25:22
TED2008

Irwin Redlener: How to survive a nuclear attack

アーウィン・レドルナー: 核攻撃を生き残る方法

Filmed:

冷戦時代からずっと核の脅威への局面は変化しています。しかし、災害医療の専門家であるアーウィン・レドルナーは、脅威は無くなっていないと主張します。歴史上のばかげた核対応策を振り返り、核攻撃時の生きのび方についての実用的なアドバイスを提供します。

- Physician, disaster-preparedness activist
Dr. Irwin Redlener spends his days imagining the worst: He studies how humanity might survive natural or human-made disasters of unthinkable severity. He's been an outspoken critic of half-formed government recovery plans (especially after Katrina). Full bio

So, a big question that we're facing now
私達は長年にわたり
大きな問題に直面しています
00:15
and have been for quite a number of years now:
私達は長年にわたり
大きな問題に直面しています
00:18
are we at risk of a nuclear attack?
それは核攻撃を受ける可能性です
00:21
Now, there's a bigger question
そしてさらに重要かもしれないのが
00:24
that's probably actually more important than that,
そしてさらに重要かもしれないのが
00:26
is the notion of permanently eliminating
核の脅威を永久に
排除できるかということです
00:29
the possibility of a nuclear attack,
核の脅威を永久に
排除できるかということです
00:33
eliminating the threat altogether.
核の脅威を永久に
排除できるかということです
00:35
And I would like to make a case to you that
米国が世界初の原子爆弾を
開発して以来
00:37
over the years since we first developed atomic weaponry,
米国が世界初の原子爆弾を
開発して以来
00:40
until this very moment,
米国が世界初の原子爆弾を
開発して以来
00:43
we've actually lived in a dangerous nuclear world
人々は核の脅威に
さらされながら生きてきました
00:45
that's characterized by two phases,
人々は核の脅威に
さらされながら生きてきました
00:48
which I'm going to go through with you right now.
そのことを2つの時期に分けて説明します
00:51
First of all, we started off the nuclear age in 1945.
1945年に核時代が始まります
00:54
The United States had developed a couple of atomic weapons
米国はマンハッタン計画を通して
2つの原子爆弾を開発しました
00:58
through the Manhattan Project,
米国はマンハッタン計画を通して
2つの原子爆弾を開発しました
01:00
and the idea was very straightforward:
その発想は非常に単純です
原子爆弾を利用すれば
01:02
we would use the power of the atom
その発想は非常に単純です
原子爆弾を利用すれば
01:04
to end the atrocities and the horror
第二次世界大戦の残虐行為と恐怖を
やっと終わらせられる というものです
01:06
of this unending World War II
第二次世界大戦の残虐行為と恐怖を
やっと終わらせられる というものです
01:08
that we'd been involved in in Europe and in the Pacific.
第二次世界大戦の残虐行為と恐怖を
やっと終わらせられる というものです
01:10
And in 1945,
唯一の核保有国だった米国は
2つの原子爆弾を日本に落としました
01:13
we were the only nuclear power.
唯一の核保有国だった米国は
2つの原子爆弾を日本に落としました
01:16
We had a few nuclear weapons,
唯一の核保有国だった米国は
2つの原子爆弾を日本に落としました
01:18
two of which we dropped on Japan, in Hiroshima,
1945年8月 1つを広島に その数日後
もう1つを長崎に投下したのです
01:20
a few days later in Nagasaki, in August 1945,
1945年8月 1つを広島に その数日後
もう1つを長崎に投下したのです
01:22
killing about 250,000 people between those two.
2つの原子爆弾で
約25万人が死亡しました
01:25
And for a few years,
その後 数年間は
米国が唯一の核保有国でした
01:28
we were the only nuclear power on Earth.
その後 数年間は
米国が唯一の核保有国でした
01:30
But by 1949, the Soviet Union had decided
しかし1949年 ソビエト連邦は
01:33
it was unacceptable to have us as the only nuclear power,
「米国だけ核を持つのは容認できない」とし
米国との核開発競争を始めました
01:37
and they began to match what the United States had developed.
「米国だけ核を持つのは容認できない」とし
米国との核開発競争を始めました
01:40
And from 1949 to 1985
1949年から1985年は核兵器を
積み上げていく異様な時代でした
01:44
was an extraordinary time
1949年から1985年は核兵器を
積み上げていく異様な時代でした
01:47
of a buildup of a nuclear arsenal
1949年から1985年は核兵器を
積み上げていく異様な時代でした
01:50
that no one could possibly have imagined
このような時代になることを
1940年代に 誰が想像したでしょうか
01:53
back in the 1940s.
このような時代になることを
1940年代に 誰が想像したでしょうか
01:55
So by 1985 -- each of those red bombs up here
この赤い印は1つ当たり
1000発分の核弾頭を示しています
01:57
is equivalent of a thousands warheads --
この赤い印は1つ当たり
1000発分の核弾頭を示しています
02:00
the world had
1985年まで 世界には
6万5千発の核弾頭がありました
02:03
65,000 nuclear warheads,
1985年まで 世界には
6万5千発の核弾頭がありました
02:05
and seven members of something
そして核を保有する7か国が
「核クラブ」として知られるようになりました
02:08
that came to be known as the "nuclear club."
そして核を保有する7か国が
「核クラブ」として知られるようになりました
02:10
And it was an extraordinary time,
異常な時代です
02:13
and I am going to go through some of the mentality
当時の人々はどんな精神状態で
この時代を過ごしたのでしょうか
02:15
that we -- that Americans and the rest of the world were experiencing.
当時の人々はどんな精神状態で
この時代を過ごしたのでしょうか
02:17
But I want to just point out to you that 95 percent
ここで注意しなければならないのは
1985年以降 核兵器の95%が
02:20
of the nuclear weapons at any particular time
ここで注意しなければならないのは
1985年以降 核兵器の95%が
02:23
since 1985 -- going forward, of course --
米国とソ連のものだということです
02:26
were part of the arsenals
米国とソ連のものだったということです
02:28
of the United States and the Soviet Union.
米国とソ連のものだったということです
02:30
After 1985, and before the break up of the Soviet Union,
1985年から ソ連崩壊までの間に
核武装解除が開始されます
02:33
we began to disarm
1985年から ソ連崩壊までの間に
核武装解除が開始されます
02:36
from a nuclear point of view.
1985年から ソ連崩壊までの間に
核武装解除が開始されます
02:38
We began to counter-proliferate,
世界に存在する核弾頭が
約2万1千発まで削減されました
02:40
and we dropped the number of nuclear warheads in the world
世界に存在する核弾頭が
約2万1千発まで削減されました
02:42
to about a total of 21,000.
世界に存在する核弾頭が
約2万1千発まで削減されました
02:44
It's a very difficult number to deal with,
この数字は非常にやっかいです
核を「引退」させただけで
02:47
because what we've done is
この数字は非常にやっかいです
核を「引退」させただけで
02:48
we've quote unquote "decommissioned" some of the warheads.
「復帰」させれば
再び使用できるからです
02:50
They're still probably usable. They could be "re-commissioned,"
「復帰」させれば
再び使用できるからです
02:53
but the way they count things, which is very complicated,
この計算方法によると
核が3分の1に削減されたことになります
02:55
we think we have about a third
この計算方法によると
核が3分の1に削減されたことになります
02:58
of the nuclear weapons we had before.
この計算方法によると
核が3分の1に削減されたことになります
03:00
But we also, in that period of time,
しかしここで新たに2か国が
核クラブに参入しました
03:02
added two more members to the nuclear club:
しかしここで新たに2か国が
核クラブに参入しました
03:04
Pakistan and North Korea.
パキスタンと北朝鮮です
03:06
So we stand today with a still fully armed nuclear arsenal
米国が現在も
核武装しているのはこのためです
03:09
among many countries around the world,
米国が現在も
核武装しているのはこのためです
03:13
but a very different set of circumstances.
米国が現在も
核武装しているのはこのためです
03:15
So I'm going to talk about
これから2章にわたり
核の脅威についてお話しします
03:17
a nuclear threat story in two chapters.
これから2章にわたり
核の脅威についてお話しします
03:20
Chapter one is 1949 to 1991,
第1章は1949年から1991年
ソ連が崩壊するまで
03:22
when the Soviet Union broke up,
第1章は1949年から1991年
ソ連が崩壊するまで
03:25
and what we were dealing with, at that point and through those years,
超大国同士の
核軍拡競争が続いていた時期です
03:27
was a superpowers' nuclear arms race.
超大国同士の
核軍拡競争が続いていた時期です
03:30
It was characterized by
国家対国家の
非常に危険な睨み合いです
03:33
a nation-versus-nation,
国家対国家の
非常に危険な睨み合いです
03:35
very fragile standoff.
国家対国家の
非常に危険な睨み合いです
03:37
And basically,
現在もそうだという人もいますが
03:39
we lived for all those years,
現在もそうだという人もいますが
03:41
and some might argue that we still do,
当時 地球規模の大惨事が
起きる瀬戸際にありました
03:43
in a situation of
当時 地球規模の大惨事が
起きる瀬戸際にありました
03:45
being on the brink, literally,
当時 地球規模の大惨事が
起きる瀬戸際にありました
03:47
of an apocalyptic, planetary calamity.
当時 地球規模の大惨事が
起きる瀬戸際にありました
03:49
It's incredible that we actually lived through all that.
人類がこうした状況を生き延びたのは
驚くべきことです
03:53
We were totally dependent during those years
人類は相互確証破壊(MAD)と
いうものに依存していたのです
03:56
on this amazing acronym, which is MAD.
人類は相互確証破壊(MAD)と
いうものに依存していたのです
03:58
It stands for mutually assured destruction.
人類は相互確証破壊(MAD)と
いうものに依存していたのです
04:01
So it meant
「もし相手が攻撃してきたら
こちらも攻撃するぞ」という意味です
04:04
if you attacked us, we would attack you
「もし相手が攻撃してきたら
こちらも攻撃するぞ」という意味です
04:06
virtually simultaneously,
「もし相手が攻撃してきたら
こちらも攻撃するぞ」という意味です
04:08
and the end result would be a destruction
そうなると 最後には
双方の国が破壊されてしまいます
04:10
of your country and mine.
そうなると 最後には
双方の国が破壊されてしまいます
04:12
So the threat of my own destruction
自国が壊滅する恐れがあるため
相手国への核攻撃が抑止されるのです
04:14
kept me from launching
自国が壊滅する恐れがあるため
相手国への核攻撃が抑止されるのです
04:16
a nuclear attack on you. That's the way we lived.
こうして私たちは生存しました
04:18
And the danger of that, of course, is that
ここでの危険性は
レーダーの誤読です
04:22
a misreading of a radar screen
ここでの危険性は
レーダーの誤読です
04:24
could actually cause a counter-launch,
相手が発射していなくても
カウンター攻撃が起きる可能性があります
04:27
even though the first country had not actually launched anything.
相手が発射していなくても
カウンター攻撃が起きる可能性があります
04:29
During this chapter one,
当時「核の大惨事はありえる」という考えが
04:32
there was a high level of public awareness
当時「核の大惨事はありえる」という考えが
04:34
about the potential of nuclear catastrophe,
当時「核の大惨事はありえる」という考えが
04:36
and an indelible image was implanted
集団意識の中に
深く植えつけられました
04:39
in our collective minds
集団意識の中に
深く植えつけられました
04:41
that, in fact, a nuclear holocaust
実際に核戦争が起これば
全世界が破壊され
04:43
would be absolutely globally destructive
実際に核戦争が起これば
全世界が破壊され
04:45
and could, in some ways, mean the end of civilization as we know it.
この文明は終わるかもしれません
04:48
So this was chapter one.
第1章はここまでです
04:51
Now the odd thing is that even though
奇妙なことに我々は
文明が消滅することを知りつつ
04:54
we knew that there would be
奇妙なことに我々は
文明が消滅することを知りつつ
04:56
that kind of civilization obliteration,
奇妙なことに我々は
文明が消滅することを知りつつ
04:58
we engaged in America in a series --
アメリカもソ連も
一連の報復計画を議論していました
05:01
and in fact, in the Soviet Union --
アメリカもソ連も
一連の報復計画を議論していました
05:03
in a series of response planning.
アメリカもソ連も
一連の報復計画を議論していました
05:05
It was absolutely incredible.
全く信じられないことです
05:07
So premise one is we'd be destroying the world,
世界が破壊される可能性があるならば
対策を取るべきではないでしょうか?
05:09
and then premise two is, why don't we get prepared for it?
世界が破壊される可能性があるならば
対策を取るべきではないでしょうか?
05:11
So what
ここでみなさんの記憶を
呼び覚ましたいと思います
05:14
we offered ourselves
ここでみなさんの記憶を
呼び覚ましたいと思います
05:16
was a collection of things. I'm just going to go skim through a few things,
ここでみなさんの記憶を
呼び覚ましたいと思います
05:18
just to jog your memories.
ここでみなさんの記憶を
呼び覚ましたいと思います
05:20
If you're born after 1950, this is just --
1950年以前に生まれた人は
懐かしく思うのではないでしょうか
05:22
consider this entertainment, otherwise it's memory lane.
1950年以前に生まれた人は
懐かしく思うのではないでしょうか
05:24
This was Bert the Turtle. (Video)
カメのバート君です(ビデオ)
05:27
This was basically an attempt
これは子供向けに作られたもので
05:45
to teach our schoolchildren
これは子供向けに作られたもので
05:47
that if we did get engaged
核戦争が起こったときは
05:49
in a nuclear confrontation and atomic war,
核戦争が起こったときは
05:51
then we wanted our school children
「机の下に隠れるように」
と教えています
05:54
to kind of basically duck and cover.
「机の下に隠れるように」
と教えています
05:56
That was the principle. You --
核爆発が起きたとしても
05:58
there would be a nuclear conflagration
核爆発が起きたとしても
06:00
about to hit us, and if you get under your desk,
机の下に隠れれば大丈夫なのです
06:02
things would be OK.
机の下に隠れれば大丈夫なのです
06:04
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:06
I didn't do all that well
私は医学部のときに 精神科で優秀だったわけではありませんが
興味はありました
06:08
in psychiatry in medical school, but I was interested,
私は医学部のときに 精神科で優秀だったわけではありませんが
興味はありました
06:10
and I think this was seriously delusional.
このケースは重度の妄想が疑われます
06:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:15
Secondly, we told people
また 地下に核シェルターを作ることが
勧められていました
06:17
to go down in their basements
また 地下に核シェルターを作ることが
勧められていました
06:19
and build a fallout shelter.
また 地下に核シェルターを作ることが
勧められていました
06:21
Maybe it would be a study when we weren't having an atomic war,
核戦争が起きていないときには
テレビを見たり
06:23
or you could use it as a TV room, or, as many teenagers found out,
核戦争が起きていないときには
テレビを見たり
06:26
a very, very safe place for a little privacy with your girlfriend.
彼女とこっそり会うことぐらいしか
使用されないかもしれません
06:29
And actually -- so there are multiple uses of the bomb shelters.
彼女とこっそり会うことぐらいしか
使用されないかもしれません
06:32
Or you could buy a prefabricated bomb shelter
しかし地下に埋めるだけの
プレハブ式のシェルターなどもあり
06:35
that you could simply bury in the ground.
しかし地下に埋めるだけの
プレハブ式のシェルターなどもあり
06:38
Now, the bomb shelters at that point --
購入した場合 高いもので
500ドルぐらいの価格です
06:40
let's say you bought a prefab one -- it would be a few hundred dollars,
購入した場合 高いもので
500ドルぐらいの価格です
06:42
maybe up to 500, if you got a fancy one.
購入した場合 高いもので
500ドルぐらいの価格です
06:44
Yet, what percentage of Americans
核シェルターを持った経験のある
米国人は何%いるでしょうか?
06:46
do you think ever had a bomb shelter in their house?
核シェルターを持った経験のある
米国人は何%いるでしょうか?
06:48
What percentage lived in a house with a bomb shelter?
核シェルターを持った経験のある
米国人は何%いるでしょうか?
06:50
Less than two percent. About 1.4 percent
2%未満です
06:53
of the population, as far as anyone knows,
地下に核シェルターのための空間を確保したり
実際に作っているのは1.4%の人だけです
06:56
did anything,
地下に核シェルターのための空間を確保したり
実際に作っているのは1.4%の人だけです
06:58
either making a space in their basement
地下に核シェルターのための空間を確保したり
実際に作っているのは1.4%の人だけです
07:00
or actually building a bomb shelter.
地下に核シェルターのための空間を確保したり
実際に作っているのは1.4%の人だけです
07:02
Many buildings, public buildings, around the country --
米国では多くの建物に
民間防衛のサインが掲げられています
07:05
this is New York City -- had these little civil defense signs,
米国では多くの建物に
民間防衛のサインが掲げられています
07:07
and the idea was that you would
ここのシェルターに逃げ込めば
核攻撃から身を守れるというものです
07:10
run into one of these shelters and be safe
ここのシェルターに逃げ込めば
核攻撃から身を守れるというものです
07:12
from the nuclear weaponry.
ここのシェルターに逃げ込めば
核攻撃から身を守れるというものです
07:14
And one of the greatest governmental delusions
ここで政府の大嘘があります
07:16
of all time was something that happened
ここで政府の大嘘があります
07:19
in the early days of
これには あの連邦緊急事態管理庁(FEMA)
が関わっていました
07:21
the Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA, as we now know,
これには あの連邦緊急事態管理庁(FEMA)
が関わっていました
07:23
and are well aware of their behaviors from Katrina.
ハリケーン・カトリーナの対応で
どんな組織かお分かりですね
07:26
Here is their first big public
FEMAが行った
最初の公式発表の中で
07:29
announcement.
FEMAが行った
最初の公式発表の中で
07:32
They would propose --
緊急移住計画が提案されました
07:34
actually there were about six volumes written on this --
緊急移住計画が提案されました
07:36
a crisis relocation plan
緊急移住計画が提案されました
07:38
that was dependent upon
これはソ連が攻撃してくる3~4日前に
警報が発せられることが前提でした
07:40
the United States having three to four days warning
これはソ連が攻撃してくる3~4日前に
警報が発せられることが前提でした
07:42
that the Soviets were going to attack us.
これはソ連が攻撃してくる3~4日前に
警報が発せられることが前提でした
07:45
So the goal was to evacuate the target cities.
標的となった都市から
人々を避難させることが目的です
07:47
We would move people out of the target cities
標的となった都市から
人々を避難させることが目的です
07:50
into the countryside.
標的となった都市から
人々を避難させることが目的です
07:52
And I'm telling you, I actually testified at the Senate
私は上院議会で
07:54
about the absolute ludicrous idea
「実際に避難や警報を行ってはどうか」
と発言しました
07:57
that we would actually evacuate,
「実際に避難や警報を行ってはどうか」
と発言しました
08:00
and actually have three or four days' warning.
「実際に避難や警報を行ってはどうか」
と発言しました
08:01
It was just completely off the wall.
場違いな発言とみなされました
彼らには別の考えがあったのです
08:03
Turns out that they had another idea
場違いな発言とみなされました
彼らには別の考えがあったのです
08:05
behind it, even though this was --
その考えとは国民にこの計画で助かると
言っておきながら
08:08
they were telling the public it was to save us.
その考えとは国民にこの計画で助かると
言っておきながら
08:10
The idea was that we would force the Soviets
ソ連に超高価な核兵器を
使わせるために
08:12
to re-target their nuclear weapons -- very expensive --
ソ連に超高価な核兵器を
使わせるために
08:14
and potentially double their arsenal,
ソ連に超高価な核兵器を
使わせるために
08:17
to not only take out the original site,
元々の標的だけでなく
避難先まで狙わせるつもりでした
08:19
but take out sites where people were going.
元々の標的だけでなく
避難先まで狙わせるつもりでした
08:21
This was what apparently, as it turns out, was behind all this.
裏でこんなことがあるとは
本当に恐ろしく思います
08:24
It was just really, really frightening.
裏でこんなことがあるとは
本当に恐ろしく思います
08:27
The main point here is we were dealing with
ポイントは今までの対策が
現実離れしていたということです
08:30
a complete disconnect from reality.
ポイントは今までの対策が
現実離れしていたということです
08:32
The civil defense programs were disconnected
民間防衛プログラムは
核戦争の現実を直視していません
08:35
from the reality of what we'd see in all-out nuclear war.
民間防衛プログラムは
核戦争の現実を直視していません
08:38
So organizations like Physicians for Social Responsibility,
「社会的責任を果たすための医師団」
のような団体は
08:40
around 1979, started saying this a lot publicly.
1979年頃から何度も公然と
以下のように述べています
08:44
They would do a bombing run. They'd go to your city,
都市が爆撃されるとわかったとき
08:47
and they'd say, "Here's a map of your city.
「この地図には核攻撃を受けたとき
どうなるかが書かれています」と言われるだけで
08:50
Here's what's going to happen if we get a nuclear hit."
「この地図には核攻撃を受けたとき
どうなるかが書かれています」と言われるだけで
08:52
So no possibility of medical response to,
核戦争に対する医療対策や
適切な備えは何もありません
08:55
or meaningful preparedness for
核戦争に対する医療対策や
適切な備えは何もありません
08:57
all-out nuclear war.
核戦争に対する医療対策や
適切な備えは何もありません
08:59
So we had to prevent nuclear war
だから生き残るためには
核戦争を防ぐ以外にないのです
09:01
if we expected to survive.
だから生き残るためには
核戦争を防ぐ以外にないのです
09:03
This disconnect was never actually resolved.
この現実離れが実際に
解消されることはありませんでした
09:05
And what happened was --
この現実離れが実際に
解消されることはありませんでした
09:08
when we get in to chapter two
ではどうなったのかを
第2章で説明したいと思います
09:10
of the nuclear threat era,
ではどうなったのかを
第2章で説明したいと思います
09:12
which started back in 1945.
核の脅威は1945年に始まりました
09:15
Chapter two starts in 1991.
第2章は1991年から始まります
ソビエト連邦が崩壊したため
09:17
When the Soviet Union broke up,
第2章は1991年から始まります
ソビエト連邦が崩壊したため
09:19
we effectively lost that adversary
米国を攻撃しようという敵が
一時的にいなくなったというわけです
09:21
as a potential attacker of the United States, for the most part.
米国を攻撃しようという敵が
一時的にいなくなったというわけです
09:23
It's not completely gone. I'm going to come back to that.
米国を攻撃しようという敵が
一時的にいなくなったというわけです
09:26
But from 1991
しかし1991年以降
09:28
through the present time,
しかし1991年以降
09:30
emphasized by the attacks of 2001,
特に2001年のテロによって
核戦争への関心は薄れ
09:32
the idea of an all-out nuclear war
特に2001年のテロによって
核戦争への関心は薄れ
09:34
has diminished and the idea of a single event,
核テロのみが
取沙汰されるようになりました
09:37
act of nuclear terrorism
核テロのみが
取沙汰されるようになりました
09:40
is what we have instead.
核テロのみが
取沙汰されるようになりました
09:42
Although the scenario has changed
シナリオが根本的に
変わったにもかかわらず
09:44
very considerably, the fact is
シナリオが根本的に
変わったにもかかわらず
09:47
that we haven't changed our mental image
私達は核戦争に対する考え方を
変えられていません
09:49
of what a nuclear war means.
私達は核戦争に対する考え方を
変えられていません
09:51
So I'm going to tell you what the implications of that are in just a second.
では核テロの脅威とは何でしょうか?
09:53
So, what is a nuclear terror threat?
では核テロの脅威とは何でしょうか?
09:56
And there's four key ingredients to describing that.
キーポイントは4つあります
09:58
First thing is that the global nuclear weapons,
1つ目は 世界中に存在する核兵器の
セキュリティーです
10:01
in the stockpiles that I showed you in those original maps,
1つ目は 世界中に存在する核兵器の
セキュリティーです
10:04
happen to be not uniformly secure.
1つ目は 世界中に存在する核兵器の
セキュリティーです
10:06
And it's particularly not secure
特に安全ではないのが旧ソ連
現在のロシアです
10:09
in the former Soviet Union, now in Russia.
特に安全ではないのが旧ソ連
現在のロシアです
10:11
There are many, many sites where warheads are stored
ロシアには核弾頭の貯蔵庫をはじめ
10:13
and, in fact, lots of sites where fissionable materials,
ウランやプルトニウムなどの
核分裂物質を扱う施設が多くありますが
10:16
like highly enriched uranium and plutonium,
ウランやプルトニウムなどの
核分裂物質を扱う施設が多くありますが
10:19
are absolutely not safe.
全くセキュリティーが保たれていません
売買や盗難など何でも起こり得ます
10:22
They're available to be bought, stolen, whatever.
全くセキュリティーが保たれていません
売買や盗難など何でも起こり得ます
10:24
They're acquirable, let me put it that way.
核をすぐ手に入れられるのです
10:27
From 1993 through 2006,
1993年から2006年にかけて
10:30
the International Atomic Energy Agency
国際原子力機関は175件に及ぶ
核の盗難事件を記録しており
10:33
documented 175 cases of nuclear theft,
国際原子力機関は175件に及ぶ
核の盗難事件を記録しており
10:35
18 of which involved highly enriched uranium or plutonium,
そのうち18件が 核兵器製造に必要な
高濃縮ウランまたはプルトニウムでした
10:38
the key ingredients to make a nuclear weapon.
そのうち18件が 核兵器製造に必要な
高濃縮ウランまたはプルトニウムでした
10:42
The global stockpile of highly enriched uranium
世界の高濃縮ウラン貯蔵量は
1,300トンから2,100トンです
10:46
is about 1,300, at the low end,
世界の高濃縮ウラン貯蔵量は
1,300トンから2,100トンです
10:49
to about 2,100 metric tons.
世界の高濃縮ウラン貯蔵量は
1,300トンから2,100トンです
10:51
More than 100 megatons of this
その内 [約100トン] が
ロシアの施設で不用心に貯蔵されています
10:54
is stored in particularly insecure
その内 [約100トン] が
ロシアの施設で不用心に貯蔵されています
10:56
Russian facilities.
その内 [約100トン] が
ロシアの施設で不用心に貯蔵されています
10:59
How much of that do you think it would take
破壊力10キロトンの核爆弾を作るのに
どれだけのウランが必要だと思いますか?
11:02
to actually build a 10-kiloton bomb?
破壊力10キロトンの核爆弾を作るのに
どれだけのウランが必要だと思いますか?
11:04
Well, you need about 75 pounds of it.
約34kg必要です
11:06
So, what I'd like to show you
高濃縮ウラン34kgというのは
どれぐらいなのかお見せします
11:10
is
高濃縮ウラン34kgというのが
どれぐらいなのかお見せします
11:13
what it would take to hold 75 pounds
高濃縮ウラン34kgというのが
どれぐらいなのかお見せします
11:15
of highly enriched uranium.
高濃縮ウラン34kgというのが
どれぐらいなのかお見せします
11:18
This is not a product placement. It's just --
これは宣伝ではありませんよ
11:21
in fact, if I was Coca Cola, I'd be pretty distressed about this --
もし私がコカ・コーラの人間だったら
大変困ったことになります(笑)
11:23
(Laughter)
もし私がコカ・コーラの人間だったら
大変困ったことになります(笑)
11:25
-- but
基本的にはこれだけです
11:28
basically, this is it.
基本的にはこれだけです
11:30
This is what you would need to steal or buy
100トンの貯蔵量から
たったこれだけ盗むか買えば
11:33
out of that 100-metric-ton stockpile
100トンの貯蔵量から
たったこれだけ盗むか買えば
11:36
that's relatively insecure
広島型の原子爆弾を
作ることができます
11:38
to create the type of bomb
広島型の原子爆弾を
作ることができます
11:40
that was used in Hiroshima.
広島型の原子爆弾を
作ることができます
11:42
Now you might want to look at plutonium
もう一つの核分裂物質
プルトニウムはどうでしょうか
11:44
as another fissionable material that you might use in a bomb.
もう一つの核分裂物質
プルトニウムはどうでしょうか
11:46
That -- you'd need 10 to 13 pounds of plutonium.
プルトニウム4.5kg~6kgで
11:49
Now, plutonium, 10 to 13 pounds:
プルトニウム4.5kg~6kgで
11:53
this. This is enough plutonium
長崎型原爆を作ることができます
11:56
to create a Nagasaki-size atomic weapon.
長崎型原爆を作ることができます
11:59
Now this situation, already I --
このような状況は
あまり考えたくないのですが
12:04
you know, I don't really like thinking about this,
このような状況は
あまり考えたくないのですが
12:06
although somehow I got myself a job
仕事柄そういうわけにはいきません
12:09
where I have to think about it. So
仕事柄そういうわけにはいきません
12:11
the point is that we're very, very insecure
ポイントは核開発という点で
私たちは非常に危険だということです
12:13
in terms of developing this material.
ポイントは核開発という点で
私たちは非常に危険だということです
12:16
The second thing is, what about the know-how?
2つ目のキーポイントは
ノウハウについてです
12:19
And there's a lot of controversy about
2つ目のキーポイントは
ノウハウについてです
12:21
whether terror organizations have the know-how
テロ組織が実際に核兵器を作れる
ノウハウがあるのか議論されています
12:23
to actually make a nuclear weapon.
テロ組織が実際に核兵器を作れる
ノウハウがあるのか議論されています
12:26
Well, there's a lot of know-how out there.
ノウハウは信じられないぐらい
多く氾濫しています
12:29
There's an unbelievable amount of know-how out there.
ノウハウは信じられないぐらい
多く氾濫しています
12:31
There's detailed information on how to assemble
これは部品から核兵器を
組み立てるための詳細な方法です
12:34
a nuclear weapon from parts.
これは部品から核兵器を
組み立てるための詳細な方法です
12:36
There's books about how to build a nuclear bomb.
核爆弾の作り方を紹介する本や
12:39
There are plans for how to create a terror farm
部品を製造し組み立てる
テロ工場の計画などもあります
12:42
where you could actually manufacture and develop
部品を製造し組み立てる
テロ工場の計画などもあります
12:45
all the components and assemble it.
部品を製造し組み立てる
テロ工場の計画などもあります
12:47
All of this information is relatively available.
こうした情報は簡単に
手に入れることができます
12:50
If you have an undergraduate degree in physics,
大学で物理学を専攻した人であれば
12:53
I would suggest --
大学で物理学を専攻した人であれば
12:55
although I don't, so maybe it's not even true --
現在入手できる情報を使って
12:57
but something close to that would allow you,
現在入手できる情報を使って
12:59
with the information that's currently available,
現在入手できる情報を使って
13:01
to actually build a nuclear weapon.
実際に核兵器を作れてしまいます
13:03
The third element of the nuclear terror threat
3つ目のキーポイントは
実際に誰がそんな事をするかということです
13:07
is that, who would actually do such a thing?
3つ目のキーポイントは
実際に誰がそんな事をするかということです
13:11
Well, what we're seeing now is a level of terrorism
現在私達が直面しているのは
組織立った人間が関わるテロです
13:14
that involves individuals who are highly organized.
現在私達が直面しているのは
組織立った人間が関わるテロです
13:17
They are very dedicated and committed.
彼らは非常に献身的です
そして国籍を持ちません
13:20
They are stateless.
彼らは非常に献身的です
そして国籍を持ちません
13:22
Somebody once said, Al Qaeda
「アルカイダには返送先の住所がない」
と言われます
13:24
does not have a return address,
「アルカイダには返送先の住所がない」
と言われます
13:26
so if they attack us with a nuclear weapon,
もしアルカイダから核攻撃を受けたら
誰にどうやって報復すればいいのでしょうか
13:28
what's the response, and to whom is the response?
もしアルカイダから核攻撃を受けたら
誰にどうやって報復すればいいのでしょうか
13:30
And they're retaliation-proof.
彼らは報復を恐れません
報復は意味をなさないのです
13:33
Since there is no real retribution possible
彼らは報復を恐れません
報復は意味をなさないのです
13:35
that would make any difference,
彼らは報復を恐れません
報復は意味をなさないのです
13:38
since there are people willing to actually give up their lives
私達に危害を加えるためなら
自らの命を捨てる人達だからです
13:40
in order to do a lot of damage to us,
私達に危害を加えるためなら
自らの命を捨てる人達だからです
13:43
it becomes apparent
相互確証破壊が
機能しないことは明らかです
13:45
that the whole notion
相互確証破壊が
機能しないことは明らかです
13:47
of this mutually assured destruction would not work.
相互確証破壊が
機能しないことは明らかです
13:49
Here is Sulaiman Abu Ghaith,
彼はスレイマン・アブガイス
オサマ・ビン・ラディンの側近でした
13:51
and Sulaiman was a key lieutenant of Osama Bin Laden.
彼はスレイマン・アブガイス
オサマ・ビン・ラディンの側近でした
13:53
He wrote many, many times statements to this effect:
「我々には米国人400万人を殺す権利があり
その半数は子どもであるべきだ」と声明を出しました
13:56
"we have the right to kill four million Americans,
「我々には米国人400万人を殺す権利があり
その半数は子どもであるべきだ」と声明を出しました
13:58
two million of whom should be children."
「我々には米国人400万人を殺す権利があり
その半数は子どもであるべきだ」と声明を出しました
14:01
And we don't have to go overseas
こうした人は海外だけに
いるわけではありません
14:03
to find people willing to do harm, for whatever their reasons.
こうした人は海外だけに
いるわけではありません
14:05
McVeigh and Nichols, and the Oklahoma City attack
1990年代のマクベイとニコルズによる
オクラホマシティ爆破事件は
14:07
in the 1990s
1990年代のマクベイとニコルズによる
オクラホマシティ爆破事件は
14:10
was a good example of homegrown terrorists.
国内出身テロリストの適例でした
14:12
What if they had gotten their hands on a nuclear weapon?
もし彼らが核兵器を
手に入れていたたらどうなったか?
14:14
The fourth element
4つ目のキーポイントは
価値の高い米国内のターゲットが
14:16
is that the high-value U.S. targets
4つ目のキーポイントは
価値の高い米国内のターゲットが
14:18
are accessible, soft and plentiful.
無防備で 民間で 多数あること
14:20
This would be a talk for another day, but the level of the preparedness
2001年9/11以降で
米国が達成している対策のレベルは
14:23
that the United States has achieved
2001年9/11以降で
米国が達成している対策のレベルは
14:25
since 9/11 of '01
信じられないほど
不十分なものでした
14:27
is unbelievably inadequate.
信じられないほど
不十分なものでした
14:29
What you saw after Katrina
カトリーナ後の対策を見れば
14:31
is a very good indicator
カトリーナ後の対策を見れば
14:33
of how little prepared the United States is
米国がどんな襲撃に対しても
いかに準備不足なのかわかります
14:35
for any kind of major attack.
米国がどんな襲撃に対しても
いかに準備不足なのかわかります
14:38
Seven million ship cargo containers
毎年700万の貨物コンテナ船が
米国にやって来ます
14:40
come into the United States every year.
毎年700万の貨物コンテナ船が
米国にやって来ます
14:42
Five to seven percent only are inspected --
検査されているのはたった5~7%です
14:44
five to seven percent.
検査されているのはたった5~7%です
14:47
This is Alexander Lebed,
彼はアレクサンドル・レベジ
エリツィン政権時の将軍でした
14:50
who was a general that worked with Yeltsin,
彼はアレクサンドル・レベジ
エリツィン政権時の将軍でした
14:53
who talked about, and presented to Congress,
「ロシアがスーツケース爆弾を
開発した」と彼は議会で発言しました
14:55
this idea that the Russians had developed --
「ロシアがスーツケース爆弾を
開発した」と彼は議会で発言しました
14:58
these suitcase bombs. They were very low yield --
その破壊力は0.1~1キロトン
広島型の約13キロトンと比べ少ないですが
15:01
0.1 to one kiloton,
その破壊力は0.1~1キロトン
広島型の約13キロトンと比べ少ないですが
15:03
Hiroshima was around 13 kilotons --
甚大な被害を起こすのに十分な量です
15:06
but enough to do an unbelievable amount of damage.
甚大な被害を起こすのに十分な量です
15:08
And Lebed came to the United States
レベジが米国を訪問したときに
このような発言をしました
15:11
and told us that many, many --
レベジが米国を訪問したときに
このような発言をしました
15:13
more than 80 of the suitcase bombs
「80を超えるスーツケース爆弾が行方不明だ」
15:16
were actually not accountable.
「80を超えるスーツケース爆弾が行方不明だ」
15:18
And they look like this. They're basically very simple arrangements.
それはこのような簡単な構造をしています
そして持ち運びも便利なのです
15:20
You put the elements into a suitcase.
それはこのような簡単な構造をしています
そして持ち運びも便利なのです
15:22
It becomes very portable.
それはこのような簡単な構造をしています
そして持ち運びも便利なのです
15:25
The suitcase can be conveniently dropped
車のトランクに積んで運べば
どこでも爆発させることができます
15:27
in your trunk of your car.
車のトランクに積んで運べば
どこでも爆発させることができます
15:29
You take it wherever you want to take it, and you can detonate it.
車のトランクに積んで運べば
どこでも爆発させることができます
15:31
You don't want to build a suitcase bomb,
スーツケース爆弾を作るのではなく
核兵器が盗まれる可能性もあります
15:33
and you happen to get one of those insecure
スーツケース爆弾を作るのではなく
核兵器が盗まれる可能性もあります
15:36
nuclear warheads that exist.
スーツケース爆弾を作るのではなく
核兵器が盗まれる可能性もあります
15:38
This is the size of
これは広島型原爆
リトルボーイと同じサイズです
15:40
the "Little Boy" bomb that was dropped at Hiroshima.
これは広島型原爆
リトルボーイと同じサイズです
15:42
It was 9.8 feet long,
長さは3メートル
重量は4トン
15:44
weighed 8,800 pounds. You go down to
長さは3メートル
重量は4トン
15:46
your local rent-a-truck
レンタカーで50ドル出せば
15:48
and for 50 bucks or so,
レンタカーで50ドル出せば
15:51
you rent a truck that's got the right capacity,
核爆弾を積み込めるだけの
トラックが手に入れられます
15:53
and you take your bomb,
核爆弾を積み込めるだけの
トラックが手に入れられます
15:55
you put it in the truck and you're ready to go.
トラックに核爆弾を乗せたら準備完了です
15:57
It could happen. But what it would mean and who would survive?
これが実際起きたらどうなるでしょうか
16:00
You can't get an exact number for that kind of probability,
正確な確率はわかりませんが
これが実際起きる要素はそろっています
16:03
but what I'm trying to say is that
正確な確率はわかりませんが
これが実際起きる要素はそろっています
16:06
we have all the elements of that happening.
正確な確率はわかりませんが
これが実際起きる要素はそろっています
16:08
Anybody who dismisses the thought
テロリストが核兵器を使用することは
十分あり得ることなのです
16:10
of a nuclear weapon
テロリストが核兵器を使用することは
十分あり得ることなのです
16:12
being used by a terrorist is kidding themselves.
テロリストが核兵器を使用することは
十分あり得ることなのです
16:14
I think there's a lot of people in the intelligence community --
多くの関係者が
16:16
a lot of people who deal with this work in general
多くの関係者が
16:19
think it's almost inevitable, unless we do certain things
何か対策を取らなければ
危険は避けられないといいます
16:22
to really try to defuse the risk,
何か対策を取らなければ
危険は避けられないといいます
16:25
like better interdiction, better prevention,
例えば米国に往来する貨物船を
より詳しく検査するなど
16:28
better fixing, you know, better screening
例えば米国に往来する貨物船を
より詳しく検査するなど
16:30
of cargo containers that are coming into the country and so forth.
例えば米国に往来する貨物船を
より詳しく検査するなど
16:32
There's a lot that can be done to make us a lot safer.
安全確保のために
できることはたくさんあります
16:35
At this particular moment,
いつか米国の都市で
実際に核爆発が起きるかもしれません
16:38
we actually could end up
いつか米国の都市で
実際に核爆発が起きるかもしれません
16:40
seeing a nuclear detonation in one of our cities.
いつか米国の都市で
実際に核爆発が起きるかもしれません
16:42
I don't think we would see an all-out nuclear war
核戦争になるとは思いませんが
現実離れしたものでもありません
16:45
any time soon, although even that is not completely off the table.
核戦争になるとは思いませんが
現実離れしたものでもありません
16:48
There's still enough nuclear weapons
世界には地球を破壊するのに十分な
核兵器が存在しています
16:51
in the arsenals of the superpowers
世界には地球を破壊するのに十分な
核兵器が存在しています
16:53
to destroy the Earth many, many times over.
世界には地球を破壊するのに十分な
核兵器が存在しています
16:55
There are flash points in India and Pakistan,
インドとパキスタン、中東、
北朝鮮などに火種があります
16:58
in the Middle East, in North Korea,
インドとパキスタン、中東、
北朝鮮などに火種があります
17:01
other places where the use of nuclear weapons,
他にも核兵器を使用すれば
始めは地域にとどまりますが
17:03
while initially locally,
他にも核兵器を使用すれば
始めは地域にとどまりますが
17:06
could very rapidly
一気に核戦争へと
突入するような地域もあります
17:08
go into a situation
一気に核戦争へと
突入するような地域もあります
17:10
where we'd be facing all-out nuclear war.
一気に核戦争へと
突入するような地域もあります
17:12
It's very unsettling.
非常に不安定な状況です
17:15
Here we go. OK.
トラックの話に戻りましょう
ブルックリン橋を渡ったところです
17:18
I'm back in my truck, and we drove over the Brooklyn Bridge.
トラックの話に戻りましょう
ブルックリン橋を渡ったところです
17:20
We're coming down,
そしてマンハッタンに入りました
17:23
and we bring that truck
そしてマンハッタンに入りました
17:25
that you just saw
そしてマンハッタンに入りました
17:27
somewhere in here, in the Financial District.
そしてマンハッタンに入りました
17:29
This is a 10-kiloton bomb,
破壊力10キロトンの爆弾で
広島型より少し小型です
17:43
slightly smaller than was used
破壊力10キロトンの爆弾で
広島型より少し小型です
17:46
in Hiroshima. And I want to just conclude this
破壊力10キロトンの爆弾で
広島型より少し小型です
17:48
by just giving you some information. I think --
ここで「使える情報」をお教えします
17:51
"news you could use" kind of concept here.
ここで「使える情報」をお教えします
17:53
So, first of all, this would be horrific
これは想像をこえる
恐ろしいものになるでしょう
17:56
beyond anything we can possibly imagine.
これは想像をこえる
恐ろしいものになるでしょう
17:58
This is the ultimate.
これは想像をこえる
恐ろしいものになるでしょう
18:00
And if you're in the half-mile radius
人間が爆心地から半径800mにいた場合
18:02
of where this bomb went off,
人間が爆心地から半径800mにいた場合
18:04
you have a 90 percent chance of not making it.
死ぬ確率は90%です
18:06
If you're right where the bomb went off,
爆心地にいた場合は気化されます
18:08
you will be vaporized. And that's --
爆心地にいた場合は気化されます
18:10
I'm just telling you, this is not good.
これは良くないですよね(笑)
18:12
(Laughter)
これは良くないですよね(笑)
18:14
You assume that.
半径3kmの場合
死ぬ確率が50%
18:16
Two-mile radius, you have a 50 percent chance
半径3kmの場合
死ぬ確率が50%
18:18
of being killed,
半径3kmの場合
死ぬ確率が50%
18:21
and up to about eight miles away --
半径13kmの場合
死ぬ確率が10~20%です
18:23
now I'm talking about killed instantly --
半径13kmの場合
死ぬ確率が10~20%です
18:25
somewhere between a 10 and 20 percent
半径13kmの場合
死ぬ確率が10~20%です
18:27
chance of getting killed.
即死を考えてです
18:29
The thing about this is that
核爆発では中心温度が
華氏数千万度となり
18:31
the experience of the nuclear detonation is --
核爆発では中心温度が
華氏数千万度となり
18:33
first of all, tens of millions of degrees Fahrenheit
核爆発では中心温度が
華氏数千万度となり
18:37
at the core here, where it goes off,
核爆発では中心温度が
華氏数千万度となり
18:40
and an extraordinary amount of energy
膨大なエネルギーが熱や放射線
衝撃波として放出されます
18:42
in the form of heat, acute radiation
膨大なエネルギーが熱や放射線
衝撃波として放出されます
18:44
and blast effects.
膨大なエネルギーが熱や放射線
衝撃波として放出されます
18:47
An enormous hurricane-like wind,
黄色の円の範囲では
建物が激しい風で破壊されます
18:49
and destruction of buildings almost totally,
黄色の円の範囲では
建物が激しい風で破壊されます
18:51
within this yellow circle here.
黄色の円の範囲では
建物が激しい風で破壊されます
18:54
And what I'm going to focus on, as I come to conclusion here,
ここで注目したいのは もし自分が
そこにいたらどうなるかということです
18:56
is that, what happens to you
ここで注目したいのは もし自分が
そこにいたらどうなるかということです
18:58
if you're in here?
ここで注目したいのは もし自分が
そこにいたらどうなるかということです
19:01
Well, if we're talking about the old days
もし昔風の全面核戦争になれば
どこに居ようと 全員死ぬことになります
19:03
of an all-out nuclear attack,
もし昔風の全面核戦争になれば
どこに居ようと 全員死ぬことになります
19:05
you, up here,
もし昔風の全面核戦争になれば
どこに居ようと 全員死ぬことになります
19:07
are as dead as the people here. So it was a moot point.
もし昔風の全面核戦争になれば
どこに居ようと 全員死ぬことになります
19:08
My point now, though, is that there is a lot
ここにいたら 命を守るために
できることはたくさんあります
19:11
that we could do for you who are in here,
ここにいたら 命を守るために
できることはたくさんあります
19:13
if you've survived the initial blast.
最初の爆発を生き延びたとします
19:15
You have, when the blast goes off --
最初の爆発を生き延びたとします
19:17
and by the way, if it ever comes up, don't look at it.
ちなみに爆発を見てはいけません
19:19
(Laughter)
ちなみに爆発を見てはいけません
19:21
If you look at it, you're going to be blind,
見たら一時もしくは永久に
目がつぶれてしまいます
19:23
either temporarily or permanently.
見たら一時もしくは永久に
目がつぶれてしまいます
19:25
So if there's any way that you can avoid,
そうならないためには
目をそらした方がよいでしょう
19:27
like, avert your eyes, that would be a good thing.
そうならないためには
目をそらした方がよいでしょう
19:29
If you find yourself alive, but
爆発を生き延びたとしても
爆発の近くにいた場合
19:32
you're in the vicinity of a nuclear weapon,
爆発を生き延びたとしても
爆発の近くにいた場合
19:34
you have -- that's gone off --
爆発を生き延びたとしても
爆発の近くにいた場合
19:37
you have 10 to 20 minutes, depending on the size
致死量の放射能が
きのこ雲から地上に降り注ぐまで
19:39
and exactly where it went off,
致死量の放射能が
きのこ雲から地上に降り注ぐまで
19:41
to get out of the way before
爆発の大きさや場所にもよりますが
10分から20分しかありません
19:43
a lethal amount of radiation
爆発の大きさや場所にもよりますが
10分から20分しかありません
19:45
comes straight down from the mushroom cloud that goes up.
爆発の大きさや場所にもよりますが
10分から20分しかありません
19:47
In that 10 to 15 minutes, all you have to do --
10~15分以内ですべきことは
爆発から2kmぐらい離れることです
19:50
and I mean this seriously --
10~15分以内ですべきことは
爆発から2kmぐらい離れることです
19:52
is go about a mile
10~15分以内ですべきことは
爆発から2kmぐらい離れることです
19:54
away from the blast.
10~15分以内ですべきことは
爆発から2kmぐらい離れることです
19:56
And what happens is -- this is --
20分以内に死の灰が降り注ぎ
19:58
I'm going to show you now some fallout plumes. Within 20 minutes,
20分以内に死の灰が降り注ぎ
20:00
it comes straight down. Within 24 hours,
24 時間で致死量の放射能が
季節風に乗ってやってきます
20:02
lethal radiation is going out with prevailing winds,
24 時間で致死量の放射能が
季節風に乗ってやってきます
20:04
and it's mostly in this particular direction --
そのほとんどが北東に流れます
20:07
it's going northeast.
そのほとんどが北東に流れます
20:09
And if you're in this vicinity, you've got to get away.
この付近にいた場合は
逃げなければなりません
20:11
So you're feeling the wind --
風が吹いていれば
20:14
and there's tremendous wind now
風が吹いていれば
20:16
that you're going to be feeling -- and you want to go
風に対し垂直もしくは
風下に向かってください
20:18
perpendicular to the wind
風に対し垂直もしくは
風下に向かってください
20:20
[not upwind or downwind].
風に対し垂直もしくは
風下に向かってください
20:22
if you are in fact able to see where the blast was in front of you.
目の前で爆発が見えたなら
そこから逃げる必要があります
20:24
You've got to get out of there.
目の前で爆発が見えたなら
そこから逃げる必要があります
20:27
If you don't get out of there, you're going to be exposed
逃げないと短期間で
致死量の放射能にさらされます
20:29
to lethal radiation in very short order.
逃げないと短期間で
致死量の放射能にさらされます
20:31
If you can't get out of there,
もし逃げられない場合は
シェルターに入ってください
20:33
we want you to go into a shelter and stay there.
もし逃げられない場合は
シェルターに入ってください
20:35
Now, in a shelter in an urban area means
都市のシェルターに入る場合は
できるだけ地下深くにいてください
20:38
you have to be either in a basement as deep as possible,
都市のシェルターに入る場合は
できるだけ地下深くにいてください
20:41
or you have to be on a floor -- on a high floor --
また地表で爆発が起こった場合は
建物の10階以上にいてください
20:44
if it's a ground burst explosion, which it would be,
また地表で爆発が起こった場合は
建物の10階以上にいてください
20:47
higher than the ninth floor. So you have to be tenth floor or higher,
また地表で爆発が起こった場合は
建物の10階以上にいてください
20:50
or in the basement.
また地表で爆発が起こった場合は
建物の10階以上にいてください
20:52
But basically, you've got to get out of town as quickly as possible.
しかし基本的にはできるだけ早く
町から抜け出す必要があります
20:55
And if you do that,
しかし基本的にはできるだけ早く
町から抜け出す必要があります
20:58
you actually can survive a nuclear blast.
そうすれば実際に
核爆発を生き残ることができます
21:00
Over the next few days to a week,
爆発後1週間
放射能の雲ができます
21:04
there will be a radiation cloud,
爆発後1週間
放射能の雲ができます
21:06
again, going with the wind, and settling down
これは風に乗りさらに約30km広がり
ロングアイランドを越えます
21:08
for another 15 or 20 miles out --
これは風に乗りさらに約30km広がり
ロングアイランドを越えます
21:10
in this case, over Long Island.
これは風に乗りさらに約30km広がり
ロングアイランドを越えます
21:12
And if you're in the direct fallout zone here,
もしも放射能の降下地域にいた場合
21:14
you really have to either be sheltered or you have to get out of there,
シェルターに入るか
逃げ出しさえすれば
21:17
and that's clear. But if you are sheltered,
シェルターに入るか
逃げ出しさえすれば
21:19
you can actually survive.
実際に生き残ることができます
21:22
The difference between knowing information
個人が何をすべきかという情報を
知っているかどうかで
21:24
of what you're going to do personally,
個人が何をすべきかという情報を
知っているかどうかで
21:26
and not knowing information, can save your life,
命が左右されます
21:28
and it could mean the difference between
50万~70万人の死者数を
15万~20万人に減らすことができます
21:30
150,000 to 200,000 fatalities
50万~70万人の死者数を
15万~20万人に減らすことができます
21:32
from something like this
50万~70万人の死者数を
15万~20万人に減らすことができます
21:34
and half a million to 700,000 fatalities.
50万~70万人の死者数を
15万~20万人に減らすことができます
21:37
So, response planning in the twenty-first century
だから対応計画は21世紀においても
可能で不可欠なものです
21:40
is both possible and is essential.
だから対応計画は21世紀においても
可能で不可欠なものです
21:43
But in 2008, there isn't one single American city
しかし2008年時点で
核爆発に備えて
21:45
that has done effective plans
有効な計画を立てている都市は
米国には一つもありません
21:49
to deal with a nuclear detonation disaster.
有効な計画を立てている都市は
米国には一つもありません
21:51
Part of the problem is that
この問題の一つは
緊急事態計画を立てる人自身が
21:54
the emergency planners themselves, personally,
この問題の一つは
緊急事態計画を立てる人自身が
21:56
are overwhelmed psychologically by the thought
核の大惨事と言う考えに
心理的に圧倒されていることです
21:58
of nuclear catastrophe.
核の大惨事と言う考えに
心理的に圧倒されていることです
22:00
They are paralyzed.
核の大惨事と言う考えに
心理的に圧倒されていることです
22:02
You say "nuclear" to them, and they're thinking,
核という言葉を出すと 彼らは
「何てことだ 人類は全滅するのか」
22:04
"Oh my God, we're all gone. What's the point? It's futile."
核という言葉を出すと 彼らは
「何てことだ 人類は全滅するのか」
22:06
And we're trying to tell them, "It's not futile.
そんなことはありません
22:09
We can change the survival rates
当たり前のことをすれば
生存率を変えることができます
22:11
by doing some commonsensical things."
当たり前のことをすれば
生存率を変えることができます
22:13
So the goal here is to minimize fatalities.
目標は死亡者数を
最小限に抑えることです
22:16
And I just want to leave you with the personal points
これだけ覚えておいてください
22:19
that I think you might be interested in.
これだけ覚えておいてください
22:21
The key to surviving a nuclear blast
核爆発を生き残るカギは
逃げることです
22:23
is getting out,
核爆発を生き残るカギは
逃げることです
22:25
and not going into harm's way.
安全な場所に行くのです
22:27
That's basically all we're going to be talking about here.
安全な場所に行くのです
22:30
And the farther you are away in distance,
爆発から遠ざかるほど
助かりやすくなります
22:32
the longer it is in time
爆発から遠ざかるほど
助かりやすくなります
22:35
from the initial blast;
爆発から遠ざかるほど
助かりやすくなります
22:37
and the more separation between you
そして外気に触れない方が良いでしょう
22:39
and the outside atmosphere, the better.
そして外気に触れない方が良いでしょう
22:41
So separation -- hopefully with dirt or concrete,
土やコンクリートで仕切りを作るか
地下に移動できるのが望ましいです
22:43
or being in a basement --
土やコンクリートで仕切りを作るか
地下に移動できるのが望ましいです
22:46
distance and time is what will save you.
土やコンクリートで仕切りを作るか
地下に移動できるのが望ましいです
22:48
So here's what you do. First of all,
前に言ったように 出来るだけ
閃光を見つめてはいけません
22:50
as I said, don't stare at the light flash,
前に言ったように 出来るだけ
閃光を見つめてはいけません
22:52
if you can. I don't know you could possibly resist doing that.
見ないかもしれませんが
人は見たくなってしまうものです
22:54
But let's assume, theoretically, you want to do that.
見ないかもしれませんが
人は見たくなってしまうものです
22:56
You want to keep your mouth open, so your eardrums
圧力で鼓膜が破れないように
口を開けてください
22:58
don't burst from the pressures.
圧力で鼓膜が破れないように
口を開けてください
23:00
If you're very close to what happened, you actually do have to duck and cover,
もし爆発付近にいた場合
何かの下に隠れてください
23:03
like Bert told you, Bert the Turtle.
もし爆発付近にいた場合
何かの下に隠れてください
23:06
And you want to get under something so that you're not injured
カメのバート君のように
落下物からは守ることができます
23:08
or killed by objects, if that's at all possible.
カメのバート君のように
落下物からは守ることができます
23:11
You want to get away from the initial fallout mushroom cloud,
きのこ雲からは数分以内に
逃げてください
23:13
I said, in just a few minutes.
きのこ雲からは数分以内に
逃げてください
23:15
And shelter and place. You want to move [only]
風下または垂直に
2km程移動してください
23:17
crosswind for 1.2 miles.
風下または垂直に
2km程移動してください
23:20
You know, if you're out there and you see buildings horribly destroyed
建物がこちらの方向に
倒壊していきます
23:22
and down in that direction,
建物がこちらの方向に
倒壊していきます
23:25
less destroyed here,
ここでは被害が少ない
23:27
then you know that it was over there, the blast, and you're going this way,
爆心地から出来るだけ
風に逆らう方向に移動してください
23:29
as long as you're going crosswise to the wind.
爆心地から出来るだけ
風に逆らう方向に移動してください
23:31
Once you're out and evacuating,
一旦そこから避難したら
23:35
you want to keep as much of your skin,
避難に支障のない程度に
肌や口や鼻はすべてカバーしてください
23:37
your mouth and nose covered, as long as that covering
避難に支障のない程度に
肌や口や鼻はすべてカバーしてください
23:39
doesn't impede you moving and getting out of there.
避難に支障のない程度に
肌や口や鼻はすべてカバーしてください
23:41
And finally, you want to get decontaminated as soon as possible.
そして最後に
除染をできるだけ早くしてください
23:44
And if you're wearing clothing, you've taken off your clothing,
服を脱いでシャワーを浴び
有害な放射能物質を除去してください
23:47
you're going to get showered down some place
服を脱いでシャワーを浴び
有害な放射能物質を除去してください
23:49
and remove the radiation that would be --
服を脱いでシャワーを浴び
有害な放射能物質を除去してください
23:51
the radioactive material that might be on you.
服を脱いでシャワーを浴び
有害な放射能物質を除去してください
23:53
And then you want to stay in shelter for 48 to 72 hours minimum,
そうしたら最低でも48~72 時間は
シェルター内で希望を胸に待ってください
23:56
but you're going to wait hopefully -- you'll have your little wind-up,
そうしたら最低でも48~72 時間は
シェルター内で希望を胸に待ってください
24:00
battery-less radio,
電池不要の手回しラジオがあれば
出ても安全だというアナウンスを待ちましょう
24:02
and you'll be waiting for people to tell you
電池不要の手回しラジオがあれば
出ても安全だというアナウンスを待ちましょう
24:04
when it's safe to go outside. That's what you need to do.
これが私達のすべきことです
24:06
In conclusion,
結論として
24:08
nuclear war is less likely than before,
核戦争の可能性は
24:10
but by no means out of the question, and it's not survivable.
以前より低くなったものの
甘く見てはいけません
24:12
Nuclear terrorism is possible -- it may be probable --
核のテロは起こり得るのです
しかし生き残ることはたぶん可能です
24:15
but is survivable.
核のテロは起こり得るのです
しかし生き残ることはたぶん可能です
24:18
And this is Jack Geiger, who's one of the heroes
彼はジャック・ガイガー
米国公衆衛生界の英雄です
24:20
of the U.S. public health community.
彼はジャック・ガイガー
米国公衆衛生界の英雄です
24:22
And Jack said the only way to deal
彼によると
24:25
with nuclear anything,
核戦争または核テロに
対処する唯一の方法は
24:27
whether it's war or terrorism,
核戦争または核テロに
対処する唯一の方法は
24:29
is abolition of nuclear weapons.
核兵器廃絶だといいます
24:31
And you want something to work on once you've fixed global warming,
一旦地球温暖化が片付いたら
取り組んでほしいことがあります
24:33
I urge you to think about the fact that
一旦地球温暖化が片付いたら
取り組んでほしいことがあります
24:36
we have to do something about this
受け入れがたく
非人道的な核兵器の現実に対し
24:38
unacceptable, inhumane
受け入れがたく
非人道的な核兵器の現実に対し
24:40
reality of nuclear weapons
何かしなければなりません
24:42
in our world.
何かしなければなりません
24:44
Now, this is my favorite civil defense slide, and I --
これはお気に入りの
民間防衛ポスターです(笑)
24:46
(Laughter)
これはお気に入りの
民間防衛ポスターです(笑)
24:48
-- I don't want to be indelicate, but
詳しくは言いませんが
彼はもう退職しているので構いません
24:50
this --
詳しくは言いませんが
彼はもう退職しているので構いません
24:52
he's no longer in office. We don't really care, OK.
詳しくは言いませんが
彼はもう退職しているので構いません
24:54
This was sent to me by somebody
これは民間防衛法の
愛好者から送られてきました
24:57
who is an aficionado of civil defense procedures,
これは民間防衛法の
愛好者から送られてきました
24:59
but the fact of the matter is that
実際問題として米国は
非常に困難な時代を経験してきました
25:02
America's gone through a very hard time.
実際問題として米国は
非常に困難な時代を経験してきました
25:04
We've not been focused, we've not done what we had to do,
私達はすべきことをしてきませんでした
25:06
and now we're facing the potential of
そして現在 地獄を見る
可能性に直面しているのです
25:09
bad, hell on Earth.
そして現在 地獄を見る
可能性に直面しているのです
25:12
Thank you.
ありがとう
25:14
Translated by Hidehito Sumitomo
Reviewed by Tamami Inoue

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Irwin Redlener - Physician, disaster-preparedness activist
Dr. Irwin Redlener spends his days imagining the worst: He studies how humanity might survive natural or human-made disasters of unthinkable severity. He's been an outspoken critic of half-formed government recovery plans (especially after Katrina).

Why you should listen

After 9/11, Irwin Redlener emerged as a powerful voice in disaster medicine -- the discipline of medical care following natural and human-made catastrophes. He was a leading face of the relief effort after hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and is the author of Americans at Risk: Why We Are Not Prepared for Megadisasters and What We Can Do Now. He's the associate dean, professor of Clinical Public Health and director of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health.

His parallel passion is addressing the American disaster that happens every day: millions of kids living without proper health care. He and Paul Simon are the co-founders of the Children's Health Fund, which raises money and awareness toward health care for homeless, neglected and poor children.

More profile about the speaker
Irwin Redlener | Speaker | TED.com