cs and Gs that pair to hold the strands together.
鎖を結合する A T C Gの塩基があります
04:42
And I'm going to draw it like this sometimes,
時々 私はこのように描写します
04:45
just so I don't scare you.
この方が分かりやすいでしょうから
04:47
We want to look at individual strands and not think about the double helix.
二重らせんよりも個々の鎖に着目したいのです
04:49
When we synthesize it, it comes single-stranded,
我々が合成するのは一本鎖です
04:52
so we can take the blue strand in one tube
この試験管の中に青い一本鎖
04:55
and make an orange strand in the other tube,
別の試験管にオレンジ色の鎖があります
04:58
and they're floppy when they're single-stranded.
これら一本鎖は軟弱です
05:00
You mix them together and they make a rigid double helix.
これらを混ぜ合わせると
強固な二重らせんになります
05:02
Now for the last 25 years,
過去25年間にわたり
05:05
Ned Seeman and a bunch of his descendants
ネッド・シーマンとその門下生たちは
05:07
have worked very hard and made beautiful three-dimensional structures
このDNA鎖の結合反応を利用して
05:09
using this kind of reaction of DNA strands coming together.
懸命に美しい3次元構造を作りました
05:12
But a lot of their approaches, though elegant, take a long time.
彼らの方法は優美ですが時間がかかります
05:15
They can take a couple of years, or it can be difficult to design.
数年を要すこともあり 設計も困難です
05:18
So I came up with a new method a couple of years ago
そこで私は数年前 DNA折り紙と呼ぶ
新しい方法を考案しました
05:21
I call DNA origami
そこで私は数年前 DNA折り紙と呼ぶ
新しい方法を考案しました
05:24
that's so easy you could do it at home in your kitchen
とても簡単で家の台所でもできます
05:25
and design the stuff on a laptop.
ノートパソコンでデザインします
05:27
But to do it, you need a long, single strand of DNA,
しかしこれには長い一本鎖のDNAが必要です
05:29
which is technically very difficult to get.
技術的に合成するのはとても困難です
05:32
So, you can go to a natural source.
したがって自然素材に頼ります
05:34
You can look in this computer-fabricated artifact,
コンピューターが作った既製品を見ると
05:36
and he's got a double-stranded genome -- that's no good.
彼のゲノムは2本鎖なので不適当です
05:38
You look in his intestines. There are billions of bacteria.
彼の腸には何十億ものバクテリアがいます
05:40
They're no good either.
それらも不適当です
05:43
Double strand again, but inside them, they're infected with a virus
これらも2本鎖です
しかし中にウイルスがいます
05:45
that has a nice, long, single-stranded genome
このウイルスのゲノムは長くきれいな一本鎖です
05:47
that we can fold like a piece of paper.
これを紙のように折ることができます
05:50
And here's how we do it.
これがそのやり方です
05:52
This is part of that genome.
これはゲノムの一部です
05:53
We add a bunch of short, synthetic DNAs that I call staples.
これに私がホッチキスと呼ぶ
短い合成DNAの束を入れます
05:54
Each one has a left half that binds the long strand in one place,
左側は長いDNA鎖のある部分と結合し
05:57
and a right half that binds it in a different place,
その右側はまた別の場所で結合します
06:01
and brings the long strand together like this.
このように長い鎖を手繰り寄せます
06:04
The net action of many of these on that long strand
長い鎖が網目のようになることで
06:07
is to fold it into something like a rectangle.
長方形に折りたためます
06:09
Now, we can't actually take a movie of this process,
この過程を映像でお見せしましょう
06:11
but Shawn Douglas at Harvard
ハーバードのショーン・ダグラスが
06:13
has made a nice visualization for us
うまく視覚化してくれました
06:15
that begins with a long strand and has some short strands in it.
これが長い鎖で こっちが短い鎖です
06:17
And what happens is that we mix these strands together.
これらのDNA鎖を混ぜ合わせて
06:21
We heat them up, we add a little bit of salt,
加熱し 少し塩を加えます
06:25
we heat them up to almost boiling and cool them down,
ほとんど沸騰するまで加熱し冷却します
06:27
and as we cool them down,
冷却する過程で
短い鎖は長い鎖に結合し
06:29
the short strands bind the long strands
冷却する過程で
短い鎖は長い鎖に結合し
06:30
and start to form structure.
構造を作り始めます
06:32
And you can see a little bit of double helix forming there.
ここに小さな二重らせん構造が見えますね
06:34
When you look at DNA origami,
DNA折り紙をよく見ると
06:38
you can see that what it really is,
一見複雑に見えても
本質が分かってきます
06:40
even though you think it's complicated,
一見複雑に見えても
本質が分かってきます
06:43
is a bunch of double helices that are parallel to each other,
二重らせんの集まりで
お互いに平行して走っており
06:44
and they're held together
二重らせんの集まりで
お互いに平行して走っており
06:47
by places where short strands go along one helix
短い鎖が らせん間をつないでいます
06:49
and then jump to another one.
短い鎖が らせん間をつないでいます
06:51
So there's a strand that goes like this, goes along one helix and binds --
ここにらせん構造同士をつなぐ鎖があります
06:53
it jumps to another helix and comes back.
別のらせんに飛んで戻ってきます
06:56
That holds the long strand like this.
このように長い鎖を折りたたむのです
06:58
Now, to show that we could make any shape or pattern
どんな形やパターンでも作れることをお見せするため
07:00
that we wanted, I tried to make this shape.
ここである形を作ってみます
07:03
I wanted to fold DNA into something that goes up over the eye,
目のような形
07:06
down the nose, up the nose, around the forehead,
下に行って鼻 さらにその上の額
07:08
back down and end in a little loop like this.
戻ってきてループを描いて終わりです
07:11
And so, I thought, if this could work, anything could work.
これができたら何でも作れると私は考えました
07:14
So I had the computer program design the short staples to do this.
このため短いホッチキスを
プログラムでデザインをしました
07:17
I ordered them; they came by FedEx.
注文すると フェデックスが配達しました
07:20
I mixed them up, heated them, cooled them down,
材料を混ぜて熱した後に冷却しました
07:22
and I got 50 billion little smiley faces
1滴の水あたり5百億個の
スマイリー・フェイスができました
07:24
floating around in a single drop of water.
1滴の水あたり5百億個の
スマイリー・フェイスができました
07:28
And each one of these is just
これら一つ一つの幅は人の毛髪の
千分の一しかないのですよ
07:30
one-thousandth the width of a human hair, OK?
これら一つ一つの幅は人の毛髪の
千分の一しかないのですよ
07:32
So, they're all floating around in solution, and to look at them,
これらは全て溶液に浮いていて
これを見るためには
07:36
you have to get them on a surface where they stick.
表面にくっつかせる必要があります
07:39
So, you pour them out onto a surface
ある平面に流し出すと
07:41
and they start to stick to that surface,
それらはその表面にくっつき始めます
07:43
and we take a picture using an atomic-force microscope.
原子間力顕微鏡で写真を撮りました
07:45
It's got a needle, like a record needle,
レコード針のような針があり
07:47
that goes back and forth over the surface,
表面をなぞることで
07:49
bumps up and down, and feels the height of the first surface.
表面の段差を記録することができます
07:51
It feels the DNA origami.
DNA折り紙を見分けるのです
07:54
There's the atomic-force microscope working
原子間力顕微鏡では
着地が少しばかり荒かったので
07:56
and you can see that the landing's a little rough.
原子間力顕微鏡では
着地が少しばかり荒かったので
07:59
When you zoom in, they've got, you know,
拡大すると お分かりでしょうが
08:00
weak jaws that flip over their heads
弱いあごの部分が頭の方へめくりあがったり
08:02
and some of their noses get punched out, but it's pretty good.
いくつかの鼻がつぶれています
それでもかわいいですが
08:03
You can zoom in and even see the extra little loop,
さらに拡大すると小さな山羊ひげのような
ループも見ることができます
08:06
this little nano-goatee.
さらに拡大すると小さな山羊ひげのような
ループも見ることができます
08:08
Now, what's great about this is anybody can do this.
これが素晴らしいのは誰でもできることです
08:10
And so, I got this in the mail about a year after I did this, unsolicited.
この1年後にある人から予期せぬメールが来ました
08:13
Anyone know what this is? What is it?
どなたかこれが何かお分かりになりますか?
08:17
It's China, right?
中国ですね?
08:20
So, what happened is, a graduate student in China,
これは中国の大学院生
08:22
Lulu Qian, did a great job.
ルル・チエンの素晴らしい成果です
08:24
She wrote all her own software
彼女はこのDNA折り紙をデザインを
08:26
to design and built this DNA origami,
独自のソフトウェアで開発しました
08:28
a beautiful rendition of China, which even has Taiwan,
台湾を含んだきれいな中国の形です
08:30
and you can see it's sort of on the world's shortest leash, right?
世界で最も短いひもでつながってます
08:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:36
So, this works really well
この仕事は本当にうまくいきました
08:39
and you can make patterns as well as shapes, OK?
形と同様にパターンも描くことができます
08:41
And you can make a map of the Americas and spell DNA with DNA.
DNAを用いてアメリカの地図や
DNAのスペルを描けます
08:44
And what's really neat about it --
そして本当に巧妙なことは
08:47
well, actually, this all looks like nano-artwork,
これはナノ芸術作品のようですが
08:50
but it turns out that nano-artwork
ナノ芸術作品を用いてナノ回路を
作ることができるのです
08:52
is just what you need to make nano-circuits.
ナノ芸術作品を用いてナノ回路を
作ることができるのです
08:53
So, you can put circuit components on the staples,
電球やスイッチのような
08:55
like a light bulb and a light switch.
回路の部品を配置できます
08:57
Let the thing assemble, and you'll get some kind of a circuit.
それらを集めてある種の回路を作れます
08:59
And then you can maybe wash the DNA away and have the circuit left over.
それから残ったDNAを洗い流すと回路が残ります
09:02
So, this is what some colleagues of mine at Caltech did.
カリフォルニア工科大学の同僚の成果です
09:05
They took a DNA origami, organized some carbon nano-tubes,
彼らはDNA折り紙を使い炭素のナノチューブを作り
09:07
made a little switch, you see here, wired it up,
ここにある小さなスイッチを作り 配線して
09:10
tested it and showed that it is indeed a switch.
テストしたら実際にスイッチとして動きました
09:12
Now, this is just a single switch
これは1つのスイッチにすぎず
09:15
and you need half a billion for a computer, so we have a long way to go.
1つのコンピュータには5億個もの
スイッチが必要なので先は長いです
09:17
But this is very promising
しかしとても将来有望です
09:21
because the origami can organize parts just one-tenth the size
この折り紙は普通のコンピューターの
十分の一の大きさの部品を作れるのです
09:23
of those in a normal computer.
この折り紙は普通のコンピューターの
十分の一の大きさの部品を作れるのです
09:28
So it's very promising for making small computers.
小さいコンピューターを作ることが有望です
09:29
Now, I want to get back to that compiler.
コンパイラに話を戻しましょう
09:32
The DNA origami is a proof that that compiler actually works.
DNA折り紙はコンパイラが実際に働く証拠となります
09:35
So, you start with something in the computer.
コンピュータで何かを始める際
09:39
You get a high-level description of the computer program,
コンピュータープログラムで概念的な定義をします
09:41
a high-level description of the origami.
折り紙にするための概念的な定義です
09:44
You can compile it to molecules, send it to a synthesizer,
その定義を分子にコンパイルし合成装置に送り込むと
09:46
and it actually works.
DNA折り紙が作られます
09:49
And it turns out that a company has made a nice program
ある会社が良いプログラムを作りました
09:50
that's much better than my code, which was kind of ugly,
醜い私のコードよりはるかに優れていて
09:54
and will allow us to do this in a nice,
きれいで視覚的にコンピューターを使う
デザインが可能になります
09:56
visual, computer-aided design way.
きれいで視覚的にコンピューターを使う
デザインが可能になります
09:57
So, now you can say, all right,
皆さんは思うでしょう
10:00
why isn't DNA origami the end of the story?
なぜDNA折り紙で この話は終わらないの?
10:01
You have your molecular compiler, you can do whatever you want.
分子コンパイラを持てば何でもできます
10:03
The fact is that it does not scale.
しかし実際のところ拡張性がありません
10:05
So if you want to build a human from DNA origami,
DNA折り紙を使ってヒトを作りたい場合
10:08
the problem is, you need a long strand
10兆の1兆倍もの
長い塩基が必要です
10:11
that's 10 trillion trillion bases long.
10兆の1兆倍もの
長い塩基が必要です
10:13
That's three light years' worth of DNA,
これは3光年の長さのDNAに相当します
10:16
so we're not going to do this.
ですから無理です
10:18
We're going to turn to another technology,
私たちは別の技術に注目します
10:20
called algorithmic self-assembly of tiles.
タイルの計算された自己組織化です
10:22
It was started by Erik Winfree,
エリク・ウィンフリーが提唱し始めて
10:24
and what it does,
DNA折り紙の百分の一の
大きさのタイルを使います
10:26
it has tiles that are a hundredth the size of a DNA origami.
DNA折り紙の百分の一の
大きさのタイルを使います
10:27
You zoom in, there are just four DNA strands
拡大すると タイルには
短いDNA一本鎖が4本あり
10:31
and they have little single-stranded bits on them
拡大すると タイルには
短いDNA一本鎖が4本あり
10:34
that can bind to other tiles, if they match.
鎖がマッチすると他のタイルと結合します
10:36
And we like to draw these tiles as little squares.
これらのタイルを小さな四角形として描きます
10:38
And if you look at their sticky ends, these little DNA bits,
付着性を持った各辺のDNA鎖を見ると
10:42
you can see that they actually form a checkerboard pattern.
市松模様になることが分ります
10:44
So, these tiles would make a complicated, self-assembling checkerboard.
入り組んだ自己組織化する市松模様です
10:47
And the point of this, if you didn't catch that,
重要な点は
10:50
is that tiles are a kind of molecular program
タイルは分子プログラムの一種で
10:52
and they can output patterns.
パターンを形成することです
10:55
And a really amazing part of this is
実に素晴らしいことに
10:58
that any computer program can be translated
特に計算など あらゆる
コンピューター・プログラムが
11:00
into one of these tile programs -- specifically, counting.
タイル・プログラムに変換できるのです
11:02
So, you can come up with a set of tiles
結合されたタイルの組み合わせを
11:05
that when they come together, form a little binary counter
市松模様ではなく
二進法カウンターと見なせます
11:08
rather than a checkerboard.
市松模様ではなく
二進法カウンターと見なせます
11:11
So you can read off binary numbers five, six and seven.
二進法で5 6 7という風に数字を読み取れます
11:13
And in order to get these kinds of computations started right,
この種の計算を正確に進めるためには
11:16
you need some kind of input, a kind of seed.
ある入力 つまり種が必要です
11:19
You can use DNA origami for that.
種にDNA折り紙が使えます
11:21
You can encode the number 32
DNA折り紙の右端に数字の32を符号化し
11:23
in the right-hand side of a DNA origami,
DNA折り紙の右端に数字の32を符号化し
11:25
and when you add those tiles that count,
計算できるタイルを追加すると
11:27
they will start to count -- they will read that 32
タイルは32になるまで数え始め
11:29
and they'll stop at 32.
そして32になると止まります
11:32
So, what we've done is we've figured out a way
分子プログラムが いつ動作を止めるか
11:34
to have a molecular program know when to stop going.
知る手段ができました 数えることで
いつ成長を止めるかが分かるのです
11:37
It knows when to stop growing because it can count.
知る手段ができました 数えることで
いつ成長を止めるかが分かるのです
11:40
It knows how big it is.
どのくらい大きいかが分かるのです
11:42
So, that answers that sort of first question I was talking about.
これが私が最初に述べた問題の答えです
11:44
It doesn't tell us how babies do it, however.
しかし赤ん坊の場合は 未だ分かりません
11:47
So now, we can use this counting to try and get at much bigger things
次に この計算を応用してDNA折り紙には
無理な もっと大きな物を作ろうとしました
11:50
than DNA origami could otherwise.
次に この計算を応用してDNA折り紙には
無理な もっと大きな物を作ろうとしました
11:54
Here's the DNA origami, and what we can do
ここにDNA折り紙があり
11:55
is we can write 32 on both edges of the DNA origami,
両端に数字の32を符号化し
11:58
and we can now use our watering can
じょうろを使い
12:01
and water with tiles, and we can start growing tiles off of that
タイルに水をやり成長させて
12:03
and create a square.
四角形を作り始めます
12:07
The counter serves as a template
カウンターは真ん中を四角形で
12:09
to fill in a square in the middle of this thing.
埋めるための基準になります
12:12
So, what we've done is we've succeeded
DNA折り紙とタイルを組み合わせることで
12:14
in making something much bigger than a DNA origami
DNA折り紙とタイルを組み合わせることで
12:15
by combining DNA origami with tiles.
DNA折り紙より とても大きな物を作れたわけです
12:18
And the neat thing about it is, is that it's also reprogrammable.
さらに素晴らしいことに
再プログラム化も可能です
12:21
You can just change a couple of the DNA strands in this binary representation
二進法表記のDNA鎖に少し変更を加えるだけで
12:24
and you'll get 96 rather than 32.
例えば 32 を 96 に変更できます
12:28
And if you do that, the origami's the same size,
そうすれば折り紙の大きさは同じなのに
12:31
but the resulting square that you get is three times bigger.
形成する四角形は3倍の大きさになります
12:34
So, this sort of recapitulates
以上が私が発達について
述べたい要約となります
12:39
what I was telling you about development.
以上が私が発達について
述べたい要約となります
12:40
You have a very sensitive computer program
とても繊細なコンピューター・プログラムがあり
12:42
where small changes -- single, tiny, little mutations --
なにか小さな変更をすると
12:45
can take something that made one size square
ある大きさの四角形を作っていたのを
12:48
and make something very much bigger.
とても大きな物を作るように変えられます
12:50
Now, this -- using counting to compute
このように数えることと
12:54
and build these kinds of things
発達過程を使って物を設計して作ることは
12:57
by this kind of developmental process
発達過程を使って物を設計して作ることは
12:59
is something that also has bearing on Craig Venter's question.
クレイグ・ヴェンダーの疑問と重なる部分があります
13:01
So, you can ask, how many DNA strands are required
その疑問とはある大きさの四角形を作るのに
13:05
to build a square of a given size?
何本のDNA鎖が必要となるか です
13:07
If we wanted to make a square of size 10, 100 or 1,000,
大きさが 10 100 1,000 の四角形を作る場合
13:09
if we used DNA origami alone,
DNA折り紙のみを使用すると
13:14
we would require a number of DNA strands that's the square
四角形一辺の長さ二乗分の数だけ
DNA鎖が必要になります
13:16
of the size of that square;
四角形一辺の長さ二乗分の数だけ
DNA鎖が必要になります
13:19
so we'd need 100, 10,000 or a million DNA strands.
百 万 百万のDNA鎖が必要です
13:21
That's really not affordable.
これは不可能です
13:23
But if we use a little computation --
しかし計算を使い
13:25
we use origami, plus some tiles that count --
折り紙を用い そして数えることができる
タイルを用いると
13:27
then we can get away with using 100, 200 or 300 DNA strands.
100 200 300といった数のDNA鎖で収まるのです
13:31
And so we can exponentially reduce the number of DNA strands we use,
そして指数関数的にDNA鎖の必要量を減らせます
13:34
if we use counting, if we use a little bit of computation.
数をかぞえ簡単な計算をすればいいのです
13:39
And so computation is some very powerful way
計算は物を作る際に必要となる
13:42
to reduce the number of molecules you need to build something,
分子の量を減らし 作ろうとするゲノムの
13:45
to reduce the size of the genome that you're building.
サイズを小さくする強力な方法です
13:48
And finally, I'm going to get back to that sort of crazy idea
最終的に私はコンピューターが
コンピューターを作るという
13:51
about computers building computers.
クレイジーな考えに戻ります
13:54
If you look at the square that you build with the origami
折り紙を使い作り上げた
四角形とカウンターをみると
13:56
and some counters growing off it,
折り紙を使い作り上げた
四角形とカウンターをみると
13:59
the pattern that it has is exactly the pattern that you need
そのパターンは正に記憶を
作るために必要な物です
14:01
to make a memory.
そのパターンは正に記憶を
作るために必要な物です
14:04
So if you affix some wires and switches to those tiles --
ホッチキスで鎖を止める代わりに
タイルに配線やスイッチを取り付ければ
14:05
rather than to the staple strands, you affix them to the tiles --
ホッチキスで鎖を止める代わりに
タイルに配線やスイッチを取り付ければ
14:08
then they'll self-assemble the somewhat complicated circuits,
それらは複雑な回路を自己組織化するでしょう
14:11
the demultiplexer circuits, that you need to address this memory.
この記憶装置を作るために必要な
デマルチプレクサー回路です
14:14
So you can actually make a complicated circuit
ちょっと計算するだけで
14:17
using a little bit of computation.
複雑な回路を作ることができます
14:19
It's a molecular computer building an electronic computer.
言わば 電子コンピューターを作る
分子コンピューターです
14:21
Now, you ask me, how far have we gotten down this path?
さてここに至るまで どれ位進歩したのでしょう?
14:24
Experimentally, this is what we've done in the last year.
実験的に行った去年の成果を紹介します
14:27
Here is a DNA origami rectangle,
これはDNA折り紙の長方形です
14:30
and here are some tiles growing from it.
ここが成長したタイルの部分で
14:33
And you can see how they count.
いくつ数えたか 見て取れます
14:35
One, two, three, four, five, six, nine, 10, 11, 12, 17.
1 2 3 4 5 6 9 10 11 12 17
14:37
So it's got some errors, but at least it counts up.
間違いがいくつかありますが
数え上げました
14:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:53
So, it turns out we actually had this idea nine years ago,
私たちはこの考えを9年前に思いつきました
14:54
and that's about the time constant for how long it takes
この種のことをするには必要な年月です
14:57
to do these kinds of things, so I think we made a lot of progress.
かなり進歩したと思います
15:00
We've got ideas about how to fix these errors.
これらの誤りを正すアイデアはあります
15:02
And I think in the next five or 10 years,
今後5~10年すれば
15:04
we'll make the kind of squares that I described
お話しした四角形を作り
15:06
and maybe even get to some of those self-assembled circuits.
自己組織化する回路もできることでしょう
15:08
So now, what do I want you to take away from this talk?
私がこのトークでお伝えしたいことは
15:11
I want you to remember that
次のとおりです
15:15
to create life's very diverse and complex forms,
生命は多くの複雑な形を作るために
15:17
life uses computation to do that.
計算をしています
15:21
And the computations that it uses, they're molecular computations,
行っている計算は分子計算です
15:23
and in order to understand this and get a better handle on it,
ファインマンが言うように
15:27
as Feynman said, you know,
より深く理解 習得するためには
15:29
we need to build something to understand it.
何かを作りながら理解するのが一番です
15:31
And so we are going to use molecules and refashion this thing,
私たちは分子を使い改良していくのです
15:33
rebuild everything from the bottom up,
始めからボトムアップで作り上げ
15:37
using DNA in ways that nature never intended,
自然が意図もしなかった方法でDNAを用い
15:39
using DNA origami,
DNA折り紙を用い
15:42
and DNA origami to seed this algorithmic self-assembly.
このアルゴリズム的自己組織化の種にします
15:44
You know, so this is all very cool,
全てはとてもクールな科学です
15:47
but what I'd like you to take from the talk,
理解して欲しいのは
15:50
hopefully from some of those big questions,
大きな課題を通して考えると
15:51
is that this molecular programming isn't just about making gadgets.
分子プログラミングはガジェットを
作るだけではありません
15:53
It's not just making about --
自己組織化で携帯電話や
15:56
it's making self-assembled cell phones and circuits.
回路を作るのが目的ではありません
15:58
What it's really about is taking computer science
コンピュータ科学を用い
16:00
and looking at big questions in a new light,
大きな課題に新しい光をあて
16:02
asking new versions of those big questions
その課題に新たな仮説を導き
16:05
and trying to understand how biology
生物学が いかに驚きの品を作るか
解明することが大切なのです
16:07
can make such amazing things. Thank you.
生物学が いかに驚きの品を作るか
解明することが大切なのです
16:09
(Applause)
ありがとうございます (拍手)
16:12
Translated by Haruka Igarashi
Reviewed by Akira Kan

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Paul Rothemund - DNA origamist
Paul Rothemund folds DNA into shapes and patterns. Which is a simple enough thing to say, but the process he has developed has vast implications for computing and manufacturing -- allowing us to create things we can now only dream of.

Why you should listen

Paul Rothemund won a MacArthur grant this year for a fairly mystifying study area: "folding DNA." It brings up the question: Why fold DNA? The answer is -- because the power to manipulate DNA in this way could change the way we make things at a very basic level.

Rothemund's work combines the study of self-assembly (watch the TEDTalks from Neil Gershenfeld and Saul Griffith for more on this) with the research being done in DNA nanotechnology -- and points the way toward self-assembling devices at microscale, making computer memory, for instance, smaller, faster and maybe even cheaper.

More profile about the speaker
Paul Rothemund | Speaker | TED.com