16:03
TEDGlobal 2005

Peter Diamandis: Our next giant leap

ピーター・ディアマンディス 「人類の次なる飛躍」

Filmed:

宇宙を探査し続けることは人類の倫理的要請であるとピーター・ディアマンディスは言います。そしてX PRIZEやその他のインセンティブによってそれを行う方法を語っています。

- Space activist
Peter Diamandis runs the X Prize Foundation, which offers large cash incentive prizes to inventors who can solve grand challenges like space flight, low-cost mobile medical diagnostics and oil spill cleanup. He is the chair of Singularity University, which teaches executives and grad students about exponentially growing technologies. Full bio

My mission in life since I was a kid was,
私が子どもの頃から抱いてきた
人生の目標は
00:18
and is, to take the rest of you into space.
人々を宇宙へと連れて行くことでした
00:21
It's during our lifetime that we're going to take the Earth,
私達が生きている間に
地球からの恒久的な移住が
00:24
take the people of Earth and transition off, permanently. And that's exciting.
行われるようになるでしょう
これはエキサイティングなことです
00:28
In fact, I think it is a moral imperative
宇宙を開拓することは
00:32
that we open the space frontier.
倫理的要請であると
私は思っています
00:34
You know, it's the first time that we're going to have a chance
惑星の予備を持てるようになる—
00:37
to have planetary redundancy,
初めての機会が得られるのです
00:39
a chance to, if you would, back up the biosphere.
生物圏をバックアップする機会です
00:41
And if you think about space,
宇宙を考えるとき
00:44
everything we hold of value on this planet --
私達が地球上で
価値を見出しているもの
00:47
metals and minerals and real estate and energy -- is in infinite quantities in space.
金属や鉱物や土地やエネルギーが
宇宙には無尽蔵にあります
00:50
In fact, the Earth is a crumb in a supermarket filled with resources.
地球は資源に満ちたスーパーマーケットの中の
パンくずみたいなものです
00:54
The analogy for me is Alaska. You know, we bought Alaska.
かつてのアラスカと同じです
アメリカはアラスカを買ったんです
00:59
We Americans bought Alaska in the 1850s. It's called Seward's folly.
1850年代のことで 当時はスワードの愚行
などと言われたものです
01:02
We valued it as the number of seal pelts we could kill.
アラスカの価値は どれだけアザラシの
毛皮が手に入るかで計算されました
01:06
And then we discovered these things -- gold and oil and fishing and timber --
しかしその後様々なものが見つかりました
金 石油 魚 木材・・・
01:10
and it became, you know, a trillion-dollar economy,
兆ドル規模の経済になったのです
01:14
and now we take our honeymoons there. The same thing will happen in space.
新婚旅行先にもなっています
同じことが宇宙でも起きるでしょう
01:17
We are on the verge of the greatest exploration
我々は人類史上最大の大航海時代を
01:20
that the human race has ever known.
迎えようとしているのです
01:23
We explore for three reasons,
宇宙探査する理由は3つあります
01:25
the weakest of which is curiosity.
一番小さいのが好奇心です
01:27
You know, it's funded NASA's budget up until now.
これまでNASAの予算を
支えてきたものです
01:29
Some images from Mars, 1997.
これは1997年に火星から
送られてきた画像です
01:33
In fact, I think in the next decade, without any question,
今後10年内に間違いなく
01:36
we will discover life on Mars and find that it is literally ubiquitous
火星の土壌中や至る所で
01:38
under the soils and different parts of that planet.
生命が発見されることでしょう
01:42
The stronger motivator, the much stronger motivator, is fear.
もっと強い動機になるのは 恐怖です
01:45
It drove us to the moon. We -- literally in fear -- with the Soviet Union
これは私達を月へと駆り立てたものでした
文字通り恐怖によって
01:48
raced to the moon. And we have these huge rocks,
アメリカはソ連と競い
月へと向かったのです
01:52
you know, killer-sized rocks in the hundreds of thousands or millions out there,
宇宙には数キロの大きさの岩が
無数に漂っていて
01:56
and while the probability is very small,
確率は小さいものの
02:01
the impact, figured in literally,
その1つが地球に衝突したなら
02:03
of one of these hitting the Earth is so huge
その衝撃たるや巨大なものです
02:05
that to spend a small fraction looking, searching,
だから観察し 探査し 備えることに
02:08
preparing to defend, is not unreasonable.
多少のお金をかけるのは
十分理にかなっています
02:11
And of course, the third motivator,
そして3つ目の動機は
02:13
one near and dear to my heart as an entrepreneur, is wealth.
起業家である私が惹かれるものですが
富です
02:15
In fact, the greatest wealth. If you think about these other asteroids,
それもすごく大きな
小惑星には
02:19
there's a class of the nickel iron,
鉄やニッケルの塊があり
02:23
which in platinum-group metal markets alone
岩を1つ発掘して持ち帰れたなら
02:25
are worth something like 20 trillion dollars,
白金属元素の市場価値だけで
02:27
if you can go out and grab one of these rocks.
20兆ドル規模になります
02:29
My plan is to actually buy puts on the precious metal market,
私のプランは 希少金属市場で
プットオプションを買い
02:31
and then actually claim that I'm going to go out and get one.
採掘してくると宣言する
というものです
02:34
And that will fund the actual mission to go and get one.
それがミッションを行うための
資金源になるでしょう
02:36
But fear, curiosity and greed have driven us.
恐怖 好奇心 欲が
私達を突き動かすのです
02:39
And for me, this is -- I'm the short kid on the right.
私自身には——
右のちびの方ですが
02:42
This was -- my motivation was actually during Apollo.
アポロ計画が動機になりました
02:46
And Apollo was one of the greatest motivators ever.
アポロ計画ほど大きな
動機付けはありません
02:50
If you think about what happened at the turn of -- early 1960s,
何があったのでしょう?
1961年5月25日
02:52
on May 25, JFK said, "We're going to go to the moon."
ジョン・F・ケネディが
「我々は月に行く」と言ったのです
02:58
And people left their jobs and they went to obscure locations
するとみんな職を捨てて
辺鄙な場所に集まり
03:02
to go and be part of this amazing mission.
このものすごいミッションに
参加したのです
03:05
And we knew nothing about going to space.
宇宙に行くことについては
何も分かっていませんでした
03:08
We went from having literally put Alan Shepard in suborbital flight
何もないところから始めて
アラン・シェパードが弾道飛行をし
03:10
to going to the moon in eight years,
そして人類が月に辿り
着くまで8年です
03:13
and the average age of the people that got us there was 26 years old.
参加した人たちの
平均年齢は26歳でした
03:15
They didn't know what couldn't be done.
何が不可能かさえ分からず
すべてを作り上げる必要がありました
03:21
They had to make up everything.
何が不可能かさえ分からず
すべてを作り上げる必要がありました
03:22
And that, my friend, is amazing motivation.
そしてそれは ものすごい
動機付けになったのです
03:25
This is Gene Cernan, a good friend of mine, saying,
私の友人のユージン・サーナンは
月面着陸した最後の人間ですが
03:27
"If I can go to the moon" -- this is the last human on the moon so far --
こう言っています
「月に行けるのであれば
03:30
"nothing, nothing is impossible." But of course,
不可能なことなど何もない」
03:34
we've thought about the government always as the person taking us there.
そのようなことをするのは政府だと
私達はずっと思ってきました
03:37
But I put forward here, the government is not going to get us there.
しかし敢えて言いますが 宇宙へ連れて行って
くれるのは 政府ではありません
03:41
The government is unable to take the risks required to open up this precious frontier.
政府には宇宙開拓のような
リスクを負うことができないのです
03:45
The shuttle is costing a billion dollars a launch.
スペースシャトルの打上コストは
03:50
That's a pathetic number. It's unreasonable.
1回10億ドル 絶望的で
理不尽に大きな数字です
03:52
We shouldn't be happy in standing for that.
このようなことを
甘受すべきではありません
03:55
One of the things that we did with the Ansari X PRIZE
私達がアンサリX PRIZEで
取り入れたのは
03:58
was take the challenge on that risk is OK, you know.
リスクを取るのは構わない
ということです
04:00
As we are going out there and taking on a new frontier,
宇宙という新たなフロンティアへと
乗り出すためには
04:04
we should be allowed to risk.
リスクを許容する必要があります
04:07
In fact, anyone who says we shouldn't, you know,
リスクを冒すべきではない
という人たちを
04:09
just needs to be put aside, because, as we go forward,
横にのけておく必要があります
04:12
in fact, the greatest discoveries we will ever know is ahead of us.
私達の目の前には かつてない
大きな発見が待っているからです
04:16
The entrepreneurs in the space business are the furry mammals,
宇宙ビジネスの起業家を
ほ乳類とするならば
04:20
and clearly the industrial-military complex --
軍産複合体や
04:23
with Boeing and Lockheed and NASA -- are the dinosaurs.
ボーイングや ロッキードや NASAは
恐竜なのです
04:25
The ability for us to access these resources
宇宙にあるリソースにアクセスできれば
04:29
to gain planetary redundancy --
惑星規模の冗長性が得られます
04:32
we can now gather all the information, the genetic codes,
遺伝情報をはじめとする
あらゆる情報を集めて
04:34
you know, everything stored on our databases,
データベースに収め
04:37
and back them up off the planet,
地球外にバックアップして
04:39
in case there would be one of those disastrous situations.
破滅的な災害に備えるのです
04:41
The difficulty is getting there, and clearly, the cost to orbit is key.
そこへ至る上で大きな困難は
地球軌道に乗せるコストにあります
04:45
Once you're in orbit, you are two thirds of the way, energetically, to anywhere --
軌道に乗せることさえできれば
2/3は達成したようなものです
04:50
the moon, to Mars. And today,
月に行くにしろ 火星に行くにしろ
04:53
there's only three vehicles -- the U.S. shuttle, the Russian Soyuz
現在そのための乗り物は3種類しかありません
米国のスペースシャトル ロシアのソユーズ
04:56
and the Chinese vehicle -- that gets you there.
それに中国のやつです
05:00
Arguably, it's about 100 million dollars a person on the space shuttle.
スペースシャトルでは
1人当たり1億ドルかかります
05:02
One of the companies I started, Space Adventures, will sell you a ticket.
私の始めたスペース・アドベンチャーズ社で
チケットを売っていますが
05:07
We've done two so far. We'll be announcing two more on the Soyuz
これまでに2枚売れました さらに2枚
ソユーズで宇宙ステーションに行く
05:10
to go up to the space station for 20 million dollars.
チケットを 2千万ドルで売り出します
05:14
But that's expensive and to understand what the potential is --
しかしこれは高価であり
宇宙の可能性を考えるなら・・・
05:17
(Laughter) --
(笑)
05:21
it is expensive. But people are willing to pay that!
確かに高いです
でも喜んで買う人もいるんです!
05:23
You know, one -- we have a very unique period in time today.
私達は今とても
面白い時代に生きています
05:26
For the first time ever, we have enough wealth
個人の手に
05:29
concentrated in the hands of few individuals
十分な富が集積され
05:31
and the technology accessible
利用可能な技術を使って
05:33
that will allow us to really drive space exploration.
ポケットマネーで宇宙探査ができるのです
05:35
But how cheap could it get? I want to give you the end point.
しかしこれは どこまで安くできるのでしょう?
目標地点を出したいと思います
05:39
We know -- 20 million dollars today, you can go and buy a ticket,
今はチケットが2千万ドルしますが
05:43
but how cheap could it get?
これはどこまで安くできるのでしょう?
05:45
Let's go back to high school physics here.
ちょっと物理のおさらいをしましょう
05:47
If you calculate the amount of potential energy, mgh,
位置エネルギーはmghです
05:48
to take you and your spacesuit up to a couple hundred miles,
人間と宇宙服を高度2百キロまで運び
05:52
and then you accelerate yourself to 17,500 miles per hour --
時速2万6千キロまで加速します
05:55
remember, that one half MV squared -- and you figure it out.
運動エネルギーは1/2 mv^2なので
05:59
It's about 5.7 gigajoules of energy.
計算すると5.7ギガジュールになります
06:03
If you expended that over an hour, it's about 1.6 megawatts.
それを1時間でやるとすると
1.6メガワットです
06:07
If you go to one of Vijay's micro-power sources,
電力は 安いところでは
06:12
and they sell it to you for seven cents a kilowatt hour --
7セント/kWhで売られているので・・・
06:15
anybody here fast in math?
計算が得意な人?
06:17
How much will it cost you and your spacesuit to go to orbit?
人間と宇宙服を軌道に乗せるのに
いくらかかるかというと
06:19
100 bucks. That's the price-improvement curve that --
100ドルです
価格下落のグラフを描くなら・・・
06:23
we need some breakthroughs in physics along the way,
どこかで物理学上の発見が
必要になるでしょう
06:27
I'll grant you that.
その願いを叶えてあげます
06:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:32
But guys, if history has taught us anything,
歴史が教えてくれるのは
06:33
it's that if you can imagine it, you will get there eventually.
想像することができるなら いつか
それは実現できる ということです
06:37
I have no question that the physics,
物理学や工学が 私達みんなに
06:40
the engineering to get us down to the point
軌道周回宇宙飛行できる
ようにしてくれる日は
06:43
where all of us can afford orbital space flight is around the corner.
遠くないと信じています
06:46
The difficulty is that there needs to be a real marketplace to drive the investment.
難しい点は投資を引き寄せられる
本物の市場が必要だということです
06:50
Today, the Boeings and the Lockheeds don't spend a dollar
今日ボーイングやロッキードは
研究開発に
06:55
of their own money in R&D.
自分の金を一文も使っていません
06:59
It's all government research dollars, and very few of those.
すべて政府の研究予算で
わずかなものです
07:01
And in fact, the large corporations,
実のところ 大企業や政府というのは
07:04
the governments, can't take the risk.
リスクを取れないものなのです
07:06
So we need what I call an exothermic economic reaction in space.
だから宇宙で経済活動の爆発を
起こしてやる必要があります
07:08
Today's commercial markets worldwide, global commercial launch market?
今日の世界の商用ロケット市場は
どんなものでしょう?
07:12
12 to 15 launches per year.
年に12から15回の打ち上げが
行われています
07:16
Number of commercial companies out there? 12 to 15 companies.
会社はいくつあるのでしょう?
12から15社です
07:19
One per company. That's not it. There's only one marketplace,
1つの会社が1回ずつです
これを狙っているわけではありません
07:21
and I call them self-loading carbon payloads.
目指す市場は1つ「炭素質自律移動
ペイロード」打ち上げです
07:25
They come with their own money. They're easy to make.
自分のお金で乗りに来る貨物—
07:28
It's people. The Ansari X PRIZE was my solution,
人間です
アンサリ X PRIZE が私の答えでした
07:31
reading about Lindbergh for creating the vehicles to get us there.
リンドバーグについて読んでいて見つけた
そこへ至る乗り物を作るための方法です
07:35
We offered 10 million dollars in cash for the first reusable ship,
3人を乗せ 100キロの
高度まで行って戻り
07:39
carry three people up to 100 kilometers,
2週間以内にそれを
繰り返すことのできた
07:42
come back down, and within two weeks, make the trip again.
最初の再利用可能な宇宙船に
賞金1千万ドルを提示しました
07:44
Twenty-six teams from seven countries entered the competition,
7カ国から26チームが
このコンペに参加し
07:47
spending between one to 25 million dollars each.
それぞれが百万から
2千5百万ドルを投じました
07:51
And of course, we had beautiful SpaceShipOne,
そして2回の飛行を成功させ
07:54
which made those two flights and won the competition.
勝利を勝ち取ったのが
我らがSpaceShipOneです
07:56
And I'd like to take you there, to that morning,
皆さんを その日の朝に
お連れしましょう
08:00
for just a quick video.
短いビデオです
08:03
(Video) Pilot: Release our fire.
本体を切り離す
08:21
Richard Searfoss: Good luck.
成功を祈る
08:26
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:31
RS: We've got an altitude call of 368,000 feet.
高度112キロに到達しました
08:46
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:54
RS: So in my official capacity as the chief judge
アンサリX PRIZEの
08:57
of the Ansari X PRIZE competition,
主審として
09:00
I declare that Mojave Aerospace Ventures
モハーヴェ・エアロスペース・
ベンチャーズ社が
09:02
has indeed earned the Ansari X PRIZE.
アンサリX PRIZEを勝ち取ったことを
ここに宣言します
09:04
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:07
Peter Diamandis: Probably the most difficult thing that I had to do
たぶん一番難しかったのは
09:09
was raise the capital for this. It was literally impossible.
資金を募ることで 文字通り
不可能に思えました
09:11
We went -- I went to 100, 200 CEOs, CMOs.
私は100人 200人という
CEOやCMOに会いました
09:14
No one believed it was done. Everyone said, "Oh, what does NASA think?
誰も信じません みんな言いました
「NASAはどう思うだろうね?」
09:18
Well, people are going to die,
「人が死ぬことになるぞ」
09:20
how can you possibly going to put this forward?"
「どうやってこんな話を進めようというんだ?」
09:22
I found a visionary family, the Ansari family, and Champ Car,
先見の明があるアンサリ家の人々や
チャンプカーがスポンサーになり
09:24
and raised part of the money, but not the full 10 million.
資金の一部は確保できましたが
1千万ドル全部ではありません
09:27
And what I ended up doing was going out to the insurance industry
私が結局やることになったのは
保険業界に出向いて
09:30
and buying a hole-in-one insurance policy.
賞に保険をかけるということでした
09:34
See, the insurance companies went to Boeing and Lockheed,
保険会社がボーイングや
ロッキードに行って
09:36
and said, "Are you going to compete?" No.
「コンペに参加しますか?」と聞くと
「いいや」
09:38
"Are you going to compete?" No. "No one's going to win this thing."
「誰も達成できやしないよ」
という返事です
09:40
So, they took a bet that no one would win by January of '05,
それで彼らは 2005年1月まで
誰も達成できないという方に賭け
09:42
and I took a bet that someone would win.
私の方は 誰かが達成する
という方に賭けたのです
09:47
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:51
So -- and the best thing is they paid off and the check didn't bounce.
一番良かったのは 彼らの小切手が
不渡りにならなかったということです
09:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:58
We've had a lot of accomplishments
私達は多くのことを成し遂げ
09:59
and it's been a tremendous success.
大成功を収めました
10:01
One of the things I'm most happy about is that the SpaceShipOne
私にとって ことに嬉しかったのは
今やSpaceShipOneが 航空宇宙博物館で
10:03
is going to hang in Air and Space Museum,
スピリット・オブ・セントルイスや
10:09
next to the Spirit of St. Louis and the Wright Flyer.
ライトフライヤーと共に吊されていることです
10:11
Isn't that great? (Applause)
ちょっとすごくないですか? (拍手)
10:13
So a little bit about the future, steps to space, what's available for you.
未来を少し先取りして
今日でもできることをお教えしましょう
10:18
Today, you can go and experience weightless flights.
皆さん無重量状態を体験できます
10:22
By '08, suborbital flights, the price tag for that, you know, on Virgin,
2008年までにヴァージン・ギャラクティック社
による弾道飛行の値段は
10:26
is going to be about 200,000.
20万ドルになるでしょう
10:30
There are three or four other serious efforts that will bring the price down very rapidly,
この値段を下げようという本格的な努力が
3、4箇所で行われています
10:32
I think, to about 25,000 dollars for a suborbital flight.
弾道飛行は2万5千ドルくらいになる
だろうと思います
10:35
Orbital flights -- we can take you to the space station.
軌道飛行では皆さんをスペース
ステーションへとお連れします
10:39
And then I truly believe, once a group is in orbit around the Earth --
そして起きるだろうことは
一度地球周回軌道に乗ったなら・・・
10:41
I know if they don't do it, I am --
他の人がやらなければ私がやります・・・
10:45
we're going to stockpile some fuel,
燃料を軌道上に備蓄して
10:47
make a beeline for the moon and grab some real estate.
そこから月に直行し 土地を少しばかり
確保するということです
10:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:52
Quick moment for the designers in the audience.
この場にいる設計者の方たちのために一言
10:53
We spent 11 years getting FAA approval to do zero gravity flights.
無重量飛行にFAAの認可を
取るのには 11年かかりました
10:56
Here are some fun images. Here's Burt Rutan
楽しい画像をお見せしましょう
11:00
and my good friend Greg Meronek inside a zero gravity --
これは無重量状態のバート・ルータンと
親友のグレッグ・メロネクです
11:02
people think a zero gravity room,
みんな無重量室があって
11:06
there's a switch on there that turns it off --
スイッチ1つで重力を切れると
思っていますが
11:08
but it's actually parabolic flight of an airplane.
実際は飛行機で放物飛行をしています
11:10
And turns out 7-Up has just done a little commercial that's airing this month.
セブンアップがコマーシャルを
作って今月流しています
11:12
If we can get the audio up?
音量を上げてもらえますか?
11:17
(Video) Narrator: For a chance to win the first free ticket to space,
宇宙への最初の無料チケットを
手に入れるチャンスです
11:19
look for specially marked packages of Diet 7-Up.
ダイエット・セブンアップの
特別パッケージを探してください
11:23
When you want the taste that won't weigh you down,
気を重くしない味をお望みなら
11:27
the only way to go is up.
選ぶべきは「アップ」です
11:29
PD: That was filmed inside our airplane, and so, you can now do this.
これは うちの飛行機内で撮影されました
皆さんもできるんです
11:31
We're based down in Florida.
フロリダでやっています
11:36
Let me talk about the other thing I'm excited about.
私が夢中になっている別のものを
ご紹介しましょう
11:38
The future of prizes. You know, prizes are a very old idea.
未来の賞です 賞というのは
古くからあるアイデアです
11:40
I had the pleasure of borrowing from the Longitude Prize
経度法や リンドバーグを後押しした
11:44
and the Orteig Prize that put Lindbergh forward.
オルティーグ賞からアイデアを
拝借しています
11:47
And we have made a decision in the X PRIZE Foundation
X PRIZE財団では
11:50
to actually carry that concept forward into other technology areas,
このコンセプトを別の技術領域でも
進めることにして
11:53
and we just took on a new mission statement:
新しいミッションステートメントを
掲げました
11:57
"to bring about radical breakthroughs in space
「人類に貢献するために
11:59
and other technologies for the benefit of humanity."
宇宙やその他の技術領域に
革新をもたらすこと」
12:02
And this is something that we're very excited about.
これには本当にワクワクしています
12:05
I showed this slide to Larry Page, who just joined our board.
このスライドは最近取締役会に加わった
ラリー・ペイジに見せたものです
12:08
And you know, when you give to a nonprofit,
非営利組織に寄付したら
12:11
you might have 50 cents on the dollar.
1ドルに対し50セント程度
12:13
If you have a matching grant, it's typically two or three to one.
マッチングギフトなら
通常1に対して2から3
12:15
If you put up a prize, you can get literally a 50 to one leverage on your dollars.
賞を設けたら1に対して50のレバレッジが
得られます それほど大きいんです
12:18
And that's huge. And then he turned around and said,
そしたらペイジが振り向いて言ったんです
12:23
"Well, if you back a prize institute that runs a 10 prize, you get 500 to one."
「じゃあ賞を主催する組織に出資して
10個の賞を設けたら1に対して500になるね」
12:25
I said, "Well, that's great."
私は「そりゃいい」と
12:29
So, we have actually -- are looking to turn the X PRIZE
それで私達は実際
X PRIZEを 世界的な
12:31
into a world-class prize institute.
賞を主催する組織にしようと
取り組んでいます
12:34
This is what happens when you put up a prize,
これは賞を設けたとき
何が起きるかを示しています
12:37
when you announce it and teams start to begin doing trials.
告知して 様々なチームが挑戦し始めます
12:40
You get publicity increase, and when it's won,
知名度が上がっていき
12:44
publicity shoots through the roof -- if it's properly managed --
受賞者が決まったとき
知名度が グッと上がります
12:47
and that's part of the benefits to a sponsor.
適切に管理されたなら これは
スポンサーに大きな利点になります
12:49
Then, when the prize is actually won, after it's moving,
そして受賞に伴って出てくる
社会的利点があります
12:53
you get societal benefits, you know, new technology, new capability.
新しい技術に 新しい能力
12:57
And the benefit to the sponsors
スポンサーにとっての利点は
13:01
is the sum of the publicity and societal benefits over the long term.
知名度と長期の社会的利点を
合わせたものになります
13:03
That's our value proposition in a prize.
これが私達が賞で提案する価値です
13:06
If you were going to go and try to create SpaceShipOne,
SpaceShipOneのような新技術を
13:09
or any kind of a new technology,
直接生み出そうとするなら
13:11
you have to fund that from the beginning
不確かな結果に対して
最初から出資し
13:13
and maintain that funding with an uncertain outcome.
資金を提供し続ける必要があります
13:16
It may or may not happen. But if you put up a prize,
成功するかしないか
わからないのです
13:19
the beautiful thing is, you know, it's a very small maintenance fee,
賞を設けるのが素晴らしいのは
維持費をとても小さくできて
13:22
and you pay on success.
成功したときに払えばよい
ということです
13:25
Orteig didn't pay a dime out to the nine teams that went across --
オルティーグは 大西洋横断に
挑戦しようという
13:27
tried to go across the Atlantic,
9つのチームに一銭も
払っていません
13:29
and we didn't pay a dime until someone won the Ansari X PRIZE.
私達も アンサリX PRIZEを誰かが
獲得するまで 一銭も払いませんでした
13:31
So, prizes work great.
だから賞はとてもうまく機能するのです
13:34
You know, innovators, the entrepreneurs out there,
イノベーターや世の起業家たちが
13:36
you know that when you're going for a goal,
ゴールに向かっているとき
13:38
the first thing you have to do is believe
最初にすべきことは
13:40
that you can do it yourself.
自分は成し遂げられると信じることです
13:42
Then, you've got to, you know, face potential public ridicule
それから人々の嘲笑に遭うかもしれません
13:44
of -- that's a crazy idea, it'll never work.
「馬鹿なアイデアだ」
「うまくいくわけがない」
13:46
And then you have to convince others,
それから人々を説得して
13:48
so that they can, in fact, help you raise the funds,
資金集めを助けてもらう必要があります
13:51
and then you've got to deal with the fact that you've got government bureaucracies
前に進むことを望まない政府や組織の
13:54
and institutions that don't want you to move those things forward,
官僚主義を相手に
やり合う必要があります
13:57
and you have to deal with failures. What a prize does,
そしてまた失敗に対処する
必要もあります
14:00
what we've experienced a prize doing,
賞を設けることで
私たちが体験したのは
14:02
is literally help to short-circuit or support all of these things,
これらすべての問題に対して 近道や
サポートが得られるということです
14:04
because a prize credentials the idea that this is a good idea.
賞はアイデアの良さに
お墨付きを与えます
14:09
Well, it must be a good idea.
いいアイデアに違いないと
14:11
Someone's offering 10 million dollars to go and do this thing.
何しろそのために1千万ドル出す
という人がいるわけですから
14:13
And each of these areas was something that we found
アンサリX PRIZEを通して
これらの問題すべてに対し
14:16
the Ansari X PRIZE helped short-circuit these for innovation.
イノベーションの近道をする
助けが得られました
14:19
So, as an organization, we put together a prize discovery process
私たちは組織として どうやって
賞を考え出すかという
14:24
of how to come up with prizes and write the rules,
賞の発見プロセスをまとめ
ルールを作りました
14:27
and we're actually looking at creating prizes
そして様々なカテゴリで
14:30
in a number of different categories.
賞を設けようとしています
14:33
We're looking at attacking energy, environment, nanotechnology --
エネルギー問題や 環境問題や
ナノテクノロジーに挑もうとしています
14:35
and I'll talk about those more in a moment.
後でもう少し詳しくお話しします
14:40
And the way we're doing that is we're creating prize teams
そのための方法は X PRIZE内に
14:42
within the X PRIZE. We have a space prize team.
チームを作るということです
宇宙賞チームがあります
14:44
We're going after an orbital prize.
軌道飛行の賞を追求しています
14:47
We are looking at a number of energy prizes.
いろいろなエネルギー賞を
検討しています
14:49
Craig Venter has just joined our board
クレイグ・ヴェンターが
取締役会に加わり
14:52
and we're doing a rapid genome sequencing prize with him,
高速遺伝子解析賞を
準備しています
14:54
we'll be announcing later this fall,
この秋に発表する予定です
14:56
about -- imagine being able to sequence anybody's DNA
誰でもDNA解析を千ドル以下で
受けられるようになることを
14:58
for under 1,000 dollars, revolutionize medicine.
想像してみてください
医療に革命をもたらすでしょう
15:02
And clean water, education, medicine and even looking at social entrepreneurship.
きれいな水 教育 医療 それに社会起業まで
視野に入れています
15:05
So my final slide here is, the most critical tool
最後のスライドです
人類の大きな難問を解決する
15:10
for solving humanity's grand challenges -- it isn't technology,
最も重要な道具は
テクノロジーでも お金でもありません
15:13
it isn't money, it's only one thing --
それはただ1つのもの
15:17
it's the committed, passionate human mind.
情熱を持って打ち込む
人間の精神なのです
15:19
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:22
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Takafusa Kitazume

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Peter Diamandis - Space activist
Peter Diamandis runs the X Prize Foundation, which offers large cash incentive prizes to inventors who can solve grand challenges like space flight, low-cost mobile medical diagnostics and oil spill cleanup. He is the chair of Singularity University, which teaches executives and grad students about exponentially growing technologies.

Why you should listen

Watch the live onstage debate with Paul Gilding that followed Peter Diamandis' 2012 TEDTalk >>

Peter Diamandis is the founder and chair of the X Prize Foundation, a nonprofit whose mission is simply "to bring about radical breakthroughs for the benefit of humanity." By offering a big cash prize for a specific accomplishment, the X Prize stimulates competition and excitement around some of the planet's most important goals. Diamandis is also co-founder and chairman of Singularity University which runs Exponential Technologies Executive and Graduate Student Programs.

Diamandis' background is in space exploration -- before the X Prize, he ran a company that studied low-cost launching technologies and Zero-G which offers the public the chance to train like an astronaut and experience weightlessness. But though the X Prize's first $10 million went to a space-themed challenge, Diamandis' goal now is to extend the prize into health care, social policy, education and many other fields that could use a dose of competitive innovation.

More profile about the speaker
Peter Diamandis | Speaker | TED.com