18:41
TED2003

Steven Johnson: The Web as a city

スティーブン・ジョンソン: 都市としてのウェブ

Filmed:

Outside.inのスティーブン・ジョンソンは ウェブは都市のようだと言っています: 多くの人々によって作られ、誰かが完全に管理しているわけでもなく、複雑に相互接続されており、にもかかわらず多くの要素が独立して機能しています。災害が1つの場所で起こっても、他の場所では生活が続けられます。

- Writer
Steven Berlin Johnson examines the intersection of science, technology and personal experience. Full bio

I want to take you back basically to my hometown,
私のふるさとにご案内しましょう
00:18
and to a picture of my hometown of the week
『創発(Emergence)』が
出版された週の
00:21
that "Emergence" came out.
その町の写真をご覧ください
00:23
And it's a picture we've seen several times.
これは誰もが 何度も見た写真です
00:25
Basically, "Emergence" was published on 9/11.
『創発』は9/11の時期に出版されたのです
00:33
I live right there in the West Village,
私はウエストビレッジの
このあたりに住んでいます
00:36
so the plume was luckily blowing west, away from us.
幸運にも煙は西風で
私たちから離れるように流れました
00:41
We had a two-and-a-half-day-old baby in the house that was ours --
家には生後2日半の赤ん坊がいました
00:46
we hadn't taken it from somebody else.
誘拐してきたわけじゃありませんよ
00:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:55
And one of the thoughts that I had dealing with these two separate emergences
そして 本と赤ん坊という2つのものが
それぞれ出現した時期に
00:57
of a book and a baby, and having this event happen so close --
更にこの事件がすぐ近くで起こりました
01:04
that my first thought, when I was still kind of in the apartment looking out at it all
私はアパートメントの中からその光景を見て
そして通りに出て
01:08
or walking out on the street and looking out on it just in front of our building,
家の前からそのビルを見上げ
最初に思ったことは
01:12
was that I'd made a terrible miscalculation in the book that I'd just written.
ちょうど私が書き上げた本の中で
大きな思い違いをしていたということでした
01:15
Because so much of that book was a celebration of the power
その本は 人の集中
特に大都市での集中の力と
01:20
and creative potential of density, of largely urban density,
創造の可能性を賞賛していました
01:24
of connecting people and putting them together in one place,
つまり
人々がつながり 1つの場所 たとえば
01:28
and putting them on sidewalks together and having them share ideas
道端に集まり アイデアや物理空間を
01:31
and share physical space together.
共有することを賞賛するものでした
01:34
And it seemed to me looking at that -- that tower burning and then falling,
燃え上がり崩れ落ちたビルを見て―
01:36
those towers burning and falling -- that in fact, one of the lessons
二つのタワーが燃え上がり 崩壊して
01:39
here was that density kills.
実際に人が集中していると
死者が多数出ることが分かりました
01:41
And that of all the technologies that were exploited
技術の結晶が
01:43
to make that carnage come into being,
修羅場を作ったのです
01:46
probably the single group of technologies that cost the most lives
地上110階の2つのビルで
01:51
were those that enable 50,000 people to live in two buildings
5万人がすごせるようにした
その技術こそが
01:57
110 stories above the ground.
大きな犠牲を生み出したのです
02:01
If they hadn't been crowded --
もしこんなに人が密集していなかったら...
02:03
you compare the loss of life at the Pentagon to the Twin Towers,
ツインタワーで失われた命の数を
ペンタゴンと比べれば
02:05
and you can see that very powerfully.
それがはっきりと分かります
02:08
And so I started to think, well, you know, density, density --
そして 私は考え始めました
人々の集中とは、集中とは?
02:10
I'm not sure if, you know, this was the right call.
集中に惹かれていたのは
正しかったんだろうかと
02:13
And I kind of ruminated on that for a couple of days.
数日 これに関して考えを巡らせました
02:17
And then about two days later, the wind started to change a little bit,
2日後 風は少し変わり始め
02:20
and you could sense that the air was not healthy.
空気が良くないと感じました
02:24
And so even though there were no cars still in the West Village
私の住んでいるウエストビレッジには
まだ車が入ってこなかったのですが
02:27
where we lived, my wife sent me out to buy a, you know,
妻は私に大きな空気フィルターを
02:31
a large air filter at the Bed Bath and Beyond,
20ブロックほど北にあるホームセンターで
02:34
which was located about 20 blocks away, north.
買ってくるよう言いました
02:38
And so I went out.
そして私は出かけました
02:41
And obviously I'm physically a very strong person, as you can tell -- (Laughter) --
ご覧のように 体は丈夫なタイプなので
(笑)
02:43
so I wasn't worried about carrying this thing 20 blocks.
20ブロックの距離を運ぶことには
自信がありました
02:47
And I walked out, and this really miraculous thing happened to me
外に出ると 本当に奇跡的なことが
起こったのです
02:50
as I was walking north to buy this air filter,
空気フィルターを買いに北へ歩いていたとき
02:54
which was that the streets were completely alive with people.
町は人々とともに生き生きとしていたのです
02:57
There was an incredible -- it was, you know, a beautiful day,
それは信じられなく 美しい日でした
03:02
as it was for about a week after,
事件の約1週間後でしたが
03:05
and the West Village had never seemed more lively.
ウエストビレッジは
これまでにないほど生き生きとした様子でした
03:07
I walked up along Hudson Street --
私はハドソン通りを歩いていました
03:10
where Jane Jacobs had lived and written her great book
ジェイン・ジェイコブズはここに住んで
素晴らしい本を書きました
03:12
that so influenced what I was writing in "Emergence" --
『創発』もその本に
大いに影響を受けました
03:14
past the White Horse Tavern,
ホワイト・ホース・タバーンも通り過ぎました
03:16
that great old bar where Dylan Thomas drank himself to death,
ディラン・トーマスが飲み過ぎで死んだ
古い立派なバーです
03:18
and the Bleecker Street playground was filled with kids.
ブリーカー通りの公園には
子どもが沢山いました
03:21
And all the people who lived in the neighborhood,
近所に住んでいる人たちも
03:24
who owned restaurants and bars in the neighborhood,
レストランやバーを経営している人たちも
03:26
were all out there -- had them all open.
みんな外に出ていました
03:28
People were out.
人々は外に出ていたのです
03:30
There were no cars, so it seemed even better, in some ways.
車はなかったのですが
それがさらに良かったのです
03:32
And it was a beautiful urban day,
美しい都会の一日でした
03:34
and the incredible thing about it was that the city was working.
街が機能していることは驚きでした
03:37
The city was there.
街はそこにあったのです
03:41
All the things that make a great city successful
素晴らしい都市を成功させる全て
03:43
and all the things that make a great city stimulating --
素晴らしい都市を活気づける全てが
03:45
they were all on display there on those streets.
そこに その通りにありました
03:47
And I thought, well, this is the power of a city.
私はそう これこそが都市の力だと思いました
03:49
I mean, the power of the city --
都市の力 すなわち
03:53
we talked about cities as being centralized in space,
空間的に集中した場として
都市は語られますが
03:55
but what makes them so strong most of the time
ほとんどの場合 都市が強靭になる理由は
03:57
is they're decentralized in function.
機能が分散しているからなのです
03:59
They don't have a center executive branch that you can take out
都市には 抜き取られたら
すべてが崩壊するような
04:01
and cause the whole thing to fail.
集中執行機関はなくて
04:03
If they did, it probably was right there at Ground Zero.
もしあったとすれば
おそらくここ グランドゼロです
04:05
I mean, you know, the emergency bunker was right there,
ご存知のように
緊急避難所もありましたが
04:08
was destroyed by the attacks,
攻撃により破壊され
04:10
and obviously the damage done to the building and the lives.
ビルと人命に大きなダメージを与えました
04:12
But nonetheless, just 20 blocks north, two days later,
にもかかわらず 北に20ブロックしか
離れていない場所で2日後には
04:14
the city had never looked more alive.
都市はそれ以上に無いほど
生き生きとした様子でした
04:18
If you'd gone into the minds of the people,
人々の心を覗けば
04:21
well, you would have seen a lot of trauma,
たくさんのトラウマがあり
04:23
and you would have seen a lot of heartache,
たくさんの苦悩があったでしょう
04:25
and you would have seen a lot of things that would take a long time to recover.
回復に長い時間のかかることがらも
たくさんあったでしょう
04:27
But the system itself of this city was thriving.
しかし 都市というシステムそのものは
機能していたのです
04:30
So I took heart in seeing that.
私はこれを見て勇気を得ました
04:33
So I wanted to talk a little bit about the reasons why that works so well,
都市がうまく機能する理由と
04:36
and how some of those reasons kind of map
今Webが向かおうとしている先と
その理由が
04:42
on to where the Web is going right now.
どう関連するか話したいと思います
04:44
The question that I found myself asking to people
私の本について話をした後で
04:47
when I was talking about the book afterwards is --
私はよく みなさんにこんな質問を
投げかけます
04:49
when you've talked about emergent behavior,
人が集まることで出現する行動について語られたり
04:51
when you've talked about collective intelligence,
集合知について語られたとき
04:53
the best way to get people to kind of wrap their heads around that
それを考えてもらうための
うまい方法として
04:55
is to ask, who builds a neighborhood?
「地区」というのは 誰が造るんでしょう?
と尋ねます
04:57
Who decides that Soho should have this personality
ソーホーをこういう個性にしたのは誰か?
05:00
and that the Latin Quarter should have this personality?
ラテン・クウォーターの持つ雰囲気は?
05:03
Well, there are some kind of executive decisions,
ある種の責任者の決断もあったでしょうが
05:05
but mostly the answer is -- everybody and nobody.
大半の答えは 「みんな」
もしくは「だれでもない」です
05:07
Everybody contributes a little bit.
皆が少しずつ寄与しています
05:09
No single person is really the ultimate actor
一人の人間が地区の個性を形作った
05:11
behind the personality of a neighborhood.
究極の立役者だ ということはないのです
05:15
Same thing to the question of, who was keeping the streets alive
9/11の後に
誰が私の近所で
05:17
post-9/11 in my neighborhood?
通りを活気づけたか?
も同じような質問です
05:20
Well, it was the whole city.
この答えも都市全体でした
05:22
The whole system kind of working on it,
全てのシステムが機能し
05:24
and everybody contributing a small little part.
みんなが小さな役割に貢献しました
05:26
And this is increasingly what we're starting to see on the Web
これはいくつもの興味深い仕方で
05:28
in a bunch of interesting ways --
Webで見始めるようになったことです
05:31
most of which weren't around, actually,
私が『創発』を執筆して
出版したときには
05:33
except in very experimental things,
非常に実験的なもの以外は
05:35
when I was writing "Emergence" and when the book came out.
実際 周囲にはありませんでした
05:37
So it's been a very optimistic time, I think,
思うに これまでは
非常に楽観的な時期でした
05:39
and I want to just talk about a few of those things.
そのことを少し話してみたいと思います
05:41
I think that there is effectively a new kind of model of interactivity
実質的に新しいインタラクティビティが
05:43
that's starting to emerge online right now.
今まさに オンラインに現れています
05:47
And the old one looked like this.
昔は こんなふうでした
05:49
This is not the future King of England, although it looks like it.
これは未来の英国王ではありません
―そのようにも見えますが
05:54
It's some guy, it's a GeoCities homepage of some guy that I found online
GeoCities のホームページで
見つけた男性です
05:58
who's interested, if you look at the bottom, in soccer and Jesus
下のリンクは
サッカーとイエス・キリストと
06:01
and Garth Brooks and Clint Beckham and "my hometown" -- those are his links.
ガース・ブルックスとクリント・ベッカムと
「自分の故郷」です
06:04
But nothing really says
1995年のWebの時代精神を捉えたもので
06:07
this model of interactivity -- which was so exciting and captures the real,
非常にエキサイティングだった
当時の相互作用モデルについて
06:09
the Web Zeitgeist of 1995 -- than
最もうまく語るものといえば―
06:13
"Click here for a picture of my dog."
「私の犬の写真はここをクリックして」
です
06:16
That is -- you know, there's no sentence
この時代を思い出させる
06:18
that kind of conjures up that period better than that, I think,
これ以上の文章はないと思います
06:20
which is that you suddenly have the power to put up a picture of your dog
突然 自分の犬の写真をネットに上げて
リンクする力を手に入れ
06:24
and link to it, and somebody reading the page
また このページを読む誰かには
06:27
has the power to click on that link or not click on that link.
このリンクをクリックするかどうかを
選ぶ力が与えられます
06:30
And, you know, I don't want to belittle that. That, in a sense --
私はこれをけなしている訳ではありません
06:33
to reference what Jeff was talking about yesterday --
ジェフが昨日話していたことを参照すると
06:36
that was, in a sense, the kind of interface electricity that
このインターフェースは
ある種の熱狂を引き出し
06:39
powered a lot of the explosion of interest in the Web:
Web に対する爆発的な関心を
導くものとなりました
06:41
that you could put up a link, and somebody could click on it,
リンクを置けば誰かがクリックしてくれます
06:44
and it could take you anywhere you wanted to go.
行きたいところには
どこにでも連れて行ってくれるのです
06:46
But it's still a very one-to-one kind of relationship.
しかし これはまだ
まさに「1対1」的な関係で
06:48
There's one person putting up the link, and there's another person
ある人がリンクを置き 他の人が
06:50
on the other end trying to decide whether to click on it or not.
それをクリックするかどうかを決めます
06:52
The new model is much more like this,
新しいモデルはむしろこういうものです
06:57
and we've already seen a couple of references to this.
あちこちで言及されるようになりましたが
06:59
This is what happens when you search "Steven Johnson" on Google.
グーグルで “Steven Johnson“を
検索するとこうなります
07:01
About two months ago, I had the great breakthrough --
2ヶ月前 私は大躍進を遂げました
07:05
one of my great, kind of shining achievements --
目もくらむような 大きな成果です
07:09
which is that my website finally became a top result for "Steven Johnson."
“Steven Johnson”の検索で
私のウェブサイトが最上位になりました
07:12
There's some theoretical physicist at MIT named Steven Johnson
MITの理論物理学者に
Steven Johnson がいましたが
07:15
who has dropped two spots, I'm happy to say.
うれしいことに2ランクダウンしました
07:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:24
And, you know, I mean, I'll look at a couple of things like this,
似たような例を
いくつか見ていきましょう
07:25
but Google is obviously the greatest technology ever invented for navel gazing.
明らかに グーグルは今まで発明された中で
自分探しのための最高の技術です
07:29
It's just that there are so many other people in your navel when you gaze.
自分を探す中で
多くの他人がいることがわかります
07:33
Because effectively, what's happening here,
実際 ここで何が起きているかというと
どうやってこのページを作っているのかですが
07:36
what's creating this page, obviously -- and we all know this,
―誰でも知っていることですが
07:41
but it's worth just thinking about it --
考えてみるのに値することです―
07:43
is not some person deciding that I am the number one answer for Steven Johnson,
私が Steven Johnson に対する
一番の答えだと 誰かが決める訳ではありません
07:45
but rather somehow the entire web of people
そうではなく
ウェブに作られたページの全体を調べ
07:49
putting up pages and deciding to link to my page or not link to it,
私のページにリンクが張られているかどうかを見て
07:53
and Google just sitting there and running the numbers.
Googleはその数を数えるだけです
07:56
So there's this collective decision-making that's going on.
こんな集団的意思決定が行われているのです
07:59
This page is effectively, collectively authored by the Web,
このページは実質的に
集団としてのWebが作りました
08:03
and Google is just helping us
グーグルはある一貫した方法で
08:06
kind of to put the authorship in one kind of coherent place.
情報の出典を示す場を作り
この意思決定を助けているだけです
08:08
Now, they're more innovative -- well, Google's pretty innovative --
もっと革新的なものもあります
― グーグルも十分革新的ですが
08:11
but there are some new twists on this.
さらに新機軸が加わります
08:14
There's this incredibly interesting new site -- Technorati --
この実に興味深い 新しいサイトは
Technorati です
08:17
that's filled with lots of little widgets that are expanding on these.
小さなウィジェットが沢山あり
その数はどんどん増えています
08:19
And these are looking in the blog world and the world of weblogs.
そして ここからブログの世界を
のぞき見ることができるのです
08:23
He's analyzed basically all the weblogs out there that he's tracking.
追跡中のすべてのブログを分析しています
08:27
And he's tracking how many other weblogs linked to those weblogs,
別のブログからのリンクが
いくつあるかを数えています
08:31
and so you have kind of an authority --
そしてここから見えてくるのは
08:34
a weblog that has a lot of links to it
被リンクが多いブログは
08:36
is more authoritative than a weblog that has few links to it.
被リンクが少ないブログより
「権威」があるということです
08:38
And so at any given time, on any given page on the Web, actually,
そして いかなるときも
Web上のどのページに対しても
08:43
you can say, what does the weblog community think about this page?
このページについてブログの評判はどうか?
と尋ねると
08:45
And you can get a list.
リストが得られます
08:48
This is what they think about my site; it's ranked by blog authority.
これは私のサイトがどう思われているかを示し
ブログの権威を格付けしています
08:50
You can also rank it by the latest posts.
書き込みの新しさから
ランク付けをすることもできます
08:53
So when I was talking in "Emergence,"
私が『創発』で書いたように
08:55
I talked about the limitations of the one-way linking architecture
一方向のリンク構造には限界があります
08:58
that, basically, you could link to somebody else
実際 あなたが他人にリンクしても
09:00
but they wouldn't necessarily know that you were pointing to them.
その人は必ずしもあなたから
リンクを張られたことを知りません
09:02
And that was one of the reasons why the web
これがWebが その持っている可能性ほど
09:04
wasn't quite as emergent as it could be
新しいものを生み出さなかった理由の1つです
09:07
because you needed two-way linking, you needed that kind of feedback mechanism
双方向のリンクのような
フィードバック機構がなければ
09:09
to be able to really do interesting things.
本当に面白いことができるようには
なりませんでした
09:11
Well, something like Technorati is supplying that.
Technoratiのような検索エンジンが
それを提供します
09:13
Now what's interesting here is that this is a quote from Dave Weinberger,
ここで面白いのはDave Weinbergerからの
引用です
09:16
where he talks about everything being purposive in the Web --
彼はWebの中では
全てに目的があると言っています
09:19
there's nothing artificial.
すべてのものは人工物であると
09:23
He has this line where he says, you know, you're going to put up a link there,
そして
リンクを張ったら―
09:25
if you see a link, somebody decided to put it there.
リンクが張ってあったら
それは誰かがそう決めたからだ
09:27
And he says, the link to one site didn't just grow on the other page "like a tree fungus."
あるサイトへのリンクは 木に生える
キノコとは違って自然に発生はしないものだ
09:30
And in fact, I think that's not entirely true anymore.
実は これは
今では完全に正しいとは思えません
09:35
I could put up a feed of all those links generated by Technorati
Technorati が
作り出すリンクを全部
09:38
on the right-hand side of my page,
私のページの右側に
配置することができるのです
09:42
and they would change as the overall ecology of the Web changes.
それは Web生態系全体の変化につれて
変化します
09:44
That little list there would change.
ここにある小さなリストは変化します
09:47
I wouldn't really be directly in control of it.
私が直接コントロールすることはできません
09:49
So it's much closer, in a way, to a data fungus, in a sense,
これはある意味
私がここに置いた意図的なリンクというより
09:51
wrapped around that page, than it is to a deliberate link that I've placed there.
ページを包み込んだ
いわばデータのキノコのようなものです
09:54
Now, what you're having here is basically a global brain
ここにあるものは
基本的にはグローバルな頭脳で
10:00
that you're able to do lots of kind of experiments on to see what it's thinking.
その頭脳が考えていることを知るための
さまざまな実験が行えます
10:03
And there are all these interesting tools.
これはとてもおもしろいツールです
10:06
Google does the Google Zeitgeist,
グーグルは
Google Zeitgeist で
10:08
which looks at search requests to test what's going on, what people are interested in,
検索リクエストを見て 出来ごとや
人々の興味の向いている先について
10:10
and they publish it with lots of fun graphs.
沢山の面白いグラフとして
公表します
10:15
And I'm saying a lot of nice things about Google,
私はグーグルについて
たくさん誉めましたが
10:17
so I'll be I'll be saying one little critical thing.
1つ批判的なことを言います
10:19
There's a problem with the Google Zeitgeist,
Google Zeitgeist には
問題があって
10:20
which is it often comes back with news that a lot of people are searching
多くの人が検索したニュースを
何度も表示します
10:22
for Britney Spears pictures, which is not necessarily news.
ブリトニー・スピアーズの写真といった
ニュースと言えないものなどです
10:26
The Columbia blows up, suddenly there are a lot of searches on Columbia.
コロンビア号が爆発したら
突然コロンビア号の検索が増えます
10:30
Well, you know, we should expect to see that.
これは想定できることで
10:34
That's not necessarily something we didn't know already.
必ずしも
まだ知らなかったことではありません
10:36
So the key thing in terms of these new tools
つまり これらの新しいツールで重要なことは
10:38
that are kind of plumbing the depths of the global brain,
それが グローバルな頭脳の深い部分を
つなぐ管のようなもので
10:40
that are sending kind of trace dyes through that whole bloodstream --
血流全体に少量の色素を注入すると
(つながりが)わかることです
10:43
the question is, are you finding out something new?
問題は 新しいものが
何か見つかるかということです
10:47
And one of the things that I experimented with is this thing called Google Share
私は Google Shareについて
実験しました
10:49
which is basically, you take an abstract term,
抽象的な単語を使って
10:52
and you search Google for that term,
その単語をグーグル検索します
10:56
and then you search the results that you get back for somebody's name.
そしてその検索結果を
さらに人名で検索するのです
10:59
So basically, the number of pages that mention this term,
つまり その単語に
言及しているページの数のうち
11:02
that also mention this page, the percentage of those pages
その人名に関連しているページの割合は
11:06
is that person's Google Share of that term.
その人の単語に対する
Google Shareになります
11:09
So you can do kind of interesting contests.
興味深いコンテストを行えます
11:11
Like for instance, this is a Google Share of the TED Conference.
例えば これは"TED Conference" の
Google Shareです
11:13
So Richard Saul Wurman
リチャード・ソール・ワーマンは
11:17
has about a 15 percent Google Share of the TED conference.
"TED Conference"の
Google Shareを約15%持っています
11:20
Our good friend Chris has about a six percent -- but with a bullet, I might add.
我らがクリスは約6%です
赤丸急上昇中ですが
11:24
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:29
But the interesting thing is, you can broaden the search a little bit.
検索を少し拡張すると
面白いことがわかります
11:31
And it turns out, actually, that 42 percent is the Mola mola fish.
実際のところ
42%がマンボウでした
11:34
I had no idea.
理由は分かりません
11:37
No, that's not true.
いや 本当のことを言うと
11:39
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:40
I made that up because I just wanted to put up a slide
私は ただスライドに
11:43
of the Mola mola fish.
マンボウを載せたかっただけです
11:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:47
I also did -- and I don't want to start a little fight in the next panel --
こんな実験もしました
― けんかを売るつもりはないですが
11:49
but I did a Google Share analysis of evolution and natural selection.
進化と自然淘汰について
Google Shareで分析をしました
11:52
So right here -- now this is a big category, you have smaller percentages,
結果はこちらです ―
大きな分類なので 割合は小さくなります
11:55
so this is 0.7 percent -- Dan Dennett, who'll be speaking shortly.
ダン・デネットが0.7%です
彼はこの後すぐ講演をします
12:00
Right below him, 0.5 percent, Steven Pinker.
次がスティーブン・ピンカーの0.5%
12:05
So Dennett's in the lead a little bit there.
デネットが少しリードしています
12:10
But what's interesting is you can then broaden the search
興味深いことは 検索範囲を広げて
12:12
and actually see interesting things and get a sense of what else is out there.
興味深いものを見つけ 世の中に
どんなものがあるか知ることができます
12:14
So Gary Bauer is not too far behind --
ゲイリー・バウアー(保守派活動家)は
そんなに後れを取っていません
12:18
has slightly different theories about evolution and natural selection.
彼は進化と自然淘汰について
少し違った理論を持っているだけです
12:21
And right behind him is L. Ron Hubbard. So --
そのすぐ次はL. ・ロン・ハバード
(新興宗教の創始者)です
12:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:29
you can see we're in the ascot, which is always good.
アスコットの競馬みたいで
楽しいですね
12:31
And by the way, Chris, that would've been a really good panel,
クリス このメンバーで
パネル討論も良いですね
12:33
I think, right there.
そこのところで
12:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:36
Hubbard apparently started to reach, but besides that,
ハバードはTEDで講演したいと
言っているとか
12:41
I think it would be good next year.
来年にはいいかもしれません
12:43
Another quick thing -- this is a slightly different thing,
もうひとつ これは少し違うものですが
12:45
but this analysis some of you may have seen.
この分析を見たことがある人が
いるかもしれません
12:47
It just came out. This is bursty words,
発表されたばかりです
12:49
looking at the historical record of State of the Union Addresses.
一般教書演説の過去の記録から
急に使われ始めた言葉を調べたものです
12:51
So these are words that suddenly start to appear out of nowhere,
これらの言葉は
どこからか 突然現れたのです
12:56
so they're kind of, you know, memes that start taking off,
それらは 広まり始めたミームのようなもので
13:00
that didn't have a lot of historical precedent before.
それ以前はさほど使われていなかったものです
13:02
So the first one is -- these are the bursty words around 1860s --
最初のものは ―
1860年代に爆発的に広まった言葉ですが
13:05
slaves, emancipation, slavery, rebellion, Kansas.
奴隷 解放 奴隷制
反抗 カンザス族(北米先住民族)
13:08
That's Britney Spears. I mean, you know, OK, interesting.
―ブリトニー・スピアーズの曲名ですね
13:11
They're talking about slavery in 1860.
1860年には奴隷制が語られていたのです
13:13
1935 -- relief, depression, recovery banks.
1935年 ―
救済 恐慌 回復 銀行
13:15
And OK, I didn't learn anything new there as well -- that's pretty obvious.
OK 何も新しいことはありません
明らかですね
13:18
1985, right at the center of the Reagan years --
1985年 レーガン大統領時代の真っ只中
13:21
that's, we're, there's, we've, it's.
あれは 我々は がある
しました それは
13:25
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:28
Now, there's one way to interpret this, which is to say that
これを解釈する方法がひとつあります
13:30
"emancipation" and "depression" and "recovery" all have a lot of syllables.
解放 恐慌 回復
どれも多くの音節があります
13:33
So you know, you can actually download -- it's hard to remember those.
あとでダウンロードできますよ
― 長い単語を覚えるのは大変ですからね
13:36
But seriously, actually, what you can see there,
しかし 真面目なところ
ここに見えるものは
13:41
in a way that would be very hard to detect otherwise,
こういう検索をしなければ
見つけられませんが
13:43
is Reagan reinventing the political language of the country
レーガン大統領は政治用語を再発明したのです
13:45
and shifting to a much more intimate, much more folksy, much more telegenic --
より親しみやすく より庶民的に
よりテレビ映りのよい方向にシフトしました
13:48
contracting all those verbs.
動詞の短縮形を使って
13:52
You know, 20 years before it was still, "Ask not what you can do,"
その20年前だったら「何が出来るか尋ねるな」という
(堅苦しい)表現でした
13:54
but with Reagan, it's, "that's where, there's Nancy and I," that kind of language.
それがレーガン大統領になると
「それが起きたとき...ナンシーと私で」
13:56
And so something we kind of knew,
なんとなく分かってはいましたが
14:01
but you didn't actually notice syntactically what he was doing.
実際 構文の面での彼の業績は
見逃されていました
14:04
I'll go very quickly.
次のスライドへ
14:06
The question now -- and this is the really interesting question --
現在の疑問は ― そしてそれは
本当に興味深い疑問なのですが
14:08
is, what kind of higher-level shape is emerging right now
どのような高次の形が
出現しているのかということです
14:10
in the overall Web ecosystem -- and particularly in the ecosystem of the blogs
Webの生態系のなかで ―
そして特にブログの生態系の中で
14:14
because they are really kind of at the cutting edge.
なぜならそれらは本当に
最先端なのですから
14:18
And I think what happens there will also happen in the wider system.
そこで起こることは より大きなシステムでも
起こるでしょう
14:21
Now there was a very interesting article by Clay Shirky
クレイ・シャーキーが
とても興味深い記事を書きました
14:23
that got a lot of attention about a month ago,
1か月ほど前
大いに注目を浴びました
14:26
and this is basically the distribution of links
これは基本的には
ウェブ上のさまざまなブログに対する
14:28
on the web to all these various different blogs.
リンクの分布です
14:30
It follows a power law, so that there are a few extremely well-linked to, popular blogs,
それは指数関数的になります
少数の人気ブログは多数にリンクされ
14:35
and a long tail of blogs with very few links.
一方にはリンク数が極めて少ない
多くのブログがあります
14:40
So 20 percent of the blogs get 80 percent of the links.
すなわち 20%のブログが
80%のリンクを得ます
14:44
Now this is a very interesting thing.
これはとても興味深いことです
14:47
It's caused a lot of controversy
これは大きな論争を巻き起こしました
14:49
because people thought that this was the ultimate kind of one man,
なぜならインターネットは
誰もが声を上げられる
14:51
one modem democracy, where anybody can get out there and get their voice heard.
一人一人が中心の
現代民主主義の究極形だと思われていたからです
14:53
And so the question is, "Why is this happening?"
「なぜこのこようなことが
起こっているのか?」
14:57
It's not being imposed by fiat from above.
上からの命令で強いられている
わけではありません
14:59
It's an emergent property of the blogosphere right now.
ブログ圏から 今 生まれている
創発的な性質なのです
15:03
Now, what's great about it is that people are working on --
すばらしい点は
人々がすぐに対応し始めたことです
15:06
within seconds of Clay publishing this piece, people started working on changing
クレイがその論文を発表するや否や
異なる結果が現われるように
15:09
the underlying rules of the system so that a different shape would start appearing.
検索のルールの変更が始まりました
15:14
And basically, the shape appears
基本的に 指数関数型になる理由は
15:17
largely because of a kind of a first-mover advantage.
最初に始めた人が
有利だからです
15:19
if you're the first site there, everybody links to you.
最初にできたサイトなら
全員がリンクします
15:21
If you're the second site there, most people link to you.
2番目のサイトでも
多くの人がリンクするので
15:23
And so very quickly you can accumulate a bunch of links,
このようにたくさんのリンクを集められます
15:25
and it makes it more likely for newcomers to link to you in the future,
それでさらに 新たな参加者も
リンクし続けます
15:28
and then you get this kind of shape.
それでこのような形になるのです
15:30
And so what Dave Sifry at Technorati started working on,
Technoratiのデイブ・シフリーも
そのようにし始めました
15:32
literally as Shirky started -- after he published his piece --
シャーキーが始めたように
論文を発表した後
15:35
was something that basically just gave a new kind of priority to newcomers.
新しい記事に新しい種類の
優先付けをしたということです
15:38
And he started looking at interesting newcomers that don't have a lot of links,
リンクがあまり張られていないけれど
直近の24時間に
15:42
that suddenly get a bunch of links in the last 24 hours.
急にリンクが増えた
新しい記事に注目したのです
15:45
So in a sense, bursty weblogs coming from new voices.
要するに 新しく上がって
伸び盛りのウェブログを重視するのです
15:49
So he's working on a tool right there that can actually change the overall system.
こうして彼が取り組んでいる相手は
システム全体を変えられるツールです
15:52
And it creates a kind of planned emergence.
これは計画的な「創発」です
15:57
You're not totally in control,
完全にコントロールはできていません
15:59
but you're changing the underlying rules in interesting ways
しかし 興味深い方法で
おおもとのルールを変えたのです
16:01
because you have an end result which is
なぜなら 最終結果として
より民主的な声の広がりを
16:03
maybe a more democratic spread of voices.
求めているからです
16:05
So the most amazing thing about this -- and I'll end on this note --
ここで最も驚くべきことは ―
そしてこれで話を終わりますが
16:07
is, most emergent systems, most self-organizing systems
ほとんどの創発的システム
ほとんどの自己組織的システムは
16:09
are not made up of component parts that are capable of looking at the overall pattern
全体のパターンを
見通した部品で構成されてはおらず
16:12
and changing their behavior based on whether they like the pattern or not.
そのパターンが好まれたかどうかに基づいて
行動を変えるのです
16:17
So the most wonderful thing, I think, about this whole debate
指数法則や
法則に影響する ソフトをめぐる―
16:21
about power laws and software that could change it
議論で素晴らしかったと
私が思うのは
16:23
is the fact that we're having the conversation.
私たちが対話をしているという
事実なのです
16:25
I hope it continues here.
それが続くことを願っています
16:28
Thanks a lot.
ありがとうございました
16:30
Translated by Yoji Onishi
Reviewed by Masaki Yanagishita

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Steven Johnson - Writer
Steven Berlin Johnson examines the intersection of science, technology and personal experience.

Why you should listen

A dynamic writer and speaker, Johnson crafts captivating theories that draw on a dizzying array of disciplines, without ever leaving his audience behind. Author Kurt Anderson described Johnson's book Emergence as "thoughtful and lucid and charming and staggeringly smart." The same could be said for Johnson himself. His big-brained, multi-disciplinary theories make him one of his generation's more intriguing thinkers. His books take the reader on a journey -- following the twists and turns his own mind makes as he connects seemingly disparate ideas: ants and cities, interface design and Victorian novels.

Johnson's breakout 2005 title, Everything Bad Is Good for You , took the provocative stance that our fear and loathing of popular culture is misplaced; video games and TV shows, he argues, are actually making us smarter. His appearances on The Daily Show and Charlie Rose cemented his reputation as a cogent thinker who could also pull more than his share of laughs. His most recent work, The Ghost Map, goes in another direction entirely: It tells the story of a cholera outbreak in 1854 London, from the perspective of the city residents, the doctors chasing the disease, and the pathogen itself. The book shows how the epidemic brought about profound changes in science, cities and modern society. His upcoming work, Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation, tells the fascinating stories of great ideas and great thinkers across disciplines. 

No mere chronicler of technology, Johnson is himself a longtime innovator in the web world: He was founder and Editor in Chief of FEED, one of the earliest and most interesting online magazines. He cofounded Patch, an intriguing website that maps online conversations to real-world neighborhoods, and outside.in -- and is an advisor to many other startups, including Medium and Jelly. He is the host and co-creator of the new PBS and BBC television series How We Got to Now, airing in the fall of 2014.

More profile about the speaker
Steven Johnson | Speaker | TED.com