23:20
TED1998

Paul MacCready: Nature vs. humans

ポール・マクレディ: 自然VS人類

Filmed:

航空機技術者の故ポール・マクレディが、1998年に、人類が自然を完全に支配下においた惑星、地球を考察し、自然のバランスを保つためには何ができるかを語った映像です。マクレディの実績には、太陽電池を用いた航空機や超高性能グライダー、電気自動車の開発などがあります。

- Engineer
Paul MacCready, an aircraft designer and environmentalist, is a pioneer of human-powered flight, alternative energy for transportation, and environmentally responsible design. Full bio

00:18
You hear that this is the era of environment -- or biology, or information technology ...
現代は環境、バイオ、ITの時代
と言われますが
00:25
Well, it's the era of a lot of different things
私たちが生きているのは
多様性の時代とも言えます
00:27
that we're in right now. But one thing for sure:
変化の時代だと言えることは確かです
00:29
it's the era of change. There's more change going on
地球の人間の生活史上
いまだかつてなかったような
00:32
than ever has occurred in the history of human life on earth.
多様な変化が起きています
00:38
And you all sort of know it, but it's hard to get it
誰もが実感してはいても
真に理解するには
少々わかりづらい点もあります
00:41
so that you really understand it.
00:43
And I've tried to put together something that's a good start for this.
そこで理解への第一歩として
資料をまとめて来ました
00:48
I've tried to show in this -- though the color doesn't come out --
このグラフに—
色がうまく出ませんね—
00:52
that what I'm concerned with is the little 50-year time bubble
皆さんが生きている
この50年のまとまりを見ていきます
00:56
that you are in. You tend to be interested in a generation past,
人は前後の世代に興味を抱きます
01:00
a generation future -- your parents, your kids, things you can change
両親、子供といった 向こう数十年で
自分が変化に関与できる事柄です
01:04
over the next few decades -- and this 50-year time bubble
そして この50年の区切りを
歩んでいくのです
01:06
you kind of move along in. And in that 50 years,
そしてこの50年間の
01:10
if you look at the population curve, you find the population of humans
人口推移のカーブを見れば
地球の人口が倍以上に
増加していることがわかります
01:14
on the earth more than doubles and we're up three-and-a-half times
私の誕生時に比べると3.5倍です
01:19
since I was born. When you have a new baby,
新しく子供が生まれたら
その子が高校を卒業する頃には
01:22
by the time that kid gets out of high school
01:26
more people will be added than existed on earth when I was born.
私が生まれた頃の人口以上の
増加が見られることでしょう
01:30
This is unprecedented, and it's big.
いまだかつて無かったことですし
すさまじいことです
01:33
Where it goes in the future is questioned. So that's the human part.
この先どうなるかはわかりません
人類についてはここまでです
01:37
Now, the human part related to animals: look at the left side of that.
次は動物と人間の関連についてです
図の左を見てください
私が言うところの「人の分け前」
つまり人と家畜とペット
01:42
What I call the human portion -- humans and their livestock and pets --
01:45
versus the natural portion -- all the other wild animals and just --
それに対する「自然の分け前」
他の全ての野生動物
01:49
these are vertebrates and all the birds, etc.,
脊椎動物やその他鳥類など
地上や空中の生物で
01:53
in the land and air, not in the water. How does it balance?
水棲生物は除きます
このバランスを見ていきましょう
01:57
Certainly, 10,000 years ago, the civilization's beginning,
当然ですが1万年前
つまり文明の黎明期は
02:02
the human portion was less than one tenth of one percent. Let's look at it now.
「人の分け前」はわずか0.1%以下でした
次に現代です
02:07
You follow this curve and you see the whiter spot in the middle --
グラフの曲線の中央部に
白い部分がありますね
02:11
that's your 50-year time bubble. Humans, livestock and pets
これが皆さんの50年の一区切りです
人、家畜、ペットが
総じて地球上の生物の97%を占め
02:16
are now 97 percent of that integrated total mass on earth
その他の野生動物はわずか3%
人類の勝利です
02:20
and all wild nature is three percent. We have won. The next generation
次世代はこの競争を気にしなくていい
勝敗はついています
02:24
doesn't even have to worry about this game -- it is over.
02:27
And the biggest problem came in the last 25 years:
そして最大の問題が
直近の25年の間に起きました
02:31
it went from 25 percent up to that 97 percent.
なんと25%から
97%に激増したのです
02:34
And this really is a sobering picture upon realizing that we, humans,
これはまさに衝撃的な光景です
我々人類が地球上の生物に
君臨すると見て取れるからです
02:40
are in charge of life on earth; we're like the capricious Gods
人はギリシア神話の
移り気な神々のように命をもてあそび
02:44
of old Greek myths, kind of playing with life --
02:49
and not a great deal of wisdom injected into it.
あまり叡智を駆使していないのです
02:53
Now, the third curve is information technology.
3番目のグラフは情報技術(IT)です
02:57
This is Moore's Law plotted here, which relates to density
情報の密度に関する
ムーアの法則を表したものですが
03:01
of information, but it has been pretty good for showing
ITに関する他の多くの物事の
03:04
a lot of other things about information technology --
指標とするのにも適しており
03:07
computers, their use, Internet, etc. And what's important
コンピューター、その用途
インターネットなどです
ただグラフの曲線は真っすぐ
上へ振り切れてしまい
03:11
is it just goes straight up through the top of the curve,
03:14
and has no real limits to it. Now try and contrast these.
果てがありません
では次にこちらをご覧ください
03:20
This is the size of the earth going through that same --
これは地球の大きさを
同じ軸上に示したものです
03:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:24
-- frame. And to make it really clear, I've put all four on one graph.
ではわかり易く
この4つのグラフを1つにまとめましょう
03:30
There's no need to see the little detailed words on it.
細かい解説の必要はないですね
03:33
That first one is humans-versus-nature;
1つ目は人類対自然の対立
人類が勝利し これ以上得るものはなし
03:38
we've won, there's no more gain. Human population.
2つ目は人口増加
成長分野の産業への参入を考えている人には
03:41
And so if you're looking for growth industries to get into,
03:43
that's not a good one -- protecting natural creatures. Human population
野生動物の保護は有望ではありません
人口は増加中であり 当分は続くでしょう
03:48
is going up; it's going to continue for quite a while.
03:51
Good business in obstetricians, morticians, and farming, housing, etc. --
産科医、葬儀屋、農家
不動産屋あたりが繁盛しそうですね
03:57
they all deal with human bodies, which require being fed,
これらは皆 人体と関わりがあり
人体には食事、輸送、住まいが必要です
04:02
transported, housed and so on. And the information technology,
そして人の脳と繋がりを持つ
IT産業の伸びには際限がありません
04:07
which connects to our brains, has no limit -- now, that is a wonderful
参入するには最高の分野です
04:11
field to be in. You're looking for growth opportunity?
成長産業をお探しなら
04:13
It's just going up through the roof.
著しく伸びることでしょう
04:16
And then, the size of the Earth. Somehow making these all compatible
次に地球の大きさです
これらの産業と
04:19
with the Earth looks like a pretty bad industry to be involved with.
地球とのバランスをとるという産業は
なかなか見込みが薄いようです
でも 結果としては
それが次の段階なのです
04:24
So, that's the stage out of all this. I find,
04:28
for reasons I don't understand, I really do have a goal.
私にはなぜか熱い夢があります
04:31
And the goal is that the world be desirable and sustainable
私の子供たちが今の私と
同じ年になったときを目標に
04:35
when my kids reach my age -- and I think that's -- in other words,
つまり次世代のために
維持可能な理想の世界を作ることです
04:39
the next generation. I think that's a goal that we probably all share.
おそらく皆さんも同意見でしょう
04:42
I think it's a hopeless goal. Technologically, it's achievable;
希望の持てない夢です
技術的には達成可能です
経済的にも達成可能
04:45
economically, it's achievable; politically,
しかし政治的には 人間の習性や制度に
関わることなので達成不可能でしょう
04:48
it means sort of the habits, institutions of people -- it's impossible.
04:53
The institutions of the past with all their inertia
惰性で続く過去の制度は
未来には不適当ですが
04:55
are just irrelevant for the future, except they're there
現存してしまっている以上
04:59
and we have to deal with them. I spend about 15 percent of my time
対峙しなくてはいけません
私は自分の時間のうち
15%を世界を救うことに注ぎ
05:05
trying to save the world, the other 85 percent, the usual --
残り85%を日常の好きなことや
その他の活動に費やしています
05:08
and whatever else we devote ourselves to.
05:11
And in that 15 percent, the main focus is on human mind, thinking skills,
この15%で注目しているのは
人の思考 つまり考えるスキルです
情報や教義をガチガチに教え込む学校から
05:17
somehow trying to unleash kids from the straightjacket of school,
05:20
which is putting information and dogma into them,
子供たちを解放しようとしています
05:23
get them so they really think, ask tough questions, argue
自分の頭で考え
鋭い質問をし
05:26
about serious subjects, don't believe everything that's in the book,
大切な問題について議論し
本に書いてあることを鵜呑みにせず
05:30
think broadly or creative. They can be.
広く、創造的な思考力を育てること
できるはずです
05:33
Our school systems are very flawed and do not reward you
学校システムには欠陥が多く
人生で大切なことや
文明の維持について考えても評価しません
05:37
for the things that are important in life
05:39
or for the survival of civilization; they reward you
05:41
for a lot of learning and sopping up stuff.
評価するのは詰め込み勉強や丸暗記です
05:46
We can't go into that today because there isn't time --
時間に限りがあるので
これ以上この話には触れませんが
05:50
it's a broad subject. One thing for sure, in the future
これは幅広い問題です
ひとつ言えることは
05:53
there is an essential feature -- necessary, but not sufficient --
未来は 小さな努力で
多くを行うようになるでしょう
十分ではない
必要最低限の未来です
06:00
which is doing more with less. We've got to be doing things
我々は少ないエネルギーに少ない資源で
効率よくやっていかなければなりません
06:04
with more efficiency using less energy, less material.
06:06
Your great-great grandparents got by on muscle power,
祖先たちは人力でやってきたことなのに
06:10
and yet we all think there's this huge power that's essential
今のライフスタイルには
莫大なエネルギーが必要だと考えられています
06:14
for our lifestyle. And with all the wonderful technology we have
今の素晴らしいテクノロジーがあれば
06:18
we can do things that are much more efficient: conserve, recycle, etc.
資源の保護やリサイクルなどで
もっと効率よくなれるはずです
06:26
Let me just rush very quickly through things that we've done.
私たちが取り組んできたことを
駆け足でご紹介します
06:29
Human-powered airplane -- Gossamer Condor sort of started me
人力飛行機「ゴッサマー・コンドル」は
1976年に私をこの道に導き
06:32
in this direction in 1976 and 77,
1977年にクレーマー賞を獲得し
航空史に名を残しました
06:38
winning the Kremer prize in aviation history,
06:40
followed by the Albatross. And we began
続く「ゴッサマー・アルバトロス」を経て
その後も様々な奇抜な飛行機や
生物模型を制作して来ました
06:43
making various odd planes and creatures.
06:46
Here's a giant flying replica of a pterosaur that has no tail.
これは翼竜の巨大レプリカです
尾はありません
06:51
Trying to have it fly straight is like trying to shoot an arrow
これを直線飛行させるのは進行方向の
先端に羽のついた矢を飛ばすようなもので
06:54
with the feathered end forward. It was a tough job,
非常に困難でしたが
06:57
and boy it made me have a lot of respect for nature.
おかげで自然への大いなる
畏敬の念を抱きました
07:00
This was the full size of the original creature.
これは もともと実在した生物の
実物大模型です
07:04
We did things on land, in the air, on water --
陸上、空中、水上
07:07
vehicles of all different kinds, usually with some electronics
ありとあらゆる乗り物の開発を行いました
大抵が電子部品や電源システムを
搭載しています
07:11
or electric power systems in them. I find they're all the same,
陸上、空中、水上の乗り物でも
私にとっては同じものですが
07:14
whether its land, air or water.
07:18
I'll be focusing on the air here. This is a solar-powered airplane --
ここでは空の乗り物についてお話しします
これは太陽電池搭載の飛行機です
07:22
165 miles carrying a person from France to England
仏英間265キロメートルを
人を1人乗せて飛行しました
07:25
as a symbol that solar power is going to be an important part
未来に太陽電池が担う重要な役割を
象徴する出来事でした
07:29
of our future. Then we did the solar car for General Motors --
次にGM社のソーラーカーを開発しました
07:32
the Sunracer -- that won the race in Australia.
「サンレーサー」です
オーストラリアの大会で優勝しました
多くの人々の注目が電気自動車に
集まり活用法が検討されました
07:36
We got a lot of people thinking about electric cars,
07:38
what you could do with them. A few years later, when we suggested to GM that
数年後 GMに提案をしました
07:41
now is the time and we could do a thing called the Impact,
今が電気自動車「インパクト」
開発のチャンスだとして出資を得ました
07:44
they sponsored it, and here's the Impact that we developed with them
これがその「インパクト」です
GMの企画で共同開発しました
07:47
on their programs. This is the demonstrator. And they put huge effort
これはデモ車です
GMは商品化に大きな力を注ぎました
07:51
into turning it into a commercial product.
07:54
With that preamble, let's show the first two-minute videotape,
前置きはこれくらいにして
動画の冒頭の2分間をお見せします
07:59
which shows a little airplane for surveillance
小型偵察機についての動画で
徐々に大型化する様子がわかります
08:02
and moving to a giant airplane.
08:06
Narrator: A tiny airplane, the AV Pointer serves for surveillance --
(ナレーター)小型機「AVポインター」は
軍用偵察機です
08:10
in effect, a pair of roving eyeglasses. A cutting-edge example
まるで機動性を持つ
眼鏡のような働きをします
最先端の小型化技術により
オペレーターが遠隔操作します
08:14
of where miniaturization can lead if the operator is remote
08:17
from the vehicle. It is convenient to carry, assemble
気軽に携帯でき組み立て式
手動で離陸できます
08:20
and launch by hand. Battery-powered, it is silent and rarely noticed.
電池内臓 音は静かで
容易には気付かれません
08:26
It sends high-resolution video pictures back to the operator.
オペレーターに高解像度の動画を送信します
08:29
With onboard GPS, it can navigate autonomously,
内臓GPSによる自動操縦が可能
08:33
and it is rugged enough to self-land without damage.
頑丈なので自律着陸しても壊れません
08:38
The modern sailplane is superbly efficient.
現代のグライダーは極めて高性能です
08:41
Some can glide as flat as 60 feet forward for every foot of descent.
30センチメートルの降下につき
約18メートルもの水平飛行が可能です
動力源は大気から得られる
エネルギーのみで
08:46
They are powered only by the energy
08:47
they can extract from the atmosphere --
08:50
an atmosphere nature stirs up by solar energy.
太陽の力を使って
大自然がもたらす力です
08:53
Humans and soaring birds have found nature to be generous
人類と天翔ける鳥は自然の恵みを
再生可能エネルギーとして受け取りました
08:56
in providing replenishable energy. Sailplanes have flown
1600キロメートル以上航行し
09:00
over 1,000 miles, and the altitude record is over 50,000 feet.
高度1万5千メートルに達した記録があります
09:04
(Music)
(音楽)
09:09
The Solar Challenger was made to serve as a symbol
「ソーラー・チャレンジャー」は
太陽電池セルでも強力な発電ができ
09:12
that photovoltaic cells can produce real power
明日の世界のエネルギーを担うということの
象徴として創られました
09:15
and will be part of the world's energy future.
09:18
In 1981, it flew 163 miles from Paris to England,
1981年パリとイギリス間を
太陽エネルギーのみで260キロメートル飛行
09:22
solely on the power of sunbeams,
09:24
and established a basis for the Pathfinder.
「パスファインダー」への礎を築きました
09:27
(Music)
(音楽)
09:30
The message from all these vehicles is that ideas and technology
これらの乗り物は
アイデアや技術を活用すれば
画期的な省エネの開発に
非常に有益であることを教えてくれます
09:34
can be harnessed to produce remarkable gains in doing more with less --
09:39
gains that can help us attain a desirable balance
テクノロジーと自然との間に
望ましいバランスをもたらしうるのです
09:42
between technology and nature. The stakes are high
人類の運命がかかっています
09:45
as we speed toward a challenging future.
加速して近づく未来は
厳しいからです
09:49
Buckminster Fuller said it clearly: "there are no passengers
バックミンスター・フラーは
こう明言しました
「宇宙船地球号には乗客はいない
乗組員のみだ
09:52
on spaceship Earth, only crew. We, the crew,
我々乗組員は遥かに少ない消費で
多くの事ができるし その義務がある」
09:56
can and must do more with less -- much less."
10:02
Paul MacCready: If we could have the second video, the one-minute,
さて 2本目の
1分間のビデオに行きます
10:05
put in as quickly as you can, which -- this will show
急いでお見せします
無人飛行機「パスファインダー」の
ハワイにおける過去の飛行です
10:09
the Pathfinder airplane in some flights this past year in Hawaii,
10:18
and will show a sequence of some of the beauty behind it
その背景にある素晴らしい点を
順番にお見せします
10:22
after it had just flown to 71,530 feet --
21キロメートル上昇し
プロペラ機の最高記録を抜きました
10:27
higher than any propeller airplane has ever flown.
10:30
It's amazing: just on the puny power of the sun --
驚嘆に値します
太陽光の僅かな力と機体の超軽量化だけで
10:33
by having a super lightweight plane, you're able to get it up there.
ここまで上昇できたのですから
10:38
It's part of a long-term program NASA sponsored.
これはNASAの出資による
長期プログラムの一環です
10:41
And we worked very closely with the whole thing being a team effort,
チームが固い結束で一丸となり
10:47
and with wonderful results like that flight.
この飛行のような
素晴らしい成果を生みだしました
10:52
And we're working on a bigger plane -- 220-foot span --
全長66メートルの
さらに大きな機体を開発中です
10:55
and an intermediate-size, one with a regenerative fuel cell
再生燃料電池搭載の中型機です
10:58
that can store excess energy during the day, feed it back at night,
日中に余った電力を充電
夜間に消費します
11:01
and stay up 65,000 feet for months at a time.
1か月間19.5キロメートルの
高度を維持できます
(音楽)
11:05
(Music)
11:10
Ray Morgan's voice will come in here.
プロジェクトマネジャーの
レイ・モーガンのナレーションが入ります
11:12
There he's the project manager. Anything they do
すべてがチームワークの成果です
レイがプログラムを指揮しています
11:14
is certainly a team effort. He ran this program. Here's ...
最後に彼が大変成功を
喜んだものが出て来ます
11:21
some things he showed as a celebration at the very end.
11:25
Ray Morgan: We'd just ended a seven-month deployment of Hawaii.
(レイ・モーガン)ハワイでの7カ月の
任務が終りました
11:29
For those who live on the mainland, it was tough being away from home.
本土出身のメンバーにとっては
郷里を離れた辛い日々でした
11:35
The friendly support, the quiet confidence, congenial hospitality
ハワイや軍部の皆さんからは
親身なサポートや穏やかな頼もしさ
11:39
shown by our Hawaiian and military hosts --
仲間意識に満ちた厚遇を受けました
11:41
(Music)
(音楽)
11:44
this is starting --
(PM)ここから・・・
11:45
made the experience enjoyable and unforgettable.
(RM)楽しく忘れがたい経験でした
11:48
PM: We have real-time IR scans going out through the Internet
(PM)航行中の機体はオンラインの
赤外線スキャナでライブで追跡しました
11:52
while the plane is flying. And it's exploring
成層圏を汚染せず飛行したのです
11:55
without polluting the stratosphere. That's its goal: the stratosphere,
これがそもそもの目標でした
11:58
the blanket that really controls the radiation of the earth
成層圏は地球を毛布のように包み
地上に降り注ぐ放射線量を調整し
12:02
and permits life on earth to be the success that it is --
地球上の生命の繁栄を許しています
12:06
probing that is very important. And also we consider it
ゆえに成層圏の研究は大切です
また当機は予算を要さない
静止衛星としても活用できます
12:11
as a sort of poor man's stationary satellite,
12:15
because it can stay right overhead for months at a time,
1か月間上空に静止可能だからです
NASAのGSFC静止衛星よりも
2千倍も地表に近いのです
12:19
2,000 times closer than the real GFC synchronous satellite.
12:24
We couldn't bring one here to fly it and show you.
ここで実際に飛ばして
お見せたかったのですが 叶いませんでした
12:28
But now let's look at the other end.
ではもう1つのビデオをお見せしましょう
動画では4キログラム程度の偵察機ドローン
12:32
In the video you saw that nine-pound or eight-pound Pointer airplane
「ポインター」をお見せしました
12:36
surveillance drone that Keenan has developed
マット・キーナンの開発でしたが
本当によくやってくれました
12:41
and just done a remarkable job. Where some have servos
サーボ(制御装置)は軽量化しても
18ないし25グラム程度が普通ですが
12:44
that have gotten down to, oh, 18 or 25 grams,
12:47
his weigh one-third of a gram. And what he's going to bring out here
彼が開発したものは
わずか3分の1グラムです
これからマットがわずか56グラムの
偵察ドローンを持って登壇します
12:52
is a surveillance drone that weighs about 2 ounces --
12:56
that includes the video camera, the batteries that run it,
ビデオカメラ、駆動電池、遠隔測定装置
12:59
the telemetry, the receiver and so on. And we'll fly it, we hope,
受信機その他込みの重量です
では飛ばします 昨夜のテスト飛行同様
成功するとよいのですが
13:06
with the same success that we had last night when we did the practice.
13:10
So Matt Keenan, just any time you're --
マット・キーナン
準備ができたらよろしく
13:13
all right
(マット・キーナン)いいですよ
13:14
-- ready to let her go. But first, we're going to make sure
では飛ばしますが まず
スクリーンにちゃんと映るようにします
13:18
that it's appearing on the screen, so you see what it sees.
ドローンの目線でご覧ください
13:22
You can imagine yourself being a mouse or fly inside of it,
ネズミになったかドローンに乗ったかして
13:26
looking out of its camera.
カメラから覗いたつもりになって下さい
(MK)スイッチを入れました
13:33
Matt Keenan: It's switched on.
13:35
PM: But now we're trying to get the video. There we go.
(PM)ではカメラに切り替えます
行きますよ
13:41
MK: Can you bring up the house lights?
(MK)照明を明るくしてください
13:43
PM: Yeah, the house lights and we'll see you all better
(PM)そうですね 明るい方がよく見えます
13:46
and be able to fly the plane better.
機体の操縦も楽です
13:48
MK: All right, we'll try to do a few laps around and bring it back in.
(MK)会場を何往復かさせて戻します
13:54
Here we go.
では行きます
(拍手)
14:00
(Applause)
(PM)最初はカメラが
うまく動いたのですが何故か・・・
14:08
PM: The video worked right for the first few and I don't know why it --
ああ うまく行った
14:14
there it goes.
1分間だけでしたが
14:21
Oh, that was only a minute, but I think you'd be safe
飛行の最後のほうなら
アレをやっても大丈夫でしょうね
14:25
to have that near the end of the flight, perhaps.
14:30
We get to do the classic.
(MK)古典的な曲芸をやります
はいうまく行きました
14:35
All right.
14:36
If this hits you, it will not hurt you.
衝突しても痛くないですよ
14:38
(Laughter)
(笑)
オーケー
14:41
OK.
(拍手)
14:42
(Applause)
ありがとう ありがとう
14:58
Thank you very much. Thank you.
14:59
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:06
But now, as they say in infomercials,
(PM)テレビコマーシャル風にいきます
15:09
we have something much better for you, which we're working on:
これからお届けしますのは
改良を加えた最新の製品で
わずか6インチの—
15センチメートルの機体です
15:13
planes that are only six inches -- 15 centimeters -- in size.
15:18
And Matt's plane was on the cover of Popular Science last month,
マットの飛行機は『ポピュラー・サイエンス』
先月号の表紙に載りました
15:24
showing what this can lead to. And in a while, something this size
この技術の未来を見せてくれました
いずれは このサイズのものがGPSと
ビデオカメラを搭載できるでしょう
15:28
will have GPS and a video camera in it. We've had one of these fly
すでにこの機体は時速56キロメートルで
14キロメートルの飛行に成功しています
15:34
nine miles through the air at 35 miles an hour
15:37
with just a little battery in it.
使ったのは小さな電池のみです
15:39
But there's a lot of technology going.
テクノロジーは日進月歩で
15:40
There are just milestones along the way of some remarkable things.
素晴らしい成果への道中に過ぎません
15:45
This one doesn't have the video in it,
この機体にはカメラは搭載していませんが
15:48
but you get a little feel from what it can do.
どんな性能なのかはお見せできるでしょう
15:52
OK, here we go.
(MK)では飛ばします
(笑)
15:58
(Laughter)
16:04
MK: Sorry.
(MK)失礼しました
16:05
OK.
16:06
(Applause)
(観客)いいですよ
(拍手)
16:10
PM: If you can pass it down when you're done. Yeah, I think --
(MK)ご覧になったら
こちらまでパスしてください
照明を直視して
少々方向感覚を失いました
16:14
I lost a little orientation; I looked up into this light.
16:18
It hit the building. And the building was poorly placed, actually.
(PM)壁にぶつかってしまいました
変な場所に壁があるからです
16:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
どんな開発が進んでいるか
おわかりになって来たでしょう
16:24
But you're beginning to see what can be done.
16:28
We're working on projects now -- even wing-flapping things
進行中のプロジェクトは
羽ばたきするスズメガ大の機体です
16:30
the size of hawk moths -- DARPA contracts, working with Caltech, UCLA.
米国防高等研究計画局との契約で
カリフォルニア工科大とUCLAの共同開発
今後どうなるかはわかりません
実用的なものになるかすら不明です
16:36
Where all this leads, I don't know. Is it practical? I don't know.
16:39
But like any basic research, when you're really forced to do things
しかしどんな基礎研究でもそうですが
現在の技術を超えたものを
16:43
that are way beyond existing technology,
開発せざるをえない
立場に立たされても
16:45
you can get there with micro-technology, nanotechnology.
マイクロ技術やナノテクノロジーを
駆使して達成できます
素晴らしいものを造り出せます
16:49
You can do amazing things when you realize
自然が既に何を成し遂げているかに
気づくだけでいいのです
16:51
what nature has been doing all along. As you get to these small scales,
ミクロの技術に携わると自然から
いかに学ぶことが多いかに気づかされます
16:54
you realize we have a lot to learn from nature -- not with 747s --
B747型機からは無理ですが
ひとたび自然の領域に足を踏み入れれば
16:58
but when you get down to the nature's realm,
17:01
nature has 200 million years of experience.
2億年の経験を持つ自然には
17:04
It never makes a mistake. Because if you make a mistake,
失敗はひとつもありません
ひとたび失敗すると子孫を残せないためです
17:07
you don't leave any progeny.
自然から得るのは
サクセスストーリーのみです
17:09
We should have nothing but success stories from nature,
人も鳥も自然の成功の産物です
17:12
for you or for birds, and we're learning a lot
人間は自然が提示する
魅惑的な主題からたくさん学んでいます
17:16
from its fascinating subjects.
17:18
In concluding, I want to get back to the big picture
さて 締めくくりとして
再び大局について考えましょう
17:24
and I have just two final slides to try and put it in perspective.
スライドを2本お見せして
客観的な視点を得ていただきたいと思います
17:31
The first I'll just read. At last, I put in three sentences
最初の1つは私が読み上げます
末尾の3つの文章に言いたいこと
全てが込められています
17:35
and had it say what I wanted.
17:37
Over billions of years on a unique sphere, chance has painted
「唯一無二のこの地球上に
何億年もの歳月が生み出した偶然が
17:40
a thin covering of life -- complex, improbable, wonderful
複雑で、驚異的で、脆く、
類いまれなる生命の薄膜を描き出した
17:44
and fragile. Suddenly, we humans -- a recently arrived species,
最近生まれた種族である人間は
突如として
17:47
no longer subject to the checks and balances inherent in nature --
自然に常在する抑制均衡を
ものともしなくなり
17:51
have grown in population, technology and intelligence
数を増やし
技術と知性を高め
17:55
to a position of terrible power. We now wield the paintbrush.
凄まじい力を持つ座に上り詰めた
今や絵筆を振るうのは人間である」
17:59
And that's serious: we're not very bright. We're short on wisdom;
深刻な事態です
人類は賢くはありません
技術に長けてはいますが 知恵は浅く
この先どこに行き着くのかは不明です
18:03
we're high on technology. Where's it going to lead?
この文章に啓発を受けた私は
絵筆を振るうことを決意しました
18:07
Well, inspired by the sentences, I decided to wield the paintbrush.
18:11
Every 25 years I do a picture. Here's the one --
私は25年ごとに絵を描きます
これがその1つですが
18:14
tries to show that the world isn't getting any bigger.
地球がもはや大きくは
ならない事を伝えたいのです
18:17
Sort of a timeline, very non-linear scale, nature rates
ある種の年表です
縮尺はまったくのデタラメですが
18:21
and trilobites and dinosaurs, and eventually we saw some humans
三葉虫や恐竜がいます
終盤に洞窟に暮らす人間がいます
18:25
with caves ... Birds were flying overhead, after pterosaurs.
プテロサウルスの後には
鳥が空を飛び
18:30
And then we get to the civilization above the little TV set
テレビの上には銃を持つように
なった文明が栄えています
18:33
with a gun on it. Then traffic jams, and power systems,
交通渋滞 発電所
デジタルを表すドット
18:37
and some dots for digital. Where it's going to lead -- I have no idea.
そしてその先は
私にはわかりません
18:42
And so I just put robotic and natural cockroaches out there,
ですからロボットゴキブリと
野生のゴキブリとを描きましたが
18:46
but you can fill in whatever you want. This is not a forecast.
何でも好きなものを描いていいんです
これは予告ではなく警告なのですから
私たちは真剣に考える必要があります
18:49
This is a warning, and we have to think seriously about it.
18:53
And that time when this is happening is not 100 years or 500 years.
これは100年や500年先の
話ではありません
18:57
Things are going on this decade, next decade;
この10年や その10年先の話です
未来を決めるには
もう時間がありません
19:03
it's a very short time that we have to decide what we are going to do.
世界をどうするかについて
人類がうまく合意できれば
19:08
And if we can get some agreement on where we want the world to be --
19:12
desirable, sustainable when your kids reach your age --
将来お子さんたちが
今の皆さんと同年齢になったとき
理想的で維持可能な地球を残せます
19:15
I think we actually can reach it. Now, I said this was a warning,
これは予知ではなく
警告だと言いましたね
19:19
not a forecast. That was before --
私がこの絵を描いたのは
19:21
I painted this before we started in on making robotic versions
スズメガロボットや
ゴキブリロボットの製作前でしたが
19:26
of hawk moths and cockroaches, and now I'm beginning to wonder
予想以上に未来を予知していたのではないかと
今は真剣に気になり始めています
19:30
seriously -- was this more of a forecast than I wanted?
19:32
I personally think the surviving intelligent life form on earth
個人的にはこの先
地球で生き残る知性ある生物は
19:35
is not going to be carbon-based; it's going to be silicon-based.
炭素ではなくシリコンになると思っています
19:39
And so where it all goes, I don't know.
どんな未来が待っているのかはわかりません
最後の最後にご紹介する
ささやかな希望の輝きは
19:45
The one final bit of sparkle we'll put in at the very end here
19:51
is an utterly impractical flight vehicle,
まったく実用性のない
空飛ぶ機体です
19:55
which is a little ornithopter wing-flapping device that --
羽ばたき飛行する機体で
動力源は輪ゴムです
ではお見せします
20:02
rubber-band powered -- that we'll show you.
20:12
MK: 32 gram. Sorry, one gram.
(MK)32グラム
失礼1グラムです
20:24
PM: Last night we gave it a few too many turns
(PM)昨夜 輪ゴムを巻き過ぎて
20:27
and it tried to bash the roof out also. It's about a gram.
天井を壊しそうになりました
重さは1グラムほどです
この管は空洞で薄さは紙くらいです
20:32
The tube there's hollow, about paper-thin.
ぶつかっても痛くないのでご安心ください
20:38
And if this lands on you, I assure you it will not hurt you.
20:41
But if you reach out to grab it or hold it, you will destroy it.
でも飛んでいる機体を掴むと
壊れますので優しく見守ってください
20:44
So, be gentle, just act like a wooden Indian or something.
墜落したら皆さんは木製のインディアンにでも
なったつもりでいらしてください
20:49
And when it comes down -- and we'll see how it goes.
まあ まずは飛ばしてみましょう
この飛翔はTEDの精神を
象徴するもののように感じております
20:55
We consider this to be sort of the spirit of TED.
21:00
(Applause)
(拍手)
21:05
And you wonder, is it practical? And it turns out if I had not been --
「これには実用性があるのか?」
と疑問に思われた場合—
21:09
(Laughter)
(笑)
(拍手)
21:15
(Applause)
申し訳ありませんが電球を
交換する人を呼ばなくてはなりませんね
21:21
Unfortunately, we have some light bulb changes.
21:24
We can probably get it down,
機体は取れると思います
21:25
but it's possible it's gone up to a greater destiny up there --
でもより崇高な運命の手に
委ねられたのかもしれませんね
21:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:29
-- than it ever had. And I wanted to make --
さて私は・・・
21:32
(Applause)
(拍手)
ただ・・・
21:35
just --
21:36
(Applause)
(拍手)
21:37
But I want to make just two points. One is, you think it's frivolous;
2点だけお話しします
1点はこの機体はつまらないもので
何の訳にも立たないということ
21:43
there's nothing to it. And yet if I had not been making ornithopters
しかし私が大昔の1939年に
もっと稚拙な羽ばたき機を作っていなかったら
21:46
like that, a little bit cruder, in 1939 -- a long, long time ago --
21:52
there wouldn't have been a Gossamer Condor,
ゴッサマー・コンドルは
誕生しませんでした
21:54
there wouldn't have been an Albatross, a Solar Challenger,
ゴッサマー・アルバトロス
ソーラーチャレンジャー
21:56
there wouldn't be an Impact car, there wouldn't be a mandate
インパクトの車両も
カリフォルニアでの
ゼロエミッション車規制もなかったでしょう
21:58
on zero-emission vehicles in California.
22:01
A lot of these things -- or similar -- would have happened some time,
こういったことや類似の発明は
おそらく10年は遅れていたはず
22:03
probably a decade later. I didn't realize at the time
当時の私には研究ベースの
22:06
I was doing inquiry-based, hands-on things with teams,
チーム体験学習を
している自覚はありませんでした
22:10
like they're trying to get in education systems.
今の教育システムはこれを
取り入れようとしています
22:13
So I think that, as a symbol, it's important.
ですからこの機体は
その象徴として重要です
22:16
And I believe that also is important. You can think of it
もう1点重要なのはこの機体を
22:19
as a sort of a symbol for learning and TED
学び続ける姿勢や
テクノロジーと自然を考える—
22:26
that somehow gets you thinking of technology and nature,
TEDの象徴として
捉えていただければ幸いです
この機体が それら全てを内包する
このカンファレンスを
22:31
and puts it all together in things that are --
この10年でこの国で起こった
どんな出来事よりも
22:34
that make this conference, I think, more important than any
22:36
that's taken place in this country in this decade.
重要なものにするとも
言えると思います
22:39
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとうございました
(拍手)
Translated by mika fukasawa
Reviewed by Riaki Poništ

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Paul MacCready - Engineer
Paul MacCready, an aircraft designer and environmentalist, is a pioneer of human-powered flight, alternative energy for transportation, and environmentally responsible design.

Why you should listen

Through his life, Paul MacCready turned his mind, energy and heart toward his two passions: flight and the Earth. His early training as a fighter and glider pilot (glider pilots still use the "MacCready speed ring" he developed after World War II) led him to explore nontraditional flight and nontraditional energy sources.

In the 1970s, he and his company, AeroVironment, designed and built two record-breaking human-powered planes: the Gossamer Condor, the first human-powered aircraft to complete a one-mile course set by the Kremer Prize, and the Gossamer Albatross, the first to cross the English Channel. The planes' avian names reveal the deep insight that MacCready brought to the challenge -- that large birds, in their wing shape and flying style, possess an elegant secret of flight.

He then turned his wide-ranging mind toward environmentally responsible design, informed by his belief that human expansion poses a grave threat to the natural world. His team at AeroVironment prototyped an electric car that became General Motors' pioneering EV-1. They explored alternative energy sources, including building-top wind turbines. And they developed a fleet of fascinating aircraft -- including his Helios solar-powered glider, built to fly in the very top 2 percent of Earth's atmosphere, and the 2005 Global Observer, the first unmanned plane powered by hydrogen cells.

 

More profile about the speaker
Paul MacCready | Speaker | TED.com