14:05
TED2003

Marvin Minsky: Health and the human mind

マービン・ミンスキーが健康や人間の心について語る

Filmed:

よく聴いて下さい。マービン・ミンスキーが、健康や人口過剰、人間の心について、いたずらっぽく、様々な話題を取り混ぜて、魅力的な即興で語ります。ウイット、英知、ほんの少しのごまかしも。ジョークなのでしょうか。どう思いますか?

- AI pioneer
Marvin Minsky is one of the great pioneers of artificial intelligence -- and using computing metaphors to understand the human mind. His contributions to mathematics, robotics and computational linguistics are legendary and far-reaching. Full bio

If you ask people about what part of psychology do they think is hard,
心理学で難しいのは何かと言われたら 何と答えるでしょう?
00:18
and you say, "Well, what about thinking and emotions?"
思考と感情ではどっちが難しいか?
00:24
Most people will say, "Emotions are terribly hard.
多くの人は言うでしょう 「感情は難しそうだ
00:27
They're incredibly complex. They can't -- I have no idea of how they work.
すごく複雑で どんな仕組みなのか見当も付かない
00:30
But thinking is really very straightforward:
でも思考は 非常に分かりやすいもので
00:36
it's just sort of some kind of logical reasoning, or something.
論理的推論の一種にすぎないと思う
00:38
But that's not the hard part."
そんなに難しくはないと思うな」
00:42
So here's a list of problems that come up.
問題をリストアップしてみました
00:45
One nice problem is, what do we do about health?
考えるべき問題の一つ目は 健康問題をどうすべきか?
00:47
The other day, I was reading something, and the person said
先日 ある記事が目にとまりました
00:50
probably the largest single cause of disease is handshaking in the West.
西洋において 病気の最大の原因はおそらく握手である というのです
00:54
And there was a little study about people who don't handshake,
握手しない人と 握手する人を比較した
01:00
and comparing them with ones who do handshake.
調査結果がありました
01:04
And I haven't the foggiest idea of where you find the ones that don't handshake,
握手をしない人をどこで見つければよいのか 全く分かりませんけど
01:07
because they must be hiding.
隠れていることでしょうから
01:12
And the people who avoid that
握手を避ける人は
01:15
have 30 percent less infectious disease or something.
病気にかかる可能性が30パーセントも低いそうです
01:19
Or maybe it was 31 and a quarter percent.
31と1/4パーセントだったかもしれません
01:23
So if you really want to solve the problem of epidemics and so forth,
だから 本当に病気の蔓延を防ぎたいのであれば
01:26
let's start with that. And since I got that idea,
握手防止から取り組むことです この話を知った後も
01:30
I've had to shake hundreds of hands.
何百回も握手をしなければなりませんでした
01:34
And I think the only way to avoid it
握手を避ける唯一の方法はたぶん 見るもおぞましい
01:38
is to have some horrible visible disease,
病気に罹ることでしょう
01:43
and then you don't have to explain.
説明する必要はなくなります
01:45
Education: how do we improve education?
教育 ― 教育を改善するにはどうすれば良いのでしょう
01:48
Well, the single best way is to get them to understand
最良の方法は 聞いている内容は
01:52
that what they're being told is a whole lot of nonsense.
デタラメだらけだと 分からせることです
01:56
And then, of course, you have to do something
取捨するために
01:59
about how to moderate that, so that anybody can -- so they'll listen to you.
みんな話をよく聞くようになるでしょう
02:01
Pollution, energy shortage, environmental diversity, poverty.
汚染 エネルギー不足 環境多様性 貧困
02:06
How do we make stable societies? Longevity.
どうすれば 安定した社会を作ることができるか?
02:10
Okay, there're lots of problems to worry about.
長寿もそう 考えなければならない問題はたくさんあります
02:14
Anyway, the question I think people should talk about --
しかし本当に議論すべき問題は
02:17
and it's absolutely taboo -- is, how many people should there be?
この話題はタブーなのですが 人口はどのくらいであるべきかということです
02:19
And I think it should be about 100 million or maybe 500 million.
1億人とか 5億人といったところでしょう
02:24
And then notice that a great many of these problems disappear.
そうなれば こういった問題の多くは消えるでしょう
02:31
If you had 100 million people
人口が1億人であり
02:36
properly spread out, then if there's some garbage,
適度に分布していれば ゴミがあっても適当に捨てることができます
02:38
you throw it away, preferably where you can't see it, and it will rot.
見えないどこかへ捨てれば 勝手に腐ってくれるのです
02:44
Or you throw it into the ocean and some fish will benefit from it.
海に捨てたとしても 魚が食べてくれるはずです
02:51
The problem is, how many people should there be?
人口をどれくらいにすべきかが問題です
02:56
And it's a sort of choice we have to make.
ここで選択をしなければなりません
02:58
Most people are about 60 inches high or more,
多くの人は身長が150センチ以上あり
03:01
and there's these cube laws. So if you make them this big,
空間の無駄です もし1/10にできれば
03:04
by using nanotechnology, I suppose --
ナノテクか何かを使うんでしょうが…
03:08
(Laughter)
(笑い)
03:11
-- then you could have a thousand times as many.
人口が千倍になっても大丈夫
03:12
That would solve the problem, but I don't see anybody
問題は解決しますが
03:14
doing any research on making people smaller.
人を小さくする研究というのは聞いたことがありません
03:16
Now, it's nice to reduce the population, but a lot of people want to have children.
人口を減らせれば良いのですが 子供を欲しがる人はたくさんいます
03:19
And there's one solution that's probably only a few years off.
たぶん数年以内に実現可能になる解決方法があります
03:24
You know you have 46 chromosomes. If you're lucky, you've got 23
人間には46の染色体があります 幸運な方は両親から
03:27
from each parent. Sometimes you get an extra one or drop one out,
23ずつ受け継いでいますが 一つ余計だったり不足したりもします
03:32
but -- so you can skip the grandparent and great-grandparent stage
そこで 祖父母や曾祖父母の世代を飛ばして
03:38
and go right to the great-great-grandparent. And you have 46 people
高祖父母の世代に遡りましょう そして46人集めて
03:42
and you give them a scanner, or whatever you need,
スキャナーか何かを渡し
03:47
and they look at their chromosomes and each of them says
好きな染色体を一つ選んでもらえば良いのです
03:50
which one he likes best, or she -- no reason to have just two sexes
性が2つでなければいけない理由はありません
03:54
any more, even. So each child has 46 parents,
それぞれの子供は46人の親を持つことになります
03:59
and I suppose you could let each group of 46 parents have 15 children.
そして46人の親のグループに 15人の子供を持たせることにします
04:04
Wouldn't that be enough? And then the children
十分な数ではないでしょうか?
04:10
would get plenty of support, and nurturing, and mentoring,
子供たちは十分な支援と保護を受けて育つことができ
04:12
and the world population would decline very rapidly
世界の人口も急激に減少するでしょう
04:16
and everybody would be totally happy.
誰もが幸せになることができるのです
04:18
Timesharing is a little further off in the future.
タイムシェアリングはもう少し先の話です
04:21
And there's this great novel that Arthur Clarke wrote twice,
アーサー C クラークが2度 素晴らしい小説を書いています
04:24
called "Against the Fall of Night" and "The City and the Stars."
「銀河帝国の崩壊」と「都市と星」です
04:27
They're both wonderful and largely the same,
どちらも素晴らしい作品で ストーリーはほぼ同じですが
04:31
except that computers happened in between.
コンピュータ誕生の前後という違いがあります
04:34
And Arthur was looking at this old book, and he said, "Well, that was wrong.
アーサーは前の作品を見て それが間違いだと思いました
04:36
The future must have some computers."
未来にはコンピュータが存在するはずだと
04:41
So in the second version of it, there are 100 billion
二つ目の作品では 地球は1000億だか1兆だかの人口があるのですが
04:43
or 1,000 billion people on Earth, but they're all stored on hard disks or floppies,
みんなハードディスクやフロッピーの
04:48
or whatever they have in the future.
未来版の中に格納されています
04:56
And you let a few million of them out at a time.
同時に外に出られるのは数百万人
04:58
A person comes out, they live for a thousand years
いったん外に出ると 一千年間生き続けます
05:02
doing whatever they do, and then, when it's time to go back
やりたいことをやり 時が来たらディスクに戻って
05:06
for a billion years -- or a million, I forget, the numbers don't matter --
何万年とか何億年という時を過ごします  数字は問題ではありません
05:12
but there really aren't very many people on Earth at a time.
いずれにせよ 同時に地上に存在する人間の数は多くはないのです
05:16
And you get to think about yourself and your memories,
そして 自分自身や記憶を検討し
05:20
and before you go back into suspension, you edit your memories
休止状態に戻る前に 自分の記憶を編集し
05:22
and you change your personality and so forth.
人格などを修正してしまうこともできるのです
05:27
The plot of the book is that there's not enough diversity,
このままでは十分な多様性が確保できませんから
05:30
so that the people who designed the city
この都市の設計者たちは
05:36
make sure that every now and then an entirely new person is created.
時々 新しい人が生まれてくるようにしています
05:39
And in the novel, a particular one named Alvin is created. And he says,
やがて生まれたアルビンという人物が これは正しい方法ではないと考え
05:43
maybe this isn't the best way, and wrecks the whole system.
システムを全て破壊してしまうのです
05:49
I don't think the solutions that I proposed
ご紹介した解決法が
05:53
are good enough or smart enough.
優れているとか 賢明なものだとは思いません
05:55
I think the big problem is that we're not smart enough
大きな問題は 直面する問題のうちどれを解決すべきか
05:58
to understand which of the problems we're facing are good enough.
理解できるほど 我々が賢くないということです
06:02
Therefore, we have to build super intelligent machines like HAL.
そこで我々はHALのような超知性マシンを建設せねばなりません
06:06
As you remember, at some point in the book for "2001,"
ご存じでしょう 「2001年宇宙の旅」の中で
06:10
HAL realizes that the universe is too big, and grand, and profound
HALは 宇宙が非常に大きく 壮大かつ深淵で
06:15
for those really stupid astronauts. If you contrast HAL's behavior
頭の悪い宇宙飛行士には理解できないことを悟ります
06:20
with the triviality of the people on the spaceship,
HALの行動と 宇宙船に乗る人間の取るに足りない行動を比較すれば
06:24
you can see what's written between the lines.
著者の言わんとすることが分かると思います
06:28
Well, what are we going to do about that? We could get smarter.
どうすれば良いのでしょう? 我々は賢明になることができます
06:31
I think that we're pretty smart, as compared to chimpanzees,
チンパンジーと比べれば 結構賢いと言えるでしょう
06:34
but we're not smart enough to deal with the colossal problems that we face,
しかし直面する巨大な問題に対応するには十分ではありません
06:39
either in abstract mathematics
理論数学においても
06:45
or in figuring out economies, or balancing the world around.
経済学的な問題においても 世界のバランスを取ることにしてもです
06:47
So one thing we can do is live longer.
出来ることとして 長生きするということがあります
06:52
And nobody knows how hard that is,
どのくらい困難なことかは分かりませんが
06:55
but we'll probably find out in a few years.
数年後にはなんとかなるのではないでしょうか
06:57
You see, there's two forks in the road. We know that people live
ここに分かれ道があります
07:00
twice as long as chimpanzees almost,
人の寿命はチンパンジーの約2倍ですが
07:03
and nobody lives more than 120 years,
120歳以上長生きする人はほとんどいません
07:07
for reasons that aren't very well understood.
その理由はよく分っていません
07:11
But lots of people now live to 90 or 100,
しかし 90歳や100歳まで長生きする人はたくさんいます
07:14
unless they shake hands too much or something like that.
握手みたいな危険な行為を避けていれば
07:17
And so maybe if we lived 200 years, we could accumulate enough skills
もし人が200歳まで生きることができれば
07:21
and knowledge to solve some problems.
問題解決に必要な技術や知識を蓄積することができるかもしれません
07:26
So that's one way of going about it.
これも一つの方法ではないでしょうか
07:31
And as I said, we don't know how hard that is. It might be --
どの程度難しいことなのか分かりません
07:33
after all, most other mammals live half as long as the chimpanzee,
そう ほとんどの哺乳類はチンパンジーの半分の寿命しかありません
07:36
so we're sort of three and a half or four times, have four times
確かに ヒトは哺乳類の多くよりも3.5倍から4倍も
07:42
the longevity of most mammals. And in the case of the primates,
長生きです でも 霊長類に関して言えば 遺伝子はほとんど同じです
07:45
we have almost the same genes. We only differ from chimpanzees,
人間とチンパンジーの遺伝子の違いは
07:51
in the present state of knowledge, which is absolute hogwash,
現在の知識によれば…これはクズみたいなものですが…
07:55
maybe by just a few hundred genes.
たった数百個にすぎないらしいのです
08:01
What I think is that the gene counters don't know what they're doing yet.
遺伝学者は いまだ自分で何をやっているのか分かってないのです
08:03
And whatever you do, don't read anything about genetics
遺伝学については何も読むべきではないと思います
08:06
that's published within your lifetime, or something.
皆さんが生きている間に発表される遺伝学に関しては
08:09
(Laughter)
(笑い)
08:12
The stuff has a very short half-life, same with brain science.
遺伝子研究は 脳科学同様 移り変わりがとても速いのです
08:15
And so it might be that if we just fix four or five genes,
4つか5つの遺伝子を修正すれば
08:19
we can live 200 years.
人は200歳まで生きられるかもしれません
08:25
Or it might be that it's just 30 or 40,
30とか40かもしれませんが
08:27
and I doubt that it's several hundred.
数百には ならないでしょう
08:30
So this is something that people will be discussing
これは大いに議論されることでしょう
08:32
and lots of ethicists -- you know, an ethicist is somebody
倫理学者…つまり私達が何を考えようと
08:36
who sees something wrong with whatever you have in mind.
悪い点を見つけ出す人たちのことですが
08:39
(Laughter)
(笑い)
08:42
And it's very hard to find an ethicist who considers any change
どんな変化であれ倫理学者は やる価値を認めません
08:45
worth making, because he says, what about the consequences?
どんな結果をもたらすかわからないと言うのです
08:49
And, of course, we're not responsible for the consequences
もちろん 我々は今でも結果に対する責任を負ってはいません
08:53
of what we're doing now, are we? Like all this complaint about clones.
クローンに対する抵抗と同じです
08:56
And yet two random people will mate and have this child,
偶然出会った二人が子供をつくります
09:02
and both of them have some pretty rotten genes,
どちらにも良くない遺伝子が少しあります
09:05
and the child is likely to come out to be average.
生まれてくるのは 平均的な子供になることでしょう
09:09
Which, by chimpanzee standards, is very good indeed.
チンパンジーの基準で言えば非常に優秀な子供です
09:13
If we do have longevity, then we'll have to face the population growth
人の寿命が延びれば 人口増加の問題に直面することになります
09:19
problem anyway. Because if people live 200 or 1,000 years,
なぜなら 人の寿命が200歳とか1,000歳になったとき
09:22
then we can't let them have a child more than about once every 200 or 1,000 years.
その生涯に一人しか子供を持たせることができないのです
09:26
And so there won't be any workforce.
そうすると 労働力が無くなります
09:32
And one of the things Laurie Garrett pointed out, and others have,
ローリー ギャレットが指摘したように
09:35
is that a society that doesn't have people
労働年齢の世代が存在しない社会は
09:39
of working age is in real trouble. And things are going to get worse,
本当に悲惨な状態になります 様々なことが悪化するでしょう
09:44
because there's nobody to educate the children or to feed the old.
子供を教育する人も 高齢者の面倒をみる人もいないのですから
09:47
And when I'm talking about a long lifetime, of course,
長寿について話をしていますが もちろん
09:53
I don't want somebody who's 200 years old to be like our image
200歳と言っても我々が今想像するような200歳ではありません
09:55
of what a 200-year-old is -- which is dead, actually.
200歳というのは 普通は死んでしまっていますけどね
10:01
You know, there's about 400 different parts of the brain
脳は400のパーツから構成されていますが
10:05
which seem to have different functions.
それぞれに固有の機能があるようです
10:07
Nobody knows how most of them work in detail,
詳細はよく分かっていません
10:09
but we do know that there're lots of different things in there.
しかし 様々なものが存在していることは分かっています
10:12
And they don't always work together. I like Freud's theory
全てが常に協調して働く訳ではありません
10:16
that most of them are cancelling each other out.
打ち消す働きが大半であるというフロイトの理論もあります
10:18
And so if you think of yourself as a sort of city
自分を百のリソースを持つ都市だと考えてみてください
10:22
with a hundred resources, then, when you're afraid, for example,
恐怖に直面したとき
10:26
you may discard your long-range goals, but you may think deeply
長期的な目標は諦めて 直面する恐怖を解決することだけに
10:32
and focus on exactly how to achieve that particular goal.
集中することになることでしょう
10:36
You throw everything else away. You become a monomaniac --
それ以外は一切行わなくなり 偏執狂となります
10:40
all you care about is not stepping out on that platform.
その枠からはみ出さないようにすることだけが大切になります
10:43
And when you're hungry, food becomes more attractive, and so forth.
例えば お腹がすくと 食べ物はより魅力的になります
10:47
So I see emotions as highly evolved subsets of your capability.
感情というのは能力のサブセットが高度に発達したものなのです
10:51
Emotion is not something added to thought. An emotional state
感情は思考に何かが追加されたものではありません
10:57
is what you get when you remove 100 or 200
感情的状態というのは 通常利用可能なリソースが
11:01
of your normally available resources.
100個とか200個取り除かれた状態なのです
11:05
So thinking of emotions as the opposite of -- as something
感情を逆に 思考以下のものと捉えるなら
11:08
less than thinking is immensely productive. And I hope,
非常に生産的になります 今後数年で
11:11
in the next few years, to show that this will lead to smart machines.
それが知的なマシンにつながることを示せたらと思います
11:15
And I guess I better skip all the rest of this, which are some details
残りの部分はスキップします
11:19
on how we might make those smart machines and --
その知的なマシンをどうやって作るかという話なんですが…
11:22
(Laughter)
(笑い)
11:27
-- and the main idea is in fact that the core of a really smart machine
中心になるアイデアは 本当に知的なマシンの核になるのは
11:32
is one that recognizes that a certain kind of problem is facing you.
ある種の問題に直面していると認識するということです
11:37
This is a problem of such and such a type,
これはしかじかのタイプの問題だから
11:42
and therefore there's a certain way or ways of thinking
この問題にはこういうアプローチが有効だと
11:45
that are good for that problem.
判断するということです
11:50
So I think the future, main problem of psychology is to classify
将来の心理学の主要な課題は 状況や障害のタイプを分類し
11:52
types of predicaments, types of situations, types of obstacles
そして利用可能な手段も分類して
11:56
and also to classify available and possible ways to think and pair them up.
その組み合わせを考えるということだと思います
12:00
So you see, it's almost like a Pavlovian --
パブロフの条件反射のようなものです
12:06
we lost the first hundred years of psychology
心理学は最初の百年を
12:09
by really trivial theories, where you say,
人は状況への反応をどう学習するのかという
12:11
how do people learn how to react to a situation? What I'm saying is,
つまらない理論によって失いました 私が言っているのは
12:14
after we go through a lot of levels, including designing
何千の部品からなる乱雑な巨大システムも設計し
12:20
a huge, messy system with thousands of ports,
多くの段階を通過した我々は
12:25
we'll end up again with the central problem of psychology.
心理学の中心的問題に直面することになるということです
12:28
Saying, not what are the situations,
問うべきは状況が何かではなく
12:32
but what are the kinds of problems
問題の種類は何か
12:35
and what are the kinds of strategies, how do you learn them,
戦略の種類は何か それをどう学び どう繋ぎ合わせるのか
12:37
how do you connect them up, how does a really creative person
本当に創造的な人間は 利用可能なリソースから
12:40
invent a new way of thinking out of the available resources and so forth.
新しい思考法をどう考え出すのか といったことなのです
12:43
So, I think in the next 20 years,
今後の20年間で
12:48
if we can get rid of all of the traditional approaches to artificial intelligence,
ニューラルネットや遺伝的アルゴリズム それにルールベースのシステムなど
12:50
like neural nets and genetic algorithms
人工知能への従来のアプローチを脱却できればと思います
12:55
and rule-based systems, and just turn our sights a little bit higher to say,
そして視点を少しばかり高くして 問題に合ったやり方ができるよう
12:57
can we make a system that can use all those things
これらのものを全部使うシステムを作りたいと思います
13:03
for the right kind of problem? Some problems are good for neural nets;
ニューラルネットに向いた問題もあります
13:05
we know that others, neural nets are hopeless on them.
しかし中には ニューラルネットでは絶望的な問題もあります
13:09
Genetic algorithms are great for certain things;
遺伝的アルゴリズムも特定の問題には有効です
13:12
I suspect I know what they're bad at, and I won't tell you.
弱点は分かっていますが お伝えするのは止めておきましょう
13:15
(Laughter)
(笑い)
13:19
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
13:20
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:22
Translated by Kazuyuki Shimatani
Reviewed by Yasushi Aoki

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Marvin Minsky - AI pioneer
Marvin Minsky is one of the great pioneers of artificial intelligence -- and using computing metaphors to understand the human mind. His contributions to mathematics, robotics and computational linguistics are legendary and far-reaching.

Why you should listen

Marvin Minsky is the superstar-elder of artificial intelligence, one of the most productive and important cognitive scientists of the century, and the leading proponent of the Society of Mind theory. Articulated in his 1985 book of the same name, Minsky's theory says intelligence is not born of any single mechanism, but from the interaction of many independent agents. The book's sequel,The Emotion Machine (2006), says similar activity also accounts for feelings, goals, emotions and conscious thoughts.

Minsky also pioneered advances in mathematics, computational linguistics, optics, robotics and telepresence. He built SNARC, the first neural network simulator, some of the first visual scanners, and the first LOGO "turtle." From his headquarters at MIT's Media Lab and the AI Lab (which he helped found), he continues to work on, as he says, "imparting to machines the human capacity for commonsense reasoning."

More profile about the speaker
Marvin Minsky | Speaker | TED.com