14:39
TED2007

Jonathan Drori: What we think we know

ジョナサン・ドローリ:私たちが知っている気になっていること

Filmed:

ジョナサン・ドローリが、4つの簡単な問題(みなさん答えられない自分に驚くかも)をはじめとして、知識のギャップ、特に知っていると思っていて実は知らない科学の知識について考察します。

- Educator
Jonathan Drori commissioned the BBC's very first websites, one highlight in a long career devoted to online culture and educational media -- and understanding how we learn. Full bio

I'm going to try and explain why it is that perhaps
私達は 実は自分が考えているほど物事を分かっていないことを
00:18
we don't understand as much as we think we do.
ご説明しようと思います
00:22
I'd like to begin with four questions.
まず4つの問題を出します
00:24
This is not some sort of cultural thing for the time of year.
これはこの時期に行われる ある種の文化的なものではありません
00:27
That's an in-joke, by the way.
まぁ これは仲間内の冗談なのですが
00:30
But these four questions, actually,
この4つの問題は実際 科学の知識がある人達が
00:32
are ones that people who even know quite a lot about science find quite hard.
非常に難しいと思ったものです
00:35
And they're questions that I've asked of science television producers,
そして これらの問題を 科学番組のプロデューサー
00:38
of audiences of science educators --
科学教育者の観客 つまり理科の先生です
00:43
so that's science teachers -- and also of seven-year-olds,
そして7歳の子供達に出しました
00:46
and I find that the seven-year-olds do marginally better
すると 他の観客より子供達の方が少し成績がよかったんです
00:50
than the other audiences, which is somewhat surprising.
これには少々驚かされます
00:53
So the first question, and you might want to write this down,
では最初の問題です みなさん よかったら書いて下さい
00:55
either on a bit of paper, physically, or a virtual piece of paper
本当の紙かまたは頭の中の仮想の紙か
00:58
in your head. And, for viewers at home, you can try this as well.
家でご覧のみなさんも挑戦してみてださい
01:02
A little seed weighs next to nothing and a tree weighs a lot, right?
小さな種にはほとんど重さがありませんが 木は重いですよね
01:05
I think we agree on that. Where does the tree get the stuff that makes up this chair,
これにはみなさん異論はないと思います では木はこのイスを作り上げている
01:10
right? Where does all this stuff come from?
モノをどこから得たのでしょうか? これらは全てどこから来たのでしょう?
01:16
(Knocks)
(イスを叩く音)
01:19
And your next question is, can you light a little torch-bulb
続いての問題は 電池 電球 そして1本のワイヤで
01:20
with a battery, a bulb and one piece of wire?
電球を点けることができますか?
01:26
And would you be able to, kind of, draw a -- you don't have to draw
そして 実際に書かなくてもいいですが
01:31
the diagram, but would you be able to draw the diagram,
必要であれば 回路図を書くことができますか?
01:33
if you had to do it? Or would you just say,
それとも そんなことは不可能だと
01:35
that's actually not possible?
おっしゃいますか?
01:37
The third question is, why is it hotter in summer than in winter?
3つ目の問題は どうして夏は冬より暑いのかです
01:40
I think we can probably agree that it is hotter in summer than in winter,
冬より夏の方が暑いことにはみなさん同意されると思いますが
01:44
but why? And finally, would you be able to --
でも どうしてでしょう? そして最後は
01:49
and you can sort of scribble it, if you like --
太陽系の平面図を描くことができますか?
01:55
scribble a plan diagram of the solar system,
よかったら描いてみてください
01:57
showing the shape of the planets' orbits?
惑星の軌道を描いてください
02:00
Would you be able to do that?
描けますか?
02:04
And if you can, just scribble a pattern.
もしできるなら 図を描いてください
02:05
OK. Now, children get their ideas not from teachers,
子供達はアイデアを 先生が考えているほど
02:10
as teachers often think, but actually from common sense,
先生からは得ていません 実際は 常識や
02:16
from experience of the world around them,
彼らが経験したことからや
02:19
from all the things that go on between them and their peers,
友達や面倒をみてくれる人や両親との間で
02:21
and their carers, and their parents, and all of that. Experience.
起こるすべての経験から得ています
02:25
And one of the great experts in this field, of course, was, bless him,
この分野の偉大なエキスパートの一人はもちろんウルジー枢機卿です
02:30
Cardinal Wolsey. Be very careful what you get into people's heads
子供達に何を教え込むのか注意してください
02:35
because it's virtually impossible to shift it afterwards, right?
なぜなら 後から変えるのはほとんど不可能だからです
02:39
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:42
I'm not quite sure how he died, actually.
彼はどのように亡くなったんでしたっけ?
02:45
Was he beheaded in the end, or hung?
首をはねられたんでしたっけ?それとも絞首刑?
02:47
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:49
Now, those questions, which, of course, you've got right,
さて これらの問題は もちろんみなさん正解だと思いますが
02:50
and you haven't been conferring, and so on.
まだみなさんの間で答え合わせしたりしてませんよね?
02:52
And I -- you know, normally, I would pick people out and humiliate,
いつもは 誰か選び出して 恥をかかせるのですが
02:54
but maybe not in this instance.
今回はやめておきましょう
02:57
A little seed weighs a lot and, basically, all this stuff,
小さな種は重くなります そして基本的に 全体の99%は
02:59
99 percent of this stuff, came out of the air.
大気中から得たものです
03:03
Now, I guarantee that about 85 percent of you, or maybe it's fewer at TED,
みなさんの約85%は TEDではもうすこし少ないかもしれませんが
03:06
will have said it comes out of the ground. And some people,
土の中から得たものだとおっしゃっていたでしょう
03:10
probably two of you, will come up and argue with me afterwards,
そして 何人かは たぶん2人くらいは後でやって来て
03:13
and say that actually, it comes out of the ground.
本当は土の中から得たものですよ と私と言い争うでしょう
03:16
Now, if that was true, we'd have trucks going round the country,
では もしそれが本当だとして トラックを走らせて
03:18
filling people's gardens in with soil, it'd be a fantastic business.
みんなの庭を土で満たしたら きっとすばらしいビジネスになるでしょうね
03:20
But, actually, we don't do that.
でも 実際はそんなことはしません
03:23
The mass of this comes out of the air.
これらは大気中のものからできているのです
03:25
Now, I passed all my biology exams in Britain.
私はイギリスで全ての生物のテストにとてもいい成績でパスしましたが
03:28
I passed them really well, but I still came out of school
それでも木は土の中のモノでできてると
03:32
thinking that that stuff came out of the ground.
思ったまま学校を卒業しました
03:34
Second one: can you light a little torch-bulb with a battery bulb and one piece of wire?
2問目は 電池と1本のワイヤを使って電球に灯りを点けることができますか?
03:37
Yes, you can, and I'll show you in a second how to do that.
ええ できますよ どうするかお見せしましょう
03:41
Now, I have some rather bad news,
ただ ちょっと悪いお知らせがあります
03:43
which is that I had a piece of video that I was about to show you,
お見せしようと思っていたビデオがあるのですが
03:45
which unfortunately -- the sound doesn't work in this room,
残念なことに この部屋ではうまく音声が出ません
03:48
so I'm going to describe to you, in true "Monty Python" fashion,
そこでモンティパイソン(英国のコメディ番組)風にご説明したいと思います
03:51
what happens in the video. And in the video, a group of researchers
ビデオでは研究者のグループがMITの卒業式に行きます
03:54
go to MIT on graduation day.
MITを選んだのは 言うまでもなく
03:59
We chose MIT because, obviously, that's a very long way away
ここからすごく遠いところにあって
04:01
from here, and you wouldn't mind too much,
みなさんがそれほど気にならないだろうからです
04:04
but it sort of works the same way in Britain
しかし まぁイギリスでも同じことが起こります
04:06
and in the West Coast of the USA.
そしてアメリカの西海岸でも同じです
04:09
And we asked them these questions, and we asked those questions
理系の卒業生たちにこれらの質問をすると
04:11
of science graduates, and they couldn't answer them.
彼らは答えることができませんでした
04:15
And so, there's a whole lot of people saying,
そして多くの卒業生たちが
04:17
"I'd be very surprised if you told me that this came out of the air.
「まさか、木が空気でできているなんて言うんじゃないでしょうね。」
04:19
That's very surprising to me." And those are science graduates.
と言うのです 理系の学生なんですけどね
04:21
And we intercut it with, "We are the premier science university in the world,"
その言葉を遮ります 「世界でも優秀な理系大学から来たんだ」
04:25
because of British-like hubris.
英国人は自慢好きですからね
04:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:30
And when we gave graduate engineers that question,
そして エンジニアの卒業生にこの問題を出すと
04:31
they said it couldn't be done.
彼らは「不可能です」と答えました
04:34
And when we gave them a battery, and a piece of wire, and a bulb,
電池1つ ワイヤ1本 電球1個を渡して
04:36
and said, "Can you do it?" They couldn't do it. Right?
「電球を点けることができますか?」と聞くと 彼らはできませんでした
04:40
And that's no different from Imperial College in London, by the way,
これはロンドンのインペリアルカレッジで行っても同じことです
04:44
it's not some sort of anti-American thing going on.
反米主義に基づいた言動ではないのですよ
04:47
As if. Now, the reason this matters is we pay lots and lots of money
ここで問題なのは 私達は教育にとても多くのお金を
04:51
for teaching people -- we might as well get it right.
かけているからです もちろん正解したほうがいいでしょう
04:57
And there are also some societal reasons
そして光合成の仕組みを人々に理解してもらい
04:59
why we might want people to understand what it is that's happening
社会的な理由もあります
05:01
in photosynthesis. For example, one half of the carbon equation
例えば 炭酸ガスバランスの一方は
05:05
is how much we emit, and the other half of the carbon equation,
どれだけ私たちが放出したかで もう一方は
05:08
as I'm very conscious as a trustee of Kew,
キュー国立植物園の役員として非常に気になっているのですが
05:11
is how much things soak up, and they soak up carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere.
どれだけ植物が吸収しているか 植物は二酸化炭素を吸収します
05:13
That's what plants actually do for a living.
まさにそれは植物が生きるためにしていることです
05:18
And, for any Finnish people in the audience, this is a Finnish pun:
この中にフィンランドの方がいらっしゃいますかね
05:21
we are, both literally and metaphorically, skating on thin ice
フィンランド風の言い方ですが その仕組みを理解しなければ
05:24
if we don't understand that kind of thing.
正に「薄氷を踏む思いをする」ことになります
05:29
Now, here's how you do the battery and the bulb.
さて 次はどうやってこの電池で電球を点けるかお見せしましょう
05:32
It's so easy, isn't it? Of course, you all knew that.
とても簡単でしょう? もちろん みなさんお分かりだったでしょうけど
05:34
But if you haven't played with a battery and a bulb,
しかし もし電池と電球で遊んだことがなければ
05:38
if you've only seen a circuit diagram,
回路図しか見たことがなかったら
05:40
you might not be able to do that, and that's one of the problems.
多分できなかったでしょう それが問題なのです
05:42
So, why is it hotter in summer than in winter?
では どうして夏は冬より暑いのでしょうか?
05:46
We learn, as children, that you get closer to something that's hot,
私達は熱いものに近づくと火傷することを
05:48
and it burns you. It's a very powerful bit of learning,
子供の時に学びます これはとても記憶に残るような学習で
05:51
and it happens pretty early on.
かなり早い時期に学習します
05:54
By extension, we think to ourselves, "Why it's hotter in summer than in winter
そこから 冬より夏の方が暑いのは
05:56
must be because we're closer to the Sun."
太陽に近いからに違いないと考えるのです
05:59
I promise you that most of you will have got that.
みなさんのほとんどが そうお考えになるでしょう
06:02
Oh, you're all shaking your heads,
おや みなさん首を横に振ってらっしゃいますね
06:04
but only a few of you are shaking your heads very firmly.
しかし 自信をもって振ってらっしゃるのはほんの少しですね
06:05
Other ones are kind of going like this. All right.
他の方はこんな感じですね
06:08
It's hotter in summer than in winter because the rays from the Sun
冬より夏の方が暑いのは 太陽光がより拡散するからです
06:10
are spread out more, right, because of the tilt of the Earth.
地球が傾いているからですね
06:13
And if you think the tilt is tilting us closer, no, it isn't.
もし この傾斜によって近くなっているからとお考えであれば それは違います
06:17
The Sun is 93 million miles away, and we're tilting like this, right?
太陽は9300万マイルの彼方にあって 地球の傾きはこんなものですよ
06:20
It makes no odds. In fact, in the Northern Hemisphere,
実際 北半球では
06:24
we're further from the Sun in summer,
夏の方が太陽から遠くなりますが
06:27
as it happens, but it makes no odds, the difference.
それは北半球での気候と全く関係ないのです
06:30
OK, now, the scribble of the diagram of the solar system.
では次は太陽系図です ほとんどの方がそうだと思いますが
06:33
If you believe, as most of you probably do,
もし冬より夏の方が暑いのは
06:36
that it's hotter in summer than in winter because we're closer to the Sun,
太陽に近いからだと考えていらっしゃったら
06:38
you must have drawn an ellipse.
楕円形を描いたはずです
06:40
Right? That would explain it, right?
違いますか?これで説明がつきますよね?
06:42
Except, in your -- you're nodding -- now, in your ellipse,
ただし あなたの... 頷いていらっしゃいますね
06:44
have you thought, "Well, what happens during the night?"
あなたの図を見て「夜はどうなるんだろう」と考えましたか?
06:48
Between Australia and here, right, they've got summer
オーストラリアとここでは いいですか? 向こうでは夏
06:50
and we've got winter, and what --
そしてここは冬です では地球は
06:54
does the Earth kind of rush towards the Sun at night,
夜には太陽へと急ぎ 大急ぎで戻るということなのでしょうか?
06:57
and then rush back again? I mean, it's a very strange thing going on,
とても不思議なことが起こってることになります
07:00
and we hold these two models in our head, of what's right and what isn't right,
私達の頭の中には2つのモデルがありますが 正しいものと間違ったものがあります
07:03
and we do that, as human beings, in all sorts of fields.
そして 人間というものは あらゆる分野で同じことをしているのです
07:07
So, here's Copernicus' view of what the solar system looked like as a plan.
さて ここにコペルニクスが描いた太陽系の平面図があります
07:11
That's pretty much what you should have on your piece of paper. Right?
これはまさにみなさんに描いて頂きたかったものです
07:16
And this is NASA's view. They're stunningly similar.
そしてこれがNASAのものです 驚くほど似ていますね
07:19
I hope you notice the coincidence here.
ここでの一致点に気づいて頂きましたか?
07:22
What would you do if you knew that people had this misconception,
もし あなたが 子供の頃の経験によって
07:25
right, in their heads, of elliptical orbits
楕円軌道について思い違いをしてしまうことを知っていたら
07:29
caused by our experiences as children?
あなたならどうしますか?
07:32
What sort of diagram would you show them of the solar system,
子供にどのような太陽系の図を見せますか?
07:34
to show that it's not really like that?
これとは違ったものを見せますか?
07:36
You'd show them something like this, wouldn't you?
恐らく こういう図を見せるのではないでしょうか?
07:38
It's a plan, looking down from above.
これは真上から見た平面図です
07:40
But, no, look what I found in the textbooks.
しかし 私が教科書で見つけたのはこれです
07:41
That's what you show people, right? These are from textbooks,
みんなが見せるのはこれなのです
07:44
from websites, educational websites --
これらは教科書や教育ウェブサイトに載っているものです
07:47
and almost anything you pick up is like that.
みなさんが選ぶほとんどの図はこのようなものでしょう
07:49
And the reason it's like that is because it's dead boring
理由は 同心円だと非常につまらないからです
07:51
to have a load of concentric circles,
一方 この角度から見ると
07:53
whereas that's much more exciting, to look at something at that angle,
よりエキサイティングです
07:55
isn't it? Right? And by doing it at that angle,
そうでしょ? そしてこの角度から見ると
07:58
if you've got that misconception in your head, then that
もしあなたがこの勘違いをしているとしたら
08:01
two-dimensional representation of a three-dimensional thing will be ellipses.
三次元を二次元で表すと楕円になるんです
08:03
So you've -- it's crap, isn't it really? As we say.
バカげてるでしょう ほんとに
08:08
So, these mental models -- we look for evidence that reinforces our models.
私達は 自分が信じているモデル(解釈)を強固にするための証拠を探します
08:12
We do this, of course, with matters of race, and politics, and everything else,
人種問題や政治問題やその他全てのことにおいて行います
08:15
and we do it in science as well. So we look, just look --
そして 科学の世界においても同様です
08:19
and scientists do it, constantly -- we look for evidence
科学者は 自分の解釈を強固にする証拠を
08:21
that reinforces our models, and some folks are just all too able
常に探しています 中には 自分の信じるモデルを補強するための
08:24
and willing to provide the evidence that reinforces the models.
証拠を無理にでも示そうとする科学者もいます
08:27
So, being I'm in the United States, I'll have a dig at the Europeans.
アメリカに来ているので ヨーロッパの悪口を言いましょう
08:30
These are examples of what I would say is bad practice in science
これらは 科学を扱うときの悪い習慣とでもいいましょうか
08:34
teaching centers. These pictures are from La Villette in France
学習センターのようなもので フランスのラヴィレットと
08:37
and the welcome wing of the Science Museum in London.
ロンドンの科学博物館です
08:40
And, if you look at the, kind of the way these things are constructed,
これらの建物の構造を見ていただくと
08:44
there's a lot of mediation by glass, and it's very blue, and kind of professional --
多くのガラスで仕切られていて 青くて なんだか専門的な感じです
08:48
in that way that, you know, Woody Allen comes up
ウディ=アレンがシーツの下から出てきて
08:53
from under the sheets in that scene in "Annie Hall,"
「アニー=ホール」のあのシーンで言った
08:56
and said, "God, that's so professional." And that you don't --
「おぉ、なんてプロフェッショナルなんだ」って感じですね
08:58
there's no passion in it, and it's not hands on, right,
情熱がないし それに実践的でもありません
09:01
and, you know, pun intended. Whereas good interpretation --
わざとらしいというか 一方良い例として
09:04
I'll use an example from nearby -- is San Francisco Exploratorium,
この近くにあるサンフランシスコの科学博物館を例にあげたいと思います
09:07
where all the things that -- the demonstrations, and so on,
ここでは 実演されているものやその他全てのものが
09:11
are made out of everyday objects that children can understand,
子供達も良く知っている 日常使う物から作られています
09:14
it's very hands-on, and they can engage with, and experiment with.
実際に子供たちが体験したり 実験したりできます
09:17
And I know that if the graduates at MIT
もしMITやインペリアルカレッジの卒業生が
09:20
and in the Imperial College in London had had the battery and the wire
電池とワイヤ1本で電球を点けることができていたなら
09:22
and the bit of stuff, and you know, been able to do it,
回路図のとおりに考えて
09:26
they would have learned how it actually works,
不可能だと思ってしまうのではなく
09:29
rather than thinking that they follow circuit diagrams and can't do it.
実際の仕組みがどのようになっているのかを学んでいたでしょう
09:32
So good interpretation is more about
つまり 適正な解釈というのは
09:36
things that are bodged and stuffed and of my world, right?
実際に触れることができる 日常生活の中から
09:38
And things that -- where there isn't an extra barrier
得られるのです
09:42
of a piece of glass or machined titanium,
ガラスや機械の仕切りがある
09:44
and it all looks fantastic, OK?
幻想的なものからではないのです
09:47
And the Exploratorium does that really, really well.
サンフランシスコの科学博物館はそれを非常に上手くやっています
09:49
And it's amateur, but amateur in the best sense,
そして 素人っぽさもありながら それもいい意味で
09:52
in other words, the root of the word being of love and passion.
アマチュアの語源は愛と情熱ですから
09:55
So, children are not empty vessels, OK?
さて 子供達は空っぽの入れ物ではないのです
10:00
So, as "Monty Python" would have it,
空っぽだなんて考えは モンティパイソン風に言うと
10:02
this is a bit Lord Privy Seal to say so,
王璽尚書(英国政府内の古風な役職)みたいなものです
10:04
but this is -- children are not empty vessels.
子供達は空の入れ物ではないのです
10:06
They come with their own ideas and their own theories,
自分たちのアイデアや理論を持っています
10:08
and unless you work with those, then you won't be able to shift them,
それを知らない限り 彼らの考えを変えることはできません
10:10
right? And I probably haven't shifted your ideas
私も 世界や宇宙がどのように機能しているかについての
10:14
of how the world and universe operates, either.
皆さんの考えをまだ変えてはいないでしょう
10:16
But this applies, equally, to matters of trying to sell new technology.
これは新しいテクノロジーをどのようにして
10:19
For example, we are, in Britain, we're trying to do a digital switchover
売り込むかについても同じです イギリスでは
10:22
of the whole population into digital technology [for television].
全国民の デジタルテレビへの切り替えを推進しています
10:25
And it's one of the difficult things
難しいのは 人々が その仕組みについて
10:27
is that when people have preconceptions of how it all works,
先入観を持っている場合です
10:29
it's quite difficult to shift those.
これらを変えるのは非常に困難です
10:31
So we're not empty vessels; the mental models that we have
つまり 私達は空っぽの入れ物ではありません
10:34
as children persist into adulthood.
子供の時に持ったモデルは大人になっても維持されます
10:38
Poor teaching actually does more harm than good.
質の悪い教育は本当に百害あって一利なしです
10:40
In this country and in Britain, magnetism is understood better
この国やイギリスでは 子供達は 磁力について
10:42
by children before they've been to school than afterwards, OK?
学校で習う前の方がよく理解しています
10:46
Same for gravity, two concepts, so it's -- which is quite humbling,
重力や引力についても同じです これは実に恥ずべきことです
10:49
as a, you know, if you're a teacher, and you look before and after,
もし あなたが先生で 教える前と教えた後を比較してみると
10:53
that's quite worrying. They do worse in tests afterwards, after the teaching.
とても心配になりますよ 学校で習った後の方がテストの点が悪いのです
10:56
And we collude. We design tests,
そこで 私達はズルして 少なくともイギリスでは
11:00
or at least in Britain, so that people pass them. Right?
生徒達がパスするようにテストを作ります
11:02
And governments do very well. They pat themselves on the back.
政府は実に上手くやって 自己満足にふけります
11:05
OK? We collude, and actually if you --
いいですか? ズルすんですよ
11:08
if someone had designed a test for me
もし 私が本当に理解しているかが分かるような
11:12
when I was doing my biology exams,
テストを作ってくれていたら
11:14
to really understand, to see whether I'd understood
単に デンプンにヨウ素を入れると青くなるみたいなのではなくて
11:16
more than just kind of putting starch and iodine together
植物は大気中のものを吸収して
11:18
and seeing it go blue,
大きくなると分かっているかを
11:20
and really understood that plants took their mass out of the air,
テストするように作ってくれていたら
11:22
then I might have done better at science.
もっと理科が得意になっていたかもしれません
11:25
So the most important thing is to get people to articulate their models.
つまり 最も大切なのは 自分のモデル(解釈)を上手く説明させることです
11:30
Your homework is -- you know, how does an aircraft's wing create lift?
では宿題です 飛行機の翼はどのように揚力を作り出すのでしょうか?
11:35
An obvious question, and you'll have an answer now in your heads.
簡単な問題です  頭の中に答えが浮かんだでしょう
11:40
And the second question to that then is,
そこで お伺いします
11:44
ensure you've explained how it is that planes can fly upside down.
どうやって飛行機が逆さまに飛べるか説明してください
11:47
Ah ha, right. Second question is, why is the sea blue? All right?
あー、ね 2つめの問題は どうして海は青いのかです
11:51
And you've all got an idea in your head of the answer.
みなさん頭の中にアイデアが浮かんでいることでしょう
11:55
So, why is it blue on cloudy days? Ah, see.
では 曇りの日にも青いのはどうしてでしょう? あー、ね
11:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:03
I've always wanted to say that in this country.
アメリカでこれを言ってみたかったんですよね
12:06
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:08
Finally, my plea to you is to allow yourselves, and your children,
最後になりましたが 私がお願いしたいのは あなた自身や 子供たち
12:10
and anyone you know, to kind of fiddle with stuff,
誰にでも 色々な物に触れて遊べる機会を与えてほしいということです
12:14
because it's by fiddling with things that you, you know,
なぜなら 物に触れることによって 他の学習を
12:17
you complement your other learning. It's not a replacement,
補足するのです 学習方法を変えてしまうという意味ではありません
12:19
it's just part of learning that's important.
学習の一部としてです そして これが大切なんです
12:21
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとうございました
12:24
Now -- oh, oh yeah, go on then, go on.
さて あー はい どうぞ どうぞ
12:25
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:28
Translated by Satoko MAEDA
Reviewed by Kazuyuki Shimatani

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Jonathan Drori - Educator
Jonathan Drori commissioned the BBC's very first websites, one highlight in a long career devoted to online culture and educational media -- and understanding how we learn.

Why you should listen

Jonathan Drori has dedicated his career to media and learning. As the Head of Commissioning for BBC Online, he led the effort to create bbc.co.uk, the online face of the BBC (an effort he recalls fondly). He came to the web from the TV side of the BBC, where as an editor and producer he headed up dozens of television series on science, education and the arts.

After almost two decades at the BBC, he's now a director at Changing Media Ltd., a media and education consultancy, and is a visiting professor at University of Bristol, where he studies educational media and misperceptions in science. He continues to executive produce the occasional TV series, including 2004's award-winning "The DNA Story" and 2009's "Great Sperm Race." He is on the boards of the Royal Botanic Gardens and the Woodland Trust.

(Photo: Lloyd Davis/flickr)

More profile about the speaker
Jonathan Drori | Speaker | TED.com