sponsored links
TED2003

Jared Diamond: Why do societies collapse?

ジャレド・ダイアモンド 文明崩壊は何故起こるのか

February 28, 2003

なぜ、社会は失敗するのか?グリーンランドの鉄器時代のノース人、森林伐採のイースター島、そして現代のモンタナの教訓から、ジャレド・ダイアモンドは崩壊が近い徴候や、--我々がその徴候に気付くのに間に合えば--どうやって我々は崩壊を防ぐことができるかを語ります。

Jared Diamond - Civilization scholar
Jared Diamond investigates why cultures prosper or decline -- and what we can learn by taking a broad look across many kinds of societies. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I think all of us have been interested, at one time or another,
皆さんも、一度は興味を抱いたことがあると思います
00:18
in the romantic mysteries of all those societies that collapsed,
崩壊した文明社会のロマンチックなミステリー
00:22
such as the classic Maya in the Yucatan, the Easter Islanders,
例えば古代マヤ文明やユカタン州、イースター島
00:27
the Anasazi, Fertile Crescent society, Angor Wat, Great Zimbabwe
アナサジ族、メソポタミア、アンコールワット、グレートジンバブエ など
00:32
and so on. And within the last decade or two,
過去10~20年の間に
00:36
archaeologists have shown us that there were environmental problems
考古学者は 過去の文明が崩壊した根底には
00:40
underlying many of these past collapses.
環境問題があることを明らかにしました
00:44
But there were also plenty of places in the world
しかし 世界のいたるところで
00:47
where societies have been developing for thousands of years
大きな崩壊の徴候も無しに 数千年もの間
00:48
without any sign of a major collapse,
発展している文明もあります
00:52
such as Japan, Java, Tonga and Tikopea. So evidently, societies
例えば日本、ジャワ島、トンガやティコピアなど。文明社会の脆弱さは
00:54
in some areas are more fragile than in other areas.
明らかに地域によって異なります
01:00
How can we understand what makes some societies more fragile
ある文明社会を他の社会よりも脆弱にするのがいったい何であるかを理解するのは
01:03
than other societies? The problem is obviously relevant
現代の状況にも大いに係わる問題です
01:06
to our situation today, because today as well, there are
なぜなら現代においても ソマリアやルワンダ、旧ユーゴスラビアなど
01:12
some societies that have already collapsed, such as Somalia
崩壊した文明社会があります
01:15
and Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. There are also
そして ネパールやインドネシア
01:19
societies today that may be close to collapse, such as Nepal, Indonesia and Columbia.
コロンビアなど崩壊寸前の社会もあります
01:22
What about ourselves?
我々自身はどうでしょう?
01:27
What is there that we can learn from the past that would help us avoid
我々の社会を 過去の文明社会がたどったような衰退または崩壊から守るために
01:30
declining or collapsing in the way that so many past societies have?
過去から学べることが何かあるでしょうか?
01:36
Obviously the answer to this question is not going
明らかに、この質問に対する答えは一つの要因ではありません
01:41
to be a single factor. If anyone tells you that there is a single-factor
社会の崩壊を単一の要因で説明する人は
01:43
explanation for societal collapses, you know right away
愚か者です
01:47
that they're an idiot. This is a complex subject.
これは複雑な問題だからです
01:50
But how can we make sense out of the complexities of this subject?
しかし 我々はこの主題の複雑さをどうやって理解することができるでしょう?
01:54
In analyzing societal collapses, I've arrived at a
社会の崩壊を分析するうちに 私は五項目の枠組みに到達しました
01:58
five-point framework -- a checklist of things that I go through
崩壊を理解する上で利用するチェックリストです
02:01
to try and understand collapses. And I'll illustrate that five-point
その五項目の枠組みを グリーンランドの
02:05
framework by the extinction of the Greenland Norse society.
ノース人社会の滅亡で例示してみましょう
02:10
This is a European society with literate records,
これは文書記録のあるヨーロッパ社会なので
02:15
so we know a good deal about the people and their motivation.
その民族や彼らの動機づけはよく知られています
02:18
In AD 984 Vikings went out to Greenland, settled Greenland,
西暦984年 ヴァイキングはグリーンランドへ移動しそこに定住しました
02:22
and around 1450 they died out -- the society collapsed,
そして 約1450年に彼らは滅びます -- 社会は崩壊し
02:26
and every one of them ended up dead.
最後の一人まで死に絶えました
02:30
Why did they all end up dead? Well, in my five-point framework,
なぜ 皆死に絶えたのか?私の五項目の枠組みの
02:32
the first item on the framework is to look for human impacts
最初の項目は 人間が及ぼす環境への影響を見ることです
02:36
on the environment: people inadvertently destroying the resource
人が不注意に 不可欠な資源を破壊していないか
02:40
base on which they depend. And in the case of the Viking Norse,
ノース人のヴァイキングの場合は
02:43
the Vikings inadvertently caused soil erosion and deforestation,
不注意に土壌浸食や森林破壊の原因をつくりました
02:48
which was a particular problem for them because
鉄は炭を必要とし 炭は森林を必要とするので
02:53
they required forests to make charcoal, to make iron.
森林破壊は彼らにとって 特に致命的だったのです
02:56
So they ended up an Iron Age European society, virtually
こうして鉄器時代の欧州社会において自分達で鉄を作ることが
02:59
unable to make their own iron. A second item on my checklist is
実質的に出来なくなりました: チェックリストの二項目めは
03:03
climate change. Climate can get warmer or colder or dryer or wetter.
気候変動です 温暖化や寒冷化 乾燥したり湿潤になったりします
03:08
In the case of the Vikings -- in Greenland, the climate got colder
グリーンランドのヴァイキングの場合 1300年代後半から
03:14
in the late 1300s, and especially in the 1400s. But a cold climate
特に1400年代に 気候は寒くなりました
03:18
isn't necessarily fatal, because the Inuit -- the Eskimos inhabiting
しかし 寒冷気候は致命的ではありません なぜなら同じ時期グリーンランドには
03:22
Greenland at the same time -- did better, rather than worse,
イヌイット族が住んでいましたが 彼らは寒冷気候に旨く適応しました
03:27
with cold climates. So why didn't the Greenland Norse as well?
ではなぜ グリーンランドのノース人は適応出来なかったのでしょう?
03:29
The third thing on my checklist is relations with neighboring
私のチェックリストの第三項目は
03:33
friendly societies that may prop up a society. And if that
その文明社会の支えとなる 隣人社会との友好関係です
03:37
friendly support is pulled away, that may make a society
そしてもし その友好的な支援がなくなったとき
03:41
more likely to collapse. In the case of the Greenland Norse,
社会は崩壊しやすい傾向にあります グリーンランドのノース人の場合
03:44
they had trade with the mother country -- Norway --
彼らは母国ノルウェーと貿易がありました
03:48
and that trade dwindled: partly because Norway got weaker,
そしてノルウェーが弱小化したことや グリーンランドとノルウェー間の
03:50
partly because of sea ice between Greenland and Norway.
海氷などのせいもあり その取引は減少しました
03:54
The fourth item on my checklist is relations with hostile societies.
私のチェックリストの第四項目は 敵対的な社会との関係です
03:59
In the case of Norse Greenland, the hostiles were the Inuit --
グリーンランドのノース人の場合 敵はイヌイット族でした
04:05
the Eskimos sharing Greenland -- with whom the Norse
グリーンランドを共有していた エスキモーと犬猿の仲だったのです
04:08
got off to bad relationships. And we know that the Inuit
そして イヌイット族がノース人を殺したことは知られています
04:12
killed the Norse and, probably of greater importance,
そしておそらく それより深刻なことに イヌイット族は
04:16
may have blocked access to the outer fjords, on which
ノース人が 冬場にアザラシ狩りの為に通る
04:19
the Norse depended for seals at a critical time of the year.
外フィヨルドへの出入りを妨害したのかもしれません
04:23
And then finally, the fifth item on my checklist is the political,
そして 私のチェックリストの最終項目は文明における
04:27
economic, social and cultural factors in the society that make it
政治、経済、社会や文化要素です それは社会の
04:31
more or less likely that the society will perceive and solve its
環境問題への対処方法に多少なりとも影響を及ぼします
04:35
environmental problems. In the case of the Greenland Norse,
グリーンランドのノース人の場合
04:39
cultural factors that made it difficult for them
彼らの問題解決を困難にさせた
04:44
to solve their problems were: their commitments to a
文化的要素は 教会に多額の資金を注ぎ込む
04:46
Christian society investing heavily in cathedrals; their being
キリスト教への傾倒と
04:49
a competitive-ranked chiefly society; and their scorn for the Inuit,
競争意識の強い族長社会とイヌイットへの蔑視でした
04:53
from whom they refused to learn. So that's how the five-part
イヌイット族から学ぼうとはしませんでした
04:59
framework is relevant to the collapse and eventual extinction of the Greenland Norse.
以上のように ノース人の崩壊と絶滅は 五項目の枠組みに従って捉えられます
05:02
What about a society today?
では現代文明はどうでしょう?
05:07
For the past five years, I've been taking my wife and kids to
ここ5年間 私は西南モンタナで家族と休暇を過ごしました
05:10
Southwestern Montana, where I worked as a teenager
そこは かって私が10代の頃
05:14
on the hay harvest. And Montana, at first sight, seems
干し草の収穫のアルバイトをした所です
05:17
like the most pristine environment in the United States.
そして モンタナは一見 合衆国で最も手付かずの環境のようです
05:21
But scratch the surface, and Montana suffers from serious problems.
しかし一皮むくと 深刻な問題を抱えています
05:24
Going through the same checklist: human environmental impacts?
チェックリストを見ます:環境への人的影響
05:29
Yes, acute in Montana. Toxic problems from mine waste
そうです モンタナで深刻な問題です 鉱山廃棄物の
05:33
have caused damage of billions of dollars.
毒物問題は モンタナに何億ドルもの損害を与えました
05:38
Problems from weeds, weed control, cost Montana nearly
雑草や雑草防除の問題では年間
05:41
200 million dollars a year. Montana has lost agricultural areas
約2億ドルを出費します 他にもモンタナは
05:44
from salinization, problems of forest management,
塩害で農地を失い 森林管理の問題を抱え
05:48
problems of forest fires. Second item on my checklist:
山火事の問題もあります: チェックリストの第二項目
05:52
climate change. Yes -- the climate in Montana is getting warmer
気候変動 そうです -- モンタナの気候は温暖かつ乾燥傾向にありますが
05:56
and drier, but Montana agriculture depends especially on irrigation
モンタナの農業は殆ど 雪原からの灌漑に
05:59
from the snow pack, and as the snow is melting -- for example,
依存しているため その雪が減っていく 例えば
06:03
as the glaciers in Glacier National Park are disappearing --
グレーシャー国立公園の氷河が消えていくのは
06:07
that's bad news for Montana irrigation agriculture.
モンタナの潅漑農業にとって悪い知らせです
06:10
Third thing on my checklist: relations with friendlies
第三項目: 社会を支える友好関係
06:14
that can sustain the society. In Montana today, more than half of
今日のモンタナでは 半分以上の収入が
06:16
the income of Montana is not earned within Montana,
モンタナ内で生まれた収入ではなく
06:20
but is derived from out of state: transfer payments from
社会保障や投資などによって
06:24
social security, investments and so on --
モンタナ州以外から送金されたものです
06:27
which makes Montana vulnerable to the rest of the United States.
他の州に対するモンタナの立場は弱くなります
06:30
Fourth: relations with hostiles. Montanans have the same problems
第四項目:敵対関係 モンタナ州の人は
06:34
as do all Americans, in being sensitive to problems
すべてのアメリカ人と同じく 海外の敵対勢力による
06:38
created by hostiles overseas affecting our oil supplies,
石油の供給やテロ攻撃などに影響されます
06:42
and terrorist attacks. And finally, last item on my checklist:
そして最終項目:政治 経済 社会 文化的姿勢の
06:46
question of how political, economic, social, cultural attitudes
影響について
06:52
play into this. Montanans have long-held values, which today
モンタナ州の人々が長い間もっていた価値感は
06:55
seem to be getting in the way of their solving their own problems.
問題を解決する上で障害になっているようです
07:00
Long-held devotion to logging and to mines and to agriculture,
彼らは長い間、伐採、鉱山、農業に専念し 政府規制はありませんでした
07:03
and to no government regulation; values that worked well
それは過去においては上手に機能していましたが
07:07
in the past, but they don't seem to be working well today.
今日においては機能しなくなっています
07:11
So, I'm looking at these issues of collapses
それでこれらの崩壊の問題を
07:15
for a lot of past societies and for many present societies.
過去や現在の多くの社会において調べています
07:17
Are there any general conclusions that arise?
何か共通した結論を導くことができるでしょうか?
07:22
In a way, just like Tolstoy's statement about every unhappy marriage
不幸な結婚はどれも皆異なるという トルストイの言葉のように
07:24
being different, every collapsed or endangered society is different --
崩壊した社会 あるいは危険に立つ社会は異なります-
07:29
they all have different details. But nevertheless, there are certain
それらすべてに異なる詳細がありますが それでも
07:32
common threads that emerge from these comparisons
崩壊した あるいは崩壊しなかった 過去の文明社会と
07:36
of past societies that did or did not collapse
今日 崩壊の危機に立つ文明社会を比較すると
07:39
and threatened societies today. One interesting common thread
共通の特徴が見えてきます
07:42
has to do with, in many cases, the rapidity of collapse
興味深い特徴の一つは 文明社会が
07:49
after a society reaches its peak. There are many societies
そのピークにたどり着いた後 急速に崩壊することです
07:53
that don't wind down gradually, but they build up -- get richer
多くの文明社会は 段階的に縮小していくのではなく
07:57
and more powerful -- and then within a short time, within a few decades
築き上がり、より豊かで強力になり そして頂点に達した後
08:00
after their peak, they collapse. For example,
短期間内 数十年 以内に崩壊します
08:04
the classic lowland Maya of the Yucatan began to collapse in the
例えば ユカタンの古代低地マヤ文明は800年代初期に崩壊しましたが
08:06
early 800s -- literally a few decades after the Maya were building
それはマヤの人口が最大に達し
08:12
their biggest monuments, and Maya population was greatest.
最大の記念碑を建ててから 文字通り数十年後のことでした
08:15
Or again, the collapse of the Soviet Union took place
またソビエト連邦の崩壊は
08:20
within a couple of decades, maybe within a decade, of the time
ソビエト連邦が最も偉大な大国であった時から
08:23
when the Soviet Union was at its greatest power.
およそ20年もしくは10年以内に起こりました
08:27
An analogue would be the growth of bacteria in a petri dish.
これを例えるならシャーレの中のバクテリアの培養です
08:30
These rapid collapses are especially likely where there's
利用可能な資源と資源の消費とが釣り合わないときや
08:35
a mismatch between available resources and resource consumption,
経済的支出と潜在的経済力とが釣り合わないときに
08:38
or a mismatch between economic outlays and economic potential.
急速な崩壊に見舞われやすくなります
08:43
In a petri dish, bacteria grow. Say they double every generation,
シャーレの中でバクテリアは増殖します 世代ごとに2倍になるとしましょう
08:47
and five generations before the end the petri dish is 15/16ths empty,
最後から5世代前にはシャーレは 16分の15が空いています
08:52
and then the next generation's 3/4ths empty, and the next generation
3世代前には 残りが 4分の3になってその次には半分が空いています
08:57
half empty. Within one generation after the petri dish still
半分空のシャーレは、一世代で一杯になります
09:01
being half empty, it is full. There's no more food and the bacteria have collapsed.
食べるものが無くなれば バクテリアは壊滅します
09:05
So, this is a frequent theme:
そうです これが文明社会が頂点に達した後
09:10
societies collapse very soon after reaching their peak in power.
すぐに崩壊するという よくあるパターンです
09:12
What it means to put it mathematically is that, if you're concerned
数学的に表現するとこうなります
09:17
about a society today, you should be looking not at the value
もしあなたが 今日の社会を憂慮しているなら
09:19
of the mathematical function -- the wealth itself -- but you should
数学的な関数の値 すなわち富そのものではなく
09:24
be looking at the first derivative and the second derivatives
1次微分と2次微分に注目すべきでしょう
09:27
of the function. That's one general theme. A second general theme
これが共通項の一つ目です
09:30
is that there are many, often subtle environmental factors that make
共通項の二つ目は環境の要因です 多くの複雑な環境要因が
09:35
some societies more fragile than others. Many of those factors
ある文明社会を他の社会より脆弱にしますが
09:40
are not well understood. For example, why is it that in the Pacific,
それらの要因の多くは十分理解されていません
09:44
of those hundreds of Pacific islands, why did Easter Island end up as
例えばなぜ 何百もの太平洋諸島のうちで イースター島が
09:48
the most devastating case of complete deforestation?
完全なる森林破壊という 最も悲惨な終焉を迎えたのでしょうか?
09:52
It turns out that there were about nine different environmental
かなり複雑なものも含めて 9つの異なる環境要因が
09:56
factors -- some, rather subtle ones -- that were working against
イースター島に不利に作用していた為であることが判明しました
09:59
the Easter Islanders, and they involve fallout of volcanic tephra,
それらは 火山灰の落下 緯度 雨量などを含みます
10:03
latitude, rainfall. Perhaps the most subtle of them
おそらく 最も捉え難い要因ですが
10:08
is that it turns out that a major input of nutrients
太平洋の島の環境を保護する栄養分は
10:11
which protects island environments in the Pacific is from
主に中央アジアから飛来する砂塵から
10:14
the fallout of continental dust from central Asia.
得られていたということが判明しました
10:18
Easter, of all Pacific islands, has the least input of dust
土壌の栄養を回復するアジアからの砂塵が
10:21
from Asia restoring the fertility of its soils. But that's
太平洋諸島の中で一番届き難かったのがイースター島でした
10:25
a factor that we didn't even appreciate until 1999.
そしてその要因は 1999年まで理解されていませんでした
10:29
So, some societies, for subtle environmental reasons,
こういった理由で 文明社会のいくつかは
10:34
are more fragile than others. And then finally,
複雑な環境の要因を理由として 他よりも脆弱なのです
10:36
another generalization. I'm now teaching a course
そして最後に別の共通項です
10:39
at UCLA, to UCLA undergraduates, on these collapses
私は今 UCLA で大学生にこれらの文明崩壊について
10:42
of societies. What really bugs my UCLA undergraduate students is,
講義をしているのですが 大学生の腑に落ちないことがあります
10:45
how on earth did these societies not see what they were doing?
一体どうして これらの社会は 彼らが何をしているかが見えなかったんだ?
10:49
How could the Easter Islanders have deforested their environment?
どうしてイースター島の人々は すべての森林を伐採してしまったんだ?
10:52
What did they say when they were cutting down the last palm tree?
彼らが最後の椰子の木を切り倒すとき いったい何て言っただろう?
10:55
Didn't they see what they were doing? How could societies
彼らは自分達のしていることが見えなかったのか?
10:59
not perceive their impacts on the environments and stop in time?
どうして社会は環境への影響に気付いて 間に合うように止めなかったんだ?
11:02
And I would expect that, if our human civilization carries on,
そして 我々の文明が進むに従って
11:07
then maybe in the next century people will be asking,
多分 次の世紀に人々はこう尋ねると私は思います
11:14
why on earth did these people today in the year 2003 not see
いったい何故 今日の2003年の人々は
11:17
the obvious things that they were doing and take corrective action?
これほど明白なことが見えず 修正行動を取らなかったのか?
11:21
It seems incredible in the past. In the future, it'll seem
過去のことが理解できないように 未来の人には
11:25
incredible what we are doing today. And so I've been
今日の私達の行為が理解できないことでしょう
11:28
trying to develop a hierarchical set of considerations
それで私は 社会が自らの問題を解決できない理由について
11:31
about why societies fail to solve their problems --
階層的な考察を展開しようとしています
11:36
why they fail to perceive the problems or, if they perceive them,
なぜ彼らは問題を認識できなかったのか あるいは認識していたならば
11:40
why they fail to tackle them. Or, if they tackle them,
なぜ取り組むことが出来なかったのか? またはもし取り組んだとしたら
11:42
why do they fail to succeed in solving them?
なぜ 問題を解決できなかったのか?
11:45
I'll just mention two generalizations in this area.
この分野では2つの共通項のみに触れます
11:48
One blueprint for trouble, making collapse likely,
崩壊を招く危険な構図の一つは
11:52
is where there is a conflict of interest between the short-term
短期的利益を求める意思決定エリート集団と
11:55
interest of the decision-making elites and the long-term
長期的利益を求める社会全体の 利害関係の対立にあります
11:58
interest of the society as a whole, especially if the elites
特にエリート集団が彼らの行動による影響を
12:02
are able to insulate themselves from the consequences
受けることが無い場合
12:06
of their actions. Where what's good in the short run for the elite
エリートが短期利益を上げるためにすることが 社会全体に
12:08
is bad for the society as a whole, there's a real risk of the elite
悪影響を及ぼすことである場合 そこにはエリートが 長期的に
12:12
doing things that would bring the society down in the long run.
社会を滅ぼすようなことをしているという 本当のリスクがあります
12:16
For example, among the Greenland Norse --
例えば グリーンランドのノース人の中では
12:19
a competitive rank society -- what the chiefs really wanted
対抗意識の強い -- 階層社会 -- 族長が本当に望んだものは
12:21
is more followers and more sheep and more resources
近隣の族長を打ち負かし より多くの支持者と
12:24
to outcompete the neighboring chiefs. And that led the chiefs
より多くの羊 そしてより多くの資源をえることでした
12:27
to do what's called flogging the land: overstocking the land,
そして それは族長に土地を鞭で打つようなことをさせました:
12:30
forcing tenant farmers into dependency. And that made
土地を過剰に抱え込み小作人の独立を奪いました
12:34
the chiefs powerful in the short run,
これは 短期的に族長を強力にしましたが
12:38
but led to the society's collapse in the long run.
長い目で見れば社会の崩壊に至りました
12:42
Those same issues of conflicts of interest are acute
同じような利害対立問題が 今日
12:46
in the United States today. Especially because
アメリカ合衆国では特に深刻になっています
12:49
the decision makers in the United States are frequently
なぜなら合衆国の意思決定者はゲートコミュニティーに暮らし
12:52
able to insulate themselves from consequences
ボトルの水を飲むので
12:56
by living in gated compounds, by drinking bottled water
彼ら自身をその影響外におくことが出来るからです
12:59
and so on. And within the last couple of years,
そして 過去2年間の間に
13:02
it's been obvious that the elite in the business world
実業界のエリートは
13:05
correctly perceive that they can advance
社会全体に悪影響を及ぼすことで
13:09
their short-term interest by doing things that are
自分達の短期的利益を伸ばすことが出来ると
13:11
good for them but bad for society as a whole,
正確に認識していたのは明らかでした
13:14
such as draining a few billion dollars out of Enron
例えばエンロンと他の企業から
13:16
and other businesses. They are quite correct
数10億ドルを流出させること これらが短期的に
13:19
that these things are good for them in the short term,
彼らに利益を及ぼすという点で彼らは正しいのですが
13:23
although bad for society in the long term.
長期的に見ると 社会にとっては悪影響です
13:26
So, that's one general conclusion about why societies
さて これが社会が間違った決定をする理由について
13:29
make bad decisions: conflicts of interest.
共通項の一つめです:利益相反
13:32
And the other generalization that I want to mention
そして 私が話したいもう一つの共通項は
13:36
is that it's particularly hard for a society to make
ある社会において 強く支持された価値観が
13:40
quote-unquote good decisions when there is a conflict involving
多くの状況では適切だが 別の状況では不適切となるとき
13:42
strongly held values that are good in many circumstances
その価値観を超えた「良い」意思決定を下すことが
13:48
but are poor in other circumstances. For example,
特に難しくなるということです
13:53
the Greenland Norse, in this difficult environment,
グリーンランドのノース人は この困難な環境で
13:56
were held together for four-and-a-half centuries
宗教への共通の傾倒や 強い社会的一体感によって
13:59
by their shared commitment to religion,
ともに 4世紀半結束していました
14:02
and by their strong social cohesion. But those two things --
でも この2点の
14:05
commitment to religion and strong social cohesion --
宗教への傾倒と強い社会的一体感は
14:09
also made it difficult for them to change at the end
最終的に彼らの変化への適応や
14:12
and to learn from the Inuit. Or today -- Australia.
イヌイットから学ぶことを困難にしました
14:15
One of the things that enabled Australia to survive
又 今日のオーストラリア: オーストラリアが
14:18
in this remote outpost of European civilization
250年の間 ヨーロッパ文明から遠い辺境の地で
14:21
for 250 years has been their British identity.
生き残れた理由の一つに 彼らの英連邦人としてのアイデンティティーがあります
14:24
But today, their commitment to a British identity
しかし現代においては 英連邦への忠誠が
14:28
is serving Australians poorly in their need to adapt
彼らがアジアにおいて十分適応できない障害にもなっています
14:32
to their situation in Asia. So it's particularly difficult
トラブルをもたらすものが
14:35
to change course when the things that get you in trouble
力の源でもある場合
14:39
are the things that are also the source of your strength.
方向を変更するのは 特に困難です
14:43
What's going to be the outcome today?
今日の状況からはどういう結果にいたるのでしょうか?
14:47
Well, all of us know the dozen sorts of ticking time bombs
さて皆さんも 現代世界で沢山の時限爆弾が
14:49
going on in the modern world, time bombs that have fuses
カチカチ時を刻み作動しているのをご存知でしょう
14:55
of a few decades to -- all of them, not more than 50 years,
時限爆弾は 数十年で起爆します
15:01
and any one of which can do us in; the time bombs of water,
すべてが50年以内に爆発します その一つでも 我々には致命的です
15:05
of soil, of climate change, invasive species,
時限爆弾は、水、土壌、気候変動、侵入生物種
15:10
the photosynthetic ceiling, population problems, toxics, etc., etc. --
光合成の許容限度、人口問題、毒物、その他いろいろです
15:14
listing about 12 of them. And while these time bombs --
リストは12にも上ります そしてこれらの時限爆弾が
15:19
none of them has a fuse beyond 50 years, and most of them
50年以上の猶予があるものはなく ほとんどが 数十年のうちに起爆します
15:23
have fuses of a few decades -- some of them, in some places,
場所によっては そのいくつかがもっと早くに爆発します
15:25
have much shorter fuses. At the rate at which we're going now,
今のままの率で伐採を続ければ
15:28
the Philippines will lose all its accessible loggable forest
フィリピンは5年以内に伐採可能な森林を失うでしょう
15:32
within five years. And the Solomon Islands are only
そしてソロモン諸島は 彼らの輸出の大半を占める
15:36
one year away from losing their loggable forest,
伐採可能な森林を あと一年程で失う所まで来ています
15:39
which is their major export. And that's going to be spectacular
そして それはソロモン諸島の経済に
15:42
for the economy of the Solomons. People often ask me,
大きな打撃を与えるでしょう
15:44
Jared, what's the most important thing that we need to do
よくこう聞かれます "世界の環境問題で我々が
15:48
about the world's environmental problems?
やるべき 一番重要なことはなんだ?"
15:51
And my answer is, the most important thing we need to do
そして私の答えはこうです
15:53
is to forget about there being any single thing that is
我々がやるべき重要なことが何か一つある
15:55
the most important thing we need to do.
などという考えを捨てることが一番重要です
15:58
Instead, there are a dozen things, any one of which could do us in.
その代わりに 一つひとつが致命的な問題が 12個あるのです
16:00
And we've got to get them all right, because if we solve 11,
そして我々は すべてを正しくする必要があるのです なぜなら
16:03
we fail to solve the 12th -- we're in trouble. For example,
もし11の問題を解決しても 12番目の問題を解決しそこなったら 困ったことになります
16:06
if we solve our problems of water and soil and population,
例えば 我々は水と土壌と人口問題を解決したとしても
16:09
but don't solve our problems of toxics, then we are in trouble.
毒物の問題が解決しなければ 困ったことになります
16:12
The fact is that our present course is a non-sustainable course,
実のところ 我々の辿っている道は 持続不可能な道です
16:18
which means, by definition, that it cannot be maintained.
これは定義上 維持できないことを意味します
16:23
And the outcome is going to get resolved within a few decades.
そしてこの結果は 数十年以内に出るでしょう
16:27
That means that those of us in this room who are less than
この意味は ここにいる人で 50または60才未満の人は
16:34
50 or 60 years old will see how these paradoxes are resolved,
これらのパラドックスがどういうふうに解消されるかを見るでしょう
16:37
and those of us who are over the age of 60 may not see
そして60歳以上の人は その結果を見ることはないかもしれません
16:41
the resolution, but our children and grandchildren certainly will.
しかし 我々の子供達や孫達は間違いなく見るでしょう
16:44
The resolution is going to achieve either of two forms:
その結果は つぎの二つのうちどちらかでしょう:
16:48
either we will resolve these non-sustainable time-fuses
我々はこれらの 持続不可能な時限起爆装置を
16:51
in pleasant ways of our own choice by taking remedial action,
自分たちで対処することを選択して好適な解決を図るか
16:56
or else these conflicts are going to get settled
さもなければ これらの紛争は我々の選択を離れ
17:01
in unpleasant ways not of our choice -- namely, by war,
不快な方法で解消されるでしょう すなわち 戦争 病気または飢餓によって
17:04
disease or starvation. But what's for sure is that our
しかし確かなことは 我々の持続不可能な道は
17:08
non-sustainable course will get resolved in one way or another
数十年のうちに何らかの方法で解消されるということです
17:12
in a few decades. In other words, since the theme of this session
このセッションのテーマは選択ですが 言い換えれば我々には選択肢があります
17:14
is choices, we have a choice. Does that mean that we should
これは我々が悲観的に打ちのめされることを
17:18
get pessimistic and overwhelmed? I draw the reverse conclusion.
意味するのでしょうか? 私の結論は反対です
17:23
The big problems facing the world today are not at all
今日 世界が直面する大問題は制御不能ではありません
17:28
things beyond our control. Our biggest threat is not an asteroid
我々の最大の脅威は 地球に衝突しようとする
17:31
about to crash into us, something we can do nothing about.
小惑星のような 制御不可の事ではないのです
17:35
Instead, all the major threats facing us today are problems
その代わりに 今日 私達が向き合う すべての大きな脅威は
17:39
entirely of our own making. And since we made the problems,
我々が作った問題です そして問題を作ったのが我々なら
17:42
we can also solve the problems. That then means that it's
問題を解決することも可能です これは これらの問題に取り組むかどうかは
17:46
entirely in our power to deal with these problems.
完全に人類の手中にあることを意味します
17:50
In particular, what can all of us do? For those of you
我々全員が出来る事とは 具体的に いったい何でしょう?
17:54
who are interested in these choices, there are lots of things
これらの選択に興味があるならば あなたが出来ることは沢山あります
17:57
you can do. There's a lot that we don't understand,
我々が理解するべきなのに 理解していないことが沢山あります
18:00
and that we need to understand. And there's a lot that
そして我々はすでに理解しているにもかかわらず
18:04
we already do understand, but aren't doing, and that
やっていないことも沢山あります
18:07
we need to be doing. Thank you.
それを我々はやるべきです: ありがとう
18:11
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:13
Translator:Kayo Mizutani
Reviewer:Natsuhiko Mizutani

sponsored links

Jared Diamond - Civilization scholar
Jared Diamond investigates why cultures prosper or decline -- and what we can learn by taking a broad look across many kinds of societies.

Why you should listen

In his books Guns, Germs and Steel and Collapse (and the popular PBS and National Geographic documentaries they inspired), big-picture scholar Jared Diamond explores civilizations and why they all seem to fall. Now in his latest book, The World Until Yesterday, Diamond examines small, traditional, tribal societies -- and suggests that modern civilization is only our latest solution to survival.
 
Diamond’s background in evolutionary biology, geography and physiology informs his integrated vision of human history. He posits that success -- and failure -- depends on how well societies adapt to their changing environment.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.