sponsored links
TED2005

Ray Kurzweil: The accelerating power of technology

レイ・カーツワイル 「加速するテクノロジーの力」

February 24, 2005

発明家、起業家、ビジョナリであるレイ・カーツワイルが豊富で詳細な根拠をもとに、なぜ2020年までに人間の脳がリバースエンジニアリングされ、ナノ・ボットが人の意識を操作するようになるのかを説明します。

Ray Kurzweil - Inventor, futurist
Ray Kurzweil is an engineer who has radically advanced the fields of speech, text and audio technology. He's revered for his dizzying -- yet convincing -- writing on the advance of technology, the limits of biology and the future of the human species. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Well, it's great to be here.
この場に立てるのは光栄です
00:24
We've heard a lot about the promise of technology, and the peril.
テクノロジーのもたらす希望や危険について
いろいろ語られてきました
00:25
I've been quite interested in both.
私はその両面に
関心があります
00:30
If we could convert 0.03 percent
もし地球に届く
太陽光の0.03%を
00:32
of the sunlight that falls on the earth into energy,
エネルギーに
変えられたなら
00:36
we could meet all of our projected needs for 2030.
予想される2030年における
需要をすべて賄えます
00:38
We can't do that today because solar panels are heavy,
現在それができないのは
ソーラーパネルが重く
00:43
expensive and very inefficient.
高価で非効率だからです
00:46
There are nano-engineered designs,
ナノテクによるデザインなら
00:48
which at least have been analyzed theoretically,
少なくとも理論上は
00:51
that show the potential to be very lightweight,
軽量性 経済性 効率性を
00:53
very inexpensive, very efficient,
実現できる見込みがあり
00:55
and we'd be able to actually provide all of our energy needs in this renewable way.
すべてのエネルギー需要を
再生可能なもので賄えます
00:57
Nano-engineered fuel cells
ナノテク燃料電池は
01:01
could provide the energy where it's needed.
エネルギーをどこでも
利用できるようにします
01:03
That's a key trend, which is decentralization,
鍵となるトレンドは
分散化です
01:06
moving from centralized nuclear power plants and
集中した原発や
01:08
liquid natural gas tankers
液化天然ガス・タンカーから
01:11
to decentralized resources that are environmentally more friendly,
自然にやさしく 効率が良く
高性能で 破綻の危険のない
01:13
a lot more efficient
分散したリソースへと
01:17
and capable and safe from disruption.
向かうのです
01:20
Bono spoke very eloquently,
先の講演でボノが
雄弁に語ったように
01:24
that we have the tools, for the first time,
長年の病気や貧困の問題に
対処できるツールを
01:26
to address age-old problems of disease and poverty.
我々は初めて
手にしたのです
01:30
Most regions of the world are moving in that direction.
世界の多くの地域で
そういう方向に向かっています
01:34
In 1990, in East Asia and the Pacific region,
1990年には
東アジアや太平洋地域に
01:38
there were 500 million people living in poverty --
貧困層が5億人いましたが
01:42
that number now is under 200 million.
現在は2億人以下です
01:44
The World Bank projects by 2011, it will be under 20 million,
世界銀行の予測によると
2011年には2千万人以下になり
01:47
which is a reduction of 95 percent.
95%の減少です
01:50
I did enjoy Bono's comment
ヒッピー発祥の地
ヘイト・アシュベリーと
01:53
linking Haight-Ashbury to Silicon Valley.
シリコンバレーをつなげた
ボノのコメントは愉快でした
01:56
Being from the Massachusetts high-tech community myself,
マサチューセッツの
ハイテクコミュニティの出身者として
02:00
I'd point out that we were hippies also in the 1960s,
私たちも60年代には
ヒッピーでしたが
02:03
although we hung around Harvard Square.
私たちがたむろしていたのは
ハーバードスクウェアでした
02:08
But we do have the potential to overcome disease and poverty,
病気や貧困は克服できる可能性が
十分にあるということを
02:11
and I'm going to talk about those issues, if we have the will.
今日はお話ししますが
それには意志が必要です
02:16
Kevin Kelly talked about the acceleration of technology.
ケビン・ケリーが 加速する
テクノロジー進化の話をしましたが
02:19
That's been a strong interest of mine,
これは私が30年来
02:22
and a theme that I've developed for some 30 years.
関心を抱いてきた
テーマでもあります
02:25
I realized that my technologies had to make sense when I finished a project.
プロジェクトが完了するときに
その技術は意味を持つ必要があります
02:28
That invariably, the world was a different place
新しい技術が
もたらされるとき
02:33
when I would introduce a technology.
世界は必然的に
違う場所になります
02:36
And, I noticed that most inventions fail,
多くの発明が失敗するのは
02:38
not because the R&D department can't get it to work --
研究開発部門が
実現し損ねるためではありません
02:40
if you look at most business plans, they will actually succeed
ビジネスプランを
見ると分かりますが
02:43
if given the opportunity to build what they say they're going to build --
多くの場合 作ろうとするものを作れる条件が
揃っていれば 成功していたはずなのです
02:46
and 90 percent of those projects or more will fail, because the timing is wrong --
そういったプロジェクトの9割は
タイミングの悪さのために失敗します
02:50
not all the enabling factors will be in place when they're needed.
必要となる要素が
揃っていないのです
02:53
So I began to be an ardent student of technology trends,
私はテクノロジーのトレンドの
熱心な研究者となり
02:56
and track where technology would be at different points in time,
時間軸上でテクノロジーの
現れる時期を追い
03:00
and began to build the mathematical models of that.
その数学的モデルを
作り始め
03:03
It's kind of taken on a life of its own.
それがやがて独り歩き
するようになりました
03:06
I've got a group of 10 people that work with me to gather data
10人の仲間と一緒に
様々な分野の技術について
03:08
on key measures of technology in many different areas, and we build models.
重要な指標を集め
モデルを構築しました
03:11
And you'll hear people say, well, we can't predict the future.
未来の予測は不可能だと
よく言います
03:16
And if you ask me,
3年後にGoogleの株価は
03:19
will the price of Google be higher or lower than it is today three years from now,
上がっているか
下がっているか
03:21
that's very hard to say.
言うのは難しいです
03:24
Will WiMax CDMA G3
WiMAX CDMA G3のどれが
3年後主流になっているか
03:26
be the wireless standard three years from now? That's hard to say.
言い当てるのは難しいです
03:29
But if you ask me, what will it cost
一方で 2010年に
03:31
for one MIPS of computing in 2010,
MIPS単価はいくらになるかとか
03:33
or the cost to sequence a base pair of DNA in 2012,
2012年にDNA塩基配列
解読コストはいくらになるかとか
03:36
or the cost of sending a megabyte of data wirelessly in 2014,
2014年にワイヤレス通信のメガバイト
あたりのコストはいくらになるかとか
03:39
it turns out that those are very predictable.
そういったことなら
かなり正確に予想できます
03:43
There are remarkably smooth exponential curves
計算コスト 性能 通信速度などを
03:46
that govern price performance, capacity, bandwidth.
支配する ごくなめらかな
指数曲線があるのです
03:48
And I'm going to show you a small sample of this,
いくつか例をお見せしますが
03:51
but there's really a theoretical reason
テクノロジーが
指数的に発展する
03:53
why technology develops in an exponential fashion.
理論的な理由があるのです
03:55
And a lot of people, when they think about the future, think about it linearly.
多くの人は
未来を予想するとき
04:00
They think they're going to continue
一次関数的に考えます
04:02
to develop a problem
今日のツールや
04:04
or address a problem using today's tools,
今日の進展のスピードが
04:06
at today's pace of progress,
そのまま続くものと考え
04:09
and fail to take into consideration this exponential growth.
指数的な発展を
考慮しないのです
04:11
The Genome Project was a controversial project in 1990.
ゲノムプロジェクトは
90年代には疑問を持たれていました
04:15
We had our best Ph.D. students,
世界最高の博士課程研究者と
04:18
our most advanced equipment around the world,
最高の機材を揃えながら
04:20
we got 1/10,000th of the project done,
1万分の1しか進まず
04:22
so how're we going to get this done in 15 years?
どうやって15年で
完了できるんだと
04:24
And 10 years into the project,
10年経っても
懐疑派は根強く
04:26
the skeptics were still going strong -- says, "You're two-thirds through this project,
「期間の3分の2が
過ぎたのに
04:30
and you've managed to only sequence
ゲノム全体の
ほんのわずかしか
04:32
a very tiny percentage of the whole genome."
解析できていない」
と難じていました
04:34
But it's the nature of exponential growth
しかしこれは
指数的成長の特徴で
04:37
that once it reaches the knee of the curve, it explodes.
ひとたび軌道に乗り始めると
爆発的に進むのです
04:39
Most of the project was done in the last
プロジェクトの大部分は
04:41
few years of the project.
最後の2、3年で片付きました
04:43
It took us 15 years to sequence HIV --
HIVのゲノム解析には
15年かかりましたが
04:45
we sequenced SARS in 31 days.
SARSは31日です
04:47
So we are gaining the potential to overcome these problems.
だから我々はこういった問題を
解決する力を増しているのです
04:49
I'm going to show you just a few examples
いくつかの例で
04:53
of how pervasive this phenomena is.
この現象がいかにあまねく
存在しているか示します
04:55
The actual paradigm-shift rate, the rate of adopting new ideas,
パラダイムシフトの頻度
新しいアイデアが取り入れられる頻度は
04:58
is doubling every decade, according to our models.
我々のモデルによれば
10年ごとに2倍になっています
05:02
These are all logarithmic graphs,
グラフはみんな対数グラフで
05:05
so as you go up the levels it represents, generally multiplying by factor of 10 or 100.
一段上がるごとに
10倍とか100倍になります
05:08
It took us half a century to adopt the telephone,
最初の仮想現実技術
である
05:11
the first virtual-reality technology.
電話の普及には
半世紀かかりました
05:14
Cell phones were adopted in about eight years.
携帯電話は8年です
05:17
If you put different communication technologies
様々な通信技術を
05:19
on this logarithmic graph,
対数グラフ上に
プロットすると
05:22
television, radio, telephone
テレビ ラジオ 電話は
05:24
were adopted in decades.
普及に何十年も
かかりましたが
05:26
Recent technologies -- like the PC, the web, cell phones --
最近の技術の PCや
ウェブや携帯電話は
05:28
were under a decade.
10年未満です
05:31
Now this is an interesting chart,
これは興味深いチャートです
05:33
and this really gets at the fundamental reason why
生物にせよ技術にせよ
05:35
an evolutionary process -- and both biology and technology are evolutionary processes --
進化的プロセスが加速する
基本的な理由を
05:37
accelerate.
示しています
05:41
They work through interaction -- they create a capability,
インタラクションを
通じて能力を生み出し
05:43
and then it uses that capability to bring on the next stage.
その能力を使って
次の段階へと進むのです
05:46
So the first step in biological evolution,
生物進化の最初の
ステップである
05:49
the evolution of DNA -- actually it was RNA came first --
DNAの進化—
最初はRNAですが
05:52
took billions of years,
それには数十億年
かかりました
05:54
but then evolution used that information-processing backbone
しかしこの情報処理の
バックボーンを使って
05:56
to bring on the next stage.
次の段階へと進み
05:59
So the Cambrian Explosion, when all the body plans of the animals were evolved,
カンブリア爆発で あらゆる動物の
体のデザインが発展するのには
06:01
took only 10 million years. It was 200 times faster.
1千万年しか かかっていません
200倍のスピードです
06:04
And then evolution used those body plans
そして その体のデザインを使い
06:08
to evolve higher cognitive functions,
より高度な認知機能を
進化させ
06:10
and biological evolution kept accelerating.
生物進化は
加速し続けたのです
06:12
It's an inherent nature of an evolutionary process.
これは進化的過程に
本質的な性質です
06:14
So Homo sapiens, the first technology-creating species,
ホモ・サピエンスはテクノロジーを
生み出す初めての種で
06:17
the species that combined a cognitive function
認知能力と
対置した親指を
06:20
with an opposable appendage --
併せ持っています
06:22
and by the way, chimpanzees don't really have a very good opposable thumb --
ちなみにチンパンジーの親指は
あまり対置していません
06:24
so we could actually manipulate our environment with a power grip
人類は握る力と
繊細な動作制御力で
06:28
and fine motor coordination,
環境を操ることが
できたのです
06:30
and use our mental models to actually change the world
そしてメンタルモデルを使って
実際に世界を変え
06:32
and bring on technology.
テクノロジーを
生み出しました
06:34
But anyway, the evolution of our species took hundreds of thousands of years,
人類の種の進化には
数十万年かかりましたが
06:36
and then working through interaction,
インタラクションを通じ
06:39
evolution used, essentially,
進化は このテクノロジーを
生み出す種を使って
06:41
the technology-creating species to bring on the next stage,
次なる段階へと進みました
06:43
which were the first steps in technological evolution.
それがテクノロジー進化の
第一歩となります
06:46
And the first step took tens of thousands of years --
最初のステップには
何万年もかかりました
06:49
stone tools, fire, the wheel -- kept accelerating.
石器 火 車輪
加速し続けます
06:52
We always used then the latest generation of technology
常に前の世代の
技術を使って
06:55
to create the next generation.
次の世代の技術を
生み出すのです
06:57
Printing press took a century to be adopted;
活版印刷の普及には
1世紀かかりました
06:59
the first computers were designed pen-on-paper -- now we use computers.
最初のコンピュータは紙とペンで設計されましたが
今はコンピュータを使っています
07:01
And we've had a continual acceleration of this process.
プロセスはたえず
加速し続けています
07:05
Now by the way, if you look at this on a linear graph, it looks like everything has just happened,
これを均等目盛のグラフで見たら
あらゆることが急に起きたように見えます
07:08
but some observer says, "Well, Kurzweil just put points on this graph
ある観察者たちは
「カーツワイルは直線に乗る点を選んで
07:11
that fall on that straight line."
グラフに置いただけだ」
と言います
07:17
So, I took 15 different lists from key thinkers,
それで私は重要な思想家による
15のリストを引っ張り出しました
07:19
like the Encyclopedia Britannica, the Museum of Natural History, Carl Sagan's Cosmic Calendar
ブリタニカ百科事典 自然史博物館
カール・セーガンのコスミック・カレンダー
07:22
on the same -- and these people were not trying to make my point;
別に彼らは私の論点を支持
しようとしたわけではありません
07:26
these were just lists in reference works,
単に参考資料として
作られたものです
07:29
and I think that's what they thought the key events were
これは生物進化や技術進化の上で
何が重要な出来事と
07:31
in biological evolution and technological evolution.
彼らが捉えているかを
表していると思います
07:34
And again, it forms the same straight line. You have a little bit of thickening in the line
すると それがまた直線上に乗るのです
線に少し幅がありますが
07:37
because people do have disagreements, what the key points are,
それは重要な時点ついて
意見の違いがあるためです
07:40
there's differences of opinion when agriculture started,
農業はいつ始まったのか
07:43
or how long the Cambrian Explosion took.
カンブリア爆発には
どれくらいかかったのか
07:45
But you see a very clear trend.
しかし非常に明確な
トレンドがあります
07:48
There's a basic, profound acceleration of this evolutionary process.
進化過程が基本的
本質的に加速していることです
07:50
Information technologies double their capacity, price performance, bandwidth,
情報技術では 容量 通信速度
性能価格比が
07:55
every year.
毎年倍増しています
08:00
And that's a very profound explosion of exponential growth.
明らかに急速な
指数的成長です
08:02
A personal experience, when I was at MIT --
個人的な体験で言うと
私がMITにいたとき
08:06
computer taking up about the size of this room,
コンピュータは このホール
ほどの大きさで
08:08
less powerful than the computer in your cell phone.
計算能力は 今の携帯電話
より劣っていました
08:10
But Moore's Law, which is very often identified with this exponential growth,
ムーアの法則は この指数的成長と
よく同一視されていますが
08:15
is just one example of many, because it's basically
実はたくさんある中の
一例に過ぎません
08:19
a property of the evolutionary process of technology.
これは技術の進化過程に
本質的な性質なのです
08:21
I put 49 famous computers on this logarithmic graph --
49の有名なコンピュータを
対数グラフ上にプロットしました
08:26
by the way, a straight line on a logarithmic graph is exponential growth --
ちなみに対数グラフ上の直線は
指数的成長を表します
08:29
that's another exponential.
これも指数的になっています
08:33
It took us three years to double our price performance of computing in 1900,
1900年に計算の性能価格比は
3年で2倍になっていました
08:35
two years in the middle; we're now doubling it every one year.
それが2年で2倍になり
今では1年で2倍になっています
08:38
And that's exponential growth through five different paradigms.
この指数的成長は5つの
パラダイムにまたがっています
08:42
Moore's Law was just the last part of that,
集積回路上のトランジスタが
08:45
where we were shrinking transistors on an integrated circuit,
縮小していくムーアの法則は
その最後の部分にあたります
08:47
but we had electro-mechanical calculators,
電子機械式計算機があり
ドイツのエニグマ暗号を
08:50
relay-based computers that cracked the German Enigma Code,
解読したリレー式の
コンピュータがあり
08:53
vacuum tubes in the 1950s predicted the election of Eisenhower,
アイゼンハワーの当選を予測した
50年代の真空管コンピュータがあり
08:55
discreet transistors used in the first space flights
最初の宇宙飛行に使われた 個々の
トランジスタを用いるコンピュータがあり
08:59
and then Moore's Law.
それからムーアの法則がきます
09:02
Every time one paradigm ran out of steam,
1つのパラダイムの
勢いが衰えるごとに
09:04
another paradigm came out of left field to continue the exponential growth.
別のパラダイムが現れて
指数的成長を支え続けたのです
09:06
They were shrinking vacuum tubes, making them smaller and smaller.
真空管をどんどん小さく
していくと壁に突き当たります
09:09
That hit a wall. They couldn't shrink them and keep the vacuum.
真空を保って それ以上小さくできません
そこへ まったく
09:12
Whole different paradigm -- transistors came out of the woodwork.
異なるパラダイムの
トランジスタが現れます
09:15
In fact, when we see the end of the line for a particular paradigm,
実のところ 1つのパラダイムの
限界が見え始めると
09:17
it creates research pressure to create the next paradigm.
次のパラダイムを生み出す
研究の圧力が生じるのです
09:20
And because we've been predicting the end of Moore's Law
ムーアの法則の限界はだいぶ
以前から予想されていました
09:24
for quite a long time -- the first prediction said 2002, until now it says 2022.
最初の予想では2002年でしたが
今は2022年だと言われています
09:27
But by the teen years,
2010年代に現れる
トランジスタは
09:30
the features of transistors will be a few atoms in width,
原子数個分という幅になり
09:33
and we won't be able to shrink them any more.
それ以上縮小できなくなります
09:36
That'll be the end of Moore's Law, but it won't be the end of
ムーアの法則の限界ですが
それが計算能力の指数的成長の
09:38
the exponential growth of computing, because chips are flat.
終わりを意味するわけ
ではありません
09:41
We live in a three-dimensional world; we might as well use the third dimension.
今のチップは平面的ですが
我々が住んでいる世界は3次元です
09:43
We will go into the third dimension
まだ第3の次元を
使うことができます
09:46
and there's been tremendous progress, just in the last few years,
この数年で その3次元化において
大きな進展がありました
09:48
of getting three-dimensional, self-organizing molecular circuits to work.
自己組織化分子回路です
09:51
We'll have those ready well before Moore's Law runs out of steam.
ムーアの法則が息絶える前に
実用化されるでしょう
09:55
Supercomputers -- same thing.
スーパーコンピュータも同様です
10:02
Processor performance on Intel chips,
Intelチップの処理能力もそう
10:05
the average price of a transistor --
トランジスタの平均価格は
10:08
1968, you could buy one transistor for a dollar.
1968年には
1個が1ドルでした
10:11
You could buy 10 million in 2002.
2002年には同じ値段で
1千万個買えます
10:14
It's pretty remarkable how smooth
このような指数的成長の
一貫性は
10:17
an exponential process that is.
驚くほどです
10:20
I mean, you'd think this is the result of some tabletop experiment,
限定的な実験の結果と
思うかもしれませんが
10:22
but this is the result of worldwide chaotic behavior --
これは世界全体のカオス的な
振る舞いの結果なのです
10:26
countries accusing each other of dumping products,
ダンピングを非難し合う国家
10:29
IPOs, bankruptcies, marketing programs.
IPO 会社の倒産
マーケティングキャンペーン
10:31
You would think it would be a very erratic process,
とても不規則なプロセスなのに
10:33
and you have a very smooth
その結果は
10:36
outcome of this chaotic process.
極めて なだらかになるのです
10:38
Just as we can't predict
気体中の個々の分子が
10:40
what one molecule in a gas will do --
どう振る舞うか
10:42
it's hopeless to predict a single molecule --
予測することはできませんが
10:44
yet we can predict the properties of the whole gas,
それでも気体全体
としての性質は
10:47
using thermodynamics, very accurately.
熱力学によって極めて
正確に予測できます
10:49
It's the same thing here. We can't predict any particular project,
ここでも同じことが言えます
特定のプロジェクトの予測はできませんが
10:52
but the result of this whole worldwide,
世界中のカオス的で
10:55
chaotic, unpredictable activity of competition
予測不能な競争の結果としての
10:57
and the evolutionary process of technology is very predictable.
技術の進化過程は
予測可能なのです
11:02
And we can predict these trends far into the future.
そういったトレンドについて
かなり先まで予測できます
11:05
Unlike Gertrude Stein's roses,
ガートルード・スタインの
「薔薇は薔薇」の様に
11:10
it's not the case that a transistor is a transistor.
トランジスタはトランジスタ
とは言えません
11:12
As we make them smaller and less expensive,
小さくすることで安価にでき
11:14
the electrons have less distance to travel.
電子の移動距離も小さくなり
速くなります
11:16
They're faster, so you've got exponential growth in the speed of transistors,
トランジスタのスピードは
指数的に上がり
11:18
so the cost of a cycle of one transistor
1トランジスタ1サイクル
あたりのコストは
11:22
has been coming down with a halving rate of 1.1 years.
1.1年で半分という
ペースで下がっています
11:26
You add other forms of innovation and processor design,
その他のイノベーションや
プロセッサデザインの改良も加わって
11:29
you get a doubling of price performance of computing every one year.
性能価格比は
毎年2倍になっています
11:32
And that's basically deflation --
これは基本的にデフレです
11:36
50 percent deflation.
50%のデフレです
11:39
And it's not just computers. I mean, it's true of DNA sequencing;
コンピュータに限りません
DNA解析でもそうだし
11:41
it's true of brain scanning;
脳スキャンや
11:44
it's true of the World Wide Web. I mean, anything that we can quantify,
ウェブもそうです
11:46
we have hundreds of different measurements
計りうるどのような面でも—
11:48
of different, information-related measurements --
情報関係の測度は
たくさんありますが
11:51
capacity, adoption rates --
性能 普及率
11:54
and they basically double every 12, 13, 15 months,
そういったものはどれも
12、13、15ヶ月ごとに
11:56
depending on what you're looking at.
2倍になります
11:59
In terms of price performance, that's a 40 to 50 percent deflation rate.
性能価格比については
40%から50%のデフレ率です
12:01
And economists have actually started worrying about that.
経済学者はそれを
懸念し始めています
12:06
We had deflation during the Depression,
大恐慌ではデフレになりましたが
12:08
but that was collapse of the money supply,
それは貨幣供給の減少
12:10
collapse of consumer confidence, a completely different phenomena.
消費者マインドの低下など
まったく異なる現象です
12:12
This is due to greater productivity,
こちらは 生産性向上で
起きていることです
12:15
but the economist says, "But there's no way you're going to be able to keep up with that.
しかし経済学者は言います
「ずっとそれに付いていける方法はない
12:18
If you have 50 percent deflation, people may increase their volume
50%のデフレでは 人は30、40%
量を増やすかもしれないが
12:20
30, 40 percent, but they won't keep up with it."
それでも付いていくことはできない」
12:23
But what we're actually seeing is that
しかし我々が実際に
目にしているのは
12:25
we actually more than keep up with it.
付いていく以上のことです
12:27
We've had 28 percent per year compounded growth in dollars
過去50年に渡り
情報技術は
12:29
in information technology over the last 50 years.
28%の複利成長率を
保ってきました
12:32
I mean, people didn't build iPods for 10,000 dollars 10 years ago.
10年前に1万ドルで
iPodを作りはしません
12:35
As the price performance makes new applications feasible,
新しいアプリケーションは
価格効率がそれを実現可能にするとき
12:39
new applications come to the market.
マーケットに現れるのです
12:42
And this is a very widespread phenomena.
これは広く見られる現象です
12:44
Magnetic data storage --
磁気記憶装置の場合
12:47
that's not Moore's Law, it's shrinking magnetic spots,
ムーアの法則ではなく
記録密度の高度化で
12:49
different engineers, different companies, same exponential process.
異なる技術者 異なる企業によるものながら
同じ指数的プロセスになります
12:52
A key revolution is that we're understanding our own biology
重要な革命は 人間が自身の
体の仕組みを 情報の言葉で
12:56
in these information terms.
理解できるようになったことです
13:00
We're understanding the software programs
我々の体を動かしている
ソフトウェアを
13:02
that make our body run.
理解できるようになったのです
13:04
These were evolved in very different times --
随分違った時代に
進化したものなので
13:06
we'd like to actually change those programs.
私たちはそのプログラムを
変えたいと思っています
13:08
One little software program, called the fat insulin receptor gene,
ファット・インスリン・
レセプター遺伝子という
13:10
basically says, "Hold onto every calorie,
小さなソフトウェアが
するのは 基本的に
13:12
because the next hunting season may not work out so well."
「次の猟期の不猟に備え 出来る限り
カロリーを保持せよ」と言うことです
13:14
That was in the interests of the species tens of thousands of years ago.
これは何万年も昔には
有用でしたが
13:18
We'd like to actually turn that program off.
我々は このプログラムを
オフにしたいと思っています
13:21
They tried that in animals, and these mice ate ravenously
マウスでの動物実験では
大量に食べてもスリムなままで
13:24
and remained slim and got the health benefits of being slim.
スリムであることの
健康上の利点も持っています
13:27
They didn't get diabetes; they didn't get heart disease;
糖尿病になりません
心臓病になりません
13:29
they lived 20 percent longer; they got the health benefits of caloric restriction
20%長生きします
カロリー制限なしで
13:32
without the restriction.
カロリー制限の利点を
手にしています
13:35
Four or five pharmaceutical companies have noticed this,
4社か5社の製薬会社が
このことに気付き
13:37
felt that would be
市場的に有望な薬だと
13:40
interesting drug for the human market,
見ています
13:43
and that's just one of the 30,000 genes
我々の体の生化学に
影響する
13:46
that affect our biochemistry.
3万の遺伝子のうちの
たった1つの例です
13:48
We were evolved in an era where it wasn't in the interests of people
人類が進化した時代には
このカンファレンスの参加者のような
13:51
at the age of most people at this conference, like myself,
年代の人が 長生きするのは
種の利益になりませんでした
13:54
to live much longer, because we were using up the precious resources
限られたリソースは
子どもや 子どもの世話を
13:57
which were better deployed towards the children
する人たちに
14:01
and those caring for them.
割り当てた方が
良いからです
14:02
So, life -- long lifespans --
だから30よりも
14:04
like, that is to say, much more than 30 --
長生きするというようなことは
14:06
weren't selected for,
自然選択されなかったのですが
14:08
but we are learning to actually manipulate
バイオテクノロジー革命によって
14:11
and change these software programs
我々はそのソフトウェアを操作し
14:14
through the biotechnology revolution.
変更する方法を学んだのです
14:16
For example, we can inhibit genes now with RNA interference.
たとえば遺伝子の発現抑止を
RNA干渉によって行えます
14:18
There are exciting new forms of gene therapy
染色体のしかるべき場所に
14:22
that overcome the problem of placing the genetic material
遺伝物質を置くという
課題を解決する
14:24
in the right place on the chromosome.
新しく期待される
遺伝子治療法があります
14:26
There's actually a -- for the first time now,
人体への最初の適用も
行われようとしています
14:28
something going to human trials, that actually cures pulmonary hypertension --
致命的な肺高血圧症の
遺伝子治療です
14:31
a fatal disease -- using gene therapy.
単なる
デザイナー・ベビーでなく
14:34
So we'll have not just designer babies, but designer baby boomers.
デザイナー・ベビーブーマーが
現れることになるでしょう
14:37
And this technology is also accelerating.
このテクノロジーもまた加速しており
DNA解読のコストは
14:40
It cost 10 dollars per base pair in 1990,
1990年には1つの塩基対
当たり10ドルだったのが
14:43
then a penny in 2000.
2000年には1セントになり
14:46
It's now under a 10th of a cent.
今では0.1セント以下です
14:48
The amount of genetic data --
遺伝子情報の量は
14:50
basically this shows that smooth exponential growth
基本的になめらかな
指数曲線で成長していて
14:52
doubled every year,
毎年2倍に増え
14:55
enabling the genome project to be completed.
ヒトゲノム計画の
完遂を可能にしました
14:57
Another major revolution: the communications revolution.
別の大きな革命として
通信技術の革命があります
15:00
The price performance, bandwidth, capacity of communications measured many different ways;
性能価格比 通信速度
様々な尺度による通信能力
15:03
wired, wireless is growing exponentially.
有線 無線ともに
指数的に増大しています
15:08
The Internet has been doubling in power and continues to,
インターネットは 様々な指標で
1年で2倍という
15:11
measured many different ways.
成長を続けています
15:14
This is based on the number of hosts.
これはホスト数で見たものです
15:16
Miniaturization -- we're shrinking the size of technology
縮小化技術の進展も
15:18
at an exponential rate,
有線無線を問わず
15:20
both wired and wireless.
指数的です
15:22
These are some designs from Eric Drexler's book --
これはエリック・ドレクスラーの
本にあるデザインですが
15:24
which we're now showing are feasible
スーパーコンピュータ・
シミュレーションによって
15:28
with super-computing simulations,
実現性が示されています
15:30
where actually there are scientists building
実際に分子スケールの
ロボットを
15:32
molecule-scale robots.
作っている
科学者たちがいます
15:34
One has one that actually walks with a surprisingly human-like gait,
驚くほど人間に似た
歩みをする
15:36
that's built out of molecules.
分子から作られた
ロボットがあります
15:38
There are little machines doing things in experimental bases.
様々なことをする小さなマシンが
実験的に作られています
15:41
The most exciting opportunity
もっとも興味深い応用は
15:45
is actually to go inside the human body
人体の中に入って
15:48
and perform therapeutic and diagnostic functions.
治療や診断を行う
ということでしょう
15:50
And this is less futuristic than it may sound.
見た目ほど未来的な
話でもありません
15:53
These things have already been done in animals.
すでに動物実験が
行われています
15:55
There's one nano-engineered device that cures type 1 diabetes. It's blood cell-sized.
1型糖尿病治療をする
ナノテク装置があります
15:57
They put tens of thousands of these
血球の大きさで それを
何万個も体内に入れます
16:01
in the blood cell -- they tried this in rats --
彼らはネズミを使いましたが
16:03
it lets insulin out in a controlled fashion,
制御しながらインスリンを出し
16:05
and actually cures type 1 diabetes.
実際に1型糖尿病を治しました
16:07
What you're watching is a design
今見て頂いているのは
16:09
of a robotic red blood cell,
ロボット赤血球です
16:12
and it does bring up the issue that our biology
人間は生物学的に
16:14
is actually very sub-optimal,
非常に良くできているにしても
16:16
even though it's remarkable in its intricacy.
最適ではありません
16:18
Once we understand its principles of operation,
基本的な仕組みを理解したなら—
16:21
and the pace with which we are reverse-engineering biology is accelerating,
生物学のリバースエンジニアリングも
加速しており
16:24
we can actually design these things to be
このようなものを
何千倍も
16:28
thousands of times more capable.
高性能に作れるようになります
16:30
An analysis of this respirocyte, designed by Rob Freitas,
ロブ・フレータスがデザインした
「レスピロサイト」です
16:32
indicates if you replace 10 percent of your red blood cells with these robotic versions,
赤血球の10%を
このロボットで置き換えれば
16:37
you could do an Olympic sprint for 15 minutes without taking a breath.
オリンピック・スプリントを 休みなしで
15分続けられるようになります
16:40
You could sit at the bottom of your pool for four hours --
プールの底に4時間
座り続けることもできます
16:43
so, "Honey, I'm in the pool," will take on a whole new meaning.
「ねぇ プールの中にいるからね」というのが
まったく新しい意味合いを持つようになります
16:46
It will be interesting to see what we do in our Olympic trials.
オリンピック選考がどうなるのか
興味深いところです
16:50
Presumably we'll ban them,
おそらくそういったものは
禁止されるでしょうが
16:52
but then we'll have the specter of teenagers in their high schools gyms
そうするとオリンピック選手を越える
16:54
routinely out-performing the Olympic athletes.
高校生がザラに出てくることでしょう
16:56
Freitas has a design for a robotic white blood cell.
フレータスはロボット白血球も
デザインしています
17:01
These are 2020-circa scenarios,
2020年頃と想定されていますが
17:04
but they're not as futuristic as it may sound.
これは見た目ほど未来的
というわけでもありません
17:08
There are four major conferences on building blood cell-sized devices;
血球サイズのデバイスに関する大きな
カンファレンスは既に4つあります
17:10
there are many experiments in animals.
動物では多くの実験が
既に行われ
17:14
There's actually one going into human trial,
人体への臨床試験も
1件 予定されています
17:16
so this is feasible technology.
実用化可能な
技術なのです
17:18
If we come back to our exponential growth of computing,
計算能力の指数的発展に
話を戻しましょう
17:22
1,000 dollars of computing is now somewhere between an insect and a mouse brain.
千ドル分の計算能力は現在
昆虫の脳とマウスの脳の間です
17:24
It will intersect human intelligence
2020年代には能力の点で
17:27
in terms of capacity in the 2020s,
人間の知力を越えます
17:30
but that'll be the hardware side of the equation.
あくまでハードウェア的に
ということですが
17:33
Where will we get the software?
ソフトウェアはどうやって
手に入れるのでしょう?
17:35
Well, it turns out we can see inside the human brain,
人間の脳の中身を見られる
ことが分かりました
17:37
and in fact not surprisingly,
驚くことでもないでしょうが
17:39
the spatial and temporal resolution of brain scanning is doubling every year.
脳スキャンの時間的・空間的解像度も
毎年2倍になっています
17:41
And with the new generation of scanning tools,
新世代のスキャン装置では
17:45
for the first time we can actually see
個々の神経繊維間の
17:47
individual inter-neural fibers
処理や信号を
リアルタイムで
17:49
and see them processing and signaling in real time --
見られるようになっています
17:51
but then the question is, OK, we can get this data now,
そこで疑問は
データが得られたとして
17:54
but can we understand it?
我々にそれを理解できるのか
ということです
17:56
Doug Hofstadter wonders, well, maybe our intelligence
ダグラス・ホフスタッターが
言っています
17:58
just isn't great enough to understand our intelligence,
「人間の知性は 知性を理解できるほど
優れたものでないかもしれない
18:01
and if we were smarter, well, then our brains would be that much more complicated,
人間がそれより優れているなら
その脳はさらに複雑であり
18:04
and we'd never catch up to it.
追いつくことができない
かもしれない」
18:07
It turns out that we can understand it.
しかしそれは理解できる
ということが分かりました
18:10
This is a block diagram of
このブロックダイアグラムは
18:13
a model and simulation of the human auditory cortex
人間の聴覚皮質のモデル・
シミュレーションですが
18:16
that actually works quite well --
非常にうまく機能し
音響心理学の実験では
18:20
in applying psychoacoustic tests, gets very similar results to human auditory perception.
人間の聴覚にごく近い
結果が得られます
18:22
There's another simulation of the cerebellum --
これは別の小脳の
シミュレーションです
18:26
that's more than half the neurons in the brain --
脳のニューロンの半数以上は
小脳にあります
18:29
again, works very similarly to human skill formation.
これもまた人間のスキル形成に
よく似た働きをします
18:31
This is at an early stage, but you can show
まだ初期段階ですが
18:35
with the exponential growth of the amount of information about the brain
脳についての情報量の
指数的増加や
18:38
and the exponential improvement
脳スキャン解像度の
18:41
in the resolution of brain scanning,
指数的向上によって
18:43
we will succeed in reverse-engineering the human brain
2020年代には 人間の脳の
リバースエンジニアリングが
18:45
by the 2020s.
できるようになるでしょう
18:48
We've already had very good models and simulation of about 15 regions
脳に数百あるうちの
15の領域について
18:50
out of the several hundred.
既にかなり良いモデルと
シミュレーションができています
18:53
All of this is driving
これらすべてが
経済の指数的成長を
18:56
exponentially growing economic progress.
推し進めることになります
18:58
We've had productivity go from 30 dollars to 150 dollars per hour
過去50年で時間当たりの
労働生産性は
19:00
of labor in the last 50 years.
30ドルから150ドルに
上がりました
19:05
E-commerce has been growing exponentially. It's now a trillion dollars.
E-コマースは指数的に成長し
今や兆ドル規模です
19:07
You might wonder, well, wasn't there a boom and a bust?
浮き沈みがあるだろうと
思うかもしれませんが
19:10
That was strictly a capital-markets phenomena.
それは金融市場に限った現象です
19:12
Wall Street noticed that this was a revolutionary technology, which it was,
ウォールストリートはこれが革命的技術だと
気付き 実際そうだったのですが
19:14
but then six months later, when it hadn't revolutionized all business models,
6ヶ月たってもビジネスモデルの
革命が起きていないので
19:18
they figured, well, that was wrong,
あれは間違いだったんだと
判断したのです
19:21
and then we had this bust.
それで今の状況があります
19:23
All right, this is a technology
これは私たちが関わっている
19:26
that we put together using some of the technologies we're involved in.
技術をまとめ上げた
ものですが
19:28
This will be a routine feature in a cell phone.
やがて携帯電話では
当たり前の機能になるでしょう
19:31
It would be able to translate from one language to another.
1つの言語から 別の言語へ
翻訳できます
19:35
So let me just end with a couple of scenarios.
2つシナリオを紹介して
終わりにします
19:47
By 2010 computers will disappear.
2010年までに
コンピュータは姿を消すでしょう
19:49
They'll be so small, they'll be embedded in our clothing, in our environment.
小さくなり 洋服や環境の中に
埋め込まれるようになります
19:53
Images will be written directly to our retina,
画像は網膜に
直接描き込まれ
19:56
providing full-immersion virtual reality,
完全没入型の 仮想現実や
拡張現実が提供され
19:58
augmented real reality. We'll be interacting with virtual personalities.
仮想的な人格を通して
やりとりするようになります
20:00
But if we go to 2029, we really have the full maturity of these trends,
2029年になると
このトレンドが円熟を迎え
20:04
and you have to appreciate how many turns of the screw
幾世代にも渡る技術の進歩を
ありがたく思うことでしょう
20:08
in terms of generations of technology, which are getting faster and faster, we'll have at that point.
高速化が進んで
性能価格比
20:11
I mean, we will have two-to-the-25th-power
能力 通信速度は
20:15
greater price performance, capacity and bandwidth
2の25乗倍
20:17
of these technologies, which is pretty phenomenal.
驚異的なものになります
20:20
It'll be millions of times more powerful than it is today.
今日の百万倍も強力になります
20:22
We'll have completed the reverse-engineering of the human brain,
人の脳のリバース
エンジニアリングが完了し
20:24
1,000 dollars of computing will be far more powerful
千ドルのコンピュータが
基本的な能力という点で
20:27
than the human brain in terms of basic raw capacity.
人の脳をはるかに
凌駕するようになります
20:30
Computers will combine
コンピュータは
20:34
the subtle pan-recognition powers
人間のパターン認識能力と
20:36
of human intelligence with ways in which machines are already superior,
既に優れている分析力や
20:38
in terms of doing analytic thinking,
何十億という事実を
正確に記憶する能力を
20:41
remembering billions of facts accurately.
組み合わせるようになります
20:43
Machines can share their knowledge very quickly.
マシンは知識を
速やかに共有できます
20:45
But it's not just an alien invasion of intelligent machines.
これは知的マシンによる侵略
のような話ではありません
20:47
We are going to merge with our technology.
我々自身テクノロジーと
融合するようになるでしょう
20:52
These nano-bots I mentioned
ナノ・ボットは最初
20:54
will first be used for medical and health applications:
医療分野で使われる
ようになるでしょう
20:56
cleaning up the environment, providing powerful fuel cells
次いで環境の清浄化
強力な燃料電池
21:00
and widely distributed decentralized solar panels and so on in the environment.
広く分散配備されたソーラー
パネルといった環境への利用
21:03
But they'll also go inside our brain,
さらには人間の脳の中にも
取り入れられ
21:08
interact with our biological neurons.
神経と交信します
21:10
We've demonstrated the key principles of being able to do this.
それを可能する基本的な方式は
既に実現されています
21:12
So, for example,
たとえば
神経系に組み込む
21:15
full-immersion virtual reality from within the nervous system,
完全没入型
仮想現実では
21:17
the nano-bots shut down the signals coming from your real senses,
ナノ・ボットが感覚器官からくる
シグナルを遮断し
21:19
replace them with the signals that your brain would be receiving
仮想環境にいたら
受け取るであろう
21:22
if you were in the virtual environment,
シグナルを代わりに
送ります
21:25
and then it'll feel like you're in that virtual environment.
すると仮想環境の中にいる
ように感じられます
21:27
You can go there with other people, have any kind of experience
他の人たちと一緒に
そこへ行くこともでき
21:29
with anyone involving all of the senses.
すべての感覚を伴う
あらゆる体験ができます
21:31
"Experience beamers," I call them, will put their whole flow of sensory experiences
「体験プロジェクタ」と私は呼んでいますが
感情をともなう
21:34
in the neurological correlates of their emotions out on the Internet.
神経内の感覚的体験全体をインターネットに
アップできるようになります
21:37
You can plug in and experience what it's like to be someone else.
それに接続して 他人になるのが
どういうものか体験できます
21:40
But most importantly,
しかし最も重要なのは
21:43
it'll be a tremendous expansion
テクノロジーとの融合によって
21:45
of human intelligence through this direct merger with our technology,
人間の知性が格段に
拡張されるだろうことです
21:47
which in some sense we're doing already.
これはある部分では
すでに行われています
21:51
We routinely do intellectual feats
私たちは日常的に
テクノロジー無しでは
21:53
that would be impossible without our technology.
為しえなかった知的偉業を
成し遂げています
21:55
Human life expectancy is expanding. It was 37 in 1800,
人間の寿命ものびています
1800年には37歳でした
21:57
and with this sort of biotechnology, nano-technology revolutions,
バイオテクノロジーや
ナノテクノロジーの革命により
22:00
this will move up very rapidly
寿命もまた
22:05
in the years ahead.
今後 急速にのびるでしょう
22:07
My main message is that progress in technology
私のメッセージは
テクノロジーの進歩は
22:09
is exponential, not linear.
一定速度ではなく
指数的だということです
22:13
Many -- even scientists -- assume a linear model,
科学者を含め 多くの人が
一定速度のモデルを前提として
22:16
so they'll say, "Oh, it'll be hundreds of years
「自己複製ナノテクマシンや
22:20
before we have self-replicating nano-technology assembly
人工知能ができるのは
22:22
or artificial intelligence."
何百年も先だ」と考えます
22:25
If you really look at the power of exponential growth,
指数的成長の力を考えるなら
22:27
you'll see that these things are pretty soon at hand.
そういったものは ずっと早く
手に入ることが分かります
22:30
And information technology is increasingly encompassing
情報技術はますます
22:33
all of our lives, from our music to our manufacturing
音楽 製造から生物学
エネルギー 物質に至るまで
22:36
to our biology to our energy to materials.
我々の生活全体を
取り込んでいます
22:40
We'll be able to manufacture almost anything we need in the 2020s,
2020年代には 情報と安価な原料と
ナノテクを使って
22:44
from information, in very inexpensive raw materials,
必要なほとんどあらゆるものを
22:47
using nano-technology.
作れるようになっているでしょう
22:49
These are very powerful technologies.
非常に強力な技術です
22:52
They both empower our promise and our peril.
可能性も危険も
大きくなります
22:54
So we have to have the will to apply them to the right problems.
適切な問題に適用する意志を
持つ必要があります
22:58
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
23:01
(Applause)
(拍手)
23:02
Translator:Yasushi Aoki
Reviewer:Akiko Hicks

sponsored links

Ray Kurzweil - Inventor, futurist
Ray Kurzweil is an engineer who has radically advanced the fields of speech, text and audio technology. He's revered for his dizzying -- yet convincing -- writing on the advance of technology, the limits of biology and the future of the human species.

Why you should listen

Inventor, entrepreneur, visionary, Ray Kurzweil's accomplishments read as a startling series of firsts -- a litany of technological breakthroughs we've come to take for granted. Kurzweil invented the first optical character recognition (OCR) software for transforming the written word into data, the first print-to-speech software for the blind, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, and the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments, and the first commercially marketed large-vocabulary speech recognition.

Yet his impact as a futurist and philosopher is no less significant. In his best-selling books, which include How to Create a Mind, The Age of Spiritual Machines, The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology, Kurzweil depicts in detail a portrait of the human condition over the next few decades, as accelerating technologies forever blur the line between human and machine.

In 2009, he unveiled Singularity University, an institution that aims to "assemble, educate and inspire leaders who strive to understand and facilitate the development of exponentially advancing technologies." He is a Director of Engineering at Google, where he heads up a team developing machine intelligence and natural language comprehension.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.