sponsored links
TED2004

Stewart Brand: The Long Now

スチュアート・ブランド「ロング・ナウについて語る」

February 2, 2004

スチュアート・ブランドは 一万年にわたって時を刻み続ける ロング・ナウの時計に取り組んでいます。遠い未来の事を考えさせる素晴らしいプロジェクトです。ここでは時計に関する問題の一側面、どこに時計を設置するか、について話します。

Stewart Brand - Environmentalist, futurist
Since the counterculture '60s, Stewart Brand has been creating our internet-worked world. Now, with biotech accelerating four times faster than digital technology, Stewart Brand has a bold new plan ... Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Welcome to 10,000 feet.
標高 3000メートルの世界にようこそ
00:12
Let me explain why we are here
この講演の目的と
00:15
and why some of you have a pine cone close to you.
皆さんの周りに松ぼっくりが置いてある理由を お話しましょう
00:16
Once upon a time, I did a book called "How Buildings Learn."
だいぶ前に「建物は学ぶ」という本を書きましたが
00:20
Today's event you might call "How Mountains Teach."
今日の話は いわば「山は教える」です
00:23
A little background: For 10 years I've been trying to figure out how to
簡単な背景です 私はここ10年間
00:27
hack civilization so that we can get long-term thinking
文明をどう操作すれば
長い目で物事を見るのが習慣になり
00:29
to be automatic and common instead of difficult and rare --
困難で不可能なものではなくなるか
00:34
or in some cases, non-existent.
ということを考えてきました
00:38
It would be helpful if humanity got into the habit of thinking
人類が「今」という時間枠を
00:41
of the now not just as next week or next quarter, but you know,
来週 来期までと短く捉えず
00:46
next 10,000 years and the last 10,000 years --
1万年先 1万年前という文明史の長さの尺度で
00:50
basically civilization's story so far.
普段から意識するようになると良いのです
00:54
So we have the Long Now Foundation in San Francisco.
サンフランシスコにあるロング・ナウ協会は
00:58
It's an incubator for about a dozen projects,
長期間の持続性に関する事業を
01:00
all having to do with continuity over the long term.
十数件育成している団体です
01:02
Our core project is a rather ambitious folly --
中心になるのは 大がかりな看板プロジェクトで
01:06
I suppose, a mythic undertaking: to build a 10,000-year clock
夢物語のような 一万年時計を造るという大事業です
01:11
that can really keep good time for that long a period.
それだけ長いこと時間を
正確に刻む時計を造る計画です
01:16
And the design problems of a project like that are just absolutely delicious.
こういう企画の設計上の課題を考えるのは
本当に楽しいものです
01:21
Go to the clock. And what we have here is something
まず時計 ここにあるのは
01:28
many of you saw here three years ago.
3年前に この場で紹介したのと同じ物です
01:33
It's the first working prototype of the clock.
実際に動いている試作一号機です
01:35
It's about nine feet high.
高さは3メートル弱です
01:37
Designed by Danny Hillis and Alexander Rose. It's presently in London,
ダニー・ヒリスとアレグザンダー・ローズの設計で
現在ロンドンの
01:38
and is ticking away very deliberately at the science museum there.
科学博物館で しっかりと時を刻んでいます
01:43
So the design problem for today is going to be,
今日お話しする 設計上の課題は
01:47
how do you house an eventual monumental clock like this
将来遺跡となり得る この時計をどこにどう設置すれば
01:51
so it can really tick, save time beautifully for 100 centuries?
今後100世紀間 誤差もなく
時を刻み続けられるかという事です
01:55
Well, this was the first solution.
まず最初に思いついたのが
02:00
Alexander Rose came up with this idea
アレグザンダー・ローズの考えた
02:02
of a spiraloid tower with continuous sloping ramps.
外側にぐるりと坂が付いたタワーです
02:04
And it looked like a way to go, until you start thinking
「これはいい」と思えるのは
02:09
about, what does deep time do to a building?
非常に長い時間が建造物に与える影響を考えるまでです
02:11
Well, this is what deep time does to a building.
非常に長い時間の影響の例を見てみましょう
02:14
This is the Parthenon. It's only 2,450 years old,
これはパルテノン 建ててから2450年しか経っていません
02:17
and look what happened to it.
それから
02:21
Here's a beautiful project. They really knew it'd last forever,
この素晴らしいプロジェクトは永遠に持つはずでした
02:22
because they'd build it out of absolutely huge stones.
巨大な石で造ったのですから
02:25
And now it's a pathetic ruin and no one even knows what it was used for.
現在の悲惨な姿からは
元来の建物の目的すら分かりません
02:29
That's what happens to buildings. They're vulnerable.
建物の宿命です 建物は弱いのです
02:32
Even the most durable and intactable buildings,
頑丈で絶対に壊れないはずの
02:35
like the pyramids of Giza, are in bad shape when you look up close.
ギザのピラミッドも 近くで見るとひどいものです
02:38
They've been looted inside and out.
中も外も略奪に会い
02:42
And they're built to protect things but they don't protect things.
物を守るように造られたはずが何も守っていません
02:45
So we got to thinking, if you can't put things safely in a building,
建物が駄目なら どこに設置すれば安全か考えた結果
02:48
where can you safely put them? We thought, OK, underground.
そうだ 地下にしよう ということになりました
02:52
How about underground with a view?
地面の下だが景色が楽しめる所で
02:55
Underground in a place that's really solid.
地盤がしっかりとした所はないだろうか
02:58
So the obvious answer was, we need a mountain.
明らかな答は山です
03:00
You don't want just any mountain.
どの山でも良いと言うわけではありません
03:04
You need absolutely the right mountain
条件にぴったりな山が必要です
03:06
if you're going to have a clock for 10,000 years.
一万年も時計を守っていくのですから
03:09
So here's an image of the long view of the search problem.
探す場所を遠くから見ると こんなイメージになります
03:11
And we got to thinking for various reasons it ought to be a desert mountain,
様々な理由から砂漠にある山が良いことになり
03:16
so we got looking in the dry areas of the Southwest.
アメリカ南西部の乾燥地帯を探し始めました
03:20
We looked at mesas in New Mexico.
ニューメキシコの高台や
03:23
We were looking at dead volcanoes in Arizona.
アリゾナの死火山も候補にあがりました
03:26
Then Roger Kennedy, who was the director of the National Parks Service,
その頃 国立公園局のロジャー・ケネディーが
03:28
led us to Eastern Nevada,
ネバダ東部のアメリカで最も新しく
03:31
to America's newest and oldest national park,
かつ一番古い国立公園を紹介してくれました
03:33
which is called Great Basin National Park.
グレートベースン国立公園です
03:36
It's right on the eastern border of Nevada.
ネバダ東側の州境にある 標高3千メートルを超える
03:40
It's the highest range in the state -- over 13,000 feet.
ネバダ州で一番高い山脈に位置します
03:43
And you'll notice that on the left, on the left, on the west, it's very steep,
左側 つまり西側は急斜面で
03:47
and on the right it's gentle.
右側はゆったりとした勾配です
03:51
This place is remote. It's over 200 miles from any major city.
周りには何もありません 300キロ以内に都市はなく
03:54
It's nowhere near any Interstate or railroad.
ハイウエイや鉄道からも遠く離れ
03:58
And it's -- the only thing that goes by is what's called
唯一 近くを通る道は アメリカで一番寂しい
04:01
America's loneliest highway, U.S. 50.
国道50番線だけです
04:05
Now, inside the yellow line here, on the right is -- that's all national park.
右側にある 黄色の線の内側が国立公園
04:09
Inside the green line is national forest.
緑色の線の内側が国有林
04:14
And then over to the left is Bureau of Land Management land and some private land.
その左は土地管理局と民間の土地です
04:17
Now, as it happened, that two-mile-long strip right in the middle,
たまたま ここにある長さ 3キロの
04:21
this vertical, was available because it was private land.
縦に細長い土地が私有地で入手可能でした
04:24
And thanks to Jay Walker who was here and Mitch Kapor who was here,
ここにいるジェイ・ウオーカーとミッチ・ケイパーのおかげで
04:30
who started the process, Long Now was able to get that two-mile-long strip of land.
ロング・ナウはこの3キロの細長い土地を購入できました
04:34
And now let's look at the grand truth of what's there.
ここに広がる雄大な真実を見てみましょう
04:40
We're in Pole Canyon, looking west up the western escarpment
これはポールキャニオンから西側を見ているところです
04:43
of Mount Washington, which is 11,600 feet on top.
標高 3535メートル ワシントン山の急斜面が見えます
04:47
Those white cliffs are a dense Cambrian limestone.
白い崖は高密度のカンブリア紀石灰岩です
04:52
That's a 2,000-foot thick formation,
岩層は厚さ600メートルで
04:55
and it might be a beautiful place to hide a clock.
時計を隠すには素晴らしい場所かもしれない
04:58
It would be a pilgrimage to get to it; it would be a serious hike
時計までたどり着くには いわば巡礼で
05:03
to get up to where the clock is.
かなり本格的な山登りにもなります
05:06
So last June, the Long Now board, some staff and some donors
昨年の六月 ロング・ナウの幹部、スタッフ、支援者と専門家で
05:09
and advisors, made a two-week expedition to the mountain
この山に 二週間の探検に出かけました
05:14
to explore it and investigate, one, if it's the right mountain,
これが適格な山か もしそうであったら
05:19
and two, if it's the right mountain, how it might actually work for us.
今後 計画をどう進めるか 探索 調査するためです
05:24
Now Danny Hillis sort of framed the problem.
ダニー・ヒリスが課題の枠組みをしました
05:28
He has a theory of how the overall clock experience should work.
彼は時計訪問の経験がどうあるべきかを定義し
05:31
It's what he calls the seven stages of a mythic adventure.
「幻想的な冒険の7つのステップ」 と名付けました
05:34
It starts with the image. The image is a picture you have in your mind
最初のステップはイメージです 旅の終わりにある目的を
05:38
of the goal at the end of the journey.
心の中に思い浮かべます
05:42
In this case it might well be an image of the clock.
この場合 イメージはこの時計かもしれません
05:44
Then there's the point of embarkation, that is, the point of transition
次は出発 普通の生活から
05:47
from ordinary life to being a pilgrim on a quest.
何かを探す巡礼の旅に移るステップです
05:51
Then -- this is a nice image of it, there's the labyrinth.
その次はこのイメージにある様な迷路です
05:55
The labyrinth is a concept, it's like a twilight zone,
迷路とは単なる概念で トワイライトゾーンのような所
05:59
it's a place where it's difficult, where you get disoriented,
困難で 思考を混乱させる場所を意味します
06:03
maybe you get scared -- but you have to go through it
怖いかもしれないが 思想をしっかりまとめていくには
06:06
if you're going to get to some kind of deep reintegration.
通過しなくてはならない所です
06:09
Then there should always be in sight the draw --
次のステップにあるのが 常に視野にある牽引力
06:12
a kind of a beacon that draws you on through the labyrinth
迷路内を誘導してくれる灯台の様な物が
06:16
to finish the process of getting there.
目的地にたどりつく過程を助けてくれます
06:19
Now Brian Eno, who's been in the thick of the Long Now process,
ロング・ナウに深く関わっているブライアン・イーノが
06:22
spent two years making a C.D. called "January 7003,"
2年間かけて「January 7003」というCDを作りました
06:25
and it's "Bell Studies for the Clock of the Long Now."
副題は「ロング・ナウの時計のベルの研究」です
06:30
Based on -- parts of it are based on an algorithm that Danny Hillis developed,
ダニー・ヒリスの開発したアルゴリズムに 部分的に基づいて
06:33
so that a peal of 10 bells
10 の鐘が
06:38
makes a different peal every day for 10,000 years.
一万年間 毎日違う音を奏でるのです
06:40
The Hillis algorithm. 10 factorial gives you that number.
ヒリスのアルゴリズム 10の階乗でそんな数字になります
06:44
And in fact, pretty soon we'll hear the sound.
この音を聞いてみましょう
06:48
January 7003. There it is.
7003年1月、お聞きください
06:51
OK, back to Danny's list.
ダニーのリストに戻ります
06:55
Number five of the seven is the payoff. This is it. The climax.
7つのうちの5つ目は見返り
旅のクライマックス 即ちゴールです
06:57
The goal. The main thing that you're trying to get to.
これを手に入れるために みんな努力するわけです
07:01
And then Danny says a really great journey will have a secret payoff.
ダニーによれば よい旅には秘密のおまけがつきものです
07:05
Something you didn't expect that caps what you did expect.
思いもしなかった 予想を上回る何かが付いてくるのです
07:09
Then there's the return.
そして 帰還
07:13
You've got to have a gradual return to the ordinary world,
元の世界に戻るのはゆっくりである必要があります
07:15
so you have time to assimilate what you've learned.
学んだことが心に浸み込むようにです
07:18
And then, how about a memento? Number seven.
思い出となるものは? 7番目です
07:22
At the end of it there's something physical,
終わりには手で触れる何か ご褒美のような物があります
07:26
a kind of reward that you take away.
終わりには手で触れる何か ご褒美のような物があります
07:27
It might be a piece of a core drill of the mountain.
山を掘削した時の岩石でもいいでしょう
07:29
Something that's just yours.
「おみやげ」として持ち帰る 自分だけの特別な物です
07:31
How do you study a mountain
この様なプロジェクトの為に
07:34
for the kinds of things we're talking about?
どのように山を調査すればいいのでしょう
07:37
This is not a normal building project.
普通の建物を建てるのとは違います
07:39
What do you look for?
何を探すのでしょう
07:41
What are the elements that will most affect your ideas and decisions?
どんな要素が 考えや判断に最も影響を与えるのでしょう
07:42
Start with borders. If you look on the left side of the cliffs here,
境界線を見てみましょう 崖の左側には
07:48
that's national park. That's sacrosanct --
国立公園があります ここは手をつけられないところで
07:51
you can't do anything with that. To the right of it is national forest.
どうすることもできません その右は国有林です
07:53
There's possibilities. The borders are important.
ここは可能性があります 境界線を見る事は大切です
07:56
Other elements were mines, weather, approaches and elevation.
他の要素として 鉱山、天気、道、標高などがあります
07:59
And especially trees. Look at those things up on top there.
それから特に木 あの頂上にある木を見てください
08:07
It turns out that Mount Washington is covered with bristlecone pines.
ワシントン山はブリッスルコーンパインで
覆われているのです
08:10
They're the world's oldest living thing.
この世で最高齢の生命体です
08:14
People think they're just the size of shrubs, but that's not actually true.
この木は潅木程度のものかと思われがちですが
そうとは限りません
08:17
There are trees on that mountain that are 5,000 years old and still living.
樹齢が5000年以上のものもあります
08:22
The wood is so solid it's like stone, and it lasts for a long time.
木質は頑丈で石のように固く 枯れても何年も持つのです
08:29
So when you do tree ring studies of trunks that are on the mountain,
この山に残っている幹の年輪を調べると
08:34
some of them go back 10,000 years.
中には一万年前から残っているものもあります
08:38
The stone itself is absolutely beautiful,
この "石" そのものはとても美しい
08:41
sculpted by millennia of very tough winters up there.
数千年もの厳しい冬によって削り磨かれてきました
08:43
We had tree ring analysts from the University of Arizona
アリゾナ大学の年輪年代学の専門家が
08:47
join us on the expedition.
一緒でした
08:50
Now, if you guys have a pine cone handy,
松ぼっくりが近くにあったら
08:52
now's a good time to put it in your hand and feel it, especially on the end.
手にとって触ってください 特に先端のところが
08:54
That's interesting.
面白いです
08:59
You'll find out why it's called a bristlecone pine. A little sensory experience.
ブリッスルコーンパインと呼ばれる訳が分かりますね
珍しい感覚です
09:01
Here's Danny Hillis in the midst of a bristlecone pine forest
ブリッスルコーンパインの森の中に居るダニー・ヒリスです
09:07
on Long Now land. I should say that the age of bristlecones
この森はロング・ナウの所有地内にあります
ブリッスルコーンパインの樹齢は
09:12
was discovered, led by a theory.
ある理論に基づいて発見されました
09:17
Edmund Schulman in the 1950s
1950年代にエドムンド・シュルマンが
09:20
had been studying trees under great stress at Timberline,
森林限界に生息するストレスにさらされた木を研究して
09:22
and came to the realization that he put in an article in Science magazine
その結果をサイエンス・マガジンに発表しました
09:26
called, "Longevity under Adversity in Conifers."
タイトルは「逆境下における針葉樹の長命」というものです
09:29
And then, based on that principle, he started looking around
そして その考えに基づいて森林限界にある
09:35
at the various trees at Timberline,
様々な木を探し始めたのです
09:38
and realized that the bristlecone pines --
そしてホワイトマウンテンで見つけた
09:40
he found some in the White Mountains that were over 4,000 years old.
ブリッスルコーンパインは樹齢4000年以上だと分かりました
09:42
Longevity under adversity is a pretty interesting design principle in its own right.
逆境下における長命は
それ自体 興味をそそられるデザインの仕組みです
09:47
OK, onto the mines. The first asking price for the property
話を鉱山に移しましょう 1998年当時の土地の売値は
09:52
when we looked at it in 1998 was one billion dollars for 180 acres and a couple of mines.
70ヘクタールと二つの坑道 合わせて1億ドルでした
09:56
Because the owner said, "There's one billion dollars of beryllium in that mountain."
地主は山には一億ドル以上のベリリウムが
埋まっているはずだというのです
10:06
And we said, "Wow, that's great. Listen, we'll counter. How about zero?
「それは素晴らしい でも どうでしょう
タダにはなりませんか?
10:10
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:15
And we're a non-profit foundation, you can give us the property
うちはNPO法人ですから 土地の寄付は
10:17
and take a hell of a tax deduction.
ものすごい税金控除になりますよ
10:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:24
All you have to do is prove to the government it's worth a billion dollars."
国に一億ドルの価値があると証明できればの話ですが」
10:27
Well, a few years went by and there was some kind of back and forth,
まあこの様に数年程交渉を続けた結果
10:30
and by and by, thanks to Mitch and Jay,
ミッチとジェイの助けもあって
10:32
we were able to buy the whole property for 140,000 dollars.
その土地を14万ドルで手に入れることが出来ました
10:34
This is one of the mines. It doesn't have any beryllium in it.
これが坑道の一つ ベリリウムはありませんでした
10:39
It's called the Pole Adit. And it does have tungsten,
ポール・アディットという名が付いていて
タングステンがありました
10:43
a little bit of tungsten, left over, that's the kind of mine it was.
掘り残したタングステンが少し そんな程度の鉱山でした
10:47
But it goes a mile-and-a-half in a straight line,
でも坑道は東の山脈のほうに
10:50
due east into the range, into very interesting territory -- except that,
まっすぐに とても面白い区域に向かって
2キロ以上続いています
10:52
as you'll see when we go inside in a minute,
ただ問題は 中に入ると分かるのですが
10:58
we were hoping for limestone but in there is just shale.
坑道が石灰岩ではなく頁岩で出来ているという事です
11:01
And shale is not quite completely competent rock.
頁岩は粘土岩の一種で硬質岩盤とは言い切れません
11:05
Competent rock is rock that will hold itself up without any shoring.
硬質岩盤は柱なしでも崩れませんが
11:08
The shale would like some shoring,
頁岩は支えが必要になります
11:12
and so parts of it are caved in in there.
部分的に崩れているところもあります
11:14
That's Ben Roberts from -- he's the bat specialist from the National Park.
これはベン・ロバーツ、国立公園のコウモリ専門家です
11:16
But there are many wonders back in there, like this weird fungus
中には素晴らしいものが沢山あります
例えば このカビ
11:20
on some of the collapsed timbers.
倒れた木材に生えています
11:24
OK, here's another mine that's up on top of the property,
これはもう一つの坑道 土地の一番高いところにあります
11:26
and it dates back to 1870.
1870年に掘られたものです
11:30
That's what the property was originally built around --
この土地は当時 集まった
11:32
it was a set of mining claims. It was a very productive silver mine.
採掘者によって開拓され かつては銀の良く出る鉱山でした
11:34
In fact, it was the highest-operating mine in Nevada,
実はネバダ州で一番標高の高い鉱山で
11:39
and it ran year round.
年中休まず操業していました
11:42
You can imagine what it was like in the winter at 10,000 feet.
標高3000メートルの冬がどんなものか想像つくでしょう
11:44
You may recognize a couple of the miners there.
この二人の坑夫 ご存知の方いる人もいると思います
11:47
There's Jeff Bezos on the right and Paul Saville on the left looking for galena,
右がジェフ・ベゾス、左がポール・セビルで鉛と銀の混合物
11:50
which is the lead-silver thing. They didn't find any.
ガレナを探しています 結局何もみつからず
11:56
They both kept their day jobs. Here's the last mine.
二人とも本業に戻りました
これが最後の坑道
12:01
It's called the Bonanza Adit. It's down in a canyon.
ボナンザ・アディットと呼ばれ 谷の底にあります
12:06
And Alexander Rose on the left there worked with a bunch of people
左のアレグザンダー・ローズが
12:08
from the National Park to survey the whole mine. It's a mile deep.
国立公園の人達と坑道の調査をしました 深さが2キロ弱あり
12:12
And they also found four species of bats in there.
4種類のコウモリが発見されました
12:15
Now, almost all those mines, by the way, meet underneath the mountain.
山の下でこれらの坑道は殆どつながっています
12:18
They don't quite, but it's something to think about.
完全にではないのですが 検討する価値があります
12:22
They don't quite meet.
ほんの少しだけ離れているのです
12:25
Let's go to weather. Mountains specialize in interesting weather.
天気に話を移しましょう 山の天気は面白いものです
12:27
Way more interesting than Monterey even today.
今日でさえモントレーの天気よりもずっと面白い
12:33
And so one Tuesday morning last June, there we were.
去年の六月の火曜日のことです
12:36
Woke up in the morning -- the mountain was covered with snow.
朝起きたら山は雪にすっぽり覆われていました
12:39
That was a great time to go up and visit our weather station which again,
ミッチ・ケイパーのお陰で建設中の
12:42
thanks to Mitch Kapor, we're building up there.
天気観測所に行くには打ってつけの日でした
12:46
And it's a pretty interesting scene.
これはちょっと面白い話です
12:49
This is, on the left there, the joyful lady is Pat Irwin,
この左笑顔の人は パット・アーウィン
12:52
who's the regional head of the National Forest Service,
国有林の地域主任です
12:55
and they gave us the temporary use permit to be there.
観測所建設のため 仮の使用許可証をくれました
12:58
We want a temporary use permit for the clock, eventually --
やがては時計のために
13:02
10,000-year temporary use permit.
別の仮許可証を頼むことになります
13:04
(Laughter)
一万年間有効の仮の許可証をね (笑)
13:06
The weather station's pretty interesting.
天気観測所はうまく出来ています
13:08
Kurt Bollacker and Alexander Rose designed a radically wireless station.
カート・ボラッカーとアレグザンダー・ローズが
革新的な無線の基地を設計しました
13:10
It runs on solar, and it sends a signal
with that antenna
ソーラー発電で信号を あのアンテナから送り
13:14
and bounces it off of micrometeorite trails in the atmosphere
大気中の宇宙塵の軌跡に反射させて
13:17
to a place in Bozeman, Montana, where the data is taken down
モンタナ州ボーズマンでデータを取得します
13:23
and then sent through landlines to San Francisco,
データは地上回線を使ってサンフランシスコに送られ
13:27
where we put the data in real time up on our website.
そこで私たちがウエブサイトにリアルタイムに更新します
13:30
And there you see a week of weather at 9,400 feet on Mount Washington.
ネット上で標高2800メートル地点の
ワシントン山の一週間の天気を見られる訳です
13:34
Let's go to approaches.
つぎに時計への道
13:40
As it happens, there are no trails anywhere on Mount Washington,
ワシントン山には登山道が一切ありません
13:43
just a few old mining roads like this,
古い鉱山用の道が何本かあるだけなので
13:47
so you have to bushwhack everywhere.
かき分けて進むしかありません
13:49
But there's no bears, and there's no poison oak,
幸いな事に 熊やウルシは生息していません
13:50
and there's basically no people because this place has been empty for a long time.
そして基本的には人間もいません
長い間何もありませんでした
13:54
You can hike for days and not encounter anybody.
何日歩いても誰にも会いません
14:00
Well, here's a potential approach.
さて これが登り道候補のひとつ
14:03
You need to come up the Lincoln Canyon.
リンカーン・キャニオンから登ってきます
14:05
It's this beautiful world all of its own, surrounded by cliffs,
崖に囲まれ ここ自体 とても美しい場所です
14:08
and it's an easy hike to stroll up the canyon bottom,
谷を登るのは簡単ですが
14:11
until you get to this barrier, and it actually presents a problem.
この断崖絶壁につきあたります これは問題です
14:15
So you can scratch Lincoln Canyon as an approach.
リンカーン・キャニオンからの登頂はダメです
14:22
Another possible approach is right up the western front of the mountain.
他に考えられるのが、山の西側を登る道
14:27
You can see why we sometimes call it Long Mountain.
なぜロングマウンテンとも呼ばれるかお分かりでしょう
14:30
And from where you're standing at 6,000 feet in the valley,
1800メートル下の谷から
14:33
it's an easy hike up to the mature pinyon and juniper forest
松や杜松の成林までは簡単に登れます
14:36
through that knoll at the front at 7,600 feet.
手前2300メートル地点にある丘を通って
14:39
And you can carry right on up through meadows
草原を難なく進み
14:41
and steepening forest to the high base of the cliffs at 10,500 feet,
傾斜が段々増す森の中を3200メートルの崖下まで進みます
14:44
where there's a bit of a problem.
そこからが問題です
14:49
Now, Jeff Bezos advised us when he left at the end of the expedition,
ジェフ・ベゾスは探検を終えた時にこう言いました
14:52
"Make the clock inaccessible.
「時計にはできるだけ人が近づきにくいようにしよう
14:57
The harder it is to get to, the more people will value it."
到達するのが難しいほど行く価値が増すから」
15:01
And check -- those are 600-foot vertical walls there.
ピッタリです ― まさにこれは 180メートそそり立つ壁です
15:05
So Alexander Rose wanted to explore this route,
アレグザンダー・ローズはこの道を探索することにしました
15:10
and he started over here on the left from his pickup truck
この左のトラックのところから出発して
15:15
at 8,900 feet and headed up the mountain.
2700メートル地点から上を目指しました
15:19
Now, as you gain elevation your IQ goes down --
高度が上がるに連れて IQ は下がるものです
15:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:26
but your emotional affect goes up,
反対に感情の効果は上がります
15:28
which is great for having a mythic experience,
幻想的な経験をしたかったら もってこいの環境です
15:30
whether you want to or not.
望んでも望まなくてもね
15:33
In fact, Danny Hillis can estimate altitude
ダニー・ヒリスに言わせると 高度がどのくらいか
15:35
by how much math he can't do in his head.
暗算能力の低下で分かるそうです
15:38
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:41
Now, I happened to be on the radio with Alexander
アレグザンダーが 崖のふもとに着いた時
15:44
when he got to this point at the base of the cliffs, and he said, quote,
丁度 無線を聞いていたら 彼がこう言いました
15:46
"There's a hidden notch. I think I can get up a ways."
「隠れた窪みがあるから ここを登っていけそうだ」と
15:51
Now, he's a rock climber, but you know, he's our executive director.
彼は崖登りには慣れていますが 当協会の幹部です
死なれたら困ります
15:56
I don't want him killed. I know he's going to love cliffs.
崖登りが大好きな彼は
16:00
I'm saying, "Be careful, be careful, be careful."
「気をつけて 気をつけて」と私が言っているうちに
16:02
Then he starts going up, and the next thing I hear is,
登りはじめて 次に無線機からは
16:05
"I'm half-way up. It's like climbing stairs. I'm going up 60 degrees.
「半分登った まるで階段を登っているようだ
傾斜60度で登っている_
16:08
It's a secret passage. It's like something from Tolkien."
秘密の道だ まるでトルキンの話に出てくるようだ」
と聞こえてきました
16:14
And I'm going, "Careful, careful. Please be careful."
「気をつけて 気をつけて お願いだから」
16:18
And then, of course, the next thing I hear is,
と応えたあと しばらくすると
16:21
"I've made it to the top. You can see all of creation from up here."
「頂上に着いた ここから全てが良く見える」
と言うのが 聞こえ
16:22
And he dashed across the top of the mountains.
山の頂上を走っているのが見えたのです
16:25
In fact, there he is. That's Alexander Rose.
ほら これがアレグザンダー・ローズです
16:28
First ascent of the western face to Mount Washington,
ワシントン山への西側からの初めての登頂
16:30
and a solo ascent at that.
それも単独登頂でした
16:33
This discovery changed everything about our sense of these cliffs
この発見は崖に関する感覚を全て変えました
16:37
and what to do with them.
計画をもです
16:40
We realized that we had to name this thing that Alexander discovered.
アレグザンダーが見つけたルートに
名前をつけることになりました
16:42
How about Zander's Crevice? No.
ザンダーのクレバス (割れ目) ではおかしいので
16:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:50
So we finally decided on Alexander's Siq.
アレグザンダーのシークと呼ぶことにしました
16:54
Zander's Siq is named after -- some of you have been to Petra,
由来は ぺトラの遺跡に行った方もいると思いますが
16:57
there's this wonderful slot canyon that leads into Petra
ぺトラに通じる荘重な峡谷がシークと呼ばれているので
17:00
called the Siq, and so this is the Siq.
こちらも そうしました
17:04
And it really is hidden. I can't find it in this image,
うまく隠れていて 私でさえ見つけられません
17:06
and I'm not sure you can.
皆さんにも見えないでしょうね
17:09
Only when you get fresh snow can you see just along the rim there,
新しい雪が降った時にだけ
この縁にそって見えるようになります
17:10
and that brings it out.
はっきり浮き上がるのです
17:14
Now, Danny and I were up at this same area one day,
ダニーと私がここら辺にいた時
17:16
and Danny looked over to the right
ダニーが右の方の
17:18
and noticed something halfway up the cliffs,
崖の中腹に何かを見つけました
17:20
which is a kind of a porch or a cliff shelf with bristlecones on it,
ベランダか崖の棚のようなもので
ブリッスルコーンが生えていました
17:23
and supposed that people going up to the clock inside the mountain
山の中の時計を見た人達が
17:27
could come out onto that shelf and look down at the view.
その棚に出て来て景色を見渡せると思いました
17:31
And the people toiling up the mountain could see them,
後から登ってくる人達は小さな人影が
17:35
these tiny little people up there, incredibly halfway up the cliff.
崖の半ばにいるのを見て 目をこすり 思うでしょう
17:38
How did they get there? Do I have to do that?
どうやって登ったのだろう 自分もあれをやるのかと
17:41
And so that maybe becomes part of the draw and part of the labyrinth.
これは迷路の一部である牽引力になるでしょう
17:44
You can get another angle on Danny's porch
違う角度から見たダニーのポーチ
17:47
by going around to the south and looking north at the whole formation there.
南にまわって北の方角を見ると地形全体がみえます
17:51
And you need to know that Danny's clock is to be kept accurate
ダニーの時計が正確に動くには
17:58
by a ray of sunshine, that perfect noon hitting it every sunny day,
天気の良い日の正午 太陽光が
時計に当たる必要があります
18:01
and the pulse of heat from that sets off a solar trigger
太陽光を利用した熱伝導が引き金になって
18:06
which resets the clock to make it perfectly accurate.
時計を正確な時刻にリセットします
18:09
So even with the slowing of the rotation of the earth and so on,
地球の自転が遅くなったとしても
18:12
the clock will keep perfectly good time.
時計は正確な時間を刻み続けます
18:14
So here we're looking from the south, look north.
南側から北を見てみましょう
18:17
This is all Forest Service land. If you go up on top of those cliffs,
ここは全て国有林です この崖を上まで行くと
18:19
that's some of the Long Now land in those trees.
ロング・ナウの土地が森林の中にあります
18:23
And if you go up there and look back, then you'll get a sense of
登って下を振り返ると山の頂上からの景色が
18:26
what the view starts to be like from the top of the mountain.
想像できます
18:31
That's the long view. That's 80 miles to the horizon.
遠くまでの景色が見渡せます 地平線まで130キロもあります
18:34
And that's also timberline and those bristlecones really are shrubs.
そこは森林限界で ここのブリッスルコーンは潅木です
18:38
That's a different place to be. It's 11,400 feet and it's exquisite.
全くの別世界です 標高3470メートルの世界は
言葉で表せないほど素晴らしい
18:42
Now, if you go over to the right from this image to looking at the edge of the cliffs,
この写真の右から崖の淵を見ると
18:50
it's 600 foot, just about a yard to the left of Kurt Bollacker's foot,
カート・ボラッカーの立っている左側 約 1メートル先は
18:54
there is a 600-foot drop. He's ambling on over to Zander's Siq.
180メートルの垂直な壁です
彼はのんびりザンダーのシークへ向かっています
18:58
That's what it looks like looking down it.
縁から下を見下ろした景色
19:03
We should probably put in a rail or something.
手すりをつけないと危ないでしょうね
19:07
Over on the eastern side it's gentle, as you can see.
東側は見渡す限り緩やかです
19:11
And that's not snow -- that's what the white limestone looks like.
これは雪ではなく 白い石灰岩がこのように見えるのです
19:15
You also see there a bighorn sheep.
ここにはビッグホーン・シープがいます
19:18
Their herd was reintroduced from Wyoming.
群れはワイオミングから再導入されました
19:22
And they're doing pretty well, but they've got a bit of trouble.
事はうまく運んでいますが問題もあります
19:25
This is Danny Hillis, and he's figuring out a design problem.
これはダニー・ヒリス デザイン上の問題を検討中です
19:28
he's trying to determine if where he is on a bit of Long Now land
ロング・ナウの土地で彼が立っている所が
19:31
would appear from down in the valley to be the actual peak of the mountain.
下の谷からは頂上のように見えるか考えているのです
19:36
because the real peak is hidden around the corner.
真の頂上は向こう側に隠れています
19:42
This is what in the infantry we used to call the military crest.
これは以前は軍事的な見せかけの頂上と呼んでいました
19:44
And as it turned out the answer is, yes,
彼の疑問は正しく
19:48
that is from down below in the valley it does look like the peak,
実際 谷からはそこが頂上に見えます
19:51
and that might be conjured with.
これは大切な事かもしれません
19:55
We gradually realized we have three serious design domains to work on with this.
このプロジェクトには三つの
大切な要素があることに気づきました
19:57
One is the experience of the mountain.
一つは山を見た時の体験
20:02
Another is the experience in the mountain.
二つ目は山の中での体験
20:04
And the third is the experience from the mountain,
三つ目は山から周りを見た時の体験で
20:07
which is really dominated by the view shed
これは見渡す谷の景色で決まります
20:10
of the spring valley there behind Danny,
ダニーの後ろの景色です
20:13
and if you look off to the right, out there,
右側はずっと
20:17
15 miles across to the Schell Creek range.
シェルクリーク山脈まで20キロ以上見渡せます
20:19
In the front, there are 10 ranches strung right along the base of the mountains
手前には山のふもとに沿って牧場が10もあります
20:23
using the water from the mountains.
山の水を水源にしています
20:26
In fact, there are artesian wells where water springs right into the air.
実は水が吹き出ている井戸もあります
20:28
One of the ranches is called the Kirkeby Ranch,
牧場のひとつはカークビー牧場と言います
20:33
and I'll take you there for a minute.
そこをちょっと紹介しましょう
20:36
It's a very nice ranch.
とてもすてきな牧場です
20:38
Alfalfa and cattle, run by Paul and Ronnie Brenham,
アルファルファと牛
ポールとロニー・ブレンハムが経営しています
20:40
and it's pretty idyllic. It's also hard work.
のんびりとしていますが 仕事は大変です
20:45
And most of these ranches are having trouble keeping going.
ここら辺の牧場は ほとんどが経営難です
20:50
This is their view to the west of the Schell Creek range.
これはシェルクリーク西側の景色です
20:52
And if you go out to that line of trees at the far end,
生えている木々のところまでいくと
20:56
you'll see what the valley used to look like.
昔 この谷がどんな様子だったか 分かります
20:59
This is Rocky Mountain junipers that have been there for thousands of years.
これは ここに何千年とある ロッキーマウンテン杉です
21:03
And a scheme emerged that Long Now is looking to see
ここで新しい計画が生まれました ロング・ナウが_
21:08
if it might be possible to buy up the whole valley,
谷全体を買いとる可能性を 模索するというものです
21:11
because those 10 ranches with their 17,000 acres
10の牧場は合計でも7000ヘクタール余りなのに
21:14
dominate a 500 square mile valley with their grazing allotments and so on,
放牧地が1200平方キロの谷全体を
台無しにしているからです
21:18
and there's a possibility that you could get the whole thing
全部を500万ドルで買い取り 少しづつ
21:23
for five million dollars and gradually restore it to its wild condition,
元の自然な状態に戻していける可能性があります
21:26
and somewhere in the process turn it back over to the National Park,
ある程度復旧したら国立公園に
寄贈してもいいと思っています
21:30
and it would double the size of Great Basin National Park. That would be swell.
グレートベースン国立公園の面積を二倍にできます
出来たらすごいですね
21:34
OK, let's take one more look at the mountain itself.
山そのものを もう一度見てみましょう
21:38
The clock experience should be profound,
時計との出会いは特別でなくてはいけません
21:41
but from the outside it should be invisible.
でも外から見えてはいけないのです
21:45
Now, at the base of the high cliffs there's this natural cave.
崖のふもとに自然にできた洞窟があります
21:49
It's only about 12 feet deep, but what if it were deepened from inside?
たったの4メートルの奥行きですが
もっと深くしたらどうでしょう
21:53
You excavated from somewhere, came up from inside and deepened it.
中のどこかから上がってきて削るのです
21:57
And then you could have an entrance
入り口の
22:00
which was very rough and narrow as you first went in,
足を踏み入れる所は がさつで狭いままにして
22:01
that gradually becomes more refined and then actually quite exquisite.
中に進むにつれ洗練され段々と美しくなるようにします
22:04
And this stone takes a perfect polish.
この石は磨くと特別な輝きを放ちます
22:08
You'd have a polished set of passages and chambers in there
磨き上げられた道と部屋を幾つか通り
22:11
eventually leading to the 10,000 year clock.
最終的に一万年時計にたどり着くようにします
22:16
And it's not a mine. This would be a nuanced evocation
鉱山ではなく 山の基本的な構造を
22:20
of the basic structure of the mountain,
思い起こさせるような所にして
22:24
and you would be appreciating it as much from inside as you do from outside.
外で感じた 素晴らしさを中からも味わえるようにします
22:27
This is architecture not made by building,
これは積み重ねて作る建造物ではなく
22:30
but by what you very carefully take away.
慎重に取り除いてできる建造物です
22:33
So that's what the mountain taught us.
以上が 山が教えてくれたことです
22:37
Most of the amazingness of the clock
時計のすばらしさの殆どは
22:40
we can borrow from the amazingness of the mountain.
山の素晴らしさから借りることが出来ます
私たちの仕事は
22:43
All we have to do is highlight its spectacular features and blend in with them.
山の素晴らしい特徴を強調しながら
時計を周りに融合させる事だけです
22:47
It's not a clock in a mountain -- it's a mountain clock.
山の中にある時計でなく
山と一体化した時計にするのです
22:51
Now, the Tewa Indians in the Southwest have a saying
アメリカ南西部のテワ・インディアンは
22:56
for what you need to do when you want to think long term about anything.
長い目で物を考えるために何をすべきか
と言う時 こう言います
22:58
They say, "pin peya obe" -- welcome to the mountain.
「ピン ペヤ オベ」 ― 山に目を向けなさい
23:04
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
23:11
(Applause)
(拍手)
23:13
Translator:Akiko Hicks
Reviewer:Akira Kan

sponsored links

Stewart Brand - Environmentalist, futurist
Since the counterculture '60s, Stewart Brand has been creating our internet-worked world. Now, with biotech accelerating four times faster than digital technology, Stewart Brand has a bold new plan ...

Why you should listen

With biotech accelerating four times faster than digital technology, the revival of extinct species is becoming possible. Stewart Brand plans to not only bring species back but restore them to the wild.

Brand is already a legend in the tech industry for things he’s created: the Whole Earth Catalog, The WELL, the Global Business Network, the Long Now Foundation, and the notion that “information wants to be free.” Now Brand, a lifelong environmentalist, wants to re-create -- or “de-extinct” -- a few animals that’ve disappeared from the planet.

Granted, resurrecting the woolly mammoth using ancient DNA may sound like mad science. But Brand’s Revive and Restore project has an entirely rational goal: to learn what causes extinctions so we can protect currently endangered species, preserve genetic and biological diversity, repair depleted ecosystems, and essentially “undo harm that humans have caused in the past.”

His newest book is Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.