20:14
TED2003

Rodney Brooks: Robots will invade our lives

ロドニー・ブルックス「ロボットは我々の生活を侵略する」

Filmed:

2003年のこの予言的な講話において、ロボット研究者であるロドニー・ブルックスは、玩具から家事、そしてその先に至るまで、ロボットがどのように我々の生活において役割を果たして行くかを述べています。

- Roboticist
Rodney Brooks builds robots based on biological principles of movement and reasoning. The goal: a robot who can figure things out. Full bio

What I want to tell you about today is how I see robots invading our lives
本日お話ししたいのは
様々なレベルや時間尺度おいて
00:18
at multiple levels, over multiple timescales.
ロボットが私たちの生活を
侵略していることついての私見です
00:23
And when I look out in the future, I can't imagine a world, 500 years from now,
今から500年後の未来を考えると
00:26
where we don't have robots everywhere.
至る所にロボットが存在する
世界しか想像できません
00:30
Assuming -- despite all the dire predictions from many people about our future --
人類の運命に関する
悲観的な予測は別として
00:32
assuming we're still around, I can't imagine the world not being populated with robots.
我々がこの世に存在しているとすれば
ロボットもたくさんいるはずです
00:37
And then the question is, well, if they're going to be here in 500 years,
疑問は500年後に
この様に存在するであろうロボットが
00:41
are they going to be everywhere sooner than that?
それ以前に
至る所に存在するようになるか
00:44
Are they going to be around in 50 years?
50年後にでも
既にそうなるかということです
00:46
Yeah, I think that's pretty likely -- there's going to be lots of robots everywhere.
十分にありえると思います
ロボットはそこらじゅうに存在し
00:48
And in fact I think that's going to be a lot sooner than that.
実際 もっと早い時期に
そうなると考えています
00:51
I think we're sort of on the cusp of robots becoming common,
現在はロボット普及の
「幕開け」であるとも言えます
00:54
and I think we're sort of around 1978 or 1980 in personal computer years,
丁度 1978年から1980年あたりの
パソコンがそうであったように
00:58
where the first few robots are starting to appear.
ロボットが徐々に登場し始めると
思っています
01:04
Computers sort of came around through games and toys.
コンピューターは はじめ
ゲームや玩具を通してやってきました
01:07
And you know, the first computer most people had in the house
家庭に一番先にやってきたのは
01:11
may have been a computer to play Pong,
「Pong」が遊べる
コンピューターだったかもしれません
01:14
a little microprocessor embedded,
小さなマイクロプロセッサー内蔵のものです
01:16
and then other games that came after that.
他のゲームも次々に登場しました
01:18
And we're starting to see that same sort of thing with robots:
ロボットでも同じような事が
起こっています
01:21
LEGO Mindstorms, Furbies -- who here -- did anyone here have a Furby?
LEGOマインドストームやファービー
ファービーを持っていた人は?
01:24
Yeah, there's 38 million of them sold worldwide.
いますね
全世界で3800万個も売れました
01:28
They are pretty common. And they're a little tiny robot,
結構 流行っていました
これは とても小さな
01:31
a simple robot with some sensors,
センサー数個の シンプルなロボットで
01:33
a little bit of processing actuation.
ちょっとした情報処理や動きをします
01:35
On the right there is another robot doll, who you could get a couple of years ago.
右側は数年前に売られていた
別の人形ロボットです
01:37
And just as in the early days,
コンピューターの初期
01:40
when there was a lot of sort of amateur interaction over computers,
マニアの人たちが
コンピューターをいじっていた頃のように
01:42
you can now get various hacking kits, how-to-hack books.
様々なハッキング・キットや本も売っています
01:47
And on the left there is a platform from Evolution Robotics,
左側はEvolution Robotics社の
プラットフォームです
01:51
where you put a PC on, and you program this thing with a GUI
PCをのせGUIでプログラムし
01:55
to wander around your house and do various stuff.
家の中をウロウロさせて
いろんな事ができます
01:58
And then there's a higher price point sort of robot toys --
もっと高額な
ロボット玩具のようなものもあって
02:01
the Sony Aibo. And on the right there, is one that the NEC developed,
ソニーのアイボ
右側はNECの開発した
02:04
the PaPeRo, which I don't think they're going to release.
PaPeRoです
発売はされないと思いますが
02:08
But nevertheless, those sorts of things are out there.
でも こういったものが存在しています
02:11
And we've seen, over the last two or three years, lawn-mowing robots,
ここ数年 芝刈りロボットも出てきました
02:14
Husqvarna on the bottom, Friendly Robotics on top there, an Israeli company.
下はHusqvarna社製
上はイスラエルのFriendly Robotics社製
02:18
And then in the last 12 months or so
そして 昨年あたりから
02:24
we've started to see a bunch of home-cleaning robots appear.
たくさんの 家庭用掃除ロボットを
見るようになりました
02:26
The top left one is a very nice home-cleaning robot
左上は とても素晴らしい
家庭用掃除ロボットで
02:30
from a company called Dyson, in the U.K. Except it was so expensive --
イギリスのDyson社製です
ただ とても高額で
02:33
3,500 dollars -- they didn't release it.
3,500ドルです
市場には出ませんでしたが
02:37
But at the bottom left, you see Electrolux, which is on sale.
でも左下のElectrolux社製のものは
販売されています
02:39
Another one from Karcher.
Karcher社製の また別のものもあって
02:42
At the bottom right is one that I built in my lab
右下は 私の研究室で
02:44
about 10 years ago, and we finally turned that into a product.
10年ほど前に作ったもので
最近製品化されました
02:46
And let me just show you that.
これをお見せしましょう
02:49
We're going to give this away I think, Chris said, after the talk.
後でこれは誰かに差し上げるとか
クリスは言っています
02:51
This is a robot that you can go out and buy, and that will clean up your floor.
これは皆さんも購入できるロボットで
床を掃除します
02:55
And it starts off sort of just going around in ever-increasing circles.
だんだん円を大きく描きながら動き
03:05
If it hits something -- you people see that?
何かにぶつかると…見えました?
03:10
Now it's doing wall-following, it's following around my feet
壁に沿って移動したり
私の足に沿って
03:14
to clean up around me. Let's see, let's --
周りを掃除してくれています
ではここで...
03:17
oh, who stole my Rice Krispies? They stole my Rice Krispies!
あれ?誰か僕のシリアルを盗みました?
シリアルが盗まれてしまいました!
03:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:26
Don't worry, relax, no, relax, it's a robot, it's smart!
心配しないで 大丈夫ですよ
ロボットだから賢いんです!
03:32
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:35
See, the three-year-old kids, they don't worry about it.
3歳の子供は心配しないんですよね
03:38
It's grown-ups that get really upset.
大人だけが取り乱すんです
03:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:44
We'll just put some crap here.
では「ゴミ」を少しここに置いて
03:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:47
Okay.
はい
03:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:53
I don't know if you see -- so, I put a bunch of Rice Krispies there,
見えにくいですが
ここにたくさんシリアルを置きました
03:57
I put some pennies, let's just shoot it at that, see if it cleans up.
硬貨もいくつか置いて あれに向かって
動かしてみましょう 掃除するかどうか
04:00
Yeah, OK. So --
はい 大丈夫ですね では…
04:10
we'll leave that for later.
これはひとまず置いておきましょう
04:12
(Applause)
(拍手)
04:16
Part of the trick was building a better cleaning mechanism, actually;
難しかったのは 良い掃除メカニズムの
デザインでした
04:22
the intelligence on board was fairly simple.
中の頭脳はかなり単純なものです
04:26
And that's true with a lot of robots.
概してこれは他のロボットでも同じです
04:30
We've all, I think, become, sort of computational chauvinists,
私たちはある意味で
コンピュータ優位論者であるようで
04:32
and think that computation is everything,
コンピュータ処理が全てと考えがちです
04:36
but the mechanics still matter.
でも 機械部も大切なんです
04:38
Here's another robot, the PackBot,
これは 別のロボット
PacBotというもので
04:40
that we've been building for a bunch of years.
ここ何年も作っているものです
04:43
It's a military surveillance robot, to go in ahead of troops --
軍事用の偵察ロボットで
兵隊に先立って
04:45
looking at caves, for instance.
例えば 洞窟を偵察したりするものですが
04:51
But we had to make it fairly robust,
かなり頑丈に作る必要がありました
04:54
much more robust than the robots we build in our labs.
研究室で普段作るロボットよりも
かなり頑丈にね
04:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:03
On board that robot is a PC running Linux.
ロボットの頭脳はLinux搭載のPCでして
05:12
It can withstand a 400G shock. The robot has local intelligence:
400Gの衝撃に耐えることができます
ロボット自身が知能を持っていて
05:16
it can flip itself over, can get itself into communication range,
自分を反転させたり 通信域に移動したり
05:22
can go upstairs by itself, et cetera.
自力で階段を昇ったりすることなどができます
05:28
Okay, so it's doing local navigation there.
ここでは 現場でのナビゲーションを
行っています
05:38
A soldier gives it a command to go upstairs, and it does.
兵士が階段を昇る指令を出すと
それに従います
05:42
That was not a controlled descent.
今のは意図的な落下ではありませんが…
05:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:52
Now it's going to head off.
今度は回避します
05:54
And the big breakthrough for these robots, really, was September 11th.
これらのロボットの大きな転換点は
9・11の多発テロでした
05:56
We had the robots down at the World Trade Center late that evening.
あの夜遅く ワールドトレードセンターに
出動させましたが
06:01
Couldn't do a lot in the main rubble pile,
中心の瓦礫の山では
大したことは出来ませんでした
06:06
things were just too -- there was nothing left to do.
全てがとても…
できることはありませんでした
06:08
But we did go into all the surrounding buildings that had been evacuated,
しかし 避難済みの周囲の建物に
全て入って行って
06:11
and searched for possible survivors in the buildings
危険すぎて入ることができない建物の中で
06:16
that were too dangerous to go into.
生存者の探索を行うことができました
06:19
Let's run this video.
この映像をご覧ください
06:21
Reporter: ...battlefield companions are helping to reduce the combat risks.
戦場の友が
戦闘リスクの軽減に役立っています
06:23
Nick Robertson has that story.
ニック・ロバートソンの報告です
06:26
Rodney Brooks: Can we have another one of these?
ロドニー:これをもうひとつもらえますか?
06:31
Okay, good.
ありがとう
06:38
So, this is a corporal who had seen a robot two weeks previously.
これは2週間前に
ロボットをはじめて見た伍長です
06:43
He's sending robots into caves, looking at what's going on.
ロボットを洞窟に送り込み
状況を確認しています
06:48
The robot's being totally autonomous.
ロボットは完全に自律して動きます
06:52
The worst thing that's happened in the cave so far
過去 洞窟内で起きた最悪の出来事は
06:54
was one of the robots fell down ten meters.
ロボットの1つが10m落下したことでした
06:58
So one year ago, the US military didn't have these robots.
米軍がこの様なロボットを
使うようになって まだ一年ですが
07:08
Now they're on active duty in Afghanistan every day.
現在アフガニスタンで
毎日のように活躍しています
07:11
And that's one of the reasons they say a robot invasion is happening.
ロボットの侵略が起きていると
言われる理由のひとつです
07:13
There's a sea change happening in how -- where technology's going.
テクノロジーの未来もどんどん
変わって来ています
07:16
Thanks.
ありがとう
07:20
And over the next couple of months,
数ヶ月先には
07:23
we're going to be sending robots in production
私達はロボットを油田に送り出し
07:25
down producing oil wells to get that last few years of oil out of the ground.
地中に残った数年分の石油を取り出すために
地下産出を行う予定です
07:28
Very hostile environments, 150˚ C, 10,000 PSI.
150℃ 圧力も10,000psiという
とても過酷な環境です
07:32
Autonomous robots going down, doing this sort of work.
自律型ロボットが地中に潜り
この種の仕事を行うのです
07:36
But robots like this, they're a little hard to program.
しかし このようなロボットの制御は多少難しく
07:40
How, in the future, are we going to program our robots
将来 どの様にプログラムし
07:43
and make them easier to use?
ロボットを使いやすくするかが
課題になります
07:45
And I want to actually use a robot here --
ここで 実際にロボットを見てみましょう
07:47
a robot named Chris -- stand up. Yeah. Okay.
クリスという名前のロボットです
立ち上がって はい OK
07:50
Come over here. Now notice, he thinks robots have to be a bit stiff.
こっちへ来て ロボットだから 堅苦しく
しなくてはと思っているようですね
07:57
He sort of does that. But I'm going to --
そんな風に見えますが
ここで...
08:01
Chris Anderson: I'm just British. RB: Oh.
単にイギリス人だからですよ
なるほど
08:04
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:06
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:08
I'm going to show this robot a task. It's a very complex task.
このロボットにタスク(作業)を見せます
とても複雑なタスクです
08:10
Now notice, he nodded there, he was giving me some indication
頷きましたね
ここで何かを私に伝えているわけです
08:13
he was understanding the flow of communication.
コミュニケーションの流れを
理解したのだとわかります
08:16
And if I'd said something completely bizarre
私が突拍子もないことを言ったとすると
08:19
he would have looked askance at me, and regulated the conversation.
顔をしかめて
会話を調整したでしょう
08:21
So now I brought this up in front of him.
ここで これを彼の前にかざしてみます
08:24
I'd looked at his eyes, and I saw his eyes looked at this bottle top.
彼の目を見て ボトルの頭を見たと
確認します
08:27
And I'm doing this task here, and he's checking up.
そしてここでタスクを行い
彼はそれを見ています
08:31
His eyes are going back and forth up to me, to see what I'm looking at --
彼は 私の目と 私の見ているものを
交互に見ています
08:33
so we've got shared attention.
つまり 注意を共有しているわけです
08:36
And so I do this task, and he looks, and he looks to me
タスクを置こうなうと
それ見ると同時に 私のことも見て
08:38
to see what's happening next. And now I'll give him the bottle,
次に何が起こるか理解しようとしています
ここでボトルを渡します
08:41
and we'll see if he can do the task. Can you do that?
ここでタスクができるでしょうか
できますか?
08:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:47
Okay. He's pretty good. Yeah. Good, good, good.
OK 上手ですね
はい 上手 上手
08:50
I didn't show you how to do that.
それは教えてないよ
08:54
Now see if you can put it back together.
では 元に戻せるか見てみましょう
08:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:58
And he thinks a robot has to be really slow.
ロボットはゆっくり動くと
思っているみたいですね
09:00
Good robot, that's good.
いいロボットだ よくできました
09:01
So we saw a bunch of things there.
さあ これでいろいろ解りました
09:03
We saw when we're interacting,
相互のやりとりでは
09:06
we're trying to show someone how to do something, we direct their visual attention.
何かやり方を見せるとき
相手の視線の注意を引きます
09:09
The other thing communicates their internal state to us,
相手は自分の状態を伝え
09:13
whether he's understanding or not, regulates a social interaction.
理解したかどうかとか
対話を調整します
09:17
There was shared attention looking at the same sort of thing,
同じものを見ることで
注意が共有され
09:20
and recognizing socially communicated reinforcement at the end.
最後には対話で
褒められたのを認識するのもわかりました
09:22
And we've been trying to put that into our lab robots
現在 これを研究室のロボットに
取り入れようとしています
09:26
because we think this is how you're going to want to interact with robots in the future.
これが将来ロボットとやりとりする
望ましい方法だと思います
09:29
I just want to show you one technical diagram here.
ここで技術的な図をひとつお見せします
09:33
The most important thing for building a robot that you can interact with socially
対話できるロボットをつくる上で最も重要なのが
09:35
is its visual attention system.
視覚的な注意喚起システムです
09:39
Because what it pays attention to is what it's seeing
なぜなら 注意を払っている対象は
それが見たり
09:41
and interacting with, and what you're understanding what it's doing.
関連している対象であり
ロボットの行動を理解するものだからです
09:44
So in the videos I'm about to show you,
今からお見せする映像では
09:47
you're going to see a visual attention system on a robot
ロボットの視覚的な注意喚起システムを
ご覧いただきます
09:50
which has -- it looks for skin tone in HSV space,
これは…HSV色空間で
肌色を探すので
09:54
so it works across all human colorings.
全ての人種の色に対応していてます
09:58
It looks for highly saturated colors, from toys.
玩具の鮮やかなを見つけ出したり
10:02
And it looks for things that move around.
動くものを探します
10:04
And it weights those together into an attention window,
それらを視野の中で比較し
10:06
and it looks for the highest-scoring place --
最も高いスコアの箇所を見つけます
10:09
the stuff where the most interesting stuff is happening --
最も興味深い出来事が起きている箇所に
10:11
and that is what its eyes then segue to.
そして そこに目をすみやかに移し
10:13
And it looks right at that.
それを注視します
10:17
At the same time, some top-down sort of stuff:
同時に トップダウン的に
10:19
might decide that it's lonely and look for skin tone,
寂しいので 肌色を探そうと判断したり
10:22
or might decide that it's bored and look for a toy to play with.
退屈なので 遊ぶための玩具を
探そうと判断したりするので
10:25
And so these weights change.
ウエイトがかわります
10:28
And over here on the right,
そして この右側は
10:30
this is what we call the Steven Spielberg memorial module.
私達がスティーブン・スピルバーグの
記念モジュールと呼ぶ…
10:32
Did people see the movie "AI"? (Audience: Yes.)
「AI」という映画をご覧になりました?
(観客:はい)
10:35
RB: Yeah, it was really bad, but --
ひどい映画でしたが
10:37
remember, especially when Haley Joel Osment, the little robot,
特に ハーレイ・ジョエル・オスメントの扮した
小さなロボットが
10:39
looked at the blue fairy for 2,000 years without taking his eyes off it?
ひと時も目を離さずに 青い妖精を
2000年もの間 見続けたのも
10:43
Well, this gets rid of that,
これは それに対処する答えです
10:47
because this is a habituation Gaussian that gets negative,
なぜなら これは負に作用する
ガウス的な馴化でありまして
10:49
and more and more intense as it looks at one thing.
一つのものを見続けると
10:53
And it gets bored, so it will then look away at something else.
結果的に 飽きてしまい
何か他のものを見るようになります
10:56
So, once you've got that -- and here's a robot, here's Kismet,
簡単な説明でしたが
これがロボットの Kismetです
10:59
looking around for a toy. You can tell what it's looking at.
おもちゃを探しています
何を見ているかわかりますね
11:03
You can estimate its gaze direction from those eyeballs covering its camera,
カメラを覆っている目玉から
目線の方向を推測できます
11:07
and you can tell when it's actually seeing the toy.
おもちゃを見つける様子が
わかります
11:12
And it's got a little bit of an emotional response here.
ちょっと感情的な反応を示しましたね
11:15
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:17
But it's still going to pay attention
しかし 注意は継続しています
11:18
if something more significant comes into its field of view --
もし もっと面白いものが視野に入れば
11:20
such as Cynthia Breazeal, the builder of this robot, from the right.
例えば右にいる このロボットの
生みの親であるシンシア・ブリジールなどに
11:24
It sees her, pays attention to her.
気づくと そちらに注意を払います
11:28
Kismet has an underlying, three-dimensional emotional space,
Kismetは内的な3次元の感情空間を持っていて
11:33
a vector space, of where it is emotionally.
それは感情の位置を示すベクトル空間で
11:37
And at different places in that space, it expresses --
その空間のどこにいるかを表現します
11:40
can we have the volume on here?
音声を出してもらえますか?
11:46
Can you hear that now, out there? (Audience: Yeah.)
聞こえますか?(観客:はい)
11:48
Kismet: Do you really think so? Do you really think so?
本当にそう思う?本当にそう思う?
11:50
Do you really think so?
本当にそう思う?
11:57
RB: So it's expressing its emotion through its face
表情と声の調子を通して
12:00
and the prosody in its voice.
感情を表現するのです
12:03
And when I was dealing with my robot over here,
ここで私がロボットとやりとりしていた際
12:05
Chris, the robot, was measuring the prosody in my voice,
ロボットのクリスが私の声の調子を
測っていたように
12:09
and so we have the robot measure prosody for four basic messages
声の調子で表現される
4種の基本メッセージを測るようにしました
12:12
that mothers give their children pre-linguistically.
これは言葉以前に
母親が子供に伝えるものです
12:17
Here we've got naive subjects praising the robot:
ここでは事前情報のない被験者が
ロボットを褒めています
12:21
Voice: Nice robot.
いいロボットね
12:26
You're such a cute little robot.
小さくてかわいいロボットね
12:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:31
RB: And the robot's reacting appropriately.
そして ロボットは適切に反応しています
12:33
Voice: ...very good, Kismet.
よくできたわ Kismet
12:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:40
Voice: Look at my smile.
私の笑顔を見て
12:42
RB: It smiles. She imitates the smile. This happens a lot.
笑顔になります 笑顔を真似するんです
これは頻繁に起こります
12:46
These are naive subjects.
これらは事前情報のない被験者です
12:49
Here we asked them to get the robot's attention
ロボットの気を引いて
12:51
and indicate when they have the robot's attention.
ロボットの気が引けたら
知らせるように頼みました
12:54
Voice: Hey, Kismet, ah, there it is.
Kismet はい そうね
12:57
RB: So she realizes she has the robot's attention.
彼女はロボットの注意が
得られたとわかりました
13:01
Voice: Kismet, do you like the toy? Oh.
おもちゃが好き?
13:08
RB: Now, here they're asked to prohibit the robot,
さて ここではロボットを咎めるよう
頼みました
13:13
and this first woman really pushes the robot into an emotional corner.
この最初の女性はほんとうにロボットを
感情的に追い詰めます
13:15
Voice: No. No. You're not to do that. No.
だめ だめ
やっちゃいけません だめ
13:19
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:24
Not appropriate. No. No.
そんなのだめ だめ だめ
13:27
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:33
RB: I'm going to leave it at that.
これくらいにしておきましょう
13:36
We put that together. Then we put in turn taking.
これらを組み合わせ
順番交替を追加しました
13:38
When we talk to someone, we talk.
誰かと話す際 まず話して
13:40
Then we sort of raise our eyebrows, move our eyes,
次に 眉を上げたり 目を動かしたりして
13:43
give the other person the idea it's their turn to talk.
相手に会話の順番が来たと気づかせます
13:47
And then they talk, and then we pass the baton back and forth between each other.
そうして相手が話し そして交互に
かわるがわる話します
13:50
So we put this in the robot.
これをロボットに組み込みました
13:54
We got a bunch of naive subjects in,
何も知らない被験者を
何人も用意して
13:56
we didn't tell them anything about the robot,
ロボットのことは何も教えず
13:58
sat them down in front of the robot and said, talk to the robot.
ロボットの前に座らせ
会話をしてもらいました
14:00
Now what they didn't know was,
彼らが知らないのは
14:02
the robot wasn't understanding a word they said,
ロボットは実は言葉を全く理解せず
14:04
and that the robot wasn't speaking English.
話しているのも英語ではない
という事です
14:06
It was just saying random English phonemes.
ランダムな英語の音素を話すだけです
14:09
And I want you to watch carefully, at the beginning of this,
この冒頭の部分を
良く見て頂きたいのですが
14:11
where this person, Ritchie, who happened to talk to the robot for 25 minutes --
この方 リッチーはロボットと
25分も会話をしました
14:13
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:17
-- says, "I want to show you something.
「見せたいものがあるんだ
14:19
I want to show you my watch."
この時計を見せたいんだ」と言って
14:21
And he brings the watch center, into the robot's field of vision,
彼は時計をロボットの
視界の中心に持ってきて
14:23
points to it, gives it a motion cue,
指さし 動かして示し
14:28
and the robot looks at the watch quite successfully.
ロボットに時計を見せる事に成功します
14:30
We don't know whether he understood or not that the robot --
気が付いていたかわかりませんが
14:32
Notice the turn-taking.
ロボットは順番交替もしています
14:36
Ritchie: OK, I want to show you something. OK, this is a watch
「見せたいものがあるんだ
これは時計
14:38
that my girlfriend gave me.
僕の彼女がくれたんだ」
14:41
Robot: Oh, cool.
「あら、いい」
14:44
Ritchie: Yeah, look, it's got a little blue light in it too. I almost lost it this week.
「そうだろ 見て 中に青いライトも
あるんだ 先週失くしそうになったよ」
14:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:51
RB: So it's making eye contact with him, following his eyes.
彼の目を追いかけて
彼とアイ・コンタクトをとっています
14:55
Ritchie: Can you do the same thing? Robot: Yeah, sure.
「まねできる?」
「ええ もちろん」
14:58
RB: And they successfully have that sort of communication.
こんな具合で
コミュニケーションに成功しました
15:00
And here's another aspect of the sorts of things that Chris and I were doing.
クリスと私がやった
また別のこともお見せします
15:02
This is another robot, Cog.
これは別の「コグ」というロボットで
15:06
They first make eye contact, and then, when Christie looks over at this toy,
最初にアイ・コンタクトをして
次に クリスティーが玩具に目をやると
15:08
the robot estimates her gaze direction
ロボットは彼女の視線を推測して
15:14
and looks at the same thing that she's looking at.
彼女が見ているのと同じ物を見ます
15:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:18
So we're going to see more and more of this sort of robot
この種のロボットが さらに多く
15:19
over the next few years in labs.
研究されるようになるでしょ
15:22
But then the big questions, two big questions that people ask me are:
そこで大きな疑問が出てきます
私が聞かれる2つの大きな疑問は
15:24
if we make these robots more and more human-like,
これらのロボットが更にもっと
人間に近づいたら
15:29
will we accept them, will we -- will they need rights eventually?
彼らを受け入れられるでしょうか?
将来 彼らにも権利が必要になるでしょうか?
15:31
And the other question people ask me is, will they want to take over?
もう一つ良く訊かれるのが
ロボットは人間にとって代わろうとするか?
15:36
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:39
And on the first -- you know, this has been a very Hollywood theme
最初の疑問は
ハリウッドの映画によくある
15:40
with lots of movies. You probably recognize these characters here --
テーマです
これらのキャラクターはお馴染みですが
15:43
where in each of these cases, the robots want more respect.
いずれの場合も
ロボット達は尊厳を求めています
15:46
Well, do you ever need to give robots respect?
ロボットに権利を与える必要があるでしょうか?
15:50
They're just machines, after all.
たかが機械です
15:54
But I think, you know, we have to accept that we are just machines.
でも 良く考えれば
私たちだって機械です
15:56
After all, that's certainly what modern molecular biology says about us.
分子科学者の目でみると
そうなります
16:00
You don't see a description of how, you know,
例えば「A」という分子がやってきて
16:05
Molecule A, you know, comes up and docks with this other molecule.
他の分子と結合するなんて
説明はありませんが
16:08
And it's moving forward, you know, propelled by various charges,
いろいろな力がはたらいて
進んできて
16:12
and then the soul steps in and tweaks those molecules so that they connect.
そこに魂がやってきて分子が
きちんとつながる様になっている
16:15
It's all mechanistic. We are mechanism.
全て機械的なのです
私たちは機械です
16:19
If we are machines, then in principle at least,
もし我々が機械なら
少なくとも原則的には
16:22
we should be able to build machines out of other stuff,
他のものから機械を作って
16:25
which are just as alive as we are.
私たちの様に生きてるものを
作れるはずです
16:29
But I think for us to admit that,
でも それを認めるには
16:33
we have to give up on our special-ness, in a certain way.
自分たちが 特別な存在である事を
あきらめなければなりません
16:35
And we've had the retreat from special-ness
これまでも この特別性から
後退してきました
16:38
under the barrage of science and technology many times
少なくとも過去数百年渡り
科学と技術の攻撃を受け何度もです
16:40
over the last few hundred years, at least.
少なくとも過去数百年渡り
科学と技術の攻撃を受け何度もです
16:43
500 years ago we had to give up the idea
500年前には宇宙の中心であるという考えを
16:45
that we are the center of the universe
捨てなければなりませんでした
16:47
when the earth started to go around the sun;
地球が太陽の中心を周りはじめたときにです
16:50
150 years ago, with Darwin, we had to give up the idea we were different from animals.
150年前には ダーウィンによって
他の動物と違うという考えを
捨てなければなりませんでした
16:52
And to imagine -- you know, it's always hard for us.
そして想像するに…いつもながら厳しいことですが
16:57
Recently we've been battered with the idea that maybe
近年 こんな考えもつきつけられています
17:00
we didn't even have our own creation event, here on earth,
我々は地球で生まれたのでは
ないかもしれない
17:03
which people didn't like much. And then the human genome said,
これは皆嫌います
そして人間の遺伝子は
17:05
maybe we only have 35,000 genes. And that was really --
3500個しかないなんて言われると
17:08
people didn't like that, we've got more genes than that.
そんなはずでない
もっとあるはずだと感じるものです
17:11
We don't like to give up our special-ness, so, you know,
このように人間の特別性を
あきらめたくないので
17:14
having the idea that robots could really have emotions,
ロボットが本当に感情を持つ可能性や
17:17
or that robots could be living creatures --
生き物と考えられるとなると
17:19
I think is going to be hard for us to accept.
受け入れがたいものになるでしょう
17:21
But we're going to come to accept it over the next 50 years or so.
でも ここ50年ぐらいで
これを受け入れるようになるでしょう
17:23
And the second question is, will the machines want to take over?
次の疑問は 機械が我々に
とって代わるかということですが
17:27
And here the standard scenario is that we create these things,
一般的なシナリオとしては
我々が彼らを創造し
17:30
they grow, we nurture them, they learn a lot from us,
彼らが育ち 我々が育成し
彼らが我々から多くを学習し
17:35
and then they start to decide that we're pretty boring, slow.
いつかしら我々をのろまで
退屈だと判断するようになる
17:38
They want to take over from us.
我々にとって代わりたいとなるわけです
17:42
And for those of you that have teenagers, you know what that's like.
10代のお子さんをお持ちなら
よくわかると思います
17:44
(Laughter)
(笑)
17:47
But Hollywood extends it to the robots.
ハリウッドでは この感情を
ロボットに延長するわけですが
17:48
And the question is, you know,
でも ここで不思議に思うのは
17:51
will someone accidentally build a robot that takes over from us?
一体誰が 人間をのっとる
ロボットを間違って作るかということです
17:54
And that's sort of like this lone guy in the backyard,
庭で一人でゴチャゴチャやって
17:58
you know -- "I accidentally built a 747."
「間違って747を作っちまった!」という感じで
18:01
I don't think that's going to happen.
それは起きないでしょう
18:04
And I don't think --
そして…
18:06
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:08
-- I don't think we're going to deliberately build robots
故意に危険なロボットを作るということは
18:09
that we're uncomfortable with.
あり得ないでしょう
18:12
We'll -- you know, they're not going to have a super bad robot.
すごく悪いロボットが登場する前に
18:14
Before that has to come to be a mildly bad robot,
なんとなく悪いロボットが登場するはずですし
18:16
and before that a not so bad robot.
その前には大して悪くはないロボットが
いるはずです
18:19
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:21
And we're just not going to let it go that way.
だから これを放っておくわけありません
18:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:24
So, I think I'm going to leave it at that: the robots are coming,
結論としては ロボットはやってきます
18:25
we don't have too much to worry about, it's going to be a lot of fun,
でも心配する程の事はありません
楽しいものになるでしょう
18:31
and I hope you all enjoy the journey over the next 50 years.
これからの50年の旅を
楽しみましょう
18:34
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:38
Translated by Shungo Haraguchi
Reviewed by Akiko Hicks

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Rodney Brooks - Roboticist
Rodney Brooks builds robots based on biological principles of movement and reasoning. The goal: a robot who can figure things out.

Why you should listen

Former MIT professor Rodney Brooks studies and engineers robot intelligence, looking for the holy grail of robotics: the AGI, or artificial general intelligence. For decades, we've been building robots to do highly specific tasks -- welding, riveting, delivering interoffice mail -- but what we all want, really, is a robot that can figure things out on its own, the way we humans do.

Brooks realized that a top-down approach -- just building the biggest brain possible and teaching it everything we could think of -- would never work. What would work is a robot who learns like we do, by trial and error, and with many separate parts that learn separate jobs. The thesis of his work which was captured in Fast, Cheap and Out of Control,went on to become the title of the great Errol Morris documentary.

A founder of iRobot, makers of the Roomba vacuum, Brooks is now founder and CTO of Rethink Robotics, whose mission is to apply advanced robotic intelligence to manufacturing and physical labor. Its first robots: the versatile two-armed Baxter and one-armed Sawyer. Brooks is the former director of CSAIL, MIT's Computers Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.

 
More profile about the speaker
Rodney Brooks | Speaker | TED.com