20:18
TED2006

Burt Rutan: The real future of space exploration

バート・ルータン:宇宙旅行ビジネスの未来

Filmed:

著名な宇宙船設計士、バート・ルータンがアメリカ政府(NASA)の停滞した宇宙計画を批判しています。宇宙計画を国家主導から民間主導に移し、ビジネスとして発展させる重要性を説いています。

- Aircraft engineer
In 2004, legendary spacecraft designer Burt Rutan won the $10M Ansari X-Prize for SpaceShipOne, the first privately funded craft to enter space twice in a two-week period. He's now collaborating with Virgin Galactic to build the first rocketship for space tourism. Full bio

I want to start off by saying, Houston, we have a problem.
「このままでは困ったことになる」と、NASAに言いたい
00:25
We're entering a second generation of no progress
有人宇宙飛行の分野において
00:30
in terms of human flight in space. In fact, we've regressed.
人類は全く進歩していないどころか、むしろ後退しています
00:34
We stand a very big chance of losing our ability to inspire our youth
子供達に夢を持たせ、私達人類がこれまで行なってきたような
00:39
to go out and continue this very important thing
重要な活動を可能にさせるという能力を
00:45
that we as a species have always done.
私達は失いつつあります
00:48
And that is, instinctively we've gone out
これまで人類は本能に従い
00:50
and climbed over difficult places, went to more hostile places,
より厳しい環境に向かい、それを乗り越えることで
00:53
and found out later, maybe to our surprise, that that's the reason we survived.
結局のところ、生き延びることができたのです
00:59
And I feel very strongly
私が強く思うのは
01:05
that it's not good enough for us to have generations of kids
私たちの子供がただ単に
01:07
that think that it's OK to look forward to a better version
新発売の携帯電話に期待しているようでは
01:11
of a cell phone with a video in it.
ダメだということです
01:15
They need to look forward to exploration; they need to look forward to colonization;
子供たちは未知の世界を探求し、他の星へ移り住み、
01:18
they need to look forward to breakthroughs.
今まで成し得なかった躍進に期待する必要があるのです。
01:22
We need to inspire them, because they need to lead us
私たちは、将来の発展のため、生き延びるために
01:26
and help us survive in the future.
子供たちに夢を持たせる必要があります
01:30
I'm particularly troubled that what NASA's doing right now with this new Bush doctrine
特に私が問題だと思うのは、NASAがブッシュ政権のもとで行っていることで・・・
01:33
to -- for this next decade and a half -- oh shoot, I screwed up.
次の15年で --- あ、しまった・・・
01:39
We have real specific instructions here not to talk about politics.
ここでは政治のことは話さないように強く言われているんです
01:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:50
What we're looking forward to is --
私が言いたいことは・・・
01:51
(Applause)
(拍手)
01:54
what we're looking forward to
私が言いたいことは・・・
01:55
is not only the inspiration of our children,
子供たちに夢を持たせることだけではないのですが
01:58
but the current plan right now is not really even allowing
現在の政府の計画は
02:01
the most creative people in this country -- the Boeing's and Lockheed's
この国の最もクリエイティブな宇宙船技術者たちが
02:06
space engineers -- to go out and take risks and try new stuff.
リスクをとって挑戦する機会を奪っている、ということなのです
02:10
We're going to go back to the moon ... 50 years later?
私たちは、「50年後」に月に行こうとしているのです
02:16
And we're going to do it very specifically planned to not learn anything new.
しかも何も新しいことを学べないと分かっていながら
02:22
I'm really troubled by that. But anyway that's --
私は本当にそれを問題視しています
02:28
the basis of the thing that I want to share with you today, though,
今日この場で私が伝えたいことは
02:32
is that right back to where we inspire people
将来私たちの指導者となる子供たちに
02:36
who will be our great leaders later.
どう夢を持たせるかということです
02:40
That's the theme of my next 15 minutes here.
それが、今日私が話すことです
02:42
And I think that the inspiration begins when you're very young:
夢を持つきっかけは幼い時に起こると思います
02:46
three-year-olds, up to 12-, 14-year-olds.
3歳から12,14歳の間です
02:50
What they look at is the most important thing.
その時子供が何を見るかが重要なのです
02:54
Let's take a snapshot at aviation.
人類の飛行の歴史を振り返ってみましょう
02:58
And there was a wonderful little short four-year time period
そこには、飛行史において数々の飛躍が起きた
03:01
when marvelous things happened.
最も重要な4年間があったのです
03:04
It started in 1908, when the Wright brothers flew in Paris, and everybody said,
1908年にライト兄弟がフランスで初飛行した時、誰もがこう言いました
03:07
"Ooh, hey, I can do that." There's only a few people that have flown
「そんなこと俺だってできる!」
03:11
in early 1908. In four years, 39 countries had hundreds of airplanes,
その当時は飛行機の操縦士は世界にほとんどいませんでしたが
03:15
thousand of pilots. Airplanes were invented by natural selection.
4年後には39カ国に数百機の飛行機、数千の操縦士が生まれたのです
03:20
Now you can say that intelligent design designs our airplanes of today,
あなたは現代の飛行機を見て、素晴らしいと思うでしょう
03:24
but there was no intelligent design really designing those early airplanes.
しかし、そのような優れた飛行機は、20世紀初頭にはなかったのです
03:28
There were probably at least 30,000 different things tried,
当時は、数万回のテストフライトが行われ
03:32
and when they crash and kill the pilot, don't try that again.
もし飛行機が堕ちてパイロットが死んだら、他のパイロットが飛ぶ
03:37
The ones that flew and landed OK
当時は、飛行訓練を受けたパイロットがいなかったため
03:41
because there were no trained pilots
うまく飛んで、着陸できた人が
03:44
who had good flying qualities by definition.
いわゆる「優秀なパイロット」と見なされたのです
03:45
So we, by making a whole bunch of attempts, thousands of attempts,
このように何千回も挑戦することによって
03:49
in that four-year time period, we invented the concepts
現代の飛行機の形が出来上がり
03:54
of the airplanes that we fly today. And that's why they're so safe,
試行錯誤を重ねたからこそ
03:57
as we gave it a lot of chance to find what's good.
現在のように安全になったのです
04:00
That has not happened at all in space flying.
そのようなことは宇宙飛行の分野では全く起きていません
04:04
There's only been two concepts tried -- two by the U.S. and one by the Russians.
なぜなら、アメリカとロシアの2カ国しか挑戦していないからです
04:06
Well, who was inspired during that time period?
その黎明期の4年間に影響を受けたのは誰でしょう?
04:10
Aviation Week asked me to make a list of who I thought
Aviation Week(週刊誌)に
04:12
were the movers and shakers of the first 100 years of aviation.
100年の飛行史の中で最も功績を上げた人物は誰かと聞かれました
04:15
And I wrote them down and I found out later that every one of them
名前を書いた後気づいたのは彼ら全員が
04:18
was a little kid in that wonderful renaissance of aviation.
子供時代に飛行史の黎明期の4年間を過ごしていたのです
04:22
Well, what happened when I was a little kid was -- some pretty heavy stuff too.
私が子供の頃にも様々な出来事がありました
04:29
The jet age started: the missile age started. Von Braun was on there
ジェット機・ミサイル開発競争、フォン・ブラウンの火星計画
04:33
showing how to go to Mars -- and this was before Sputnik.
スプートニク打ち上げもありました
04:38
And this was at a time when Mars was a hell of a lot more interesting
その頃の火星は今よりずっと興味深かったのです
04:40
than it is now. We thought there'd be animals there;
動物が生息していると思われていたし
04:44
we knew there were plants there; the colors change, right?
色が変わる植物も生えていると考えられていました
04:46
But, you know, NASA screwed that up because they've sent these robots
しかし、NASAが人工衛星を砂漠にしか着陸させなかったせいで
04:50
and they've landed it only in the deserts.
そんなことはもう誰も信じませんが
04:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:56
If you look at what happened -- this little black line is as fast as man ever flew,
黒い線が、人類が到達した最速の飛行スピード
05:00
and the red line is top-of-the-line military fighters
赤い線が、軍の最優秀パイロットの飛行スピード
05:07
and the blue line is commercial air transport.
青い線が、商業用飛行機の飛行スピードを表します
05:10
You notice here's a big jump when I was a little kid --
私が子供のとき、技術的な飛躍があったのがわかります
05:13
and I think that had something to do with giving me the courage
その出来事が、私にとって夢を持つきっかけになったのです
05:15
to go out and try something that other people weren't having the courage to try.
他の人があきらめることにも挑戦する勇気を与えてくれたのです
05:19
Well, what did I do when I was a kid?
私は子供時代に何をしていたでしょうか?
05:24
I didn't do the hotrods and the girls and the dancing
改造車も、女も、ダンスもしなかったし
05:26
and, well, we didn't have drugs in those days. But I did competition model airplanes.
その頃はクスリもありませんでした。代わりに、飛行機模型で遊んでいました
05:29
I spent about seven years during the Vietnam War
ベトナム戦争中の約7年間
05:34
flight-testing airplanes for the Air Force.
アメリカ空軍の試作飛行機製作に関わり
05:36
And then I went in and I had a lot of fun building airplanes
空軍に入隊後は、
05:39
that people could build in their garages.
簡単に組み立てられる飛行機も製作しました
05:41
And some 3,000 of those are flying. Of course, one of them
そしてこれら飛行機のうち約3000機が飛び立ちました
05:44
is around the world Voyager. I founded another company in '82,
その中の1つが、Voyagerです。 そして1982年には
05:47
which is my company now.
今の会社を立ち上げました
05:51
And we have developed more than one new type of airplane every year since 1982.
1982年以来、毎年1機以上、新型の飛行機を作り出しています
05:53
And there's a lot of them that I actually can't show you on this chart.
ここにある飛行機以外にも、まだまだたくさんあります
06:00
The most impressive airplane ever, I believe, was designed
私の中で最も印象に残っている飛行機は
06:04
only a dozen years after the first operational jet.
ジェット機が開発されてから、たった十数年で登場し
06:08
Stayed in service till it was too rusty to fly, taken out of service.
それから耐用年数まで使われ、引退しました
06:12
We retreated in '98 back to something that was developed in '56. What?
1956年に作られた飛行機が、1998年に引退したのです、信じられますか?
06:16
The most impressive spaceship ever, I believe,
最も印象に残っている宇宙船は・・・
06:23
was a Grumman Lunar Lander. It was a -- you know, it landed on the moon,
グル―マン月着陸船です。 月に着陸し、離陸する
06:26
take off of the moon, didn't need any maintenance guys --
全部自動でできるのです
06:31
that's kind of cool.
すばらしいですね
06:33
We've lost that capability. We abandoned it in '72.
そして1972年に引退となりました
06:35
This thing was designed three years after Gagarin first flew in space in 1961.
この着陸船は、ガガーリンが飛行した1961年の3年後に作られたのです
06:38
Three years, and we can't do that now. Crazy.
たった3年後です。現在はどうでしょう?
06:43
Talk very briefly about innovation cycles, things that grow,
イノベーションサイクルについて少し話しましょう
06:48
have a lot of activity; they die out when they're replaced by something else.
新しいものが登場したとき、古いものにとって代わります
06:53
These things tend to happen every 25 years.
これは25年周期で起きます
06:57
40 years long, with an overlap. You can put that statement
これは、他のどんなテクノロジーにも言えることです
07:00
on all kinds of different technologies. The interesting thing --
おもしろいのは
07:04
by the way, the speed here, excuse me, higher-speed travel
このイノベーションサイクルは高速飛行の歴史において
07:07
is the title of these innovation cycles. There is none here.
全く見られないということです
07:10
These two new airplanes are the same speed as the DC8 that was done in 1958.
この2つの新型飛行機は、1958年に登場した飛行機と同じ飛行速度です
07:16
Here's the biggie, and that is, you don't have innovation cycles
つまり、イノベーションサイクルが起きていないのです
07:24
if the government develops and the government uses it.
それは国が開発し、国が使うからです
07:27
You know, a good example, of course, is the DARPA net.
いい例が、DARPAネットワークです
07:30
Computers were used for artillery first, then IRS.
コンピューターは当初、軍事的なものに使われていました
07:34
But when we got it, now you have all the level of activity,
しかし、民間の私たちが使い始めてから、有益に使われるようになったのです
07:37
all the benefit from it. Private sector has to do it.
だから民間がやらないとダメなのです
07:40
Keep that in mind. I put down innovation --
それを忘れないでください
07:44
I've looked for innovation cycles in space; I found none.
私は宇宙飛行の分野でイノベーションサイクルを探しましたが、ゼロでした
07:47
The very first year, starting when Gagarin went in space,
ガガーリンが人類初の宇宙を成し遂げた最初の年
07:50
and a few weeks later Alan Shepherd, there were five manned
数週間後にアラン・シェパードが飛び立ち
07:54
space flights in the world -- the very first year.
その年には計5回の有人宇宙飛行がありました
07:57
In 2003, everyone that the United States sent to space was killed.
2003年、アメリカが送り出したすべての宇宙飛行士は事故死しました
08:00
There were only three or four flights in 2003.
2003年には、たった3、4回の宇宙飛行しかなかったのに、です
08:09
In 2004, there were only two flights: two Russian Soyuz flights
2004年には、国際宇宙ステーションへのロシアのソユーズ打ち上げが
08:11
to the international manned station. And I had to fly three in Mojave
2回あっただけです。 私は、モハヴェ宇宙港から
08:18
with my little group of a couple dozen people
少数のチームにより、3回の打ち上げを行いました
08:22
in order to get to a total of five,
それで合計5回です
08:24
which was the number the same year back in 1961.
それは1961年と同じ数字なのです
08:26
There is no growth. There's no activity. There's no nothing.
本当に何も成長していないのです
08:31
This is a picture here taken from SpaceShipOne.
ここにスペースシップ・ワンから撮った写真があります
08:36
This is a picture here taken from orbit.
これが軌道からの写真です
08:39
Our goal is to make it so that you can see this picture and really enjoy that.
私たちの目標は、みなさんにこの景色を見てもらうことなのです
08:41
We know how to do it for sub-orbital flying now, do it safe enough --
現時点で、弾道飛行(軌道に乗らない飛行)なら安全に行うことができます
08:47
at least as safe as the early airlines -- so that can be done.
少なくとも初期の航空機と同じレベルの安全性は保てます
08:51
And I think I want to talk a little bit about why we had the courage
こんな小さい会社が、なぜこんな壮大なことをやろうと思ったのか
08:55
to go out and try that as a small company.
少しお話ししたいと思います
09:00
Well, first of all, what's going to happen next?
まず、これから何が起ころうとしているのでしょうか
09:07
The first industry will be a high volume, a lot of players.
宇宙旅行ビジネスに参入する企業が増えるでしょう
09:10
There's another one announced just last week.
つい先週も、参入を発表した企業がありました
09:14
And it will be sub-orbital. And the reason it has to be sub-orbital
これも弾道飛行になります。軌道飛行ではない理由は
09:17
is, there is not solutions for adequate safety
軌道飛行に安全性の問題があるからです
09:23
to fly the public to orbit. The governments have been doing this --
3カ国の政府が
09:26
three governments have been doing this for 45 years,
45年間もこの問題に取り組んでいますが
09:31
and still four percent of the people that have left the atmosphere have died.
大気圏外に出た人のうち4%は事故死しています
09:33
That's -- You don't want to run a business with that kind of a safety record.
この安全記録でビジネスをするのは難しいのです
09:37
It'll be very high volume; we think 100,000 people will fly by 2020.
2020年までに10万人が宇宙に飛び立つでしょう
09:42
I can't tell you when this will start,
これがいつ始まるかは
09:48
because I don't want my competition to know my schedule.
ライバル企業に知られてしまうため、ここでは言えませんが
09:50
But I think once it does, we will find solutions,
技術革新はすぐに訪れるでしょう
09:53
and very quickly, you'll see those resort hotels in orbit.
そして、軌道上にリゾートホテルが現れる日も近いのです
09:58
And that real easy thing to do, which is a swing around the moon
月を一周したり、素晴らしい眺めを見ることも
10:01
so you have this cool view. And that will be really cool.
簡単にできるようになるのです
10:04
Because the moon doesn't have an atmosphere --
月には大気がないので、楕円軌道に乗って
10:08
you can do an elliptical orbit and miss it by 10 feet if you want.
月面を高度3メートルで飛ぶことだってできるのです
10:10
Oh, it's going to be so much fun.
楽しくてたまらないでしょう!
10:13
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:15
OK. My critics say, "Hey, Rutan's just spending
しかし、中にはこう言う人もいます
10:17
a lot of these billionaires' money for joyrides for billionaires.
「億万長者のお金を、億万長者の遊びのために使っているだけ」
10:21
What's this? This is not a transportation system; it's just for fun."
「実用的なものではなくただの遊びでしかない」
10:26
And I used to be bothered by that, and then I got to thinking,
以前私は、このことについて悩みました
10:31
well, wait a minute. I bought my first Apple computer in 1978
でも、考えてみてください。1978年にアップルのパソコンを
10:34
and I bought it because I could say, "I got a computer at my house and you don't.
買った理由は、他人に見せびらかしたり
10:39
'What do you use it for?' Come over. It does Frogger." OK.
ゲームをするためだったのです
10:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:50
Not the bank's computer or Lockheed's computer,
銀行や企業にあるパソコンとは違い
10:51
but the home computer was for games.
家庭にあるパソコンはゲームをするためのものでした
10:54
For a whole decade it was for fun -- we didn't even know what it was for.
10年もの間、パソコンは「遊び」のためにあったのです
10:57
But what happened, the fact that we had this big industry,
しかし、それから何が起こったでしょう?
11:01
big development, big improvement and capability and so on,
パソコンは巨大産業となり、大きな成長を遂げました
11:05
and they get out there in enough homes -- we were ripe for a new invention.
そして今、普及したパソコンのおかげで、新しい発明が生まれています
11:09
And the inventor is in this audience.
今日偶然ここにおられる -
11:14
Al Gore invented the Internet and because of that,
アル・ゴア氏の情報スーパーハイウェイ構想もありながら
11:16
something that we used for a whole year -- excuse me --
私たちが10年間も遊びのために使ってきたものが
11:20
a whole decade for fun, became everything -- our commerce, our research,
私たちのビジネス、研究、通信など、すべてを支えるようになったのです
11:23
our communication and, if we let the Google guys
グーグル社の社員たちに聞けば
11:29
think for another couple weekends, we can add a dozen more things to the list. (Laughter)
遊びから生まれたアイデアが成功した例を、もっと教えてくれるでしょう
11:33
And it won't be very long before you won't be able to convince kids
昔パソコンがない時代があったなんて
11:37
that we didn't always have computers in our homes.
子供たちは信じられなくなるでしょう
11:40
So fun is defendable.
だから「遊び」でもいいのです
11:45
OK, I want to show you kind of a busy chart,
このちょっと複雑なグラフを見てください
11:48
but in it is my prediction with what's going to happen.
これから何が起こっていくのか
11:53
And in it also brings up another point, right here.
そして、重要な点があるのです
11:56
There's a group of people that have come forward --
全員の名前は知らないと思いますが
12:00
and you don't know all of them -- but the ones that have come forward
子供のころに月着陸のニュースを見て影響され
12:04
were inspired as young children, this little three- to 15-year-old age,
今、実際に行動を起こしている人たちがいるのです
12:07
by us going to orbit and going to the moon here,
彼らは当時
12:14
right in this time period.
3歳から15歳くらいの子供でした
12:17
Paul Allen, Elan Musk, Richard Branson, Jeff Bezos, the Ansari family,
ポール・アレン、イーロン・マスク、リチャード・ブランソン、ジェフ・ベゾス、
12:19
which is now funding the Russians' sub-orbital thing,
ロシアの弾道飛行を援助しているアンサリ家、
12:29
Bob Bigelow, a private space station, and Carmack.
民営宇宙ステーションのボブ・ビゲロー、ジョン・カーマック、
12:34
These people are taking money and putting it in an interesting area,
彼らは私たちにとって
12:38
and I think it's a lot better than they put it in an area
重要な分野に資金を投入しています
12:44
of a better cell phone or something -- but they're putting it in very --
それは、新しい携帯電話のような分野ではなく
12:47
areas and this will lead us into this kind of capability,
私たち人類にとって重要な分野であり
12:51
and it will lead us into the next really big thing
人類の進歩に関わることなのです
12:55
and it will allow us to explore. And I think eventually
それによって私たちは未知の世界を探求することができ
12:57
it will allow us to colonize and to keep us from going extinct.
遠い将来には、星への移住により人類の絶滅を防ぐことになると考えています
13:01
They were inspired by big progress. But look at the progress that's going on after that.
彼らのような投資家たちは、偉大な進歩という夢を持っているのです
13:05
There were a couple of examples here.
では、実際に何が起こっているのでしょう
13:11
The military fighters had a -- highest-performance military airplane
軍のもっとも優秀なジェット機で、SR-71という機体がありました
13:13
was the SR71. It went a whole life cycle, got too rusty to fly,
耐用期間いっぱいまで使用され、引退しました
13:17
and was taken out of service. The Concorde doubled the speed for airline travel.
コンコルドは商業用飛行機の移動速度を2倍にしました
13:22
It went a whole life cycle without competition,
これも耐用期間いっぱいまで使用され
13:27
took out of service. And we're stuck back here
ライバル機も登場しないまま引退しました
13:30
with the same kind of capability for military fighters
私たちは、1950年代後半に登場した飛行機と
13:33
and commercial airline travel that we had back in the late '50s.
同じ技術水準のまま、取り残されているのです
13:36
But something is out there to inspire our kids now.
しかし今なら、子供たちに夢を与えられるでしょう
13:40
And I'm talking about if you've got a baby now,
赤ちゃんや、10歳の子供がいるなら
13:44
or if you've got a 10-year-old now.
特に関係があります
13:46
What's out there is there's something really interesting going to happen here.
本当におもしろいことが起ころうとしているのです
13:47
Relatively soon, you'll be able to buy a ticket
もうすぐ、軍の最新鋭の飛行機よりも速く
13:53
and fly higher and faster than the highest-performance
高い高度で飛ぶ飛行機の航空券を
13:55
military operational airplane. It's never happened before.
買うことができるようになります。これは今まで起きたことがないのです
14:00
The fact that they have stuck here with this kind of performance
軍が古い技術水準に取り残されている理由は、
14:04
has been, well, you know, you win the war in 12 minutes;
ボタン一つで戦争に勝てる時代に
14:09
why do you need something better?
速い飛行機を作る必要がなくなったからです
14:12
But I think when you guys start buying tickets and flying
ただ、宇宙旅行が一般に登場する前に
14:13
sub-orbital flights to space, very soon -- wait a minute,
まず軍に弾道飛行のスキルを持ったパイロットが
14:16
what's happening here, we'll have military fighters
登場するでしょう
14:21
with sub-orbital capability, and I think very soon this.
しかし、宇宙飛行の技術は
14:24
But the interesting thing about it is the commercial guys are going to go first.
ビジネスとして発展したほうが、より速く進歩するのです
14:27
OK, I look forward to a new "capitalist's space race," let's call it.
これを、「資本主義による宇宙開発競争」と呼びましょう。反対に・・・
14:31
You remember the space race in the '60s was for national prestige,
60年代の宇宙開発競争は国家の威信をかけたものでした
14:37
because we lost the first two milestones.
アメリカは競争で2つの敗北を経験しましたが
14:41
We didn't lose them technically. The fact that we had the hardware
どちらも技術的な敗北ではありませんでした
14:44
to put something in orbit when we let Von Braun fly it --
人工衛星にはアメリカ製の機器が積まれていたからです
14:48
you can argue that's not a technical loss.
同様に、スプートニク号の打ち上げは
14:53
Sputnik wasn't a technical loss, but it was a prestige loss.
技術的な敗北ではなく、アメリカにとって国家的威信の敗北でした
14:55
America -- the world saw America as not being the leader in technology,
その瞬間、アメリカは最先端技術の国ではなくなったのです
14:59
and that was a very strong thing.
それは衝撃的なものでした
15:06
And then we flew Alan Shepherd weeks after Gagarin,
その後アメリカは、ガガーリン飛行のたった数週間後に
15:08
not months or decades, or whatever. So we had the capability.
アラン・シェパードを打ち上げ、技術力をアピールしました
15:13
But America lost. We lost. And because of that, we made a big jump to recover it.
しかし、アメリカは負けたのです。だからこそ、その後大きな飛躍を遂げました
15:18
Well, again, what's interesting here is we've lost
繰り返しますが、開発競争当初
15:27
to the Russians on the first couple of milestones already.
アメリカはロシアに負けていたのです
15:30
You cannot buy a ticket commercially to fly into space in America --
現在、アメリカで宇宙行き航空券は買えません
15:33
can't do it. You can buy it in Russia.
でも、ロシアでは買えます
15:38
You can fly with Russian hardware. This is available
ロシア製の機器を使って飛ぶことができます
15:43
because a Russian space program is starving,
なぜなら、ロシアの宇宙計画は予算不足だからです
15:46
and it's nice for them to get 20 million here and there to take one of the seats.
大富豪に宇宙行き航空券を1枚20億円で売りたいのです
15:49
It's commercial. It can be defined as space tourism. They are also offering a trip
宇宙旅行ビジネスとも言えます
15:54
to go on this whip around the moon, like Apollo 8 was done.
アポロ8号のように月を周回するツアーも発売中なのです
16:01
100 million bucks -- hey, I can go to the moon.
数十億円の月旅行です
16:05
But, you know, would you have thought back in the '60s,
想像してみてください
16:08
when the space race was going on,
1960年代の宇宙開発競争のとき
16:11
that the first commercial capitalist-like thing to do
アメリカ人が月に打ち上げられることになり
16:13
to buy a ticket to go to the moon would be in Russian hardware?
いざロケットに乗ってみたら、ロシア製の機器が積まれていたら?
16:19
And would you have thought, would the Russians have thought,
ロシアの威信をかけた人類初の月着陸計画で
16:23
that when they first go to the moon in their developed hardware,
ロケットに乗り込む飛行士が
16:26
the guys inside won't be Russians? Maybe it'll probably be a Japanese
ロシア人ではなかったら?大富豪の日本人や
16:30
or an American billionaire? Well, that's weird: you know, it really is.
アメリカ人だとしたら、とても奇妙です
16:34
But anyway, I think we need to beat them again.
とにかく、開発競争はまたやってきます
16:38
I think what we'll do is we'll see a successful, very successful,
これから、極めて巨大な宇宙旅行ビジネスが登場し
16:42
private space flight industry. Whether we're first or not really doesn't matter.
かつての競争のように、誰が最初に開発するかは重要ではなくなります
16:49
The Russians actually flew a supersonic transport before the Concorde.
例えば、ロシアはコンコルドより以前に超音速旅客機を開発しましたが
16:54
And then they flew a few cargo flights, and took it out of service.
貨物輸送に使っただけでした
17:00
I think you kind of see the same kind of parallel
ビジネスとして発展すると
17:04
when the commercial stuff is offered.
このような違いが出るのです
17:07
OK, we'll talk just a little bit about commercial development for human space flight.
ビジネスにおける、有人宇宙飛行の発展について考えてみましょう
17:11
This little thing says here: five times
宇宙旅行ビジネスとして技術が発展した場合、
17:15
what NASA's doing by 2020. I want to tell you, already
2020年までにNASAの計画より、5倍も進展すると考えられています
17:17
there's about 1.5 billion to 1.7 billion
民間からの投資だけで、
17:25
investment in private space flight that is not government at all --
すでに10億5000万ドルから10億7000万ドルの資金が
17:29
already, worldwide. If you read -- if you Google it,
世界中から集まっています
17:35
you'll find about half of that money, but there's twice of that
グーグルで検索すればわかりますが
17:40
being committed out there -- not spent yet, but being committed
その2倍の金額が投資されることになっていて
17:43
and planned for the next few years. Hey, that's pretty big.
数年後の計画に向けて準備が進んでいるのです
17:47
I'm predicting, though, as profitable as this industry is going to be --
宇宙旅行ビジネスは、利益の大きいビジネスになるでしょう
17:50
and it certainly is profitable when you fly people at 200,000 dollars
2000万円の旅行ツアーを売り出して
17:55
on something that you can actually operate at a tenth of that cost,
かかるコストはその10分の1かそれ以下だからです
17:59
or less -- this is going to be very profitable.
大きな利益が生まれます
18:03
I predict, also, that the investment that will flow into this
また、このビジネスに投資されたお金は
18:07
will be somewhere around half of what the U.S. taxpayer
アメリカの納税者がNASAの宇宙計画に使う金額の
18:10
spends for NASA's manned spacecraft work.
半分で済むと予想しています
18:14
And every dollar that flows into that will be spent more efficiently
さらに、投資されたお金はNASAで使われるより
18:18
by a factor of 10 to 15. And what that means is before we know it,
10~15倍も効率よく使われることになります
18:23
the progress in human space flight, with no taxpayer dollars,
それはつまり、有人宇宙飛行における進歩は、税金無しでも
18:31
will be at a level of about five times as much
現在のNASAの宇宙計画より
18:38
as the current NASA budgets for human space flight.
5倍も進展する、ということなのです
18:44
And that is because it's us. It's private industry.
それは、私たち民間企業だからできるのです
18:49
You should never depend on the government to do this sort of stuff --
こういうことを国にやらせ続けてはダメなのです
18:57
and we've done it for a long time. The NACA, before NASA,
私たちは長い間、NASAなど、国に頼ってきました
19:03
never developed an airliner and never ran an airline.
民間では宇宙旅客機などは作ってきませんでした
19:06
But NASA is developing the space liner, always has,
しかしNASAは長い間、宇宙船開発を担当し、
19:10
and runs the only space line, OK. And we've shied away from it
唯一の宇宙路線を運営しています、私たちは今までその事実から目を背けてきました
19:14
because we're afraid of it. But starting back in June of 2004,
しかしながら、2004年の6月、
19:21
when I showed that a little group out there actually can do it,
私が少人数のチームでも実際に行動を起こせることを示してから
19:27
can get a start with it, everything changed after that time.
すべてが変わったのです
19:32
OK, thank you very much.
ご清聴、ありがとうございました
19:35
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:37
Translated by Takuto Oshima
Reviewed by Tomohiro Kawanami

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Burt Rutan - Aircraft engineer
In 2004, legendary spacecraft designer Burt Rutan won the $10M Ansari X-Prize for SpaceShipOne, the first privately funded craft to enter space twice in a two-week period. He's now collaborating with Virgin Galactic to build the first rocketship for space tourism.

Why you should listen

Burt Rutan is widely regarded as one of the world's most important industrial designers, and his prolific contributions to air- and spacecraft design have driven the industry forward for decades. His two companies, Rutan Aircraft Factory and Scaled Composites, have developed and flight-tested more new types of aircraft than the rest of the US industry combined. He has himself designed hundreds of aircraft, including the famous Voyager, which his brother piloted on a record-breaking nine-day nonstop flight around the world. 

Rutan might also be the person to make low-cost space tourism a reality: He's one of the major players promoting entrepreneurial approaches to space exploration, and his collaboration with Virgin Galactic is the most promising of these efforts. SpaceShipTwo, a collaboration between Richard Branson and Rutan completed its first "captive carry" in March of 2010, marking the beginning of the era of commercial space exploration.

Ever the maverick, Rutan is known for both his bold proclamations and his criticism of the aerospace industry. Witness the opening line of his presentation at TED2006: "Houston, we have a problem. We're entering a second generation of no progress in terms of human flight in space."

More profile about the speaker
Burt Rutan | Speaker | TED.com