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EG 2007

Paola Antonelli: Design and the Elastic Mind

パオラ・アントネッリが語る「デザインと柔軟性展」

December 12, 2007

ニューヨーク近代美術館(MoMA)のキュレーター、パオラ・アントネッリが、「デザインと柔軟性展」について紹介します。現代人の考え方を表す数々の作品やデザインを集めた、革新的な展覧会です。

Paola Antonelli - Design curator
Paola Antonelli is on a mission to introduce -- and explain -- design to the world. With her shows at New York's Museum of Modern Art, she celebrates design's presence in every part of life. Full bio

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Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I dabble in design. I'm a curator of architecture and design;
私は MoMAの
建築・デザイン部門の
00:16
I happen to be at the Museum of Modern Art.
キュレーターです
00:19
But what we're going to talk about today
本日は デザインについて
お話しします
00:21
is really design. Really good designers are like sponges:
本当によいデザイナーは
00:24
they really are curious
スポンジに似ています
00:27
and absorb every kind of information that comes their way,
好奇心にあふれ
どんな情報でも吸収して
00:29
and transform it so that it can be used by people like us.
私たちが使える形に変えます
00:33
And so that gives me an opportunity,
それを展示するのが
私の仕事です
00:36
because every design show that I curate
私が企画するデザイン展の
テーマは
00:38
kind of looks at a different world. And it's great,
いつも全く違います
00:41
because it seems like every time I change jobs.
毎回転職している感じで
面白いです
00:43
And what I'm going to do today is I'm going to give you a preview
本日は皆さんに
00:47
of the next exhibition that I'm working on, which is called
今度の「デザインと柔軟性展」について
ご紹介します
00:49
"Design and the Elastic Mind."
今度の「デザインと柔軟性展」について
ご紹介します
00:52
The world that I decided to focus on this particular time
この展覧会で扱うのは
00:54
is the world of science and the world of technology.
科学の世界と
技術の世界です
00:58
Technology always comes into play when design is involved,
技術とデザインは
深く関わっていますが
01:01
but science does a little less.
科学とデザインは
それほどではありません
01:04
But designers are great at taking big revolutions that happen
ですが デザイナーは
技術や科学の革新を取り入れて
01:06
and transforming them so that we can use them.
私たちが使える形にします
01:10
And this is what this exhibition looks at.
それが この展覧会の
テーマです
01:13
If you think about your life today,
私たちは生活の中で
01:17
you go every day through many different scales,
様々な尺度を使います
01:19
many different changes of rhythm and pace.
リズムや速さも様々です
01:22
You work over different time zones, you talk to very different people,
働く時間帯も様々
話す相手も様々
01:24
you multitask. We all know it, and we do it kind of automatically.
様々なことを 特に意識せず
同時に行っています
01:28
Some of the minds in this audience are super elastic,
皆さんの中には
非常に柔軟な方もいれば
01:32
others are a little slower,
それなりの方もいます
01:35
others have a few stretch marks, but nonetheless
変化に抵抗のある方も
いるでしょう
01:37
this is a quite exceptional audience from that viewpoint.
それでも ここにいる皆さんは
柔軟だと思います
01:40
Other people are not as elastic.
柔軟ではない人の
話をしましょう
01:44
I can't get my father in Italy to work on the Internet.
イタリアにいる私の父は
インターネットを使おうとしません
01:46
He doesn't want to put high-speed Internet at home.
家に回線を
引きたくないようです
01:49
And that's because there's some little bit of fear,
何かを心配しているのか――
01:51
little bit of resistance or just clogged mechanisms.
ちょっと抵抗が
あるのかもしれません
01:54
So designers work on this particular malaise that we have,
デザイナーは 私たちがもつ
このような不安感や
01:57
these kinds of discomforts that we have,
不快感をなくそうと
取り組んでいます
02:01
and try to make life easier for us.
生活の役に立つためです
02:04
Elasticity of mind is something that we really need, you know,
私たちには柔軟性が必要です
02:06
we really need, we really cherish and we really work on.
柔軟な考えを
大切に育てる必要があります
02:10
And this exhibition is about the work of designers
この展覧会では
柔軟に考えるための
02:14
that help us be more elastic,
ヒントになる作品を展示します
02:17
and also of designers that really work on this elasticity
柔軟性を
テーマにした作品もあります
02:19
as an opportunity. And one last thing is that
デザイナーだけでなく
02:23
it's not only designers, but it's also scientists.
科学者の作品も展示します
02:26
And before I launch into the display of some of the slides
展覧会のプレビューを
ご覧いただく前に
02:28
and into the preview, I would like to point out
科学者とデザインの
すばらしい関係についてお話しします
02:33
this beautiful detail about scientists and design.
科学者とデザインの
すばらしい関係についてお話しします
02:35
You can say that the relationship between science and design
始まりは 何世紀も前に
さかのぼります
02:39
goes back centuries. You can of course talk about
有名な例としては
02:42
Leonardo da Vinci and many other Renaissance men and women --
レオナルド・ダ・ビンチなどが
挙げられるでしょう
02:44
and there's a gigantic history behind it.
とても深い歴史があります
02:48
But according to a really great science historian you might know,
科学史家のピーター・ギャリソンを
ご存じでしょうか
02:51
Peter Galison -- he teaches at Harvard --
ハーバード大学の教授です
02:55
what nanotechnology in particular and quantum physics
彼によると ナノテクノロジーや
量子物理学は
02:57
have brought to designers is this renewed interest,
近年 デザイナーの興味を
引いています
03:01
this real passion for design.
情熱をかき立てています
03:04
So basically, the idea of being able to build things bottom up,
物を一から作り出すデザイナーと
03:07
atom by atom, has made them all into tinkerers.
物を原子から考える科学者は
本質的に似ていました
03:11
And all of a sudden scientists are seeking designers,
現在 科学者とデザイナーは
急速に接近して
03:14
just like designers are seeking scientists.
協調を始めています
03:17
It's a brand-new love affair that we're trying to cultivate
このデザインと科学の新たな関係に
MoMAは力を入れています
03:20
at MOMA. Together with Adam Bly, who is the founder of Seed magazine --
例えば 雑誌「シード」を創刊した
アダム・ブライと共同で
03:25
that's now a multimedia company, you might know it --
あるプログラムを始めました
03:29
we founded about a year ago a monthly salon
デザイナーと科学者が
交流するための――
03:31
for designers and scientists, and it's quite beautiful.
毎月の集まりです
03:36
And Keith has come, and also Jonathan has come and many others.
多くの関係者が参加しています
03:38
And it was great, because at the beginning was this apology fest --
最初は すれ違いばかりでした
03:41
you know, scientists would tell designers,
科学者はデザイナーに
03:44
you know, I don't know what style is, I'm not really elegant.
“スタイルのことは
分からなくて”と言います
03:46
And designers would like, oh, I don't know how to do an equation,
デザイナーも
“数式はちょっと…”という感じです
03:49
I don't understand what you're saying. And then all of a sudden
なかなかお互いを
理解できませんでしたが
03:52
they really started talking each others' language,
ある時点から
議論が活発になりました
03:55
and now we're already at the point that they collaborate.
今や 共同でプロジェクトを
進めています
03:57
Paul Steinhardt, a physicist from New York,
物理学者の
ポール・スタインハート
03:59
and Aranda/Lasch, architects, collaborated in an installation
建築家のアランダとラッシュ
彼らは共同で ロンドンで
04:02
in London at the Serpentine.
展示を行いました
04:07
And it's really interesting to see how this happens.
こうした連携に注目しています
04:09
The exhibition will talk about the work
今回の展覧会では
デザイナーと科学者の――
04:13
of both designers and scientists,
両方の作品を展示します
04:16
and show how they're presenting the possibilities of the future to us.
未来の可能性を
ご覧いただきたいと思います
04:18
I'm showing to you
では スライドです
04:22
different sections of the show right now,
展示コーナーごとに
04:23
just to give you a taste of it.
ご紹介します
04:25
Nanophysics and nanotechnology, for instance,
ナノ物理学や
ナノテクノロジーは
04:26
have really opened the designer's mind.
デザイナーの発想を
広げました
04:30
In this case I'm showing more the designers' work,
科学から影響を受けた
04:32
because they're the ones that have really been stimulated.
デザイナーの作品を中心に
ご紹介します
04:34
A lot of the objects in the show are concepts,
この展覧会の多くの作品は
04:37
not objects that exist already. But what you're looking at here
既に存在する物ではなく
概念を表現しています
04:39
is the work of some scientists from UCLA.
これは UCLAの
科学者の作品です
04:44
This kind of alphabet soup is a new way to mark proteins --
似た形のパスタがありますが
これはタンパク質です
04:47
not only by color but literally by alphabet letters.
色とアルファベットの文字で
表現しています
04:50
So they construct it, and they can construct all kinds of forms
あらゆる種類の形を
04:53
at the nanoscale. This is the work of design students
ナノの世界で表せるという
試みです
04:56
from the Royal College of Arts in London
ロイヤル・カレッジ・オブ・アート
(RCA)の学生の作品です
04:59
that have been working together with their tutor, Tony Dunne,
指導教員はアンソニー・ダンです
05:01
and with a bunch of scientists around Great Britain
英国の多くの科学者と協力して
05:04
on the possibilities of nanotechnology for design in the future.
デザインにおける
ナノテクノロジーに取り組んでいます
05:07
New sensing elements on the body --
これは新しい感覚器官です
05:10
you can grow hairs on your nails,
爪の上の細かい毛が
05:12
and therefore grab some of the particles from another person.
他人の細胞のかけらを
つかみます
05:14
They seem very, very obsessed
相手について
05:17
with finding out more about the ideal mate.
もっと知るためです
05:19
So they're working on enhancing everything: touch, smell --
触覚や嗅覚など
あらゆる感覚を高めて
05:21
everything they can, in order to find the perfect mate.
理想の相手を
見つけようとします
05:25
Very interesting. This is a typeface designer
イスラエルの
書体デザイナーは
05:28
from Israel who has designed -- he calls them "typosperma."
“タイポスペルマ”を考案しました
05:31
He's thinking -- of course it's all a concept --
彼がデザインしたこの生物は
05:35
of injecting typefaces into spermatozoa,
活字書体が組み込まれた
精子です
05:38
I don't know how to say it in English -- spermatazoi --
英語で何と呼ぶのかは
難しいですが…
05:42
in order to make them become -- to almost have a song
様々な可能性をもつ
生物でしょう
05:45
or a whole poem written with every ejaculation. (Laughter)
例えば 射精の度に
美しい詩を生み出すかもしれません
05:49
I tell you, designers are quite fantastic, you know.
デザイナーって
想像力豊かですよね
05:56
So, tissue design.
組織デザイン
05:58
In this case too, you have a mixture of scientists and designers.
ここでも 科学とデザインが
結びついています
06:00
This here is part of the same lab at the Royal College of Arts.
作者は 先程のRCAの学生と
同じコースの学生です
06:04
The RCA is really quite an amazing school from that viewpoint.
RCAはすごいですね
06:08
One of the assignments for a year was to work with in-vitro meat.
ある年 培養肉に関する
課題が出されました
06:11
You know that already you can grow meat in vitro.
人工的に肉を培養する試みが
06:14
In Australia they did it -- this research company, called SymbioticA.
オーストラリアで
行われています
06:17
But the problem is that it's a really ugly patty.
培養肉の難点は
おいしそうに見えないことです
06:20
And so, the assignment to the students was,
学生たちに出された課題は
06:24
how should the steak of tomorrow be?
未来のステーキのあり方です
06:26
When you don't have to kill cows and it can have any shape,
牛を殺さずに作る肉は
形が決まっていません
06:28
what should it be like?
理想の形とは?
06:31
So this particular student, James King,
ジェームズ・キングという学生は
06:32
went around the beautiful English countryside,
英国の田舎を回りました
06:35
picked the best, best cow that he could see,
そこで最高の牛を選んで
06:37
and then put her in the MRI machine.
MRIで撮影しました
06:40
Then, he took the scans of the best organs and made the meat --
その画像をもとに
肉の形を作ったんです
06:42
of course, this is done with a Japanese resins food maker,
作品は樹脂でできていますが
06:46
but you know, in the future it could be made better --
未来のステーキは
こうして改良できるでしょう
06:49
which reproduces the best MRI scan of the best cow he could find.
やはり 本物の肉の形が
一番なのかもしれません
06:52
Instead, this element here is much more banal.
次は もっと身近な例です
06:56
Something that you know can be done already
ご存じの技術を使っています
07:00
is to grow bone tissue, so that you can make a wedding ring
骨の組織を培養して作った
結婚指輪です
07:02
out of the bone tissue of your loved one -- literally.
まさに相手の一部ですね
07:06
So, this is indeed made of human bone tissue.
これは 実際に
人間の骨の組織で作っています
07:08
This is SymbioticA, and they've been working --
シンビオティカの
研究者の作品です
07:12
they were the first ones to do this in-vitro meat --
最初に培養肉を作った彼らは
07:15
and now they've also done an in-vitro coat, a leather coat.
次に培養革のコートを
作りました
07:17
It's miniscule, but it's a real coat. It's shaped like one.
非常に小さいのですが
本物のコートの形です
07:20
So, we'll be able to really not have any excuse
将来 実用化されれば
07:24
to be wearing everything leather in the future.
気がとがめることなく
革製品を使えるでしょう
07:27
One of the most important topics of the show -- you know,
この展覧会の
最大のテーマの1つは
07:30
as anything in our life today,
生活にも当てはまります
07:33
we can look at it from many, many different viewpoints,
物事を見る時の
07:35
and at different levels.
様々な見方です
07:37
One of the most interesting and most important concepts
特に重要なポイントは
07:38
is the idea of scale. We change scale very often:
物事を見る尺度です
07:41
we change resolution of screens, and
例えば 画面の解像度を
変えるように
07:44
we're not really fazed by it, we do it very comfortably.
私たちは日常的に
尺度を変えています
07:46
So you go, even in the exhibition,
この展覧会でも
07:50
from the idea of nanotechnology and the nanoscale
ナノテクノロジーを
扱う作品があります
07:52
to the manipulation of really great amounts of data --
一方 世界や宇宙を対象とした
07:54
the mapping and tagging of the universe and of the world.
マッピングとタグ付けを
行う作品もあります
07:57
In this particular case a section will be devoted
次にご紹介するのは
情報デザインです
08:00
to information design.
次にご紹介するのは
情報デザインです
08:03
You see here the work of Ben Fry. This is "Human vs. Chimps" --
ベン・フライの
「ヒト対チンパンジー」です
08:04
the few chromosomes that distinguish us from chimps.
ヒトとチンパンジーの
遺伝子レベルのわずかな違いを
08:08
It was a beautiful visualization that he did for Seed magazine.
イメージにした作品です
08:11
And here's the whole code of Pac-Man, visualized
これは パックマンの
ソースコードです
08:15
with all the go-to, go-back-to,
プログラムの流れを
08:18
also made into a beautiful choreography.
美しく描いています
08:20
And then also graphs by scientists,
この科学者の作品は
08:23
this beautiful diagraph of protein homology.
異なるタンパク質の類似性を
図にしたものです
08:25
Scientists are starting to also consider aesthetics.
科学者は 美しさも
考え始めています
08:28
We were discussing with Keith Shrubb* this morning
今朝 キース・シュワブと
08:30
the fact that many scientists
科学者の傾向について
話しました
08:33
tend not to use anything beautiful in their presentations,
科学者のプレゼンテーションの
見栄えがよくないのは
08:35
otherwise they're afraid of being considered dumb blondes.
見た目だけで中身がないと
思われたくないからだそうです
08:38
So they pick the worst background
それで センスの悪い
08:41
from any kind of PowerPoint presentation, the worst typeface.
背景やフォントを選ぶんです
08:43
It's only recently that this kind of marriage
ですが 最近
状況が変わってきました
08:47
between design and science is producing some of the first "pretty" --
デザインと科学を結び付けて
08:50
if we can say so -- scientific presentations.
“小ぎれいな”プレゼンを
作り始めています
08:54
Another aspect of contemporary design
デザインの世界では現在
08:57
that I think is mind-opening, promising
もう1つの
新しい流れがあります
08:59
and will really be the future of design,
将来有望な
09:02
is the idea of collective design.
コレクティブデザインです
09:03
You know, the whole XO laptop, from One Laptop per Child,
“一人ひとりの子どもに
パソコンを”というプロジェクトの
09:05
is based on the idea of collaboration and mash and networking.
ノートパソコン“XO”は
集まってお互いに通信できます
09:09
So, the more the merrier.
パソコンが多く集まるほど
09:13
The more computers, the stronger the signal,
通信が安定します
09:15
and children work on the interface so that it's all based
子どもたちは
このパソコンを使って
09:17
on doing things together, tasks together.
共同で 課題に
取り組むことができます
09:21
So the idea of collective design
コレクティブデザインの考えは
09:24
is something that will become even bigger in the future,
今後もっと重要になるでしょう
09:27
and this is chosen as an example.
その1つの例です
09:29
Related to the idea of collective design and to the new balance
コレクティブデザインや
09:33
between the individual and the collectiveness, collectivity
個と集合のバランスに関連して
もう1つご紹介します
09:36
is the idea of existence maximum.
“最大限の存在”です
09:40
That's a term that I coined a few years ago
数年前 私が造った言葉です
09:42
while I was thinking of how pressed we are together,
私たちは 集団の中で
大変圧迫を感じています
09:44
and at the same time how these small objects,
そんな時にも
手にした小さなツール
09:47
like the Walkman first and then the iPod,
例えばiPodで音楽を聴いて
09:51
create bubbles of space around us that enable us
自分の空間を作り出します
09:53
to have a metaphysical space
実際の体よりも
ずっと大きな空間です
09:56
that is much bigger than our physical space.
実際の体よりも
ずっと大きな空間です
09:58
You can be in the subway and you can be completely isolated
地下鉄に乗っていても
iPodがあれば
10:00
and have your own room in your iPod.
ひとりになれるのです
10:04
And this is the work of several designers
これはデザイナーの作品です
10:06
that really enhance the idea of solitude and expansion
閉ざされた空間の
10:09
by means of various techniques.
発展を表現しています
10:13
This is a spa telephone. The idea is that it's become so difficult
今は ゆっくり会話できる場所が
10:15
to have a private conversation anywhere
なかなかありません
10:19
that you go to the spa, you have a massage, you have a facial,
そこで スパに行って
マッサージを受けて
10:20
maybe a rub, and then you have this beautiful pool
このプールに入ります
10:23
with this perfect temperature, and you can have
ちょうどよい温度の
水に浮かんで
10:25
this isolation tank phone conversation
会話に集中できる装置です
10:27
with whomever you've been wanting to talk with for a long time.
これで 好きな相手と
ゆっくり話せます
10:30
And same thing here, Social Tele-presence.
「社会的テレプレゼンス」という
作品です
10:33
It's actually already used by the military a little bit,
この仕組みは
軍隊で既に使われています
10:36
but it's the idea of being able to be somewhere else
遠く離れた場所に
まるで実際にいるような――
10:38
with your senses while you're removed from it physically.
感覚を得られる技術です
10:41
And this is called Blind Date. It's a [unclear],
これは ブラインドデートに
利用した例です
10:45
so if you're too shy to be really at the date,
デートの場所に
行く勇気がなければ
10:48
you can stay at a distance with your flowers
その場で体感できます
10:50
and somebody else reenacts the date for you.
代理の人が
動いてくれるのです
10:52
Rapid manufacturing is another big area
技術とデザインが連携している
他の例として
10:55
in which technology and design are, I think,
ラピッドマニュファクチャリングが
あります
10:58
bound to change the world. You've heard about it before many times.
私の予想ですが 世の中を
変えるものかもしれません
11:02
Rapid manufacturing is a computer file
コンピューターで設計した
データから
11:06
sent directly from the computer to the manufacturing machine.
直接 製品を作る技術です
11:08
It used to be called rapid prototyping, rapid modeling.
以前は ラピッドプロトタイピングなどと
呼ばれていました
11:11
It started out in the '80s, but at the beginning
1980年代に開発されましたが
11:15
it was machines carving out of a foam block
当初は 発泡プラスチックなどで
試作品を作るものでした
11:17
a model that was very, very fragile,
試作品はもろくて
11:20
and could not have any real use.
実際に使えるものでは
ありませんでした
11:23
Slowly but surely, the materials became better -- better resins.
次第に 良い材料が
使われるようになって
11:25
Techniques became better -- not only carving
加工技術も向上しました
11:29
but also stereolithography and laser -- solidifying all kinds of resins,
粉末や液体の樹脂を
レーザーで固めたものを
11:31
whether in powder or in liquid form. And the vats became bigger,
積み重ねて
立体にするなどの方法です
11:37
to the point that now we can have actual chairs
今は この技術を応用して
11:41
made by rapid manufacturing.
直接 製品を作れます
11:44
It takes seven days today to manufacture a chair,
現在 椅子を作るには
7日かかりますが
11:46
but you know what? One day it will take seven hours.
いずれ7時間になるでしょう
11:49
And then the dream is that you'll be able to, from home,
将来は居ながらにして
自分好みの椅子を
11:51
customize your chair. You know, companies and designers
作れるようになるかもしれません
11:55
will be designing the matrix or the margins
メーカーは
基本の形をデザインして
11:57
that respect both solidity and brand, and design identity.
製品の質やブランドを保ちます
12:00
And then you can send it to the Kinko's store at the corner
私たちは 近所の店に
データを送って椅子を作るのです
12:05
and go get your chair. Now, the implications of this are enormous,
これには多くの意味があります
12:08
not only regarding the participation of the final buyer
買い手がデザインに関われるのは
もちろんですが
12:11
in the design process, but also no tracking,
流通を管理する必要が
ありません
12:15
no warehousing, no wasted materials.
倉庫も不要です
無駄な材料も出ません
12:17
Also, I can imagine many design manufacturers
一方 多くのメーカーでは
12:20
will have to retool their own business plans
店舗の整備なども
必要になるでしょう
12:23
and maybe invest in this Kinko's store. But it really is a big change.
ビジネスモデルまで変えるような
大きな変化です
12:25
And here I'm showing a picture that was in Wired Magazine --
これは 雑誌「ワイアード」の中の
12:29
you know, the Artifacts of the Future section that I love so much --
“未来の製品”の欄に
載っていた絵です
12:32
that shows you can have your desktop 3D printer
自宅の3Dプリンターで
12:35
and print your own basketball.
バスケットボールを
作っています
12:37
But here instead are examples, you can already 3D-print textiles,
3Dプリンターで
既に作れるものには
12:39
which is very interesting.
こんな織物もあります
12:43
This is just a really nice touch -- it's called slow prototyping.
一方こちらは
スロープロトタイピングです
12:45
It's a designer that put 10,000 bees at work and they built this vase.
デザイナーが 1万匹のハチに
作らせた花瓶です
12:48
They had a particular shape that they had to stay in.
この形をした型の中に
ハチを入れたのです
12:53
Mapping and tagging.
マッピングとタグ付け
12:56
As the capacity of computers becomes really, really big,
コンピューターの容量は
膨大になりましたが
12:57
and the capacity of our mind not that much bigger,
脳の容量には限界があります
13:01
we find that we need to tag as much as we can what we do
そこで私たちは
物事にタグを付け始めました
13:05
in order to then retrace our path.
後で探しやすくなりますし
13:08
Also, we do it in order to share with other people.
人と共有する時にも
役立ちます
13:11
Again, this communal sense of experience
経験を共有することが
13:13
that seems to be so important today.
現在 重視されています
13:16
So, various ways to map and tag
最近 多くのデザイナーも
13:18
are also the work of many designers nowadays.
マッピングやタグ付けに関する
作品を出しています
13:21
Also, the senses -- designers and scientists all work on trying to expand
感覚
デザイナーと科学者は
13:25
our senses capabilities so that we can achieve more.
人間の感覚の可能性にも
取り組んでいます
13:29
And also animal senses in a way.
動物の感覚も扱っています
13:33
This particular object that many people love so much
この独特な形をした物は
13:36
is actually based on kind of a scientific experiment --
科学的な実験に基づいて
作りました
13:40
the fact that bees have a very strong olfactory sense,
蜂の嗅覚は
非常に鋭いということです
13:43
and so -- much like dogs that can smell certain kinds of skin cancer --
犬は ある種の皮膚ガンの
においが分かります
13:46
bees can be trained by Pavlovian reflex
条件反射を起こすように
訓練された蜂も
13:50
to detect one type of cancer, and also pregnancy.
ガンや妊娠を
感知できるのです
13:54
And so this student at the RCA
RCAの学生が
13:57
designed this beautiful blown-glass object
デザインして
吹きガラスで作りました
13:59
where the bees move from one chamber to the other
蜂は 特定のにおいを
感知すると
14:02
if they detect that particular smell
別の部分に入ります
14:05
that signifies, in this case, pregnancy.
この例では
妊娠の有無が分かります
14:07
Another shape is made for cancer.
ガンを感知するための物は
違う形です
14:09
Design for Debate is a very interesting new endeavor
“議論のためのデザイン”という
面白い動きがあります
14:11
that designers have really shaped for themselves.
デザイナーが
自分たちのために始めました
14:15
Some designers don't design objects, products,
デザイナーの中には
物をデザインしない人もいます
14:18
things that we're going to actually use,
デザイナーの中には
物をデザインしない人もいます
14:21
but rather, they design scenarios that are object-based.
物を基点に 将来予測を
デザインするのです
14:22
They're still very useful.
これも大切な活動です
14:26
They help companies and other designers think better about the future.
デザイナーが未来を考える時に
役立つからです
14:28
And usually they are accompanied by videos.
たいてい 映像が
添えられています
14:32
This is quite beautiful. It's Dunne and Raby, "All the Robots."
ダンとレイビーの
「すべてロボット」です
14:35
Those are a series of robots that are meant to be taken care of.
どれも 手助けが必要な
ロボットです
14:38
We always think that robots will take care of us,
普通のロボットは
人間を手助けしますが
14:42
and instead they designed these robots that are very, very needy.
このロボットは
とても手がかかります
14:44
You need to take one in your arms and look at it in the eyes
あるものは
5分間抱いて目を見ないと
14:46
for about five minutes before it does something.
動きません
14:49
Another one gets really, really nervous if you get in to the room,
あるものは 人間を怖がるので
14:51
and starts shaking, so you have to calm it down.
なだめなくてはいけません
14:54
So it's really a way to make us think more
ロボットとは何かを
14:56
about what robots mean to us.
考えさせられます
14:59
Noam Toran and "Accessories for Lonely Men":
ノーム・トランの
「孤独な男性の癒やし」です
15:01
the idea is that when you lose your loved one
想定しているのは
15:05
or you go through a bad breakup,
最愛の人と別れた男性です
15:07
what you miss the most are those annoying things
一緒にいる時には
うっとうしいことが
15:09
that you used to hate when you were with the other person.
なくなると一番寂しいものです
15:12
So he designed all these series of accessories.
そんな時に役立つ小物を
考えました
15:15
This one is something that takes away the sheets from you at night.
これは 寝ている時に
シーツを奪うものです
15:17
Then there's another one that breathes on your neck.
首に息を吹きかけるものや
15:22
There's another one that throws plates and breaks them.
皿を投げつけるものもあります
15:25
So it's just this idea of what we really miss in life.
生活の中で懐かしく思うものを
形にした試みです
15:27
Elio Caccavale: he took the idea
エリオ・カカバレの
プロジェクトは
15:31
of those dolls that explain leukemia.
白血病について教える人形から
始まりました
15:34
He's working on dolls that explain xenotransplantation,
彼は 動物から人間への
臓器移植などを
15:37
and also the spider gene into the goat, from a few years ago.
人形を使って表現しています
15:41
He's working for the exhibition on a whole series of dolls
さらに 現在の人工授精の技術を
15:46
that explain to children where babies come from today.
子どもに教える人形も
展示しています
15:49
Because it's not anymore Mom, Dad, the flowers and the bees,
もはや 花とミツバチでは
説明できないからです
15:52
and then there's the baby. No, it can be two moms, three dads,
母親が2人で
父親が3人という状況も
15:55
in-vitro -- there's the whole idea
体外受精では あり得ます
15:58
of how babies can be made today that has changed.
生命の誕生にまつわる状況は
変わったので
16:01
So it's a series of dolls that he's working on right now.
理解を助けるものを
作っているんですね
16:05
One of the most beautiful things
デザインとは
16:09
is that designers really work on life,
生活に基づくものです
16:10
even though they take technology into account.
ただし 技術が
必要なものもあります
16:13
And many designers have been working recently
最近 多くのデザイナーが
16:15
on the idea of death and mourning,
死と弔いについて
取り組んでいます
16:17
and what we can do about it today with new technologies.
新しい技術を使って――
16:19
Or how we should behave about it with new technologies.
何ができるかを考えています
16:23
These three objects over there are hard drives
ここに3つあるのは
ハードディスクです
16:26
with a Bluetooth connection. But they're in reality
無線で接続できます
16:29
very, very beautiful sculpted artifacts
きれいに彫刻されていますね
16:32
that contain the whole desktop and computer memory
亡くなった人のファイルを
16:35
of somebody who passed away.
丸ごと収めるものです
16:38
So instead of having only the pictures,
写真を見てしのぶだけでなく
16:40
you will be able to put this object next to the computer
コンピューターの隣に
これを置きます
16:42
and all of a sudden have, you know,
すると 全てのファイルが
現れます
16:45
Gertrude's whole life and all of her files
その人の当時の生活に
16:47
and her address book come alive.
触れられるのです
16:50
And this is even better. This is Auger-Loizeau, "AfterLife."
オージェとロワゾーの
「アフターライフ」です
16:51
It's the idea that some people don't believe in an afterlife.
死後の世界を
信じていない人もいます
16:54
So to give them something tangible that shows that
そこで 死後に確かに残るものを
16:57
there is something after death, they take the gastric juices
何かの形にすることを
考えました
17:00
of people who passed away and concentrate them,
これは 亡くなった人の
胃酸を濃縮して
17:04
and put them into a battery that can actually be used
本物の電池に
利用するというものです
17:06
to power flashlights. They also go -- you know, sex toys, whatever.
懐中電灯や…バイブレーターにも
使えるかもしれません
17:09
It's quite amazing how these things can make you smile,
作品をご覧になった皆さんが
笑ったり――
17:13
can make you laugh, can make you cry sometimes.
涙したりするのを見ると
感動します
17:17
But I'm hoping that this particular exhibition
この展覧会を通じて
17:19
will be able to trace a new portrait of where design is going --
デザインの未来を
感じていただければと思います
17:22
which is always, hopefully, a portrait a few years in advance
そこには 数年先の世界も
17:25
of where the world is going.
映し出されているはずです
17:28
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
17:30
Translator:Maiko Kosaka
Reviewer:Hidehito Sumitomo

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Paola Antonelli - Design curator
Paola Antonelli is on a mission to introduce -- and explain -- design to the world. With her shows at New York's Museum of Modern Art, she celebrates design's presence in every part of life.

Why you should listen

Since she stepped back from practicing architecture in order to focus on writing about design, teaching and curating gallery exhibitions, Italian native Paola Antonelli has become a force to be reckoned with in the design world. Working at the Museum of Modern Art in New York since 1994, she is senior curator of the gallery's Architecture and Design department and, as of 2012, the museum's first ever director of research and development. Antonelli has worked on shows such as "Humble Masterpieces," which celebrated traditionally unheralded design icons such as the paperclip; "Design and the Elastic Mind," considering the relationship of design and technology, and "Talk to Me ," which looked at design and the communication of people and objects.

Ever mindful that the majority of visitors to MOMA are attracted by artists such as Picasso and Matisse, Antonelli works to ensure that if they do stumble across a design-related show, they'll be both entertained and enlightened. In 2012, she led a move to acquire 14 video games for the museum's permanent collection.

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